* Posts by -tim

412 posts • joined 10 Jul 2009

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SCO's last arguments in 'Who owns Linux?' case vs. IBM knocked out

-tim

When will it end?

It turns out that a number of developers are in a legal limbo because they singed the Sys V source code NDA and as a result they can't provide patches into Linux or many of the BSD systems.

It would be nice for this to end so that can be clarified. I'm starting to wonder if California employment law regarding non-competition couldn't be used to end it for all time.

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Submarine cable cut lops Terabits off Australia's data bridge

-tim

Re: Microwave?

Years ago I was looking at some calculations of the line of sight "hill" due to earth curvature between Victoria and Tasmania and it it was something on the order of 400 meters tall. With microwave, you also have to keep things out of the Fresnel zone as well. Undersea cable is about $10 per meter and you can put down cable cheaper than you can build tall towers in prime real estate which is considered environmentally sensitive. An old aviation chart shows that there is a 4,000 ft obstacle near Flinders island so I expect Telstra already has a microwave link going that way. I know when a betting shop opened up there about a decade ago, they had asked for 2 gigabit links and that was the entire capacity at the time.

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Who would code a self-destruct feature into their own web browser? Oh, hello, Apple

-tim

Re: Like a moth to a light

The HTML5 history.pushState() and history.replaceState() are just pure evil waiting to abuse millions of users.

I would love to have all browsers support a permissions text file (so sysadmins can properly maintain it) with entries like:

history.replaceState() disable

history.pushState() disable

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-tim
Unhappy

So many problems...

Safari becomes very unstable when the hard drive starts to fail. Oddly enough I was getting bad blocks on my iMac but the S.M.A.R.T stuff was saying the disk is fine.

When Apple brought out OS X for the Power PC processor they still were compiling for Intel in house and that found quite a few bugs that way. Once they dropped all support for Power PC, their bug ratios started to climb. I wonder how quickly the 1st bug would be found if they tried to build it on the PPC platform today. I'm also a fan of making sure developers have access to a very old supported platform and making sure they use it from time to time so they get a better feel for real world issues seeing that their top of the line box with fast cpus, massive displays, surplus ram and fast disks isn't what the end users are using.

At work most things are Intel based Linux but we have some Sparc as well. I asked a coder to compile his buggy code for the Sparc platform and he said it was a waste of time since it didn't compile correctly and it crashed but according to him that was a result of the platform not his bugs. Some of the least buggy open source code will happily build on some very old and bizarre platforms yet the buggiest code seems to require very specific platforms.

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BlackBerry axes 200 jobs – including a third of its HQ staff

-tim
FAIL

They don't know who their potential customers are

Blackberry, Mototola and Nokia all stuck to the concept that the mobile phone operators were their customer, not the end user until there weren't any more sales. Apple on the other hand treated the end user as their customer and took all the business away. Samsung is trying similar tactics. Blackberry made a good product and nearly everyone I know who takes security seriously has one but if they don't change their sales model soon, they won't be around next year. I expect a postmortem on the company will show their last mistake was to abandon their core OS and swap it Android. If these things are obvious to outsiders, why can't their board see it?

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Home Office lost its workers' completed security vetting forms

-tim
Facepalm

Missing a few?

How about "Copy machine returned to the leasing company with internal hard drive in place"? That would have happened a few times, if not by the department its self, the other departments that sent them the paperwork in the 1st place.

They seem to have plenty of faith on the drive encryption. The best dictaphone encryption seems to be based on strong encryption based on what I'm suspecting are very weak passwords.

It is becoming clear that one of the best places to plant a long term spy is in the group that vets the security for a country as it seems that long term employees seem to have excessive access to data. Perhaps far more than they should.

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AI pioneer Marvin Minsky dies at 88

-tim

Society of Mind?

What is death?

I think his book "Society of Mind" will be one of the best AI books ever written... Once AI works.

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Scandal-smashed OPM will no longer do govt's background checks – for obvious reasons

-tim
Black Helicopters

Yet another security agency

Will they get snazzy new uniforms? Maybe something designed by Hugo Boss?

Will they have their own black helicopters? After all they have sensitive documents to move around.

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iiNet struggles through five-day outage to get thousands back online

-tim

How low can it go?

I have email from Simon and Mike going back far more than a decade. I've been a player in the early days of uunet, savvis and others. If this ever happens to Internode, I'm going to find my "Internet startup" hat and put it on and do my best to put TPG out of business.

This is their 1st and final warning.

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Australian government urges holidaymakers to kill two-factor auth

-tim
Big Brother

If you think their 2FA policy is bad, look at the health records

Take a look at the eHealth record system which is part of the MyGov system. Someone should mention to that predictable Cookie hijacking of login details is so 1990s so why don't they fix that but using someone else's 2FA sure is convenient.

The terms of service describe a " System Operator" which seems to be doublespeak for "a big brother contractor" . The system is no longer opt-in and the "System Operator" keeps all the info they have collected even after you opt-out so it might be best to sign up and then opt-out before they siphon any personal data.

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Launch embiggens Galileo satnav fleet

-tim

Who is in charge?

If the Chinese can hack Cisco routers before they get delivered, Did the Russians hack the Galileo before it went into to orbit?

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Samba man 'Tridge' accidentally helps to sink request for Oz voteware source code

-tim
FAIL

Re: @-tim The law is the law and ignoring that doesn't help.

Thanks, A.C.

I may be wrong, but I don't see a better option. I know there are people who think patent reform is a better option but I have a book that I rent out to break patents on stupidly obvious things. I know more patent lawyers than I know people with patents and I know more developers that have been talken to court than I know software patent owners. Something is broken and putting your head in the sand isn't a solution.

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-tim

The law is the law and ignoring that doesn't help.

While I respect Tridge for his work on software, my discussions with him about intellectual property seem to indicate that he is as extreme as the Free Software Foundation but with a huge amount of head in the sand attitude about ignoring trends in current and future copyright and patent law. Because of the lack of patent pending on rsync, there are now a large number of patents of related technology that will have long term negative effect with rsync getting better. Samba is making use of a number of Microsoft patents but so far Microsoft has decided that Samba is useful so they haven't stopped it. Much of this would be fixed if the open source groups would file patent applications (with maybe thousands of claims) once a year and then not follow through with the full patent protection to reduce costs. That would provide the patent offices with a full proof of prior art in a way that they can deny other patents and the open source people won't get nailed for using their own intellectual property. People need to understand that patent offices can't use tools like google to find existing prior art, they can only use public resources they have access to that won't revel new technology to possible competitors. That effectively means they use their own patent pending databases.

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Oracle, looks like your revenues were down. 'Cloud! Cloud! Look at the cloud!'

-tim
Facepalm

They forgot how Sun got big.

Get a under $5k T7 server that is useful (4+ disks, 10G ethernet) and they can move hardware. They should have a low end $999 appliance to get their new tech in the hands of lots of people or else Solaris 11.3 will be meaningless to the masses and meaningless to business. The $999 box should have 2 hard drive slots and 2x 1G ports and a few cores and all the cool memory cache/compression/crypto stuff. If they don't do it now, they will never reverse their current direction.

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Galileo, Galileo, Galileo good two go

-tim

Its about time

Many modern SatNav chips are activly ignoring pulsar noise which is sort of odd since pulsars are better clocks then the ones in the satellites. I figure by 2020, the need for an orbital transmitters will go away once the chipset providers work out how to get pseudorange info from the pusar pulses they are currently ignoring. Once that happens, and someone comes up with the right info, the things could give positions even on Mars.

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NewEgg cracks open Australian shipping scheme

-tim

They appear cheaper

Local pickup will often beat a better price but New Egg was 25% cheaper on the collection of parts I recently obtained from Scroptec. MSY tends to be a slightly cheaper that Scorptec but with a more volatile range of more bleeding edge parts which make using them for "standard builds" more difficult. Scorptec also offers companies 30 day terms which increase the connivence factor. With both of them having major warehouses walking distance away from my office, I don't see Newegg taking much of our business.

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Linus Torvalds fires off angry 'compiler-masturbation' rant

-tim
Boffin

goto might disappear

Gotos will only become fully obsolete when CPUs no longer require their version typically known as a branch or jump instruction.

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LG uses sucky logic to force Dyson admission its vacuums suck badly

-tim
Coat

Can you quantify the suck?

When I hooked a vacuum gauge up to a dyson it read 28 while the trusty filter queen only read 24 and the cheap sanyo read 18. Out of the 3 the filter queen moves far more air and has the cleanest output airflow.

Oddly enough my 1960s made filter queen also uses cyclonic airflow to keep the thing working properly years before James invented the same technique.

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Radio wave gun zaps drones out of the sky – and it's perfectly legal*

-tim
Coat

Re: " jamming GPS next to an airport."

About that "There are locator beacons that extend in straight lines from either end of the runway that allow the aircraft to align itself with the centerline of the strip rather than trying to map GPS coordinates to where the strip should be"...

ILS is being its phased out plans (except at major airports), LORAN is nearly gone, ADB transmitters that fail are often not ever repaired. That is true for much of the USA, Europe and Australia. GPS (with some extra bits) is how planes will be expected to get to a runway in most of the world soon. Even the radar systems are being replaced by planes transmitting their GPS coordinates to each other and is even required to fly in airspare from W Australia all the way to Hawaii as a few years ago.

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-tim
Flame

Sounds risky

The Navstar GPS system is toy that belongs to the USAF and only to the USAF. They don't like people playing with their toys. Since that GPS sats can see your transmiter from orbit and their primary job has never been to provide consumers with location data, I expect every GPS jammer out there ends up on a screen deep in a mountin with popup box saying "Jammer located at 37.23501283° N, 115.81112921°, Kill it with fire Yes/No?"

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New NBN build plan full of linguistic holes that will explain away delays

-tim
FAIL

How about businesses?

With so much moving to the cloud, our collection of DSL links are way overloaded and the speed seems to drop by the week as more and more of the buckets are showing up with less than optimal bits per bucket. One site that is close to an exchange where we getting more than 20mb to Internode is now pushed back to the default profile for noisy lines.

Meanwhile fibre out more than about 15 km from the CBD hasn't just stalled, its dead. I have a bunch of people tyring to get connections but the ISPs won't play. If it wasn't $10 per meter install, I would be looking at dark fiber.

I still wonder who is going to do all this work. Unless the auto makers have been running Node/fiber install classes for the past few months, there simply aren't enough people to even consider this type of rollout in that time frame.

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Google .supplies .cheap web .properties with 90 top-level .domains to .world via .partners

-tim
Thumb Down

More land on the wrong side of the tracks

Since I'm only getting spam and ads from these new domains, they get added to my own dns server so they point nowhere. Once they go in, they are unlikely to ever be removed. I know plenty of people who are doing the same thing.

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Watch out VW – French prosecutors are pulling on the rubber gloves

-tim
Mushroom

Farfegnsmogen

State law in most states downunder allow for full refunds for cars as they weren't what was represented. Nothing like trading in a decade old car for the original purchase price.

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Official: North America COMPLETELY OUT of new IPv4 addresses

-tim

Commas were used for octal IP addresses as in 177,0,0,1. That still works on some systems.

The ; would have made command lines in unix very unfriendly and the - had been used for UUIDs. The / was adopted for network size options but the : was used for a port ID. I still think the , would have been a better choice.

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Penny wise and pound foolish: Server hoarders are energy wasters

-tim

At $.10 kWh, power in watts is about the price in dollars. 100W = $100/yr. Most places have power costing from about $.05 to about $.20 per kWh so half or double.

Modern A/C systems have a better efficiency. A cheap 2.5 kW split system can now move 400 Watts out of a room with 100 Watts of electricty but larger systems are less efficient.

For idle sytems, the ram may be the largest power cost. Spinning drives and graphics cards can also eat up loads of power.

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Top QLD sex shop cops Cryptowall lock; cops flop as state biz popped

-tim
Flame

Backup? What is a backup?

Lots of people think they make "backups"

What did they miss:

1) Archives

a) Tax office wants something from X years ago

b) Boss needs a customer file from long ago

c) How did we work thought this type of problem in the past?

2) Near line backup

a) "opps I deleted my report for a customer"

b) PFY just doesn't understand how to configure something so its rollback time

3) Disaster recovery

a) File server raid card died and we can't get one that talks to the existing disks anymore

b) The building burned down

c) The crazy guy in development was sacked and now all the files are funny

d) Synolocker is running on the sales XP box

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How to build a server room: Back to basics

-tim
Coat

The joy of small computer rooms...

Figure your power and then double that. Then double it again.

If you have 800 mm deep racks, you can't put modern servers in them.

If you have 1.2 m deep racks, you need 1.2 meters in front of them if you expect to put rack mount servers in them. 600 mm deep racks are only useful for cable termination and sometimes not even that.

You need at least 600 mm on all other sides.

Raised floors are cool but they come in 600 mm x 600 mm (or 2 ft x 2 ft) and you can't cut them and be useful in a small computer room. That means you need at least 5 tiles in a line per rack (600 mm behind, 1200 for the rack, 1200 in the front to load the rack). You need 600 mm on both sides and you better figure on two racks. For 7x5 full tiles is the minimum. Builders cut floor tiles to fit the room, not the other way around so either you have some sort of extra stuff around the edge or your tiles have to go in like a jigsaw puzzle where every piece is rectangular and white.

You need 1 kW of cooling for each kW of servers. A reasonable split system can do 6 kW of cooling but you also need two for redundancy.

Your UPS and cheap generator won't run a 6kW air conditioner but it can run a 2.5kW one.

We have 2 racks that each take about 1 kW and we have two 6 kW A/C and two telco grade 48V systems hooked to 16 truck sized deep cycle batteries. We can run 8 hours (except for that A/C thing) and the solar can extend that for another 4 (except for that A/C thing with a more effecient sun heating load bit)

You want LED lights hooked to the UPS. You want a phone in the room assuming tbe PBX is there too and you might want a way to power if assuming the POE switch isn't in the UPS.

A rack can weight 2 tons. Make sure the floor can cope. Even if it isn't that heavy, it can put massive loads in very small areas on a floor.

Make sure you have the door on the alarm and put in smoke detector in the room.

Did I mention that you need to double your planned power? And then double it again?

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The last post: Building your own mail server, part 1

-tim

Re: Effective spam filtering need lots of spam

I have a domain that is over 20 years old (with plenty of email address published in usenet and on the web and archived mailing lists) and that is the level I need to process so that my spam level is less than 1%.

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-tim
Meh

Effective spam filtering need lots of spam

I figure you need about 500,000 spam messages a month to be able to filter it out properly while minimal false positives. That means you have to be able to throw out about 10 gig a month of data over your home network. It is easy to collect that much if you just put in some random email address in a web page but the spammers will throw away the ones that look randmon like uizctyiutywe@example.com but bob@example.com will get far more spam. Common names all get spam as well so alice, bob and smith will get spam very soon after starting up a new server.

There are antispam services that you point your MX records to and they do the filtering and then deliver to your home server. They can install SSL certs so they only deliver to your dynamic IP address and some can do IPv6 which you might find is static. I have a computer in a data center in LAX and I've about given up on trying to filter spam and letting others try. I'm currently using MXGuardian which seems to work but is getting expensive as I keep finding more and more email address I set up years ago that are still being used. Most of the services are cost per doamin, cost per mailbox or cost per message. With over 100 people using my vanity domain over the last two decades, any of those options get expensive. My habbit of using a new email address everytime I print business cards just adds to the expense.

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IPv6 is great, says Facebook. For us. And for you a bit, too

-tim
Coat

Re: There's begillions

You can subnet a /64 but lots of things won't like it. Most won't care and if your up for static assignments for servers, it does make sense. The default assumption is that your device's hardware mac address fills up the lower 64 bits so you need the top 64 bits as a /64 network address.

I've tried to explain the IPv6 world as a /64 is much like a Class C /24 where everything on the network can talk directly to everything else. The /56 or /48 that your ISP may hand out is much like a Class B /16 where its split inside into Class C. The /32 that ISP get are more like the old Class A /8 where your have enough infrastructure that major parts are dual homed differently. At least a /56 can hit the global BGP tables so if your ISPs let you, you can broadcast parts of their blocks to your other ISP which is something very few would ever even consider in the days of IPv4/24.

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-tim
Happy

It seems faster

I'm seeing 10% faster and when you add in the fact that most tracking and ad sites (except google) don't do IPv6 at all, I'm finding turning off IPv4 isn't a real problem with many sites and speeds up things even more.

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GCHQ wants to set your passwords. In a good way

-tim
FAIL

Re: Someone Tell PCI

You might find the PCI requirement is 90 days so quarterly changes miss by a few days a year.

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Blueprints revealed: Oracle crams Sparc M7 and InfiniBand into cheaper 'Sonoma' chips

-tim

Cheaper chips?

Why do I think this won't lead to reasonably priced systems?

We bought a bunch of X1 and V100 sun boxes about a decade and a half ago when they were at the $1,000 price point. The only reason we are dumping them now is we can't buy disks for them since their PATA controller chip has a bug with disks over 120G. The SPARC IIi that is in those made with modern techniques and a SAS/SATA/PCIe in the X100 box would be great for appliances and so far we are using more power trying to virtualize them than the old stuff too. 15 years ago a $1,000 SPARC box would outrun a $1,000 x86 box for most loads. Today a $20,000 SPARC box holds its own aginst a $6,000 x86 box.

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Carders fleece $4.2 million from Victoria's MyKi transport agency

-tim

I found it amusing that a friend's black market Oyster card from London would cause the Myki terminals to crash.

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Australian online shoppers and Netflix to be fully taxed in 2017

-tim
Coat

This will not turn out as planned

There are only two minor issues with this plan which won't let it bring in as much money as they think. The first is now GST won't be collected as often on things over the $1000 limit as the processing system won't work properly.

The second reason is that any large group that has to send in a massive amount of GST will end up playing high speed automated foreign exchange currency games. I figure that will knock at least 5% off the AUD early some morning resulting in a massive unfixable currency problem.

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Cheers, Bill Gates. Who wouldn't want drinking water made from POO?

-tim
Black Helicopters

Re: Please!!!!

The tech can't filter out pirons and the only one we have found so far that kills humans is the type that causes mad cow (and mad human) disease. It is expected in many other untreatable medical conditions as well.

Oddly enough the best way to kill human effecting pirons is to put them in ocean water.

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IT jargon is absolutely REAMED with sexual double-entendres

-tim
Coat

IT's older than than you think

Does this have anything to do with the fact that many of the names for cpu parts like registers and buffers come from terminology of the pipe organ?

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Australia's marriage equality vote should take place online

-tim

Facts please?

At the last Liberal Party state conference in Victoria, the powerful members had a vote for same sex marriage and it passed by a majority.

The PM's opinion on the matter is in the minority of his own party.

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Dying cipher suites are stinking up TLS with man-in-the-middle vulns

-tim
Alert

Old macs

Most mac owners seem to hand off their older toys to family members who only need a computer for things like online bills, banking and taxes. All PPC and 32bit bootloader macs have broken browsers and aren't supported by any of the major vendors who can't seem to find a way to throw their source code at an older version of xcode and build a fat binary.

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'Sunspots drive climate change' theory is result of ancient error

-tim

Re: Science?

The total radiative output of the sun seems to be about the same in times of high sunspots vs low. Sunspots can make about 2% of the sun appear cooler yet the total energy seems to be the same within about 0.2% variation of which some is not related to sunspots. There are minor shifts in the intensity of very small areas of the spectrum and most of those aren't near the IR range where they would have the most effect. It is more likely but still very improbable that some chemical like a CFC in the high atmosphere has a higher green house gas equivalent if the sun is producing light that is shifted slightly closer to the blue side of the spectrum but that is very unlikely considering the ease that most university chemistry labs could prove or disprove that.

One of the two main theories that haven't been fully tested yet involve the concept of how gases in the high atmosphere align based on the electromagnetic field and the magnet field consistency changes more that the total radiative output due to sunspots. The theory is that gases align in the magnetic field and that effects how much they radiate back to the ground increasing their green house gas equivalent. It is like the concept of how LCDs work by blocking or unblocking light based on an electric field. There have been some attempts to study this at the limits of where balloons can fly but a theory says it will be happing above that which happens to be a region where it is very hard to get accurate data. Another untested theory involves links between the sun and earth core magnetic fields but the scale of the numbers put that way beyond the butterfly in Africa flaps its wings to cause a hurricane in the Atlantic sort of provable.

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Buy a Tesla for the good of Australia, say country's dino-burners

-tim

The duck graph is already starting to bite in Victoria as the 4 pm drop off of solar is currently offset by old coal plants that have to start heating up well before noon.

Another small issue with abandoning coal in Victoria comes down to who will protect the brown coal from wild fires if it isn't the power generators? Eastern Victoria has some places that are a wild fire away from a century of underground unstoppable coal fires.

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Your security is just dandy, Apple Pay, but here comes Android

-tim

If it quacks like a duck...

These nice 16 digit tokens that everyone is jumping to as a way to bypass some PCI-DSS issues leave out one small problem. If it looks like a card number, from the PCI-DSS point of view, it is a card number.

It is amazing that we are still not using strong public/private key encryption to move data around the credit card networks.

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Regulator okays Optus exit from HFC network

-tim

Re: What's going to happen?

Magani,

Your ISP's wholesale cost per megabit will go up quite a bit. The nbn might have to split some of the Optus segments which should speed up the network where local congestion is an issue. I wonder how they are are going to provided a wholesale network to existing Optus customers which are all currently on a network that has no ability to function as a wholesale network and can barely cope as a network allowing service resale.

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US State of Georgia sues 'terrorist' for publishing its own laws ... on the internet

-tim

I wish the state the best of luck

I hope they manage to get this all the way to the US Supreme Court where it will be shot down for the next few decades. Some states that formed the US had already determined that concept of Crown Copyright was a bad idea by the early 1700s and had refused to pass any laws allowing it.

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Bureau of Meteorology picks Cray-zy fast 1.6 petaflop supercomputer

-tim
Thumb Down

Will it run solitaire?

Do they need a better computer?

The BOM forecast aren't even close to the accuracy of about 20 other groups who do better every time?

The same BOM that clears the radar data every 6 minutes to restart the next pass at 6 levels rather than keeping the last N-1 levels and averaging it for continuous one minute updates?

This is the same BOM that can't arrange to continue the oldest weather station in Melbourne that is essential for the long term science of research of global recording temps for climate change because of a rent dispute involving groups who both want good science?

I haven't seen anything they can do that Win 3.1 machine can't cope with.

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Pan Am Games: Link to our website without permission and we'll sue

-tim
Coat

Re: "...mockery..."

A good degree of mockery?

That wasn't even dodgy cert holding help desk level mockery. I would expect at least PFY level mockery from any Reg reporter.

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BB10 AND Android? How BlackBerry can have its cake and eat it

-tim

I've just switched to blackberry

After years of playing with different smart phones and always going back to my old S40 Nokia I ended up with a BB Q10 and they do most things right. I used the phone for a week without ever signing up for an account with them and the hardware is happy to talk to my servers and my cloud. The only issues were that it had some trouble importing a few bizarre contacts, its IPv6 doesn't work with my home wifi router, and it can't use just DAV for its calendars and needs CalDAV. It did take some tweaking to the notifications since its default mode is "sleep mode is off mode" which is isn't the best someone on call 24x7. Its permissions for apps is much better too as you don't need to hack the thing to tell it "this app doesn't get that permission". The sand boxing seems to work very well too for both BB and Android apps. I like the real keyboard on a device that was just about as large as I'm willing to carry around.

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Awoogah: Get ready to patch 'severe' bug in OpenSSL this Thursday

-tim

It looks like if you built something aginst the 1.0.1o or 1.0.1n and used the other shared library, someone might be able to do very bad things to your server. Until patch thur comes around, it might be wise to check that the version that is being linked aginst is the version that the programs were built aginst.

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Wind River VxWorks patches some TCP sequence spoofing bugs

-tim

So my $20,000 NBX phone system still has this bug even if I reported it to the owning company at the time? And it still hasn't been fixed?

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Triple glitch grounds ALL aircraft in New Zealand

-tim
Black Helicopters

Didn't the OOD books tell us about this?

Oh wait, the OOD books were about how we could model an aircraft and assume a helicopter was close using inheritance and not about the real world at all.

In the olden days, the flight controllers would write the data on a card and pass it from station to station based on where it was or their best guess if it lost communication. If all else failed, they could grab a pen and make a copy if the plane could be in more than one area.

Modern air traffic control assumes controllers know where everything is all the time. Old air traffic control assumed that the controllers had a good idea but when when things went wrong, all the pilots would continue to a plan and there were ways out when those plans didn't work out even if there was no communication. Oddly enough, one has had far fewer issues than the other with no gains in traffic between the two systems.

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