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* Posts by Def

477 posts • joined 8 Jul 2009

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OpenSSL bug hunt: Find NEXT Heartbleed, earn $$$ – if enough people donate cash

Def
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Re: Open Source Funding...

So I would agree we need to find a better way of funding the original development and on-going maintenance of open source projects than we have at the present.

There is a better way to fund software development. It's where developers work for real money, and sell their products.

Funding a 'jackpot' for bug finders without rewarding original development contributions is sending the wrong message, namely the ability to develop good bug free code is of lower value than the ability to break such code.

I don't think it's actually possible to put any lower value than 'free' on the contributions most people make to open source projects.

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Bad PUPPY: Undead Windows XP deposits fresh scamware on lawn

Def
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Joke

Re: An optimist's view for your consideration

Consider this, would you feel more comfortable on the maiden flight of a new jetliner as it rolls off the Boeing assembly line (Windows 8.1) or flying into Dallas on one of American Airline's 1980s vintage DC-9s that has been proven with 30 years of six flights a day without crashing (Windows XP).

In all fairness if Windows 8.1 crashes, I'm far less likely to end up with the leg of the person sat behind me shoved up my arse and sticking out my face.

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Def
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FAIL

Re: Business as usual

The scams mentioned in the article require download and installation - so they would be safer if they used linux. For the same thing to happen they'd have to download, modify the execute permissions and then run. And then it would have to be for the right version/architecture. And why would they be going outside of their distro repo anyway?

If Linux were, God forbid, ever to become a mainstream OS, why do you think the same technologically disadvantaged users would be any different? They would be just as clueless on Linux as they are on Windows. Their response to any problem they encounter would be the same: ask Google how to solve X, where they'd immediately find a step-by-step guide on how to install the "Britney Spears Super Duper Internet Optimiser" (or whatever) on their system.

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Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released

Def
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Facepalm

Re: leaving vulnerable information in memory in the first place?

Though others using calloc() by default would minimise that risk as well.

Maybe we should just tell that to all the exploit/virus writers out there, huh? I don't think they got the memo.

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Def
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Re: leaving vulnerable information in memory in the first place?

You using calloc doesn't solve a damn thing. (It will give you a false sense of security by assuming variables you haven't bothered to explicitly initialise should be zero by default, but that's about all.)

What you should be doing is clearing memory containing sensitive information before freeing it.

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Chrome makes new password grab in version 34

Def
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Might give Opera another go though.

Opera is just Chromium these days, and it's total piece of shit. Version 12 was the last real Opera. I'm currently pondering which browser I should migrate to.

Maybe I'll write my own. (Or at least drop my own UI on top of the more standardised components out there.)

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Def
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Re: @article author: reading comprehension FAIL

So Google, and apparently you, think that it is OK to break W3C HTML5?

Google have always had a fairly cavalier attitude to standards anyway. They're as bad today as Microsoft used to be.

Also, does Chrome store your passwords in the cloud so you can access them from anywhere? While I certainly hope they don't, nothing would surprise me.

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VAT's all folks: Telecoms and services tax to be set at consumer's homeland rate

Def
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Re: What has the EU been smoking?

It's actually "better" to levy the fuel.

It used to be. Unfortunately, as far as taxation is concerned, that argument is beginning to wear a little thin now that more and more people are buying hybrids and electric cars.

Thinking about it, the fairest way to tax car usage is to tot up the amount owed according to the roads travelled (I.E., tracking where you drive), where the amount each car owner pays is based on the type of car (so if you're already paying fuel duty, you pay less, for example), and (perhaps) the time of day the journey was made (pay more during rush hour, etc).

The privacy nut-jobs will have a field day if that were ever suggested though, so we're stuck with the current unfair systems of taxation.

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Apple sued in Texas troll territory for iMovie patent infringement

Def
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Joke

Re: When

More importantly, who owns the patent for crossroads?

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India's GPS alternative launches second satellite

Def
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Happy

Re: "teach a man to fish..."

"Give a man a fire and he's warm for a day, but set fire to him and he's warm for the rest of his life."

- Solid Jackson

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Torvalds rails at Linux developer: 'I'm f*cking tired of your code'

Def
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So, let me get this right...

Systemd sends excessive data to the kernel logging system to the point where it either hangs or crashes, right?

So it's a bug in the kernel then. That's the system that can't cope with the data it's being sent. You can cry all you want about someone sending too much data, but at the end of the day any system which provides services to others should be able to cope in all situations when those services are actually used.

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Soccer's dull? A MIND-CONTROLLED robo-suit will be used to take first World Cup 2014 kick

Def
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Joke

Re: Implications

They might fit in an airline seat, but they won't have a chance in hell of getting through airport security, so I don't think us 'limbies' have to worry just yet.

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Angry Birds developers downplay fresh data leak claims

Def
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Anonymous analytical data (not talking about advertising data here - advertisers can go suck donkey cock for all I care) for any developer is a goldmine of information. Being able to see and understand how real users use your application gives amazing insights into where you went wrong with your designs, and where you should focus your efforts for future releases.

For a game developer there are even greater benefits: If most people die in a certain area, then maybe that part is too hard. If people spend less than X seconds solving one of your devious puzzles, maybe it's too simple. If nobody ever found hidden jewel 45, maybe there's an obscure bug preventing it from being discovered.

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NSA plans to FREE YOUR DATA with range of cloud services, analytics

Def
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Joke

Re: Wasn't this the plot for Die Hard 4.0?

Wait. What? There was a plot?

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Passport PIN tech could have SAVED MH370 ID fraudsters

Def
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Re: @Def - Or...

They matter to me

Why do they matter to you? I mean, seriously. I doubt very much you're hounded by international gangs so much that you fear your life would be over if international borders (and therefore countries as a concept) were abolished.

You are the one who introduced hate into the discussion. I would not want people barging into my living room or camping uninvited in my garden, and I suspect that even you would not either. Does that make me "hate" people?

I was wondering when I was writing my last post whether 'hate' was the right word, or whether it was overly harsh to describe the real sentiment. But overall, I think it's the perfect word. Yes, I think you would hate them. As I probably would as well. But exactly why you think allowing people to travel freely would encourage them to come and camp in your garden is quite baffling to me.

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Def
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Re: Or...

I think you're reading too much into what I said. :)

The point I was making is that arbitrary lines on a map really don't matter. They really haven't ever mattered. Except to people in positions of power. People who have vested interests in maintaining those lines.

My point about educating people is this: No matter where you are born, you somehow grow up with prejudices against people who live in the country next door. The Scots hate the English. Norwegians hate the Swedes. Swedes hate the Finns. Americans hate Canadians. Everyone hates the French. While a lot of this 'hate' mostly provides material for comedians, it still finds ways out into everyday life - complaining about German tourists hogging all the deckchairs when in fact everyone does it. Thinking that because certain delicacies in one country are disgusting, therefore everyone in that country is disgusting. You were never taught any of this at school. It's just absorbed knowledge through childhood.

And it's all bullshit. Enforcing and encouraging nationalism on people through passports, border controls, etc. should be considered strange. Not normal. People are people. There isn't any real difference between any of us throughout the world. That is what should be taught.

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Def
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Or...

You could look at educating people into realising that being born or living on one side of an imaginary line doesn't make you better or worse than someone on the other side and passports are just a way to continue that myth in order to maintain governmental status quo.

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TV sales PLUMMET. But no one's prepared to say what we all know

Def
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FAIL

Re: @Chris Miller

...explained why it takes so long to switch between digital channels. There were sound technical reasons IIRC...

I doubt that. I don't bother with digital TV, I just have analogue via my cable provider and my PC & Xbox connected up. Switching between any of them takes about two seconds. However, when I'm configuring the channel names or configuring the channel order or whatever, switching is instantaneous.

It's shit software written by muppets. Either that or the broadcasters have requested that TV manufacturers make it longer to change to try and dissuade people from channel surfing when the ads come on.

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EA games web server was hosting PHISHING SITE – securobod

Def
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Re: Can't EA get anything right?

Me: "...and I did map design on Syndicate..."

The Whole World: "What? That game was shit."

Me: "*sigh* No, the *original* Syndicate."

I was so angry when that piss poor remake came out.

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Help a hack: What's in your ultimate Windows XP migration toolkit?

Def
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Joke

Re: What's in your ultimate Windows XP migration toolkit ?

A Linux USB stick

Don't you think they're impoverished enough already? I mean, talk about kicking a man when he's down...

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BuzzGasm: 9 Incredible Things You Never Knew About PLIERS!

Def
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Joke

Re: gripping...

nope, just Friday!

Things that are written down discovered to be READABLE the FOLLOWING DAY!!!

Be sure to read more on this absurd notion tomorrow...

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Def
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IT Angle

Re: gripping...

10. You can't use pliers to regain precious seconds of your life that have been lost to reading garbage on the Internet.

11. You can use pliers to cause extreme anguish to someone who writes garbage and posts it on the Internet.

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Top UK e-commerce sites fail to protect 'password' password-havers from selves

Def
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Re: Locking out does not "deny" service

I think you'll find the attempts may well be coming from a lot of different IP addresses.

I'm guessing that was the point. If a user logging on from one device mistypes their password, they'll be locked out for a few seconds the first time around. If someone is systematically trying to hack their account from a different device, each failed attempted will be locked out *on that device* for subsequently longer and longer periods. Thus the buttery-fingered user isn't locked out due to some doer of evil trying to brute force their account every minute.

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Neil Young touts MP3 player that's no Piece of Crap

Def
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Paris Hilton

Every time...

I saw 'Pono', I read it as 'Porno'. Long live the PornoPlayer.

Paris, because I bet she likes a good bit of Pono.

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Winklevoss twins say their Bitcoins will take them to SPAAAAACE

Def
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Coat

The Hanson official fan site?

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Def
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Winkletossers, in fact.

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Brit Bitcoin dev: I lost 'over £200k' when MtGox popped its socks

Def
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"12th most active contributor to the Bitcoin protocol"

Wouldn't it be ironic if the security flaw that lead to this theft were traced back directly to his code...

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Hundreds of folks ready to sue Bitcoin exchange MtGox

Def
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Well, if you valued those family jewels at £100,000, hopefully that is what you would have insured them for. Similarly banks have insurance policies covering customer's assets and holdings.

How much insurance does MTGOX, or any other bitcoin exchange, or any bitcoin holder possess as of today? I bet the answer is close to zero. Why? Because as of right now, regardless of what people are willing to pay for them, bitcoin's perceived value in the real world is close to zero.

Try getting an insurance company to insure your bitcoins against theft. I'd love to be proven wrong, but I suspect you'll be told it's not possible because they're not worth anything. Or if you do get an insurance policy, it'll be a fraction of what their perceived value currently is.

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Def
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I bet most of the bitcoins stolen were purchased or mined for a fraction of their value today. So handing out a few fivers is probably far closer to the actual loss anyone incurred.

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WHOA: Get a load of Asteroid DX110 JUST MISSING planet EARTH

Def
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Right Just After?

Really?

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Apple beats off troll in German patent fracas

Def
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Unhappy

"Apple beats off troll"

Oh the horrible images that brings to mind.

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Google coughs up $6.8m for FREE BUSING for San Francisco youth

Def
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Re: Tallinn

I think you'll find all "private" transport companies throughout the world operate services that are somehow subsidised by local councils - I know for a fact that they are in the UK. If bus and train companies only ran the services they wanted to run (I.E., those that are profitable) half of the bus and train routes in a lot of cities simply wouldn't exist - and, surprise surprise, a lot of bus and train services actually have disappeared in the UK since privatisation.

One of the roles that government is supposed to fulfil is providing services to the general population. Public transport is (or increasingly used to be) one of those services.

Governments throughout the world are also actively trying to get more people using public transport to reduce congestion on the roads in and around cities. Tallinn is the only example I know of where there is an incentive to actually do so. The UK is one of the worst examples where the government wants fewer cars in the cities, but then continues to allow the transport companies to rip off commuters by allowing them to double or even triple prices during the rush hour. (Ironically, the very word 'commuter' comes from the US where ticket prices for those living in suburbs was reduced (or commuted) to make living out of while working in the city affordable.)

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Def
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Re: Tallinn

Or does every resident have to pay for it (whether they use it or not) through taxes?

Of course it's paid for through taxes. Everything provided by government is. Whether they use it or not though, every resident receives the benefit of cleaner air and less noise.

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Def
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The rest of the world would do well to take a look at Tallinn's stance on public transport: If you're a registered resident of Tallinn, all public transport within the city is free.

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Passenger jet grounded by two-hour insect attack

Def
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Thumb Up

Re: Balancing Imbalance

But no worries, mate.

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Silk Road admins: Sorry for the hack, we're sorting out refunds

Def
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No, but there is still something more real about being able to rummage around behind the sofa and pull out some lost notes than finding an old USB stick and then installing some old software that can still read the files to see how much coinage you have on it.

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Def
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My (admittedly limited) understanding is this is what the bitcoin exchanges offer: a way to buy and sell bitcoins for real money.

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Facebook gobbles WhatsApp for SIXTEEN BILLION DOLLARS

Def
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WTF?

Am I the only person to think these evaluations and amounts of money are absurd?

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Optical computing a step closer with SINGLE-MOLECULE LED

Def
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Re: Bad science

If it acts like a diode and emits light... ;)

But in answer to your question, the abstract from their paper states:

The electroluminescence of a polythiophene wire suspended between a metallic surface and the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is reported. Under positive sample voltage, the spectral and voltage dependencies of the emitted light are consistent with the fluorescence of the wire junction mediated by localized plasmons. This emission is strongly attenuated for the opposite polarity. Both emission mechanism and polarity dependence are similar to what occurs in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) but at the level of a single molecular wire.

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Cupertino copied processor pipelining claims Wisconsin U

Def
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Branch prediction has been in ARM chips since forever (late 1980s or at least early 1990s). Prior art. Patent should never have been granted.

The ARM8 architecture was the first ARM design to feature static branch prediction. It was announced in a press release in November 1995 (with availability planned for summer 1996). Designs prior to that relied on conditional execution to reduce the number of branches required in the average program.

Press Release

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Windows 8.1 becomes world's fourth-most-popular desktop OS

Def
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Re: And what have we learned Microsoft?

I prefer the default combine behaviour of XP too - the way it creates multiple taskbar icons for multiple instances of a program and then combines them when the task bar is full.

Properties > Task Bar Buttons > Combine When Full

I also think it's neater to be able to click the quick launch icon multiple times to spawn additional instances of a program, rather than right-clicking the tile in Windows 7 and then selecting the program.

Middle-click the icon to launch a new instance.

I prefer the XP 'All Programs' menu, which allows you to see, well, all your programs, rather than having to scroll up and down through a fixed-size list (with scroll bars that often cut off folder titles and looks a bit messy).

I sort of agree here. But... the 7 start menu is much faster to navigate because it always has focus, so you can scroll with the mouse wheel straight away. Also, the number of times I actually need the All Programs menu is maybe once a month. If you're a keyboard jockey, hitting the Windows key and starting to type the name of the application you're looking for will more often than not have it located and at the top of the search results much faster than navigating a huge menu.

The familiar icon to open Windows Explorer now takes you directly to your 'Libraries' folder. To change that you have to make a custom shortcut that is FAR from intuitive to do. Likewise when you save a file, the default location is always the Libraries folder.

To be honest, I've never noticed this at all. No version of Windows has ever opened Windows Explorer where I want it to be. Windows Key + E takes you to Computer instead Libraries.

Likewise when you save a file, the default location is always the Libraries folder.

Again, I've never noticed. My experience is that Windows remembers the last folder for all applications that don't override it themselves.

And the control panel view. Ignoring the renaming and re-organising of some options (some do make a bit more sense[1]), why can we only view by 'Category', 'Large icons' or 'Small icons'? I, personally, can process the control panel icons better as an alphabetically-sorted vertical list but MS have decided that I should no longer have that option. Why remove the list & details view?

I do not like the categories of the control panel, but my control panel is a sorted menu connected to the start menu, so I never really have to deal with it. (Option in the Start Menu properties.)

And what about the shared folder icon?

My shares have icons. It's just different to the XP icon.

While you have some valid concerns, on the whole I think Windows 7 is a much better experience than Windows XP. And the vast majority of every day tasks for the majority of users is much more efficient. You couldn't pay me all the money in the world to go back to Windows XP.

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ZX Spectrum game devs allege Elite Systems Ltd didn't pay their royalties

Def
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...given what we know about iOS not registering key up events which is bad news for games.

I fail to see how that's a problem. Any application on any multi-touch device has to keep track of the touches for its own purposes. If, after processing all the touches, you find that one has disappeared, you just handle it as a touch-up (ooh err, missus) and delete it from your list.

That's what I do, anyway.

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Google Glassholes, GET OFF our ROADS, thunder lawmakers in seven US states

Def
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Re: So does this ban smart-watches?

Presumably the ban will only apply to wearable computers that obstruct your vision, reduce your hearing, impede your movement, or reduce your ability to shout obscenities at other drivers.

So computers stuffed up your nose will also be okay. :)

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Blocking BitTorrent search sites 'ineffective': Pirate Bay ban lifted for Dutch ISPs

Def
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"The verdict of the court is negative for the development of the legal online market because it needs protection against illegal competition,"

Legalities aside, usually when you find yourself losing out to an alternative supplier, you improve your products so they are more appealing to the consumer.

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Want a touch-friendly solar-powered laptop? Apple just patented it

Def
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Joke

Re: At last!

Patent lawyer?

All that talk about patients led me to conclude he's probably a doctor.

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What can Microsoft learn from 'discontinued operations' at Nokia?

Def
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...is there any reason I shouldn't recommend he get one?

No. If you can live with the size and weight (a bit too large and heavy for my liking), they're great phones, and that camera is just outstanding.

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Ex-NSA guru builds $4m encrypted email biz - but its nemesis right now is control-C, control-V

Def
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Facepalm

This will make the NSA's job much easier. Instead of having to break the encryption for all email messages, they can now just ask their "ex-colleagues" for the key.

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Developers: Behold the bug NOBODY can fix

Def
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Happy

Re: You can fix that bug...

Chinese people find the use of chinese characters in tattoos by Caucasians quite puzzling.

So do most Caucasians.

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Windows 8.1 update 'screenshots' leak: Metro apps popped into classic desktop taskbar

Def
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Headmaster

"because the checkbox isn't checked"

The checkbox isn't checked, but the Apply button is active, so presumably the checkbox was unchecked between the dialog being opened, and the screenshot being taken.

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Candy Crush dev stuffs EU 'candy' trademark down gob

Def
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Re: Outrageous @Lost all faith...

If King's game had been called "Candy", I would be less infuriated, but it's not. It's called "Candy Crush Saga". There are hundreds of pre-existing games in the App Store, many of which were around long before CCS was released, that are now potentially under threat from King due to this overly generic trademark.

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