* Posts by Def

864 posts • joined 8 Jul 2009

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Boffins link ALIEN STRUCTURE ON VENUS to Solar System's biggest ever grav wave

Def
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Click baity headline is click bait

If all 'alien structures' are mountains, are all moutains alien structures? ;)

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Stanford boffins find 'correlation between caffeine consumption and longevity'

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How much chocolate does 70g of theobromine translate to?

It's just under five kilograms of dark chocolate (70-85% cacao), apparently. Or about six tins of Quality Street. :D

I should point out the actual level of toxicity is approximately 1g of theobromine per kilogram of body weight, so your mileage may vary. ;)

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Def
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I'm pretty sure there have been other studies which suggest that caffeine, tea and chocolate have deleterious effects on the human body.

Rather ironically, theobromine is the compound that makes chocolate highly toxic for cats and dogs. While its toxicity in humans is far lower, it can still be lethal in sufficient quantities (about 70g for the average person).

So it's not too different from everything else on the planet that can fit in our mouths. :)

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Promising compsci student sold key-logger, infects 16,000 machines, pleads guilty, faces jail

Def
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Re: Ignorant Brit here

And don't forget those weird places which had "middle" schools too.

heh, I went to primary, middle, and secondary school. Four years apiece.

Don't worry, I kept a low profile and made sure I didn't inadvertently teach the teachers anything. ;)

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Drone biz Lily Robotics takes $34m in pre-orders, ships nothing, shuts down, gets sued by San Francisco DA

Def
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Re: Don't buy vaporware

There's a huge difference between taking money from an investor and taking money from customer pre-orders. Investors do as much due diligence as they can before deciding whether to back a company/idea or not. Customers (might) watch a video on YouTube. Investors understand there's a risk that they might lose some or all of their money.

I wouldn't invest in a company without thorough due diligance, but if I liked what I saw, and I believed the company and especially the management team, could pull it off, I would consider investing. As a customer, I wouldn't give anyone any money for an unfinished product.

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Opera scolds stale browsers with shocking Neon experiment

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Re: Browsers

If "mature, extensible, and open sourced" doesn't describe an ageing prostitute down to a tee, I don't know what does.

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Google sends Titan broadband drones to the unicorns' graveyard

Def
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Re: Leaving the skies clear

Apparently the Zucker offered $60m for Titan before Google bought them.

I wouldn't mind being bought out for that kind of money in exchange for a few years work at Google. And I bet my new product (press release coming in a month or so, Reg) will last a hell of a lot longer than Titan's.

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New Windows 10 privacy controls: Just a little snooping – or the max

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Black Helicopters

Information we collect

Information you give us.

For example, many of our services require you to sign up for an account. When you do, we’ll ask for personal information, like your name, email address, telephone number or credit card to store with your account. If you want to take full advantage of the sharing features we offer, we might also ask you to create a publicly visible profile, which may include your name and photo.

Information we get from your use of our services.

We collect information about the services that you use and how you use them, like when you watch a video, visit a website that uses our advertising services, or view and interact with our ads and content. This information includes:

Device information

We collect device-specific information (such as your hardware model, operating system version, unique device identifiers, and mobile network information including phone number). We may associate your device identifiers or phone number with your account.

Log information

When you use our services or view content provided by us, we automatically collect and store certain information in server logs. This includes:

Details of how you used our service, such as your search queries.

Telephony log information like your phone number, calling-party number, forwarding numbers, time and date of calls, duration of calls, SMS routing information and types of calls.

Internet protocol address.

Device event information such as crashes, system activity, hardware settings, browser type, browser language, the date and time of your request and referral URL.

Cookies that may uniquely identify your browser or your account.

Location information

When you use our services, we may collect and process information about your actual location. We use various technologies to determine location, including IP address, GPS, and other sensors that may, for example, provide us with information on nearby devices, Wi-Fi access points and cell towers.

Unique application numbers

Certain services include a unique application number. This number and information about your installation (for example, the operating system type and application version number) may be sent to us when you install or uninstall that service or when that service periodically contacts our servers, such as for automatic updates.

Local storage

We may collect and store information (including personal information) locally on your device using mechanisms such as browser web storage (including HTML 5) and application data caches.

Cookies and similar technologies

We and our partners use various technologies to collect and store information when you visit a one of our services, and this may include using cookies or similar technologies to identify your browser or device. We also use these technologies to collect and store information when you interact with services we offer to our partners, such as advertising services or features that may appear on other sites. Our analytics product helps businesses and site owners analyze the traffic to their websites and apps. When used in conjunction with our advertising services, this analytics information is linked, by the analytics customer or by us, with information about visits to multiple sites.

Full statement here.

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Renault goes open source with next-gen electric buggy you might generously call 'a car'

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speed limit at 80 or 100 km/h

That's pretty much the speed limit on nearly every road in Norway (110km has recently been introduced on parts of the E6 south of Oslo towards the Swedish border). I definitely wouldn't want to take one out here. :)

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Def
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That pretty much sums it up.

I could see myself hanging out at the beach in one of those, or even pottering around the office (although to be fair, we might have to widen a few of the doorways), but I wouldn't want to take something that small on a motorway.

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Microsoft's Blue Screen of Death dead in latest Windows 10 preview

Def
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As has been mentioned, the name of the driver is sometimes immediately helpful, and the four hex values printed next to it can be decoded to give more precise information as to what's actually wrong.

Of course, if it's a reoccurring problem (that doesn't prevent the machine from actually starting) it's far better to enable memory dumps and just load one of them in WinDBG which gives you the same information that's on screen and a whole lot more.

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China to Donald Trump: Twitter diplomacy 'undesirable'

Def
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140-character kid

You misspelled 'brain cell'.

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Folders return to Windows 10's Start Thing

Def
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Re: Can you imagine Windows 95 going at the speed of today's hardware?

I seem to recall 98SE could run for about a week at a time before needing a reboot. (At least, that's roughly how often I rebooted my machines at work.)

I stuck with Win2K all the way through to 7. I hated the Walt Disney UI of XP, and Vista... well, I had to deal with Vista at work on a daily basis long before it launched, and there was simply no way I was going to install that steaming horse turd. Not even the free copy I got as a way of an apology from one of the guys at Microsoft. (By the way, if you ever worked with Microsoft around that time and heard them referring to the Games Explorer as the Games Exploder, you can thank me for that.) ;)

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Re: 17 inch penis!!

Mostly hollow, I would imagine.

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Re: Does anyone even use the Win 10 start mess?

Yes, I do.

Once you've cleaned out the default set of bullshit tiles and put in the apps that you actually use all the time it's a lot faster and quicker to access things than the start menus of earlier versions of Windows. I rarely need to actually access the main list of applications. Everything I use regularly is pinned as a tile and organised how I like them.

Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP: Spend ages traversing the Programs tree looking for the thing you want to start. Or spend a week creating your own shortcut tree at the top, and then traverse that instead.

Windows Vista, 7: Slightly better because recently used apps appear automatically, but also slightly worse because these recent shortcuts are never quite in the same place, and in fact the more you use an application, the further away from the start button it becomes as it's moved up the list.

Windows 8:, 8.1: Fullscreen was a little overkill, in my opinion, but I can see the logical progression of trying to scale to a full size monitor. 8.1 was a lot better than 8.

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Can you imagine Windows 95 going at the speed of today's hardware?

Yeah, just imagine how fast it would crash your whole system and leave you tearing your hair out.

Strange really that you pine for the days of the alleged speed of Windows 95 (which barely supported 24-bit displays or rarely had to deal with resolutions greater than 1280x1024) and yet choose Windows 7 over 10 for the exact opposite reason.

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2016 just got a tiny bit longer. Gee, thanks, time lords

Def
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...if not corrected it would eventually result in clocks showing midday before sunrise

Presumably he means in places where that doesn't already happen.

Also, it has to be said, it would take around 6,000 years before that happened on the equator.

Which by some huge coincidence is roughly equal to how long the next fours years is going to feel - assuming we all survive that long.

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Apple drops requirement for apps to use HTTPS by 2017

Def
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WTF?

Re: The thing they really need to drop

Relevant much?

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USPTO: Hi, Ask Me Anything. Reddit: Can we trademark 'AMA'? USPTO: No.

Def
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Happy

Re: The problem is people.

Is it Guyball?

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Galileo! Galileo! Galileo! Galileo! Galileo fit to go: Europe's GPS-like network switches on

Def
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I would presume it has been rolled into eCall for starters.

eCall is a European initiative intended to bring rapid assistance to motorists involved in a collision anywhere in the European Union. eCall will be mandatory in all new cars sold within EU after April 2018.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ECall

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TalkTalk hacker gets iPhone taken away by Norwich Youth Court

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Re: Ridiculous

if I have a frontdoor made of cardboard (not the case) and somebody kicks it and nicks my stuff, it is the burglar who is responsible. Not the victim.

That's a bad analogy.

If the cardboard door was the door to a vault you owned where you kept other people's private stuff (and claimed it was perfectly secure), who would be to blame then?

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Re: Ridiculous

Who caused it?

Was it the hacker? Or the hackers who used this information afterwards? Or was it the developer who didn't understand simple security procedures? Or the testers who validated the systems with an equally poor understanding of security? Or the development manager who signed off on the code and decided it was safe to push live?

TalkTalk are ultimately to blame here. They are the ones who should be fined.

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Russian hackers got Trump elected? Yeah, let's take a close look at that, says Obama

Def
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Facepalm

...we no longer respond to that sort of manipulation by rich and powerful corruptocrats...

No, these days you respond to a completely different sort of manipulation by rich and powerful corruptocrats.

Let's see how that works out for you in the long run.

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Renewed calls for Tesla to scrap Autopilot after number of crashes

Def
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A more meaningful metric would be: 'how may crashes were avoided because of autopilot?'

Does Tesla have that data? Because that would be interesting to see.

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Six car-makers team to build European 'leccy car charge bar network

Def
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Re: UK Charging points

All petrol pumps in Norway have credit card readers. You can't use the pump without letting the machine read your card first. If you want to go to the shop (if there even is one - some stations are just unsupervised pumps), you pull over and park before or after you've filled the car.

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New Euro-net will let you stream Snakes on a Plane on a *!#@ plane

Def
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Headmaster

Re: Better idea

Not too many ground stations in the ocean.

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Inside Android's source code... // TODO – Finish file encryption later

Def
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Re: It's actually worse

It's almost as if being good at ridiculous interview questions doesn't automatically mean you're a good programmer.

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Airbus flies new plane for the first time

Def
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Re: First Flight Challenges

Pah! I laugh in scorn at your aluminium, puny human: real planes are made from plywood! :-)

Oh...

*Looks at half carved granite wing in the garden*

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Emulating x86: Microsoft builds granny flat into Windows 10

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Re: Baby... Bathwater?

They tried and succeeded, actually:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/project/singularity/

"The Singularity research codebase and design evolved to become the Midori advanced-development OS project. While never reaching commercial release, at one time Midori powered all of Microsoft’s natural language search service for the West Coast and Asia."

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Def
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Re: Put an x86 processor in the dock?

That's only valid when you're using a dock. Continuum works wirelessly too.

Also, you're not thinking about the bigger picture. If Microsoft can get x86 applications running on ARM, that also opens up the door for ARM based laptop and desktop machines too. Which would really get Intel worried.

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2016 in a nutshell: Boffins break monkeys' backs to turn them into tragic shuffling cyborgs

Def
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Re: Not ethical

Our (western) society just frowns on that, but I have no beef with rat/dog/bug/whale/turtle eaters as long as it is sustainable and the species is not endangered.

How do you feel about the Chinese eating dogs that were skinned alive because there's some mistaken belief that they taste better?

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Def
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Re: Not ethical

Yes, whale meat is eaten in Japan, the Faroes, and IIRC in Greenland and the high arctic north of Canada.

And in Norway too. I've eaten it on occasion. It's not much different to beef to be honest.

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Tesla to charge for road trip 'leccy, promises it will cost less than petrol

Def
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Re: small fee to Supercharge which will be charged incrementally

It applies to new cars. As you would know if you'd read the article. ;)

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Computer forensics defuses FBI's Clinton email 'bombshell'

Def
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WTF?

Re: Bah!

I just noticed that FBI backwards is IBF.

Coincidence? I think not.

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Five-a-day energy drink habit turned chap's eyes yellow, urine dark, caused anorexia

Def
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Re: But do you REALLY have to give up pork?

...and I have reduced my cheese intake by an order of magnitude (a difficult decision for a Frenchman.

So you're just a regular surrender monkey now? ;)

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Birmingham sperm bank pulls plug after just a handful of recruits

Def
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Re: Ah, to never have that conversation.

Yeah, because *that* never happened before.

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Lad cuffed after iOS call exploit knocks out Arizona 911 center

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Facepalm

"A search warrant was also carried out at his home."

Oh come on, Reg. It's like you don't even care any more. Do you want to talk about it?

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Microsoft goes back to the drawing board – literally, with 28" tablet and hockey puck knob

Def
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Facepalm

"color palates"

Really?

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Sextortion on the internet: Our man refuses to lie down and take it

Def
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Facepalm

Re: Oh no! One of Vyvyan's socks has escaped!

You know you still would.

You know she's 70, right?

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NASA opens ISS to private sector modules

Def
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Joke

Just don't let Apple design it. Only Apple approved modules with rounded corners will be dockable if you do, and it'll only have one docking collar for legacy modules. All future modules should support remote docking.

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Nokia crawls towards comeback with new phones announcement

Def
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Re: Timing!

I get 2-3 days of standby

If we're talking about standby time, I get about six to seven days out of my Lumia 950. And that has a removable battery.

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Killer Hurricane Matthew threatens to wreck Kennedy Space Center

Def
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Re: HurriCon One?

200 Kmph

Now that's fast.

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Uncle Sam rules on self-driving cars

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Re: In the UK...

@WraithCadmus

There's not a whole lot of difference on where you are, I don't think.

The things that irritate me the most (in no particular order) are as follows:

Driving in the left or middle lane of the motorway when the middle or right lanes are empty. I swear if there was a road with 17 lanes, Norwegians would still only use the left two lanes. (Overtaking on the right is technically illegal, but anyone who gives you a ticket would have to be a massive hypocrite for not also giving everyone else a ticket for not driving in the right-most lanes - which is also illegal.)

Not indicating at all, indicating halfway through, or indicating after the manoeuvre. Roundabouts are particularly bad here because Norwegian law recommends you indicate left when entering if you're turning left, but it's not mandatory so half the driving instructors say you should indicate, the other half say you shouldn't. As a result hardly anyone does.

Staying with roundabouts for a second: No roundabout exits are marked, so if you don't remember where you're going after you pass the sign warning you about the roundabout, you're fucked.

Incredibly slow driving. 5km under the speed limit isn't unusual. Until there's an opportunity for people to overtake - then you have to speed up as much as possible to limit the ability of anyone behind you to pass. Norwegians love to lead processions. If I could see through the red mist that regularly accompanies my commuting to work, I wouldn't be surprised if they're all wearing clown outfits too.

Part of the insistence on driving slowly could be due to the fact on non-major roads you have to give way to cars pulling out from the right. (I kid you not.) This is one of the more dangerous laws I've ever encountered anywhere. (I believe New Zealand has one that beats it, but that's another story.) So if you're driving on a minor road, anyone could pull right out in front of you without warning. Legally speaking, they have right of way - unless they're pulling out of a car park, private driveway, or they have signs directing them to give way (but you can't see those signs, so you'll never know). In my experience this tends to be more guesswork than actual knowledge as to who has right of way. (Major roads are marked with yellow diamond signs *after* intersections.)

Generally speaking the quality of the roads are pretty terrible and there are hardly any motorways outside of Oslo. (Most Norwegians driving to the far north of the country first drive east to Sweden and then head north.)

With all that said, I totally recommend seeing Norway. The scenery up the west coast is incredible. :) Just don't forget to re-mortgage your house before coming.

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FAIL

Re: In the UK...

Some of the worst driving I've seen has been around schools.

In Norway, some of the worst driving I've seen has been around...

...fucking everywhere. People cannot drive for shit up here.

In all fairness, their monumentally vague and totally un-thought-through traffic laws don't help much. But even so... you'd think at least one person would have heard what an indicator is by now.

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'Google tax' already being avoided, says Australian Tax Office

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Re: Smack them with an "enhanced" GST

I think he was suggesting that the tax be levied against corporate revenue as opposed to standard corporate taxation on profits.

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Tesla to stop killing drivers: Software update beamed to leccy cars

Def
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Re: Mansfield bars

...they were able to evacuate unaided.

And for when you can't, there are pills available that should help. ;)

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33 million CLEARTEXT creds for Russian IM site dumped by chap behind Last.FM mess

Def
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Re: Irrespective of the strength of passwords

So you need - short term - my name and postal address, and a credit card number. But once the stuff is posted to me, or you receive confirmation from your shippers, you can securely delete that stuff.

Not quite.

While my site doesn't store any credit card details, I am required to save name, address, and contact information. Partly for fraud purposes (just because the stuff arrived, doesn't mean you paid with your own card), partly because my accountants require detailed sales information at the end of the year for tax reasons, and partly because after logging in* you are able to download receipts for past sales if you later require copies for your records.

* You don't need an account to buy something, but one is created in the background while you're purchasing licences from me.

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Google's AI finds its voice ... and it's surprisingly human

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Re: Gibberish

Those 'untrained' samples in the middle of the article sounded like Danish to me.

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WhatsApp, Apple and a hidden source code F-bomb: THE TRUTH

Def
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Release builds with debug symbols

Is the accepted way to do things these days - and has been since the mid 90s.

If you're developing on Windows (with Visual Studio), your build system should be pushing debug information and binaries to a symbol server, and pushing current source files to a source server. Visual Studio should be configured to fetch symbols (from the symbol server) and the correct source code (from the source server) when debugging a dump file sent back by your built in bug/crash reporting system. (Assuming you're not relying on Windows Error Reporting to send the dumps automatically back to Microsoft for you to manually download later.)

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Apple killed OS X today and binned its $10,000 BlingWatch too

Def
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Re: Sorry pedants, your time has come to an end.

For some reason I'm suddenly craving Taco Bell...

You should seek medical attention immediately. You could be having a stroke. ;)

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