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* Posts by Def

499 posts • joined 8 Jul 2009

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18,000 Apple employees could get bite of profits with class-action lawsuit

Def
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Re: Spelt Vs Spelled

Actually, outside the US spelled and spelt are interchangeable. Spelled became the preferred spelling in the US around 100 years ago.

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F1? No, it's Formula E as electric racing cars hit the track

Def
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Yeah, I wish my car had a more efficient downvote collector. ;)

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Windows 7, XP and even Vista GAIN market share again

Def
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Joke

Re: I don't see the mystery.

...she actually checks her email daily and surfs the web regularly, as opposed to checking her email once a month and... working.

There, I fixed that for you.

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LONGER flights burning MORE fuel can CUT planes' climate impact

Def
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Re: Reducing emissions

Some airlines share planes, but not all of them, which is my point. I still see multiple airlines flying smaller planes along the exact same route at the same time.

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Def
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Reducing emissions

If you really want to tackle emissions from aircraft, then simply enact the following:

Make it illegal for two (or more) airlines to fly the same route at the same time of day with smaller aircraft. The number of times I've seen a competing airline to the one I'm flying with flying to the same destination as mine five minutes before (or after) my flight. Both airlines would save money and reduce emissions if they were forced to share seats in a single, larger plane.

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DANGER MOUSE is back ... and he isn't half a GLASSHOLE

Def
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Paris Hilton

The only way it won't suck is if Seth MacFarlane is in charge.

Can't see that happening, unfortunately, so yeah, I have to agree that it will probably suck massive donkey balls.

Paris, because she enjoys sucking massi- alright, I'm going...

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Redmond is patching Windows 8 but NOT Windows 7, say security bods

Def
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Re: As someone still running Windows XP x64 ...

You many want to check if your sysadmin has redirected this folder to a network location.

Well of course he has. Most corporate network setups these days do that.

On my Windows 7 machine at home, I am at the login screen after about 15 seconds from pressing the power button. After entering my password my desktop appears after a two second delay, at which point I can start working. If I'm not still half asleep I can actually launch a web browser a few seconds before the network connection has finished initialising. (Un)fortunately that doesn't happen very often.

Contrast that with my experience in the office:

The POS Dell computer I have there (actually a newer PC than my home machine) dicks around in the BIOS for about 30 seconds, and takes another minute to get the Windows 7 login screen up. After I enter my password I can usually see my desktop after another minute or so, and can actually start working maybe half a minute after that.

Both machines have SSDs, tons of memory, and more processor cores than I thought I'd ever need. Do I blame the OS? Of course not. It's down to how it's been configured. Specifially how all personal data of mine at the office is located on our network servers - the result of corporate policies applied across all our 140,000+ employees.

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Quantum teleportation gets reliable at Delft

Def
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Re: Question.

I would assume this is the first step towards real teleportation. Teleportation of data happens almost instantaneously through measuring entangled particles. I think I'm right in stating that today we still don't know exactly how entanglement works, but presumably some smart-arse will eventually figure out it involves n-dimensional hyperspace or something to do with cats (or both). Once that happens, presumably it will become easier (for a given value of 'easier') to exploit the underlying physical phenomena to transport more than just information.

At least I certainly hope so. I also hope it happens within the next fifty years so I have a chance to witness it. :)

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SCIENCE explains why you LOVE the smell of BACON

Def
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Re: it just smells to me like burning flesh

I even had to cross the street to pass a butcher shop.

Oh my God. I used to love the smell of butcher's shops when I was a kid. That is one thing I definitely miss in both the UK and Norway these days.

Speaking of Scandinavia, I seem to recall that back in the 80s the best bacon in the UK was Danish, wasn't it?

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Def
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Re: I miss real bacon..

...and a decent Mexican restaurant is not to be found in either place.

In all fairness though that's not really a problem restricted to Australia. :)

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Google's driverless car: It'll just block our roads. It's the WORST

Def
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GPS signals cannot be received in tunnels, but even the navigation system in my CashCow can figure out how far through the tunnel I am and keep up accordingly.

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Senate decides patent reform is just too much work, waves white flag

Def
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Re: I can solve most of this in eight words:

I assume you mean round corners and the like?

Not particularly. Sometimes there are real design patents granted that actually make sense.

Probably. :)

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Def
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Headmaster

I can solve most of this in eight words:

"Make software patents valid for only two years."

Design patents should probably also be included there, and patents on technological hardware advances should be valid for about a decade - if that. The rate at which technology is advancing will only continue to increase, and retaining the 20+ year terms for patents is completely and utterly pointless.

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Apple, Beats and fools with money who trust celeb endorsements

Def
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Re: I am sticking with Sennheiser and Walkman

I would argue that Sennheiser *had* good kit. There was a time when I wouldn't consider anyone else. But those days are long gone it seems. The last Sennheiser ear-buds I bought were absolutely atrocious. They sounded pretty awful, and their design and construction was a joke. From what I can recall:

1) The ear-buds themselves were pretty uncomfortable, and kept popping out or working themselves loose from my ears every half hour. I don't think they actually came with foam covers - I eventually found some old ones at the bottom of a drawer that helped.

2) The cord was split in a Y shape equally on both sides. Gone are the days when the cord used to lie across your neck (and bear some of the weight of the swinging cable) and fall down one side (into your jacket pocket).

3) The actual split was a real Y shape, the two top cables leading to the ear-buds were distinctly separated from each other. I suspect this was a vague, untested attempt to prevent the leads from tangling up so easily.

4) The leads tangled up more easily than any other headphones I've ever owned (and I'm pretty old - I've owned a lot).

5) Untangling them was considerably harder than usual because the cables were coated in a soft rubber which meant they had a tendency to hug one another instead of slide smoothly over each other.

6) I'm fairly certain the actual jack had a slightly dodgy connection in there too, but that could have been the socket they were plugged into.

Anyway... I bought these as a replacement for the default headphones that came with my iPod (that had finally broken after a few good years of service). Compared to the Apple supplied ear-buds which *never* tangled the Sennheiser seemed like some horrible joke that I still haven't got. And they didn't sound as good as the Apple ones either.

These days I'm rocking out with some 250ohm Beyerdynamic DT250s, which are absolutely fantastic.

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Def
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Re: I am sticking with Sennheiser and Walkman

Now Sennheiser that is a good headphone brand.

That was a joke, right?

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Scientists warn of FOUR-FOOT sea level rise from GLACIER melt

Def
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Re: So I should...

...as the huge weight of ice was removed from Antarctica and other land masses, they would rise somewhat. And that this might lead to other land masses sinking somewhat.

That is exactly what's been happening to the UK for centuries. Link.

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Target topples CEO in latest data breach domino

Def
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This is why I should sleep more

I only clicked on this article because I was sure the title had 'topless beach' in it.

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Microsoft hints at smaller Surface

Def
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Re: Its the interface

Exactly what don't you like about it? Serious question.

I picked up a new ultrabook last week with Windows 8 on it. A quick upgrade to Windows 8.1 (because I will admit 8 was decidedly rough around the edges), a few hours setting up the system and my applications, and I'm up and running. I'm too busy working to care about the slightly changed UI.

Mostly though I like the UI of Windows 8.1 (all my other machines are running Windows 7). There are one or two niggles, but that's no different to any other user interface. (Trying to find something on the All Apps page is annoying, for example, and I don't like the way the on-screen keyboard insists on popping up for modern UI apps all the time when I have a physical keyboard.) All the regular Windows keyboard shortcuts still work (that I've needed so far) - I've even accidentally discovered a few new ones while adjusting to the laptop keyboard.

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OUCH... right in the Androids! Google hit by another antitrust sueball

Def
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Go

Re: Bing Bong

I'm just waiting for the "app" that is called "search"...

Something a bit like search.com then?

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94% of Brit tech bosses just can't get the staff these days, claims bank

Def
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Re: Hard to get the staff?

I love how they re-defined the meaning of "senior" ... 2/3 years experience ?

The games industry has been defining 'senior' as someone with two years experience for at least 15 years. Anything over three years and you're 'lead' potential.

It's all bullshit.

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Polymer droplets turn smartmobes into microscopes

Def
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Re: Why need a separate lamp and battery?

If you're plugged into the audio jack, why does the tone need to be inaudible?

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OnePlus One equals 'killer' new mobe running CyanogenMod

Def
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Re: Like, oh, 95% of the people on the planet

I would assume at least 40% of those 95% of people are more concerned about having enough to eat and drink than whether their smartphone's battery can be changed or not.

Mine's the one with the glass of perspective and soda in it.</DA>

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OpenSSL bug hunt: Find NEXT Heartbleed, earn $$$ – if enough people donate cash

Def
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Re: Open Source Funding...

So I would agree we need to find a better way of funding the original development and on-going maintenance of open source projects than we have at the present.

There is a better way to fund software development. It's where developers work for real money, and sell their products.

Funding a 'jackpot' for bug finders without rewarding original development contributions is sending the wrong message, namely the ability to develop good bug free code is of lower value than the ability to break such code.

I don't think it's actually possible to put any lower value than 'free' on the contributions most people make to open source projects.

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Bad PUPPY: Undead Windows XP deposits fresh scamware on lawn

Def
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Joke

Re: An optimist's view for your consideration

Consider this, would you feel more comfortable on the maiden flight of a new jetliner as it rolls off the Boeing assembly line (Windows 8.1) or flying into Dallas on one of American Airline's 1980s vintage DC-9s that has been proven with 30 years of six flights a day without crashing (Windows XP).

In all fairness if Windows 8.1 crashes, I'm far less likely to end up with the leg of the person sat behind me shoved up my arse and sticking out my face.

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Def
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FAIL

Re: Business as usual

The scams mentioned in the article require download and installation - so they would be safer if they used linux. For the same thing to happen they'd have to download, modify the execute permissions and then run. And then it would have to be for the right version/architecture. And why would they be going outside of their distro repo anyway?

If Linux were, God forbid, ever to become a mainstream OS, why do you think the same technologically disadvantaged users would be any different? They would be just as clueless on Linux as they are on Windows. Their response to any problem they encounter would be the same: ask Google how to solve X, where they'd immediately find a step-by-step guide on how to install the "Britney Spears Super Duper Internet Optimiser" (or whatever) on their system.

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Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released

Def
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Facepalm

Re: leaving vulnerable information in memory in the first place?

Though others using calloc() by default would minimise that risk as well.

Maybe we should just tell that to all the exploit/virus writers out there, huh? I don't think they got the memo.

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Def
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FAIL

Re: leaving vulnerable information in memory in the first place?

You using calloc doesn't solve a damn thing. (It will give you a false sense of security by assuming variables you haven't bothered to explicitly initialise should be zero by default, but that's about all.)

What you should be doing is clearing memory containing sensitive information before freeing it.

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Chrome makes new password grab in version 34

Def
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Might give Opera another go though.

Opera is just Chromium these days, and it's total piece of shit. Version 12 was the last real Opera. I'm currently pondering which browser I should migrate to.

Maybe I'll write my own. (Or at least drop my own UI on top of the more standardised components out there.)

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Def
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Re: @article author: reading comprehension FAIL

So Google, and apparently you, think that it is OK to break W3C HTML5?

Google have always had a fairly cavalier attitude to standards anyway. They're as bad today as Microsoft used to be.

Also, does Chrome store your passwords in the cloud so you can access them from anywhere? While I certainly hope they don't, nothing would surprise me.

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VAT's all folks: Telecoms and services tax to be set at consumer's homeland rate

Def
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Re: What has the EU been smoking?

It's actually "better" to levy the fuel.

It used to be. Unfortunately, as far as taxation is concerned, that argument is beginning to wear a little thin now that more and more people are buying hybrids and electric cars.

Thinking about it, the fairest way to tax car usage is to tot up the amount owed according to the roads travelled (I.E., tracking where you drive), where the amount each car owner pays is based on the type of car (so if you're already paying fuel duty, you pay less, for example), and (perhaps) the time of day the journey was made (pay more during rush hour, etc).

The privacy nut-jobs will have a field day if that were ever suggested though, so we're stuck with the current unfair systems of taxation.

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Apple sued in Texas troll territory for iMovie patent infringement

Def
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Joke

Re: When

More importantly, who owns the patent for crossroads?

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India's GPS alternative launches second satellite

Def
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Happy

Re: "teach a man to fish..."

"Give a man a fire and he's warm for a day, but set fire to him and he's warm for the rest of his life."

- Solid Jackson

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Torvalds rails at Linux developer: 'I'm f*cking tired of your code'

Def
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So, let me get this right...

Systemd sends excessive data to the kernel logging system to the point where it either hangs or crashes, right?

So it's a bug in the kernel then. That's the system that can't cope with the data it's being sent. You can cry all you want about someone sending too much data, but at the end of the day any system which provides services to others should be able to cope in all situations when those services are actually used.

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Soccer's dull? A MIND-CONTROLLED robo-suit will be used to take first World Cup 2014 kick

Def
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Joke

Re: Implications

They might fit in an airline seat, but they won't have a chance in hell of getting through airport security, so I don't think us 'limbies' have to worry just yet.

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Angry Birds developers downplay fresh data leak claims

Def
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Anonymous analytical data (not talking about advertising data here - advertisers can go suck donkey cock for all I care) for any developer is a goldmine of information. Being able to see and understand how real users use your application gives amazing insights into where you went wrong with your designs, and where you should focus your efforts for future releases.

For a game developer there are even greater benefits: If most people die in a certain area, then maybe that part is too hard. If people spend less than X seconds solving one of your devious puzzles, maybe it's too simple. If nobody ever found hidden jewel 45, maybe there's an obscure bug preventing it from being discovered.

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NSA plans to FREE YOUR DATA with range of cloud services, analytics

Def
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Joke

Re: Wasn't this the plot for Die Hard 4.0?

Wait. What? There was a plot?

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Passport PIN tech could have SAVED MH370 ID fraudsters

Def
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Re: @Def - Or...

They matter to me

Why do they matter to you? I mean, seriously. I doubt very much you're hounded by international gangs so much that you fear your life would be over if international borders (and therefore countries as a concept) were abolished.

You are the one who introduced hate into the discussion. I would not want people barging into my living room or camping uninvited in my garden, and I suspect that even you would not either. Does that make me "hate" people?

I was wondering when I was writing my last post whether 'hate' was the right word, or whether it was overly harsh to describe the real sentiment. But overall, I think it's the perfect word. Yes, I think you would hate them. As I probably would as well. But exactly why you think allowing people to travel freely would encourage them to come and camp in your garden is quite baffling to me.

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Def
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Re: Or...

I think you're reading too much into what I said. :)

The point I was making is that arbitrary lines on a map really don't matter. They really haven't ever mattered. Except to people in positions of power. People who have vested interests in maintaining those lines.

My point about educating people is this: No matter where you are born, you somehow grow up with prejudices against people who live in the country next door. The Scots hate the English. Norwegians hate the Swedes. Swedes hate the Finns. Americans hate Canadians. Everyone hates the French. While a lot of this 'hate' mostly provides material for comedians, it still finds ways out into everyday life - complaining about German tourists hogging all the deckchairs when in fact everyone does it. Thinking that because certain delicacies in one country are disgusting, therefore everyone in that country is disgusting. You were never taught any of this at school. It's just absorbed knowledge through childhood.

And it's all bullshit. Enforcing and encouraging nationalism on people through passports, border controls, etc. should be considered strange. Not normal. People are people. There isn't any real difference between any of us throughout the world. That is what should be taught.

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Def
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Or...

You could look at educating people into realising that being born or living on one side of an imaginary line doesn't make you better or worse than someone on the other side and passports are just a way to continue that myth in order to maintain governmental status quo.

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TV sales PLUMMET. But no one's prepared to say what we all know

Def
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FAIL

Re: @Chris Miller

...explained why it takes so long to switch between digital channels. There were sound technical reasons IIRC...

I doubt that. I don't bother with digital TV, I just have analogue via my cable provider and my PC & Xbox connected up. Switching between any of them takes about two seconds. However, when I'm configuring the channel names or configuring the channel order or whatever, switching is instantaneous.

It's shit software written by muppets. Either that or the broadcasters have requested that TV manufacturers make it longer to change to try and dissuade people from channel surfing when the ads come on.

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EA games web server was hosting PHISHING SITE – securobod

Def
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Re: Can't EA get anything right?

Me: "...and I did map design on Syndicate..."

The Whole World: "What? That game was shit."

Me: "*sigh* No, the *original* Syndicate."

I was so angry when that piss poor remake came out.

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Help a hack: What's in your ultimate Windows XP migration toolkit?

Def
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Joke

Re: What's in your ultimate Windows XP migration toolkit ?

A Linux USB stick

Don't you think they're impoverished enough already? I mean, talk about kicking a man when he's down...

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BuzzGasm: 9 Incredible Things You Never Knew About PLIERS!

Def
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Joke

Re: gripping...

nope, just Friday!

Things that are written down discovered to be READABLE the FOLLOWING DAY!!!

Be sure to read more on this absurd notion tomorrow...

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Def
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IT Angle

Re: gripping...

10. You can't use pliers to regain precious seconds of your life that have been lost to reading garbage on the Internet.

11. You can use pliers to cause extreme anguish to someone who writes garbage and posts it on the Internet.

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Top UK e-commerce sites fail to protect 'password' password-havers from selves

Def
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Re: Locking out does not "deny" service

I think you'll find the attempts may well be coming from a lot of different IP addresses.

I'm guessing that was the point. If a user logging on from one device mistypes their password, they'll be locked out for a few seconds the first time around. If someone is systematically trying to hack their account from a different device, each failed attempted will be locked out *on that device* for subsequently longer and longer periods. Thus the buttery-fingered user isn't locked out due to some doer of evil trying to brute force their account every minute.

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Neil Young touts MP3 player that's no Piece of Crap

Def
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Paris Hilton

Every time...

I saw 'Pono', I read it as 'Porno'. Long live the PornoPlayer.

Paris, because I bet she likes a good bit of Pono.

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Winklevoss twins say their Bitcoins will take them to SPAAAAACE

Def
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The Hanson official fan site?

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Def
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Winkletossers, in fact.

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Brit Bitcoin dev: I lost 'over £200k' when MtGox popped its socks

Def
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"12th most active contributor to the Bitcoin protocol"

Wouldn't it be ironic if the security flaw that lead to this theft were traced back directly to his code...

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Hundreds of folks ready to sue Bitcoin exchange MtGox

Def
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Well, if you valued those family jewels at £100,000, hopefully that is what you would have insured them for. Similarly banks have insurance policies covering customer's assets and holdings.

How much insurance does MTGOX, or any other bitcoin exchange, or any bitcoin holder possess as of today? I bet the answer is close to zero. Why? Because as of right now, regardless of what people are willing to pay for them, bitcoin's perceived value in the real world is close to zero.

Try getting an insurance company to insure your bitcoins against theft. I'd love to be proven wrong, but I suspect you'll be told it's not possible because they're not worth anything. Or if you do get an insurance policy, it'll be a fraction of what their perceived value currently is.

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