* Posts by Danny 2

254 posts • joined 6 Jul 2009

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Confirmed: How to stop Windows 10 forcing itself onto PCs – your essential guide

Danny 2
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No spoilers please

I really want to know how to stop a Win10 update repeatedly trying and failing to install itself on this PC, slowing down this bandwidth and eating up 10Gb of unrecoverable HD space. Please, nobody tell me, I have more important things to do just now and will have plenty of time to figure it out soon one way or another.

My over my self confidence has just been boosted greatly by googling IMAO and finding it recognised widely. I can't prove I invented that first, but I did come invent it independently before it was Yahoo~able, and you can't patent a FLA.

I didn't invent FLA, it was common among my fellow students back in the '80s, an extension of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-letter_acronym 's, a seemingly witty riposte to excessive use of jargon and acronyms in IT.

[Two letter acronyms were and are deemed ok - occasionally knowledgeable]

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GCHQ mass spying will 'cost lives in Britain,' warns ex-NSA tech chief

Danny 2
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Re: Privay versus Safety?

My hive mind is failing me. There was a great quote in a Guardian book review that agreed with your statement from an English earl at the time of the French revolution. It stated that he would rather have a score of cut-throats in London than suffer the mass state terrorism and surveillance endured in France.

Except that is just the gist because every time I go searching for it I get redirected to Google CAPTCHAs, despite my other googling working fine. So I guess that quote has been deemed inconvenient. Of course the actual quote never mentioned state terrorism, because at the time all terrorism was by the state against its own citizens. That was such an inconvenient word that it's very meaning has been changed.

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Danny 2
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Re: Right answer, wrong reasons

True, but they did have funding from the US, partly raised by Republican Congressman Peter King.

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Danny 2
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Re: The man is absolutely right!

I did once try to look for needles in a field after something went boom.

When the Lockerbie disaster happened the police warned people away from just one section of countryside because the flight was seemingly carrying a cargo of needles, the warning being that people could accidentally stand on them and hurt themselves (no mention of the still flaming wreckage). Needles are a low-value item never normally transported by air, and there was some suggestions by relatively sane people that they were "flechettes" and part of awful munitions that were being secretly transported and may have caused the explosion.

One easy way to test this theory would be to find either a needle or a flechette in the fields using a metal detector, so I consulted with a 'detectorist' I chanced upon on scanning a beach, and tried to gain access to the area. I was unsuccessful, partly I think due to state action.

On a differing related subject, I was aware that Depleted Uranium was regularly used as ballast on many large aircraft, so when 911 occurred I phoned the airlines to ask if it had been present on the New York flights, as this would have a serious impact on the residents and first responders health. I got no reply but a swift visit from a lost american tourist, in a town where no american tourists had been lost before or since. And now the NY first responders are all dying of cancer while their medical support is a political football as highlighted by Jon Stewart.

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If you want a USB thumb drive wiped, try asking an arts student for help

Danny 2
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Rambling free style

I used to fill my criminal drives with MP3s after formatting them as I had more songs than disk-space. Then I started I started getting raided on bogus terrorism excuses and I built a forge, better than a hammer.

There's a really good, if irrelevant, NS article just online, Memory recall works twice as fast as the blink of an eye

When I was a four year old I used to test how fast I could think by throwing my self off a small flight of steps and trying to think something before I landed. I never could think anything mid-air except, "Think something" which didn't count as I'd already been thinking that. I concluded I was a slow-thinker, and as I grew older others certainly were more 'quick-witted'. They tend to get in a lot more trouble earlier on though, it's a common-difference in brain function that leaves them open to impulsive short-termism and leaves me more open to brain-freezing in emergency situations.

Computer magazines and websites have speed-tests for machine components, processors and systems, I hope someone develops something like that for humans. There are seemingly four stages to human memory, remembering it, recalling it and I forget the other two. Not my field of study. Still, I'm in a court case just now that mostly relates to events from decades ago, and I seem to be the only person who remembers anything, and I remember those past events too well if anything. Being able to forget, to wipe memory, must be as much of a blessing. I wish there was a Darik's Boot And Nuke for the mind, like Eternal Sunshine, but everyone seems intent on memory augmentation implants.

People with autistic tendencies vulnerable to alcohol problems

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Spooks, spyware, Ashley Madison and Windows 10: What you read in 2015

Danny 2
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Re: Register Addict

"Linux is certainly becoming more and more tempting"

You kind of have to know both MS and a Unix variant if you want to call yourself a techie, and that's been true for thirty years. If you just know one in depth then you can call yourself a technologist, but 'techie' implies a 'jack of all trades' able to field any daft question from a newbie. You can block Win10 data-slurping if you know how to modify your router.

Can I test my Sherlock skillz out on you? Are you a British born and bred citizen but with a parent from the middle-east? Your hogmanay greeting seems mixed race. My Afghan, Iranian and Iraqi pals always wish me a 'successful and prosperous' New Year, whereas my inbred British pals never mention prosperous and stick solely to happiness. It's either that or you're more of a Trekker than a Whovian.

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Danny 2
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Who won the XKCD ticket?

Did the winning cartoon for the XKCD competition ever get published here? I'm still working on mine, it should be ready for the next time he releases a book.

Want to feel young? The Wii is only ten years old. It feels like my Mariokarts record has stood for far longer than that.

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Upset Microsoft stashes hard drive encryption keys in OneDrive cloud?

Danny 2
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Re: Loaded guns

"I am starting to wonder if we need a Computer Operating License?"

Oh, they have that. They used to dole them out on the New Deal, and the recipient doley considered it superior to Microsoft or Cisco accreditation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Computer_Driving_Licence

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Facebook 'Free Basics' service frozen in Egypt

Danny 2
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I don't hate it

I think Egypt probably banned it because they want to keep their poor ignorant, given the major news site on it is the BBC outside of their police state control. I'm no fan of Facebook, or the BBC for that matter, but partial internet access is far better than no internet access and I'm glad the BBC took part. It probably reaches as many people as the World Service for virtually no cost. There are some useful websites on it that are making a real difference to it's users.

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DRM is NOT THE LAW, I AM THE LAW, says JUDGE DREDD

Danny 2
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Re: Good news

"Your repeated prison fantasies are both bizarre and unwelcome."

Can I quote that in court this month? I've got a date with a sheriff who thinks he's Judge Dredd.

I just watched an episode of Alias Smith and Jones with the wrong actor and have lost the will to go on the run.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alias_Smith_and_Jones#Death_of_Pete_Duel

I pasted all my old 2000ADs onto bus-shelters in chronological order, and then I found a cartoon version of this classic online, so I printed and pasted it too. It occurs to me now that this may be the longest sentence in Sci-Fi, and perhaps the most terrifying:

It was just like what they did to Winston Smith in "1984," which was a book none of them knew about, but the techniques are really quite ancient, and so they did it to Everett C. Marm, and one day quite a long time later, the Harlequin appeared on the communications web, appearing elfish and dimpled and bright-eyed, and not at all brainwashed, and hesaid he had been wrong, that it was a good, a very good thing indeed, to belong, and be right on time hip-ho and away we go, and everyone stared up at him on the public screens that covered an entire city block, and they said to themselves, well, you see, he was just a nut after all, and if that's the way the system is run, then let's do it that way, because it doesn't pay to fight city hall, or in this case, the Ticktockman.

Bus-shelters are the worst form of time-travel.

It starts with a great quote from Thoreau's On Civil Disobedience, but here is a more appropriate quote for the daftie above:

"Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison."

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I have you now! Star Wars stocking fillers from another age

Danny 2
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The first thing I ever won was a Stars Wars board game in an Edinburgh Evening News 'spot the difference' competition. It was quite good considering it was just merchandise, I should have saved it.

The second thing I won was a bottle of whisky in a school raffle; unfortunately my mum was there and confiscated it - though the school had no problem giving it to me.

The third thing I won as a £15 book token for a BASIC computer array of the year, to use as ZX diary. Lotus Notes, Lotus I forget the name (Organizer), I beat ya by a decade.

The fourth thing I earned is my Bronze badge here. I guess somewhere along this sad tale I also earned my cynicism and weary resignation but it didn't come with an actual award.

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You ain't nothing but a porn dog, prying all the time: Cyber-hound sniffs out hard drives for cops

Danny 2
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Re: So...

FWIW, I know a woman who has been smuggling Class A drugs from the Netherlands to the UK for the past thirty years. She takes no precautions and yet she's never been caught for the simple reason she doesn't get nervous, she's a bit of a sociopath. I don't approve, she has killed many people, but the cops aren't interested in her so what do you do?

My candle trick was mainly to clam my nerves, but the wax stops he smell getting out if it wasn't in the air when the candle was remelted. To detect that tiny level of hash, well the dog would false positive every bit of luggage leaving the Netherlands.

Better policy would be to retrain the dog to sniff out cancer and end the cannabis prohibition.

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Danny 2
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Re: Disk-sniffing

I actually built my own forge to melt-hard disks (for about £10 for the iron bucket and fire-clay) but that is for long term disposal of hard-disks. In an actual police raid though you have about 15 seconds unless you live in a lair, so sitting on a DVD in your back pocket is best advice. They might theoretically be able to reconstruct all the aluminum fragments, but they won't. They rely mostly on Hum-Int, which is why you train to say 'No Comment'.

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Danny 2
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Re: So...

I smuggled skunk from the Netherlands to France for personal use on a holiday. There were no border guards so I was being overly-cautious but with some cause - the French prosecute cannabis exactly as they prosecute heroin.

I chose to buy a scented candle in a coloured-glass vase, melt the wax, insert the dope, put the scented wax back around it. I doubt a dog could have detected any dope odour from it.

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Danny 2
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Re: Disk-sniffing

The idea is it can smell all hard disks, but only the porn ones are hidden from sight.

Whereas anyone who had ever been raided would know to keep any prosecutable stuff on an rewritable DVD - quickly and easily broken.

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Danny 2
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Re: Sounds Expensive

>I have downvoted you as using the "Won't somebody think of the children." argument bugs the hell out of me.

I haven't downvoted but won't someone think of that cats?

Apparently the Chaos Computer Club have reacted to "I Know Where Your Cat Lives" by disguising their cat photos as fried eggs.

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Here – here is that 'hoverboard' you've wanted so much. Look at it. Look. at. it.

Danny 2
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Larry Walters is probably the only person to earn a Darwin Award before killing themselves. And he is probably spinning in his grave over this.

Does anyone have one of those banned pseudo-hoverboards that explode when they overheat? My nephew wants one and I'd like to get him one.

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Google probes AVG Chrome widget after 9m users exposed by bugs

Danny 2
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IT Crowd

I know I'm personally going to get blamed for this by about 32 of those 9,050,432 users.

"But you recommended AVG to me and I trusted you!"

I recommended it nearly two decades ago, let it go. Seriously, have you tried turning it off and on again?

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From Zero to hero: Why mini 'puter Oberon should grab Pi's crown

Danny 2
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"Just saying"?!!! MUMPS is epidemic parotitis spread by a paramyxovirus.

I regularly slag our government, our judiciary and corporations here and nobody bats an eyelid. But if anyone dares express a preference for a programming language or an operating system then all hell is let loose. More important issues than matters of life and death.

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Danny 2
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Re: Author comment -- could you lot miss the point any more widely?

"You lot evolved from ape-like hominids. (Clearly not very far, in some cases.) That doesn't mean you are still apes. You're human now."

Wow. I didn't down-vote you because I know what it is like to publish an article that was misunderstood, but really, attacking your audience? That's not a healthy career progression. 'Commentards' here say all sorts of silly things, we are mostly self-correcting but the clue is in our name.

By the way, and I'm not saying this to annoy you, we are all still apes.

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Danny 2
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Re: Pascal -> Modula-2 -> Oberon

C<Pascal<Basic

A genius of a man was briefly assigned to babysit me on my apprenticeship, much to his disgust, and his first words to me were,"Write a Pascal program that print's out the Fibonacci series". I replied, "Well I know who Pascal was but I don't know who Fibonacci was or what his series was".

The look of revulsion on the guys face was priceless, like he was "licking something sick and wrong".

I liked Pascal as a language, it seemed elegant compared to Basic and Assembly. A very good stepping stone to C. Then all you pesky Objectified Orientated kids came along and ruined programming for everybody.

0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610, 987, 1597, 2584, 4181, 6765, 10946, 17711, 28657, 46368, 75025, 121393, 196418, 317811

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China wants encryption cracked on demand because ... er, terrorism

Danny 2
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Re: Easier way of fighting terrorism

Terrorism isn't that scary, but how do we fight being crushed by our own furniture?

I have a new stylish wardrobe still in it's flat-pack box, free to anyone who wants to pick it up from near Edinburgh. Genuine offer, I just can't take that risk anymore now I know the stats.

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Danny 2
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Re: ban mathematics...

"In the UK you are seriously out of luck, because they have made it illegal not to comply with incriminating yourself."

That is sadly true. Mind you, Donald J Trump is a figure of fun over here, not a contender. If we are "seriously out of luck" then you can get to f---...

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North Korean operating system is a surveillance state's tour de force

Danny 2
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Lots of people carry their passports around, for example when leaving the country or trying to cash their dole giro.

Lots of people lose their laptops, to theft fire or just misplacing them.

A wee tip. Trying to convey any idea on a public forum by labelling every normal person as 'sheeple' is hardly endearing and doesn't make you look big or clever, quite the reverse. Trust me, I have malt whisky.

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Danny 2
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"The point of the device encryption is to protect the information on the system from being accessed after it was lost or stolen, not to protect the user from elaborate state-sponsored attacks or corrupt governments."

True, but it really should be explicit about that health warning. And where do you draw the line between a script-kiddie and an APT? For example, do the local police and council have access to my data if I trust MS encryption? Yes, they apparently do. And they shouldn't.

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Danny 2
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Hey, the DPRK also produce their own PCs (unlike backwards Britain where your best computer is a Pi that doesn't even a keyboard). Those North Korean laptops also have USB ports, so why not blame the USB Implementers Forum? Plus they'd never have nuclear weapons if Einstein hadn't blabbed, and they'd all float off into space if Newton had kept quiet about gravity.

If you really want to damage the Norks then go post on their forums. Your amazing stupidity is a liability to the free world.

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Danny 2
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I realise The Intercept is playing catch-up, but it is timely:

Recently Bought a Windows Computer? Microsoft Probably Has Your Encryption Key

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Bah humbug. It's Andrew's Phones of the Year

Danny 2
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2015 is the first year I gave up on owning a mobile after thirty years, due to increasing police abuse of my tracking device. I can though offer a review of BT 'public telephone boxes'. I happen to live near three, although they are much rarer than they used to be presumably because none of them can actually make a phone call. All the perspex is covered in advertising so inside is too dark to dial unless you take a torch. Compared to a 1980s phone box they are pretty impregnable, so little vandalism, but they simply don't work anyway. They eat your coins and refuse, play you an 'old skool' meaningless tone, and give no refund. I go there mostly for the nostalgia.

One pleasant and counter-intuitive improvement is that they no longer smell of urine. For some strange reason men, and Scottish women, used to go into phoneboxes to pee, and given that they are now totally shielded from view by the advertising I'd expected that use to have increased, along with drug-use, sexual encounters and so on. But no, apparently even the drunks and the junkies will no longer risk the social stigma of being seen walking into one of them.

Given the phones no longer work I guess we should call them billboard boxes. To call anyone I wait until the local internet cafe opens up. And if anything defines poverty it is still living next to three phone boxes and an internet cafe.

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EU privacy watchdog calls for new controls on surveillance tech export

Danny 2
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Re: Can we export GCHQ instead?

"You know/knew there's no magic wall around Ireland."

Parochial and missing the fact Ireland always has been under more surveillance by British security services than even the UK. Equally stupid and parochial, the top story on BBC News Scotland just now is headlined "Crime gangs using apps to evade police", although the actual headline is slightly less inaccurate, "Organised gangs using technology to evade police".

It's PR FUD fluff after numerous headlines here highlighting the fact PoliceScotland IT is abysmal, [Police recording incidents on paper after IT glitch, Police to be retrained in data protection as concerns mount over 'snooping' investigations, IT mismatch hampers single police force with eight computer systems] the real headline here should be 'Scottish cops are too daft to understand the everyday technology ordinary Scots use'.

The fact is when Scottish cops are given access to any technology they misuse it illegally to abuse innocent civilians. I once got to question a top cop here and he wasn't one bit ashamed about police over-reach, he said, "If we can do it, we do do it". And because we have a McMickey Mouse legal system and a Fisher-Price parliament here they get away with it.

I'll soon be giving criminals free lessons on proper IT security and encryption, simply because they are the less criminal and more moral than the uniformed gangs we employ.

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Speaking in Tech: Hadoop, Donald Trump, Apple TV - what do they have in common?

Danny 2
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Police infiltrators in Scotland, the UK and the US

This is off topic but I'll hang it on Donald Trump.

The Guardian has published these two stories about police infiltrators north of the border. No comments allowed there so I'll state this here.

Push to extend inquiry into police infiltration of campaigners to Scotland

Ex-undercover officer who infiltrated political groups resigns from academic posts

I was the first guy this millenium to be chatted up by a proven undercover policewoman. I'm banned from the Guardian for pointing out one of their contributors is also an infiltrator.

A decade ago anyone could be forgiven for identifying the wrong people as infiltrators into the peace-movement, due to misinformation and paranoia. Today though there is no such excuse. The infiltrators all have since been rewarded with foreign travel, expensive courses, well-paid jobs. The actual activists are still being fucked over, sometimes literally. Many lives have been destroyed, and yet the worst of the worst are still highly regarded and unexposed. It's an affront to the ideal of democracy.

I'm not trying to cower you into submission through fear. I'm recommending 'black-box testing' and a healthy suspicion of those who label you paranoid.

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IT bloke: Crooks stole my bikes after cycling app blabbed my address

Danny 2
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Re: 'Worthwhile'

In the Netherlands it is considered bad-form to speed past anyone. It's kind of the point everywhere else. But Holland is as flat as a 1970s Doctor Who set, and most 90 year olds cycle, so although it's a fairly macho culture, not so on bikes. You are frowned upon if you go too fast.

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Danny 2
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Re: 'Worthwhile'

The metal antlers were frankly terrifying! As a pedestrian, as a cyclist, hell, they'd even scare a stag. The bike was never stolen though, and in Dutch law the cyclist is never at fault.

I had a bike stolen there, and was told by my Dutch fiancee to rush to 'Junkie Bridge' to buy it back before someone else bought it. "But pay no more than 25 guilders or else you'll raise the price for the rest of us". Seemingly buying back your own bike is the Dutch method of charity for heroin addicts.

A boss there told me a sure-fire method to get a free bike. Shout out "Hey, that's my bike" and some passing cyclist will get off guiltily and give you their bike.

At Dutch v German football matches the Dutch sing, "Give us back our bikes", a reference to when the occupying Nazis melted down Dutch bikes for the war effort.

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Danny 2
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'Worthwhile'

I think it was pre-searchable web but I recall a report that visible burglar-alarms when they first started being sold that they did not have a deterrence value, quite the reverse. They simply advertised your house contained something of value compared to your neighbouring homes.

The trick is to to have the protection but not to broadcast it, to fit into the herd better. In the Netherlands I spraypainted my expensive bike black and removed the Raleigh ensign, so it didn't stand out from the mass of other bikes available. Only an expert could identify it, and most theives know nothing.

A neighbour took an alternate approach and welded metal antlers onto the front of their bike so it would be easily recognisable and a hassle to resell.

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Sanders presidential campaign accuses Democrats of dirty data tricks

Danny 2
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Re: DNC Panic Perhaps

An article from The Intercept suggests the very fact the debate is on a Saturday shows the DNC want to bury the debate from view. Media Ignores Sanders Though He’s More Popular Than Trump

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'Powerful blast' at Glasgow City Council data centre prompts IT meltdown

Danny 2
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I happen to know GCC IT are a pile of poo, but I'll not quote specifics as I've alerted friends who actually worked there to this story and they can choose to chip in.

I used to work for a similar nearby council whose Finance Director didn't trust mag tape back-ups not to degrade, so all council records had to be printed out and stored in a huge storeroom under the town hall. Yet nobody could ever have found any meaningful data in that huge pile of flammable paper, and when I checked all the older records ink had faded away anyway.

The reason we have Scottish councillors and council officials is to keep them busy and away from more important careers like dog-walking.

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Big Brother is born. And we find out 15 years too late to stop him

Danny 2
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Licio Gelli, rest in pish

This peaceful death has only twelve active googlenews hits, and admit it, most of you hadn't heard of him. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize for Poetry amongst other similar bastardisations of our decency.

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Brit 'naut Tim Peake thunders aloft

Danny 2
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Tim is the fourth person born British to go into space, but the first the tax-payer has funded.

Austerity, I don't think that word means what you think it means.

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Lettuce-nibbling veggies menace Mother Earth

Danny 2
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Face mites

Not remotely related to IT or the article which isn't remotely related to IT, but Slashdot has it and it's gruesomely interesting.

Your face mites pertain to your birthplace and the people you've rubbed faces with!

"Considering the ancient divergences within D.folliculorum , and the nearly universal presence of Demodex on adult humans, these mites provide an excellent system for studying past and present relationships among human populations."

Not in the pdf, but these critters sleep in your eyelash follicles, and if enough squeeze into one follicle then they push your eyelash out.

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Japan unveils net-wielding police drones for air patrol

Danny 2
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Drop zone

Taking out a drone in this manner will risk dropping it onto anyone beneath it - more dangerous than the drone itself. A responsible police response would be a drone that over-rides the control signals of an errant drone with closer and therefore more powerful signals ordering it down.

Or a net with a parachute or balloons. https://xkcd.com/585/

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Volkswagen blames emissions cheating on 'chain of errors'

Danny 2
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Re: My garage needs painting

That'll be your VW emissions that caused your garage needing whitewashed.

Still, good greenwashing from Paris today. We are only going to screw the climate 3/4s of the amount we were intent on.

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NZ unfurls proposed new flag

Danny 2
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Rats!

It reminded me of the Boomtown Rats song "Another Piece of Red" mourning the death of the British Empire (until then Geldof had still been pretending to be Irish), a song so bad that it doesn't seem to have made it onto Youtube.

I was reading in New Zealand about Ian Smith

I was thinking they were lucky to be rid of that shit.

The people here can still believe in stiff lips and stiff collars

They're speaking deals in English

But they're making deals in dollars.

They're breaking up an empire

Nobody's buying British

They're calling for an umpire

Nobody's playing cricket

The flags are coming down everybody stands saluting

But somewhere in the distance, I can hear somebody shooting.

And another piece of red left my atlas today.

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France says 'non' to Wi-Fi and Tor restrictions after terror attack

Danny 2
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Re: Police pigs

But are ye a Catholic Jew or a Protestant Jew?

I sincerely hope we aren't housing any of our Syrian refugees there.

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Danny 2
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Police pigs

I again recommend the use of trained pigs instead of police dogs in sieges such as St Denis. They are just as nasal when it comes to sniffing out explosives and they might give potential suicide bombers pause for thought that they may not get their 72 virgins covered in bacon.

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Steve Jobs mural highlights plight of Syrian refugees

Danny 2
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Re: The difference is important.

Call me Pollyanna if you want but I think the eventual recommends around here show we're generally more sensible commentards than on any newspaper website. Or the Daily Mail for that matter.

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Danny 2
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Re: Ch14 - Grapes of Wrath

"Long before Steve Jobs, California was the scene for mass immigration"

Although after that, California banned US migrants from the dustbowl, setting up border guards to keep them out.

And the whole of the US banned any migration from China using the Chinese Exclusion Act.

I went to San Fransisco in the '80s and stayed with an elderly Scottish woman who'd just moved there from Canada. Her young relative and me were taken to the largest shopping mall we'd ever seen, with a full size ice-skating rink inside to amuse the kids. There was only one kid on it, a seven year old hispanic girl who was performing a stunningly beautiful routine. My friend and I were transfixed by the girl's skating, but the old woman glanced at her and without any self-awareness sneered, "Immigrants". California is one of the most racist states, they just disguise it better than some.

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Danny 2
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Re: An Opportunity Presents Itself...

Well, it's in Calais so statistically it's likely to a French or Somalian or Pakistani.

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Danny 2
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Re: Not Another Steve Jobs Nor Another Apple

Donald Jesuswept Trump claims to be Scottish because his mother was, and yet it was a Scot who started the petition to get him banned from the UK.

I loathed Jobs but at least he did what it said on the tin; he made money and stayed out of politics. There are worse people still alive.

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Danny 2
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Re: The difference is important.

I'm adding to your post at a tangent, not subtracting from it.

Jobs father was a refugee from Homs because Homs was already under attack from the current Syrian dictators father, who basically levelled the city later in '82.

Anyone smart enough to post here already knows the difference between a migrant and a refugee; what is less understood is the difference between a refugee and an aslyee.

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Danny 2
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Re: Banksy's mural

http://www.stencilrevolution.com/tutorials/make-stencils-in-photoshop/

Stencils are remarkably easy. Bear in mind that you should wear a face mask when painting them.

It is tempting to fake Banksy's work now people rip out walls for lucre. And when did anyone but hairdressers and corporate graphic artists think Steve Jobs was an argument for Syrian refugees?

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ISS 'naut trio return to snowy terra firma

Danny 2
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We should always to the nutters as Daesh, for the reason you stated. Plus they don't like it (up'em). And Isis was quite a cool god-myth.

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