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* Posts by david 12

632 posts • joined 6 Jul 2009

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Want a more fuel efficient car? Then redesign it – here's how

david 12
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Killer...

And I don't mean that in a nice way. The article starts by telling us that he's running lean, producing NOx, which has a long known and easily measureable effect of increasing deaths due to respiratory failure in communities around roads, which is pretty much everwhere, and worst where there are the most roads, which is where there are the most people.

The solution is run rich. Which increases hydrocarbon emmissions. Which are cleaned by catalytic converter. Yes, that makes you less fuel efficient. Yes, they know that, but they did it anyway, because they decided it was a fair trade-off for killing fewer people.

The technology to run lean on production cars only really became available at about the same time as people realised that it should be made against the law to run lean on production cars. So no surprise that now, many years later, he can tune this car to run lean. And yes, he can piss on everyone else because they failed to make it illegal to do that to an old car. But he's an a-- if he uses that as an excuse.

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david 12
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Re: Cruise control

>The poor timing of your [Cruise Control] is a classic example of the difference that extra inputs can make ... You can see the brow of the hill approaching but the car cannot.

My CC doesn't work correctly with the car in automatic on a positive grade.

I think that the poor timing on my CC on my GM Cruze is a classic example of a poor product made to a price. Back when people paid extra to get CC on expensive models, I don't think anyone would have paid for this. I certainly would not. It is noticeably worse than any cruise control I've had before. It is 'acceptable' as a 'free' feature of the base model, but it doesn't work as a cruise control except on the flat.

It doesn't work on hills. I turn the CC off for hills. I have to use the accelerator to control the vehicle speed, because the CC doesn't. It lets the car get far too slow, shifts down a gear, then accelerates up hill to well over the speed limit. And, as a matter of policy, the local police like to do speed checks on up-hill straights, where you don't have any excuse for being over the speed limit.

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david 12
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Re: A light foot and wheel geometry works wonders

After working on my own cars and bikes, I was amazed to see a wheel spin, and spin, and spin, and spin, on an upside-down race car. On my cars, you can barely turn the undriven wheels by hand, due to bearing friction, and the bikes were only much better. Evidently race cars have much much much better wheel bearings.

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Torvalds CONFESSES: 'I'm pretty good at alienating devs'

david 12
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"it would surprise if they're talking,"

Given that Torvalds is a Techie, and a Fin, it would surprise if he took offense at all.

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Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft

david 12
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>And in few years it might get to where Solaris has been for years

You mean a hobby?

"only for the purpose of developing, testing, prototyping and demonstrating your applications, and not for any other purpose."

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White LED lies: It's great, but Nobel physics prize-winning great?

david 12
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Lighting levels with High Efficiency Fluorescent Tubes

The design suggestion for using High Efficiency Fluorecent Tubes was to place only 2 tubes on a 3 tube fixture, and to disconnect some fixtures. It is common in shopping centres and government buildings around here.

It is sold as a power saving measure. Perhaps part of the reason they get away with it is that new tubes are always brighter than old tubes, so you don't get a fair comparison when you replace 3 old tubes with 2 new tubes: the new tubes are bright by design, but also bright by newness.

In any case, I would not place 2 bright tubes in a fixture built for 3 old-design tubes: given the choice, I would make my school, government and shopping buildings brighter, because I focus better in brighter light.

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david 12
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Re: Let there be light!

>I suspect the major eco benefit of LED will be the very long life -

Both incandescent and compact fluorescent bulbs are available in long-life versions. The first CFL I bought in the 1980's is still going (outside lamp that requires a ladder to change), and I was buying 2000 hr and 5000 hr incandescents just out of laziness (so I didn't have to change as often).

I suspect that people will continue to buy lamps that require frequent replacement.

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Linux systemd dev says open source is 'SICK', kernel community 'awful'

david 12
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Re: Assholes seem to be part of the deal for success in the tech world

>Python ... explicit, unmissable and accepted codes of conduct.

Actually, I was including Python when I wrote "insults from people who didn't understand the question, much less know the answers, including some people who thought they were very experienced experts".

The Python newsgroups were marked by the extraordinary delusion that they were polite, helpful, and supportive. Which was true only in comparison to groups like the kernel community.

Let me be explicit: The Python comunity was NOTHING LIKE helpful, supportive, informative, or even generally correct, when judged on an absolute scale, or when compared to the the Microsoft newsgroups. As in "can I go here and get a true and correct answer to a common question?"

Microsoft killed off the newsgroups, and the volunteer community. But, while it lasted, it (and the onetime Borland community) demonstrated that volunteer technical communities aren't all populated by assholes.

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david 12
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Re: Assholes seem to be part of the deal for success in the tech world

>Linux has Linus

>Apple had Jobs

>Microsoft had Ballmer

I spent years in the microsoft.public newsgroups, and they were nothing at all like the alt.comp newsgroups.

microsoft.public.* was populated by volunteers with a willingness to helpfully answer boring simple questions, including from some very experienced experts.

alt.comp.* was marked by insults from people who didn't understand the question, much less know the answers, including some people who thought they were very experienced experts.

I agree with the characterization of the Open Source and kernel communities. But it is shared and pre-dated by the BSD community, so I don't see that Linus is in any way the source of the problem.

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Pen-testers outline golden rules to make hacks more €xpen$ive

david 12
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Re: let me see if I've got this right.

>Unfortunately two very common apps - Word and Excel - have scripting built in

And trivially disabled for users on Windows platforms: dunno about the modern (cloud) versions or the Mac versions.

And I've worked with Excel and Word scripting. Many people use Excel and Word scripting: many people don't. Unless your Network Admin is in a building on the other side of the <whatever> and doesn't give a <whatever>, it is trivially easy (in a Windows environment) to whitelist people or apps that need scripting, and block everything else.

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Bash bug flung against NAS boxes

david 12
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Re: Synology users Ok

--Which also points to the limitations of using the well-known test script to test your shell vulnerability.

The shell you test may not be vulnerable, but the other users and other services my be using some other shell.

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Vertigan killed FTTP but the battle for scalable FTTN has not begun

david 12
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So borrowing costs nothing?

And borrowing for the NBN does not displace borrowing for other infrustructure?

Your expectation of economic illiteracy would be breathtaking, if it wasn't taking place in a thread about the NBN. Here, we expect nothing else.

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david 12
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Either that or...

Either that, or the "tech industry" (of which I am a member) realised, long before the Whirlpool commentariat, the labour party fellow travelers, and the fourth estate, that there was no rational "nation building" argument for the NBN.

It's long since that we stopped hearing the argument that high-density residential countries like Korea and Singapore were overtaking us with their fibre networks. Presumably by now they would be able to demonstrate their "high-bandwidth applications" and their "accelerating" use.

If you want to make that case, give us a credible report. Otherwise I'm going to continue to observe that the NBN is the TV replacement, and not much else.

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Windows 10: One for the suits, right Microsoft? Or so one THOUGHT

david 12
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>multiple virtual desktops

>Another key feature is multiple virtual desktops. The engineering for multiple desktop support has been in Windows for years, but has now surfaced for the first time. Mac OS X and Linux desktops have this feature, so the puzzle is why it has taken Windows so long to catch up?<

Because F*ing virtual desktops are F*ing useless. Yes the engineering has been there for years: yes you can install multiple desktops on Win98, 2K, XP, XP2p2, Vista, or Win7 (dunno about 8). No, hardly anybody ever does, because it's a worthless feature.

Even on a non-Windows PC, where the broken X-Windows derived interface means you need to have a separate screen to get a proper separate window, only self-important sys-admins and self-imagined development gurus use virtual desktops.

Demonstrably more useful is a Large Virtual Desktop, as on the iPhone or on the Kaypro Osborne 1. That was never supported by Windows, or by third-party add-ins: it was only ever supported by Device Drivers from card makers. Does Win10 support that technology?

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Student pleads guilty to Frances Abbott 'secret' scholarship leak

david 12
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Special treatment?

Hello, actually a bit suprised to see the sub-header. Because at the time, the almost unanimous opinion of the ABC (not generally known as a hotbead of Abbott support) was that Frances Abbott was a legitmate contender for the scholarship in 2011, and that the attack was a sexist assault on a young woman merely because she had a family attachment.

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NBN Co says Melton test not valid, likely uses processes developed there anyway

david 12
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For those of you who haven't been there yet, Melton is both non-representative, and a good place to do base-line studies. It is a plain, flat, boring landscape with recent infrastructure.

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Hackers pop Brazil newspaper to root home routers

david 12
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Re: Java as a crutch

FF doesn't run Javascript exploits? Thank God I can get rid of NoScript -- Everyday more of the www refuses to run unless it can first check that you have a 'supported' browser.

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Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around

david 12
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RE: nitroglycerine.

>At the other end, the battery evolves metallic lithiun,

>which is the equivalent of the petrol in your car turning

>into nitroglycerine.

Metalic Lithium contains both an oxidiser and an oxidant? Allowing it to release energy without using an external oxidiser like 'air'?

I wish people wouldn't casually compare explosives with single components of two-part reactions.

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China is now 99.8% sure you're you, thanks to world's-best facial recognition wares

david 12
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"The systems already in place ... dramatically cut down on [immigration] wait times, much to this correspondent's delight."

Not that I'd noticed. Rather the opposite. Immigration wait times are noticebly longer now than they were back when immigration used to just look at your face, and at your passport, and then stamp the passport.

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Microsoft bins Bing image widget after Getty sueball

david 12
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Paywalled court site:

"CM/ECF has been tested and works correctly with Firefox 3.5, and Internet Explorer 7 and 8."

Not spending the money on updating the browser testing...

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Jimbo tells Wikipedians: You CAN'T vote to disable 'key software features'

david 12
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> I would download ssh, then <

Because installing SSH would /Never/ introduce a whole new set of security vulnerabilities to your machine.

Like the server here when I got it. Two web servers. Two secure shells. Three FTP servers. 2 extra editors. 2 extra backup systems. 2 extra scripting systems. etc etc yada yada yada.

Because the native software was never good enough, and then because a second *nix subsystem was better than just one.

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RIP MSN Messenger, kthxbai. Microsoft finally flicks on KILL SWITCH in China

david 12
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My old copies of Messenger can't find a server to connect to. So (1) What is Trillian etc connecting to? and (2) What server is China using until October?

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Google flushes out users of old browsers by serving up CLUNKY, AGED version of search

david 12
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Re: Feature, not bug...

Yes. I've given up trying to make my browser show me the fast version of gmail, so I use a seperate (old) browser for gmail.

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Broadband slow and expensive? Blame Telstra says CloudFlare

david 12
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Transit?

It's not clear to me that they've used the term 'transit' in a clear sense. If, as the linked article claims, they peer to all the other ISPs in Aus, then they aren't 'transiting' Telstra in the sense that they use the same word when talking about the USA.

It could be that in this one case, they mean that 'peering' to Telstra is charged, like the deal Netflix just did in the USA.

Or it could mean that they transit Telstra to get access to small ISPs that they don't peer with, that they didn't include in the group 'all other ISPs'

Or something.

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david 12
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Re: Acting just like Telecom Australia

KRudd and friends were building the NBN as a completely separate infrastructure ONLY after Telstra told them they couldn't do it for the price asked... Turned out they were correct. Went massively over budget and behind schedule, because it couldn't be done at the price.

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Government report: average Oz user will want 15 Mbps by 2023

david 12
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"optimistic assumption that speeds are symmetric"

Instead, you've implied that upload speeds are as important as download speeds for backup.

Backups are incremental and non-critical. Recoveries are critical and total. It doesn't matter to me how many weeks it takes to do a full backup of my home or office workstation or server: we don't do that, and I don't do that, because I don't want to spend weeks recovering my workstation or server if it falls over.

At present, ADSL download speeds are too slow to make cloud backup reasonable for some of our factory workloads. Our plan is to move more stuff into the cloud when we get NBN. There are some perfectly reasonable business uses for a high-speed network.

Now that we no longer host our own web server, or name server, or mail server, an assumption of symmetric 'speeds' would be a pessimistic assumption.

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Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can

david 12
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Re: And about 2 years later ...

We spent the $199 on Coherent, and found that it had no virtual memory manager. If you had 8MB, that's what you got.

Which made the whole thing pointless for us -- why bother with the overhead and limited documentation of *nix, if you didn't get a large virtual memory space?

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david 12
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Re: Can't help himself

You don't have to read it as a dig. It could be a friendly little in-joke for those of us who, like Tanenbaum and Linus, were there at the time.

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IT blokes: would you say that LEWD comment to a man? Then don't say it to a woman

david 12
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Don't bother being polite in response

Unacceptable men have nothing to loose by behaving different to the norm, their only chance is to try something different, given that they've got zero chance anyway. Because (a) being polite is what all the other blokes are doing, and (b) women at conference are not there to form a social releationship.

It follows that any kind of personal response (other than submission) is irrelevant: they still aren't any worse off than they were before.

If you want to have an effect on this kind of behaviour, you have to change the equation. Name names. Get somebody fired.

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Cutting cancer rates: Data, models and a happy ending?

david 12
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False history, artificial conflict

Everything in research gets re-invented every 30 years, due to the natural turn-over of staff. And, due to the exponenctial increase in medical knowledge and research technique, research avenues that were dead-ends 30 years ago often reveal new insites when revisited.

But having said that, you don't need to pretend that anyone in the last 50 years ever thought that surgery didn't trigger metatisation in some cases. The article would still have been interesting and informative without the faux conflct between 'old ideas' and 'new ideas'

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Big content seeks specialist court for copyright cases

david 12
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Criminalize AFACT

Back in the day, when the criminalization features were first added to the Aus copyright act, it also became a criminal offence to falsely accuse someone of copyright infringement.

No idea what the state of the paly is now, after several re-writes of the copyright act.

Writing as one who has been falsely accused of copyright infringement, I'd be pleased to see some lawbreakers brought to book. I've never heard of the false accusation sections being used, if they still exist. That seems unbalanced.

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Cracking copyright law: How a simian selfie stunt could make a monkey out of Wikipedia

david 12
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I 'm with the photographer

-- Mr Slater. I think that going to Indonesia and getting a monkey to press the trigger was an act of considerable effort and iingenuity. Precisely the kind of thing copyright rules should protect. Not the kind of thing you should rip off, even if you can.

I also think that if curating and editorial selection is not important, Wikipedia (and it's authors) don't have any particular claim to copyright: "Original" research is not permitted at Wikipedia

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Microsoft parts Azure cloud, reveals NoSQL doc database

david 12
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>the company’s first-ever non-relational database

Well, perhaps the first non-relational database since DOS 3, if you count all their other non-relational databases as bought-in from outside. But then SQL Server was bought in from outside too.

[It was DOS 3 that added record locking and data sharing to the file system? ]

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Pedals and wheel in that Google robo-car or it's off the road – Cali DMV

david 12
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Parts are in place

A true driverless car requires 3 things:

A mapping system, like google maps, so that it can plot routes.

A control system, like Siri, Skyvi, Cortana, or Google Now, to take routing commands

A lane keeping// cruise control system like that on expensive cars

--all at an affordable price. If you've used some of those, you know that at present, it's "almost their", and looks like being that way for some time yet. This is still a few years off competing with Ford/Toyoto/BMW

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Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows

david 12
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Win version?

The linked article says that "a GUI-based OS is out of the question".

What are they providing as "the IoT version of Windows"? Is it a headless version? A winphone version? Win8?

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The internet just BROKE under its own weight – we explain how

david 12
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Re: IPv6 like OSI is far more complex than necessary

I take the opposite point of view -- SIP is fucked, and it's inability to work with NAT is just one part of that. Out of all the fully -functional voice protocols that we had around, why did we wind up with SIP?

Actually, I know that answer to that: because it was easier for amateurs to make a broken open-source implementation of SIP, rather than implementing the existing ISO standard protocol, or any of the other protocols that actually worked.

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david 12
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.. we handled the very real issues posed by [Y2K] so well...

Or perhaps you handled them so badly.

Dedicating too much real resource to fix a problem is a fail, just as much as loosing resources because of unfixed problems is a fail.

I was doing consulting with a [very] large multinational company that was unable to pay their very large [national] bills for a month, because they had dedicated all of their IT effort to ensuring that there would be no Y2K problem, and then had only 6 months to prepare for a real, legislated, [national] accounting and tax change.

Proper IT management would be good. Y2K was not a good example of good management.

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Intel admits: Broadwell Core M chip looking a bit thin, no fans found at all

david 12
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Ouch - bitten by the headline writter

1 point to you, Sir/Madam

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No, minister Turnbull, IP addresses aren't part of routine billing data collection

david 12
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Headline writer is lying liar ?

Ok, manages to equate "That's recorded in their records" to"billing data collection" instead of "operational data" , thus catching many more readers, as paid to do.

Is it lying to attribute that idea to Turnbul? Or just sloppyness?

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Cracker takes control of 200 rooms in Chinese hotel

david 12
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"Claims to be an open standard"

That is an unjustified slur.

Standards are expensive to buy. I wouldn't pay E1000 for the set of standards either, I'd just download some of the Open Source KNX software, but that doesn't mean that I think E1000 is unusual for an Open Standard: it just means that I already know that any ISO/IEC set of standards is 95% self-referential administrative overhead, and 5% incomprehensible.

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Now even Internet Explorer will throw lousy old Java into the abyss

david 12
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Re: WTF ????

Missed the link. My Error. Sorry. Would have written that differently if I had found the link. Would not have said "WTF" if I had found the link and read the link. Would have been calmer. My reaction was totally only based on reading the article.

Instead, would have pointed out that the new feature was the button helping you to update a supported third-party Active-X control.

Slowly, the article, total nonsense before, starts to come into focus. FF already has, and has had for a long time "a feature that prompts you to update supported third-party addins".

Prior to this release, IE could only throw lousy old Java into the abyss. Now, like competing products, it can notify you about upgrades.

But old versions of IE will still only be able to alert users when web pages try to launch ActiveX controls that are considered out-of-date and potentially insecure.

Enhanced third party support from MS is a newsworthy step. It will be interesting to see what the business analysts make of this announcement

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david 12
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>There will be some exceptions to IE's ActiveX blocking feature, though.... the feature is only coming to recent versions of Microsoft's operating system and browser >

ActiveX blocking is a feature of every version of IE that supports ActiveX

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david 12
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WTF ????

IE blocks blocked Active X controls. Has done so for what, decades? The list of blocked Active X controls is updated regularly. Repeatedly. All the time.

To restate: IE is "automatically blocking old, insecure add-ons", and has been since I was in short pants.

So WTF is actually going on ???

I could guess that the list of blocked ActiveX controls is now going to include old versions of Java, but that would be only guessing, since, like the rest of the echo chamber that is the internet, this article includes no checkable resources: the author has clearly repeated some other unsourced report, all of which are saying the same thing, none of which are giving references.

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Windows Registry-infecting malware has no files, survives reboots

david 12
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Re: What I don't get

> Can your database system then execute the binary data being referred to without having an external file somewhere on the filesystem? <

In the obvious sense, this is a description of what a "relational" database is, by definition. But I'm sure that by 'binary' you mean something like 'encrypted' or 'encoded'. And yes, since a releational database system can execute code stored in the database, it can execute code to un-encrypte and un-encode programs stored in the database, and then execute that code.

Some old simple non-relational database systems lacked that ability to do that. Turn-of-the-century database systems presented a malware-surface because of that ability. New, modern database systems are sand-boxed to prevent that from affecting your wider system.

It would be nonsensicle to suggest that a system-configuration database could be 'sandboxed' from the system it is meant to configure, so the solution must lie either in reducing the capability of your computer system (for example by using a limited flat-file database system) or in hardening the system to prevent re-configuration in undesired and hidden ways.

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david 12
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Re: Executables in the registry.

> A microsoft trick so you can not read the code.

MS is a big company, so all kinds of s-t comes out of there. But they have a private API for writing hidden and protected information to the registry, so if this 'trick' was used deliberately to hide information in the registry, it was done by some idiot acting independantly.

On the other hand, two cents says that some blogger found a limitation of regedit, and some comentard described it as a feature.

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david 12
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Re: This is silly.

>If regedit can't access these keys then that's probably just a limitation of regedit's GUI.

Yes, regedit only correctly displays keys that a user can edit correctly. And instead of crashing, or crashing and destroying the registry, or allowing you to write garbage to keys that aren't in the expected format, it does not show those keys -- though you can still read and write through the standard API.

There are actually 'hidden' keys as well. (And 'encrypted' keys.) Windows copy protection/registration data is stored in a section of the registry that users don't normally have access to. Example 'hidden' keys are HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SECURITY and HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SAM.

The security implications of having keys and values, or INI files, that an ordinary user can't find and examine are well known. The suggestion that any modern Linux distribution has transparent and meaningful configuration files that an ordinary user can examine and alter would be laughable if it wasn't so patently arrogant and dishonest.

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david 12
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Re: "a tool Microsoft uses to hide its source code from being copied"

I'm not sure I'm following you:

>UNIX has done that for 40 years.

Unix has had record locking for 40 years? The database primitives were only on the internal versions of Unix, not on the publicly released versions. Which is why open source used text files instead of databases.

>Use LDAP for one

Your LDAP store has a seperate file for every attribute?

>with the user settings able to move with the user between machines ... relatively trivial

NIS is an effective solution for trivial problems. And 20 years ago, it wasn't even that.

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david 12
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Re: "a tool Microsoft uses to hide its source code from being copied" @Def

>In DOT.NET they brought back an improved version of the INI file

Perhaps they might have brought it back, if it had ever gone away. MS continued to use INI files for applications where it made sense: the important thing that changed was that the Windows API that accessed INI files was captured and pointed at the registry.

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Synology and the NAS-ty malware-flingers: What can be learned

david 12
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For DSM 4.0, please install DSM 4.0-2259 or later

But not -2454, because 2454 has the same date and time as 2254, 2255, and 2255, and not 2257, because that is Earlier than 2255, not Later. No, you want 2262 or 2263, because those are Later than 2259, as well as being Greater than 2259, though Lesser than 2454.

Although ACTUALLY, for most hardware, the last version of DSM 4.0 was DSM4.0-2228

> http://ukdl.synology.com/download/DSM/4.0/ <

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