* Posts by david 12

730 posts • joined 6 Jul 2009

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So why the hell do we bail banks out?

david 12
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Re: What was there being done that was actually criminal? @ Tom 13

>may have been misguided, may not have understood the long-term implications, but weren't crimina

Criminally stupid? The reason that Aus didn't get caught in this trap is that it got in early. Deregulation, and low-start loans to people who couldn't afford them, in the hope and expectation that the rising tide of the economy would pull them out of debt.

But Aus had the good fortune to make those two mistakes consecutively, not simultanously. .Small number of legit loans to people who couldn't afford them, small number of dishonest loans to people they could con money out of.

The USA had that example right in front! They could see what happened with deregulation! They could see what happened with low-start loans! So they went ahead and made both mistakes, and at the same time! They got large numbers of dishonest loans to people with no money!

That's not just ignorant. That's not just stupid.

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david 12
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Re: Maybe another reason?

>If we make the banks small-enough-to-fail we don't have to bail them out

>for the damage a failure could do to the overall system.

This was not the first failure of the American banking system. See (just one example), the "savings and loans crisis". In which the sector was to big to fail. Which is what you get if the sector is made up of a 1000 failing banks, or if the same sector is made up of 3 failing banks.

The banking system is a public utility like water or roads. In Aus, left-side governments started banks because they thought that public utilities should be in public hands. Then left-side governements ran their banks (eg State Bank of Victoria) into failure, and they had to be bailed out.

Simple ideas like Government owned banks, or more-smaller-banks, have already been tried. Whatever their advantages, they have been proven to be not solutions to the public-utility-requiring-bailout problem.

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Get off the phone!! Seven out of ten US drivers put theirs and your lives at risk

david 12
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But technically....

"A University of Utah driving simulator study

found drivers using cell phones had

slower reaction times than drivers impaired by

alcohol at a .08 blood alcohol concentration,

the legal intoxication limit."

In other words, using a cell phone for 5 minutes while driving is as dangerous as being drunk for 5 minutes while driving.

I'm not in favour of the death penalty for murder, much less for being a pedestrian sharing a road with a car, but this is slightly dishonest. Drunk drivers are not drunk only for short intervals and otherwise sober. The numbers do not support the claim that testing/calling/using your hands is "as dangerous as" being a drunk driver, because drunk drivers are drunk continously.

I wait for the day when we see an actual meaningful comparison of drunk driving and testing, because that also would be interesting

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Sorry, Windows 10 early adopters: Microsoft Edge WON'T block ads at launch

david 12
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Yes, I use tortuise svn. We also use IE.

No, we don't use tortoise as a custom protocol handler: We render svn: in the browser.

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david 12
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Goodbye to my SVN:// protocol

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Why Joe Hockey's Oz tax proposals only get five out of 10

david 12
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USA CGT, Tax treaties

The standard Capital Gains Tax rate in the USA is 15%. And it is forgiven at death. No, you don't even have to balance it out or do anything complex. But you don't have to wait until then -- you can also wipe out the CGT by converting the asset to a pension. Or if your income falls low enough so that you need the money, you can just sell out -- CGT doesn't apply if you aren't paying income tax.

Or any of a score of other lurks. There are a thousand different taxes in the USA, and a thousand different exemptions to match.

Tax treaties are worked out to be reciprocal. It's not going to break anything to have carve-outs for income that is not taxed in any country. It may, in some cases, not even require changes to tax treaties. In other cases, well, this is a G20 international agreement, and like he said, tax treaties are being continously re-negotiated.

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Australian Labor Party toys with a return to fibre, sometime, somewhere

david 12
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Think of the children!

They're still going with their original marketing:

"we will provide health services in the future ... we deliver a world class education to our kids ... we build a strong and growing economy"

This was the model sold by the big ISP's and in particular Optus. It doesn't say anything about Netflix.

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'Rombertik' malware kills host computers if you attempt a cure

david 12
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Re: "spreads through an executable screensaver disguised as an Adobe PDF file"

Right. Let us SHOW THE FILENAME, and also NOT USE THE FILENAME, so that the filename that is shown does not tell us if the file is executable. wtf?

Wait, I've go more! How about marking downloaded applications as untrusted, so that the don't run at all, in any area, telling people that they can't and why?

Um, you knew that screensavers are applications didn't you?

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Macroviruses are BACK and are the future of malware, says Microsoft

david 12
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Re: Sandboxing

The overwhelming majority of the VBA code I've developed integrates seperate database, spreadsheet and word documents. Often (always) using the file system to read and write files, plus the "print system" the "email system" and occasionally main-frame database interfaces.

Sandbox mode does allow small marcros to run harmlessly. Using current software, anything you download is sandboxed, and also marked as untrusted.

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Welcome, stranger: Inside Microsoft's command line shell

david 12
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Just looking for a little Active Directory administration. How do I do it? Oh, here are some examples: In powershell I do it using exactly the same ADO objects I've been using for the last 15 years.

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david 12
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Just looking for a little Active Directory administration. How do I do it? Oh, here are some examples: In powershell I do it using exactly the same ADO objects I've been using for the last 10-15 years.

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david 12
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all you'd end up with was an unusable chunk of text.'

>After typing out an incredibly long command and realising there was an extra letter at the very beginning, all you'd end up with was an unusable chunk of text.'

except it wasn't actually like that. You just backspace through it, delete the character, then replay the characters.

If you had altready attempted the command, you just use the correct Fn key to replay the very long command, then backspace through it

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david 12
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Re: Not dead yet

>seems to be some rule that any new feature has to be invoked by obscure metacharacters.

Not the legacy of the original feeble MS-DOS parser -- it's the legacy of ALGOL, as also seen in powershell, combined with legacy of people who are single-finger typists.

Some people like FORTRAN and COBOL because they can type. Some people like obscure metacharacters because they can't.

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david 12
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Re: re: Windows XP was the first PC operating system to drop the MS-DOS

Also, I think he messed up about Windows ME ??? - one of the great complaints about it was that it wasn't possible to just "boot into a pure MS-DOS prompt by pressing the right start-up bypass keys", because they had removed that feature ???

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david 12
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Fn keys were available from DOS 1 and later. Giving you, well, very very basic command line completion.

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david 12
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Re: paths

Yes, PCDOS 1.x was primarily a floppy disk system, and it always ran programs off the current floppy disk, and did not require a path to do so. When it morphed into something completely different, this started to be a problem.

no, it did not require a path, and dot was never an element of the path. It did become common to put things like root or dot dot into the path, and the order of the path was commonly set for optimum speed, because, until very late in the piece, MSDOS did not cache the file listing, and even on Hard Disks, a path search could be noticeably slow.

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david 12
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Re: the constraint was "you haven't got a text editor"

Edlin was a Line Editor. Which was still a well-known kind of thing in the world when PC DOS was first introduced.

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david 12
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Re: Obscure knowledge got me a job ....

Real programmers use

copy con program.exe

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david 12
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Re: Pipes

For those too young to remember, I'd just like to clarify that you could "see the results before the first one finished". That was not the problem.

The problem was that MS-DOS would only run one program at a time. The "second one" wouldn't start until the 'first one' finished, even though "the results" were ready and available.

And yes, it was possible to work around this limitation of programs run by DOS, but it was a work-around, not a natural part of the system.

Just like (while I'm here), DOS 3.x did support "partitions larger than 32 MB", through resident driver chaining, and from DOS 2.x supported large disks through installable block devices drivers.

Unlike the native support for command line editing and recall, using the Fn keys, which was a natural part of the system, not some little-remembered work-around

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DDoSsers use reflection amplification to crank up the volume to 100Gbps+

david 12
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Re: Prison time will do them good

>Serious prison time and high fines should help educate those who initiate DDoS attacks.

But are unlikely to do so.

Based on centuries of experience, plus decades of peer-reviewed studies, "policing" has an "educational" impact. Punishment, not so much.

Which is why your child is not stuck in a corner with a "dunce" cap and sign when he/she makes a spelling mistake.

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So how should we tax these BASTARD COMPANIES, then?

david 12
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"well, let's only tax profits above the normal rate of profits."

Implemented here in AUS in something that was (past tense) called "the mining tax", since rescinded. What the 'ivory tower big government academics' had failed to appreciate was that government and mining valued the speculative profits at different rates: in mining, profit is not a fungible good.

The mining industry sells to their investors the high-risk chance of speculative profits. That is their market proposition. They make a profit in that market.

In contrast, the government valued "profits above the normal rate of profits" on the same scale as "normal profits"

The effect was that the value to government was much less than the value lost by the mining companies. That was an unsustainable situation.

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Singapore's PM personally programmed C++ Suduko-solver

david 12
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Yes, but is he a Rhodes scholar, with an excelent economics degree, like the bloke with the bike and the speedos?

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Windows 10 Device Guard: Microsoft's effort to keep malware off PCs

david 12
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Re: As much as an MS fanboi that i am,

No, OSX does not have a similar mechanism. This is a HARDWARE ENFORCED mechanism.

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WikiLeaks reveals searchable trove of Sony Pictures documents

david 12
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Sony was <threatened> with the release of these documents. Since the documents have now been released, the threat is no longer effective. Sony is FREE !

And I guess it wasn't that big a threat in the first place.

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Google: Go ahead, XP stalwarts, keep on using Chrome safely all YEAR

david 12
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outdated vulnerable browser?

You could look at it another way: Google already dropped support for IE8. This was (and is) their way of forcing XP users onto Chrome.

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Rand Paul puts Hillary Clinton's hard drive on sale

david 12
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The author has clearly given enourmous enjoyment to a large number of people, and I commend him for that.

But I ask you, the commentators, was it necessary to include the cheap shot (and false) suggesting that she, or her political staff, were responsible for specifying a hard disk for a new server at her ISP* at the time she took up her state department job?

*Yes, I know that her ISP is an affiliated company. Don't dodge the question.

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Videogame publishers to fans: Oi, freetard! STOP RESURRECTING our dead titles online

david 12
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Well, no.

English copyright was designed as industry support, to benefit businesses forced out of work when the government pulled the plug on the (government dependent) censorship industry.

The censors, who had control of copying/publishing, with good existing government contacts, were in a hole when the government decided to stop requiring censorship. To keep them sweet, the government allowed them to retain the copying/publishing control that they had aquired as part of the censorship control.

Dunno how it developed in other countries, except for places like PNG which adopted it for international trade reasons.

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Microsoft's Project Spartan browser is HERE (unless you build apps or run VMs, that is)

david 12
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Re: Poor compliance with web standards

Non-standard features? You mean like NPAPI? JavaScript? XPCOM?

Or are you thinking of REST? And HTML 3.x?

Both HTML 2 and 3 were based on/derived from/inspired by non-standard extendions -- it was a common idea at the time, standard development using the model that gave us Standard C..

Microsoft, like MOSIAC and Netscape, introduced new features. Some of them stuck: some of them made it into other standards and other browsers.

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david 12
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Poor compliance with web standards

IE was, for many years, the web standard. Compliance was good by definition. You might not like that web standard. Many people didn't, which is why they created new web standards which specifically were different than the existing web standard (IE).

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Australia finds $1 BEELLION to replace No-SQL DATABASE

david 12
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Re: Given IBM's track record...

The [Commission of Inquiry] concluded ... the primary cause of the problems suffered by the Payroll System project was the State’s 'unjustified and grossly negligent conduct'.

Sadly, the government wasn't banned from QLD for gross incompetence and corruption.

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All Mac owners should migrate to OS X Yosemite 10.10.3 ASAP

david 12
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Re: ...you're out of luck.

No, don't try Vista. It doesn't run as well as XP. Try Win7. It runs better than XP.

Personally, do not like Win7 as well as XP, but it runs perfectly OK on those XP boxes that weren't so old that they've already suffered hardware failure of one form or another.

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Microsoft uses Windows Update to force Windows 10 ads onto older PCs

david 12
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Re: Strange

In which case you would have got something more exactly meeting your requirements by turning off the "automatic reboot after update" setting.

Run

gpedit.msc

Go to

Computer configuration| Administrative Templates | Windows Components | Windows Update

Enable

"No auto-restart"

Users who wish to leave auto-restart enabled may still find it useful to change the value of

"Reprompt for restart".

Unless you have users who you wish to force to restart, you might have found the default interval too short.

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LG monitor software quietly kills UAC, dev says

david 12
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>it probably writes data back into its

Fair guess, but given that it's a split-screen video driver, it probably uses admin to modify the "machine" settings..

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david 12
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>It's basically the 'su' feature that Unix has had for decades.

Which is a known and recognised security hole in a system which was created by stripping the multi-user security out of multix.

Anyway, UAC sucks. If I'm not using an account which has the permission to do the action, then all I want or need is a clear fail, not more prompts.

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Netflix fail proves copper NBN leaves Australia utterly 4Ked

david 12
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"dangerously behind"

"dangerously behind" because we can't stream Netflix? That's a risk I'm willing to take.

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Embarcadero’s cross-platform XE8 RAD Studio targets iOS 8, IoT

david 12
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Re: native code compilation in VB

>hey still needed the support of a run-time library

You mean MSVCRT?

Delphi had the advantatage over C that the linker was much smarter, based on the much smarter library architecture, based on the originally different design decisions for C and Pascal.

And I wouldn't agree with the idea that Delphi had only "close to the same levels of performance".Competing compilers from companies like Intel were better than Delphi, they also are and were much better than MSVC and MSVC++.

Modern C compilers have picked some or most of the difference by making the language more Pascal like: C++ was able to go closer to Delphi and Pascal (and FORTRAN) in the compiler and linker design, but it took them a long time to get their, and they've had to do thinks like pseudo byref variables and pseudo keywords to get there.

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Nuclear waste spill: How a pro-organic push sparked $240m blunder

david 12
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Inorganic

For those, like Worstall, who haven't read the report, they are attributing the accident to a transcription error.. Not "someone there who apparently preferentially purchases organically".

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Why Feed.Me.Pizza will never exist: Inside the world of government vetoes and the internet

david 12
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Architect

Architect is a protected designation in many jurisdictions.

I'm not an architect, or a lawyer, or a domain registrar. "Architect" is protected because badly or improperly designed buildings kill people.

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Smart meters are a ‘costly mistake’ that'll add BILLIONS to bills

david 12
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>current mechanical meter

"look into developing a smart app which would convert a photo of their current mechanical meter"

The mechanical meters are due for renewal. They will be replaced with a meter that is easier for meter readers to read, or with a meter that is read automatically (networked), or with a smart meter.

The cheapest option is to replace the meters, as they become due for renewal, with more secure electronic models which are dumb, and not networked, but which have standard meter-reader features.

In this "overseas jurisdiction" (Australia), the cost is borne by the companies, which pass it directly to the users. The governments mandated the most expensive option. The companies wanted option A, the government decided that option B was better, we got option C because once you've gone to B, C looks like a good idea.

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David Cameron's Passport number emailed to footy-head

david 12
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Re: Empty Deleted Items....

Lets not forget, he may not be using Exchange at all. Outlook also connects to other kinds of message stores.

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david 12
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Re: @caffeine addict defaults

The last time you had cause to 'play' with an Excel file that you think you remember was password protected, perhaps it was Excel 2003. Or earlier. And it was probably a protected sheet, workbook or project in a file, not a protected file.

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'If people can encrypt their cell phones, what's stopping them encrypting their PCs?'

david 12
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Windows 2K had some kind of encryption I recall. It was notable as, in common with most consumer-grade encryption at the time, it had, on examiniation, huge gaping holes. In order to allow the Administator to recover data, the encryption key was stored in a recoverable form.

The next version did not store the encryption key in recoverable form, and the Administrator is not able to recover data if the key is lost.

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Satnav launches are like buses: none for ages then three arrive at once

david 12
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Re: Maybe it's better this way...

For reasons I don't understand, Chicago Transit Authority gave up on skip-stop scheduling. I understand that the Nassau Street subway in NYC still operates as two lines, J and Z.

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Timeout, Time Lords: ICANN says there is only one kind of doctor

david 12
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Re: In the UK Medical Doctors aren't Real Doctors!

>The use of "Doctor" for medical professionals is closer to a colloquialism than any other definition,

Accepting your colloguial use of "colloquialism", and your point is? You think medical doctors aren't "real" doctors because of a semantic point?

I take the opposite point of view. Medical Doctors are Real Doctors because they are real doctors. PhDs aren't real doctors because all they have is title pinched from the historical past when the language of instruction wasn't even English.

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david 12
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Re: In the UK Medical Doctors aren't Real Doctors!

In the UK anyone with a PhD is not a real doctor, and only wishes to be called a doctor out of envy. Or (traditionally) so that they can feel justified squeezing into parking spaces that say "Doctors only".

If they actually thought the PhD meant anything, they would be calling themself "John Smith, PhD", instead of trying to pretend that the traditional English qualifier for a medical doctor applied.

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Bank of America wants to shove its IT into an OpenCompute cloud. What could go wrong?

david 12
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Amazon?

Who said anything about Amazon? This has IBM service bureau written all over it.

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FREAKing hell: ALL Windows versions vulnerable to SSL snoop

david 12
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>BTW, why is Firefox the only major browser not affected?

Since "version 33", Firefox has had no support for 512bit keys. This makes FF unsuitable for a small number of specialised web sites, particularly from embedded devices, but also (and this is the reason it was done) makes it impossible to connect to anything using a 512 bit key.

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£280k Kickstarter camera trigger campaign crashes and burns

david 12
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>*For the record, Kamps did not answer the question"

I thought he did. I thought that the answer to that question was very clearly given in the quoted remarks.

I'd be pissed off if I'd lost money in this, and his clear reply wouldn't have made me happy, but it looks like a very clear and specific reply to the question.

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SpaceX lofts two all-electric ion-drive comsats to Clarke orbit

david 12
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>first described by Arthur C. Clarke. ??

Well, I guess "(22,236 mi)" might have first been discussed by Arthur C Clarke, but "35,786 km" was discussed by SF writer Konstantin Tsiolkovsk, and later by Herman Noordung.

Clarkes contributions were:

He wrote in English.

In a popular tech. publication (not science or fiction).

About communications satellites (not space stations or research or gun platforms or anything else).

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