* Posts by david 12

709 posts • joined 6 Jul 2009

Page:

Singapore's PM personally programmed C++ Suduko-solver

david 12
Bronze badge

Yes, but is he a Rhodes scholar, with an excelent economics degree, like the bloke with the bike and the speedos?

0
0

Windows 10 Device Guard: Microsoft's effort to keep malware off PCs

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: As much as an MS fanboi that i am,

No, OSX does not have a similar mechanism. This is a HARDWARE ENFORCED mechanism.

3
3

WikiLeaks reveals searchable trove of Sony Pictures documents

david 12
Bronze badge

Sony was <threatened> with the release of these documents. Since the documents have now been released, the threat is no longer effective. Sony is FREE !

And I guess it wasn't that big a threat in the first place.

0
0

Google: Go ahead, XP stalwarts, keep on using Chrome safely all YEAR

david 12
Bronze badge

outdated vulnerable browser?

You could look at it another way: Google already dropped support for IE8. This was (and is) their way of forcing XP users onto Chrome.

1
0

Rand Paul puts Hillary Clinton's hard drive on sale

david 12
Bronze badge

The author has clearly given enourmous enjoyment to a large number of people, and I commend him for that.

But I ask you, the commentators, was it necessary to include the cheap shot (and false) suggesting that she, or her political staff, were responsible for specifying a hard disk for a new server at her ISP* at the time she took up her state department job?

*Yes, I know that her ISP is an affiliated company. Don't dodge the question.

0
0

Videogame publishers to fans: Oi, freetard! STOP RESURRECTING our dead titles online

david 12
Bronze badge

Well, no.

English copyright was designed as industry support, to benefit businesses forced out of work when the government pulled the plug on the (government dependent) censorship industry.

The censors, who had control of copying/publishing, with good existing government contacts, were in a hole when the government decided to stop requiring censorship. To keep them sweet, the government allowed them to retain the copying/publishing control that they had aquired as part of the censorship control.

Dunno how it developed in other countries, except for places like PNG which adopted it for international trade reasons.

0
0

Microsoft's Project Spartan browser is HERE (unless you build apps or run VMs, that is)

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Poor compliance with web standards

Non-standard features? You mean like NPAPI? JavaScript? XPCOM?

Or are you thinking of REST? And HTML 3.x?

Both HTML 2 and 3 were based on/derived from/inspired by non-standard extendions -- it was a common idea at the time, standard development using the model that gave us Standard C..

Microsoft, like MOSIAC and Netscape, introduced new features. Some of them stuck: some of them made it into other standards and other browsers.

0
0
david 12
Bronze badge

Poor compliance with web standards

IE was, for many years, the web standard. Compliance was good by definition. You might not like that web standard. Many people didn't, which is why they created new web standards which specifically were different than the existing web standard (IE).

2
37

Australia finds $1 BEELLION to replace No-SQL DATABASE

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Given IBM's track record...

The [Commission of Inquiry] concluded ... the primary cause of the problems suffered by the Payroll System project was the State’s 'unjustified and grossly negligent conduct'.

Sadly, the government wasn't banned from QLD for gross incompetence and corruption.

4
0

All Mac owners should migrate to OS X Yosemite 10.10.3 ASAP

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: ...you're out of luck.

No, don't try Vista. It doesn't run as well as XP. Try Win7. It runs better than XP.

Personally, do not like Win7 as well as XP, but it runs perfectly OK on those XP boxes that weren't so old that they've already suffered hardware failure of one form or another.

1
0

Microsoft uses Windows Update to force Windows 10 ads onto older PCs

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Strange

In which case you would have got something more exactly meeting your requirements by turning off the "automatic reboot after update" setting.

Run

gpedit.msc

Go to

Computer configuration| Administrative Templates | Windows Components | Windows Update

Enable

"No auto-restart"

Users who wish to leave auto-restart enabled may still find it useful to change the value of

"Reprompt for restart".

Unless you have users who you wish to force to restart, you might have found the default interval too short.

0
0

LG monitor software quietly kills UAC, dev says

david 12
Bronze badge

>it probably writes data back into its

Fair guess, but given that it's a split-screen video driver, it probably uses admin to modify the "machine" settings..

0
0
david 12
Bronze badge

>It's basically the 'su' feature that Unix has had for decades.

Which is a known and recognised security hole in a system which was created by stripping the multi-user security out of multix.

Anyway, UAC sucks. If I'm not using an account which has the permission to do the action, then all I want or need is a clear fail, not more prompts.

2
3

Netflix fail proves copper NBN leaves Australia utterly 4Ked

david 12
Bronze badge

"dangerously behind"

"dangerously behind" because we can't stream Netflix? That's a risk I'm willing to take.

0
6

Embarcadero’s cross-platform XE8 RAD Studio targets iOS 8, IoT

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: native code compilation in VB

>hey still needed the support of a run-time library

You mean MSVCRT?

Delphi had the advantatage over C that the linker was much smarter, based on the much smarter library architecture, based on the originally different design decisions for C and Pascal.

And I wouldn't agree with the idea that Delphi had only "close to the same levels of performance".Competing compilers from companies like Intel were better than Delphi, they also are and were much better than MSVC and MSVC++.

Modern C compilers have picked some or most of the difference by making the language more Pascal like: C++ was able to go closer to Delphi and Pascal (and FORTRAN) in the compiler and linker design, but it took them a long time to get their, and they've had to do thinks like pseudo byref variables and pseudo keywords to get there.

0
0

Nuclear waste spill: How a pro-organic push sparked $240m blunder

david 12
Bronze badge

Inorganic

For those, like Worstall, who haven't read the report, they are attributing the accident to a transcription error.. Not "someone there who apparently preferentially purchases organically".

3
0

Why Feed.Me.Pizza will never exist: Inside the world of government vetoes and the internet

david 12
Bronze badge

Architect

Architect is a protected designation in many jurisdictions.

I'm not an architect, or a lawyer, or a domain registrar. "Architect" is protected because badly or improperly designed buildings kill people.

0
0

Smart meters are a ‘costly mistake’ that'll add BILLIONS to bills

david 12
Bronze badge

>current mechanical meter

"look into developing a smart app which would convert a photo of their current mechanical meter"

The mechanical meters are due for renewal. They will be replaced with a meter that is easier for meter readers to read, or with a meter that is read automatically (networked), or with a smart meter.

The cheapest option is to replace the meters, as they become due for renewal, with more secure electronic models which are dumb, and not networked, but which have standard meter-reader features.

In this "overseas jurisdiction" (Australia), the cost is borne by the companies, which pass it directly to the users. The governments mandated the most expensive option. The companies wanted option A, the government decided that option B was better, we got option C because once you've gone to B, C looks like a good idea.

0
0

David Cameron's Passport number emailed to footy-head

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Empty Deleted Items....

Lets not forget, he may not be using Exchange at all. Outlook also connects to other kinds of message stores.

0
0
david 12
Bronze badge

Re: @caffeine addict defaults

The last time you had cause to 'play' with an Excel file that you think you remember was password protected, perhaps it was Excel 2003. Or earlier. And it was probably a protected sheet, workbook or project in a file, not a protected file.

0
1

'If people can encrypt their cell phones, what's stopping them encrypting their PCs?'

david 12
Bronze badge

Windows 2K had some kind of encryption I recall. It was notable as, in common with most consumer-grade encryption at the time, it had, on examiniation, huge gaping holes. In order to allow the Administator to recover data, the encryption key was stored in a recoverable form.

The next version did not store the encryption key in recoverable form, and the Administrator is not able to recover data if the key is lost.

0
0

Satnav launches are like buses: none for ages then three arrive at once

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Maybe it's better this way...

For reasons I don't understand, Chicago Transit Authority gave up on skip-stop scheduling. I understand that the Nassau Street subway in NYC still operates as two lines, J and Z.

0
0

Timeout, Time Lords: ICANN says there is only one kind of doctor

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: In the UK Medical Doctors aren't Real Doctors!

>The use of "Doctor" for medical professionals is closer to a colloquialism than any other definition,

Accepting your colloguial use of "colloquialism", and your point is? You think medical doctors aren't "real" doctors because of a semantic point?

I take the opposite point of view. Medical Doctors are Real Doctors because they are real doctors. PhDs aren't real doctors because all they have is title pinched from the historical past when the language of instruction wasn't even English.

0
4
david 12
Bronze badge

Re: In the UK Medical Doctors aren't Real Doctors!

In the UK anyone with a PhD is not a real doctor, and only wishes to be called a doctor out of envy. Or (traditionally) so that they can feel justified squeezing into parking spaces that say "Doctors only".

If they actually thought the PhD meant anything, they would be calling themself "John Smith, PhD", instead of trying to pretend that the traditional English qualifier for a medical doctor applied.

1
17

Bank of America wants to shove its IT into an OpenCompute cloud. What could go wrong?

david 12
Bronze badge

Amazon?

Who said anything about Amazon? This has IBM service bureau written all over it.

0
0

FREAKing hell: ALL Windows versions vulnerable to SSL snoop

david 12
Bronze badge

>BTW, why is Firefox the only major browser not affected?

Since "version 33", Firefox has had no support for 512bit keys. This makes FF unsuitable for a small number of specialised web sites, particularly from embedded devices, but also (and this is the reason it was done) makes it impossible to connect to anything using a 512 bit key.

11
0

£280k Kickstarter camera trigger campaign crashes and burns

david 12
Bronze badge

>*For the record, Kamps did not answer the question"

I thought he did. I thought that the answer to that question was very clearly given in the quoted remarks.

I'd be pissed off if I'd lost money in this, and his clear reply wouldn't have made me happy, but it looks like a very clear and specific reply to the question.

0
0

SpaceX lofts two all-electric ion-drive comsats to Clarke orbit

david 12
Bronze badge

>first described by Arthur C. Clarke. ??

Well, I guess "(22,236 mi)" might have first been discussed by Arthur C Clarke, but "35,786 km" was discussed by SF writer Konstantin Tsiolkovsk, and later by Herman Noordung.

Clarkes contributions were:

He wrote in English.

In a popular tech. publication (not science or fiction).

About communications satellites (not space stations or research or gun platforms or anything else).

3
2

Assemblers were once people: My aunt did it for NASA

david 12
Bronze badge

Not a computer programmer

-- a computer. And my Dad told be that it was not unusual for Engineers to marry their computer.

He would have found "Her" and "Samantha OS" kinda amusing.

But yes, I programmed in machine code. Mid 80's and Turbo Pascal 3 inline machine code.

1
0

OLPC spin-off teases modular 'Infinity' computer

david 12
Bronze badge

... And if more people were like you, and willing to accept that without upgrading the cpu footprint, motherboard, video, memory and hardisk, your memory and video and disk access will still be too slow for Win 7, they would still be making computers like that.

0
0

Visa's tokenisation scheme to debut in Australia

david 12
Bronze badge

useless

Looks like yet another mobile phone payment scheme. Which I have no use for.

What I/we would like is a token scheme for business payments. We have that for transfers, but we don't have that for credit card payments, and numerically, most of our actual payments to suplliers are credit card payments. We don't use our mobile phones to make payments to our suppliers.

0
0

US trade bods: No, your iPhone can't detect CANCER

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Minor slap

Well I don't know if THIS system really works. But particularly in the USA, "really works" is not a defence for unlicensed medical products, so I'd need a cite to believe that this "really didn't work", and I don't see anything in the FTC declaration that makes that claim. I wonder if all the other similar iphone apps have already been withdrawn?

http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/smartphone-apps/iphone-app-scans-for-skin-cancer-20120122-1qctb.html

http://www.businessinsider.com.au/iphone-app-for-detecting-skin-cancer-2014-5

In AUS, there are iphone cancer classification apps sold only to registered medical doctors and advertised in the medical magazines.

0
0

Why IP telephony is about more than just saving money

david 12
Bronze badge

zero downtime

>and oneday when your small company grows a bit and moves

>moves to bigger premises you have zero voice downtime.

We down't get zero downtime from our VOIP system even staying at the same premises.

0
0

NBN Co's HFC build will be DOCSIS 3.1 ready, but use 3.0 only

david 12
Bronze badge

Nodes?

>Arris nominated to provide cable termination and passive equipment.

And then the article quotes Aris on nodes: "Arris CTO Joshau Eum said the nodes for the network will be "shoebox"-sized" and "Key products used in the build will be Arris' E6000 edge router, CORWave forward path transmitters, OM4100 optical receivers"

At the risk of being obvious, nodes and edge routers are not cable termination and passive equipment.

And yes, you were being very foolish if you ever thought that you were ever going to get anything other than a nationalised TV service.

0
0

Apple: Fine, we admit it – MacBook Pros suffer wonky GPU crapness

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: RoHS?

>something to do with using lead-free solder?

Lead-free solder is more difficult to use, but it is possible to make bad joints with any kind of solder, including tin-lead. The failure isn't "because they used silver-solder", it's "because they didn't do the job properly".

And FWIW, my guess would be that the difficulty traced back to no-clean flux, rather than silver-solder.

3
0

Royal Mail's Colossus move gets ex-WREN's stamp of approval

david 12
Bronze badge

WRENs

From the USA one of the WAVEs on related work recalled her induction in Washington DC ("I joined the navy to see the world, but all I saw was DC"), unfortunately I can'd find the reference, so I'm recreating from memory:

"We had a tough introductory talk about security. This was followed by another man, who we expected would give us a warm introduction, perhaps a prayer. Instead, he told us not to expect to be treated differently because we were women: If we talked about our work, we would be shot."

2
0

Superfish: Lenovo ditches adware, but that doesn't fix SSL megavuln – researcher

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: About that root certificate...

I think, and other readers are invited to correct me, that the problem is that all clients have a known, installed, self-signed root CA certificate. If you have an identical copy of the root certificate (something that is normally kept secure, and probably off-line), then you can generate SSL certificates for anything, knowing that they will by accepted by any Lenova client.

So now you can do your own Man-in-the-middle attack on Lenova clients. And this problem is not corrected by removing Superfish, only by removing the well-known root CA certificate.

Question: if this is correct, does Superfish reject (on the internet side) it's own well-known root CA certificate? If so, web browsers on Lenova clients only become insecure when Superfish is deactivatated?

1
0
david 12
Bronze badge

Re: IT IS THE SAME ONE IN ALL CASES??

Yes, I thought the article was particularly unclear about that. Perhaps instead of writing

>Obtaining a private key from one Lenovo laptop would

...the author could have written...

"Obtaining the private key from any Lenovo laptop would "

1
0

Australian government may take leave of its census

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Look before you leap

>Just look to the cancellation of the long-form census in Canada.

No suggestion than the census be cancelled in Aus. No suggestion that it be replaced by a "voluntary household survey". Or by universal internet access.

And as to business requirements... the whole point of the suggestion is that the money could be better spent meeting business requirements by moving from a 5 year cycle to a 3 month cycle.

0
0

Ethernet patents claim smacked down by US judge

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Judge invalidates two expired patents??? (July 1992 + 20 yrs = July 2012)

1992 would be prior to the 1995 fix to the American Patent system, so it would be 17 years from the issue date. Technically, it is possible that the patent wasn't issued until much later (1998 plus?): such patents were called "submarine" patents, because you didn't know the technology was patented until you were torpedoed years later.

No idea if that applied at all here.

0
0

'Revenge p0rn' kingpin Kevin Bollaert faces 20 years in jail

david 12
Bronze badge

identity theft ???

Where did "identity theft" come into it?

1
0

Why Windows 10 on Raspberry Pi 2? Upton: 'I drank the Kool-Aid'

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: When the music died

>"Well, yes I do now, but back then I expected it to be included in the OS

> as it was in every other OS I had encountered thus far. The idea I had to

> get my wallet out again to buy what I assumed was already in their didn't

> occur to me."

It didn't ocour to me either. Fortunately, the free tools MS and others provided allowed me to continue programming as I had before, on a series of main frame, mini, & micro computers.

I take it you didn't actually try very hard: what I can't tell from here is if you even actually owned a copy of Win 3.x and Win 98, or if you are just making it up.

4
1
david 12
Bronze badge

Red Cool-Aid

Rasberry of course.

1
0

Pull up the Windows 10 duvet and pretend Win8 and Vista were BAD DREAMS

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: @ Kubla Cant -- Not too sure

Funny, all the copies of unix around here came with a generic GUI.

Even Linus T doesn't think that unix == the kernel.

2
5

Want a cheap Office-er-riffic tablet? Microsoft Windows takes on Android

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Good for the price

Between Google and MS, it's like deciding who you want to barrack for / root for in the Middle East. But, apart from that:

Google does let Outlook work, without disabling "security". You need to enable "two step verification", register your device on you Gmail account, and save a separate password in Outlook.

and IE probably does let you use other search engines. If it's like any recent version of IE, the search engine registration process is a bit strange, and Google doesn't fully support it outside the USA.

3
0

Remember Corel? It's just entered .DLL hell

david 12
Bronze badge

Interesting how many vulnerabilitie are found in .EXEs

...but this isn't a vulnerability found "in" an EXE or a DLL. This is a "search path vulnerability" which is part of a a DOS / Windows 3 design decision, thoughtlessly replicated to this very day, particularly by cross-platform developers: The decision to put the Application (EXE and DLL) in the same folder as the application Data ( BMP/JPG/DOC/DAT )

Originally, because you wanted, if possible, to put everything on the same floppy disk. Still, if thoughtless, because different platforms have different customs/rules for where user data should go, and where applications should go, and there are still people who just dump averything in together.

The vulnerability descibed her is that "the DLL search path includes the current directory". This was the default case on Windows for many years.

Is this just a description of the way old Windows application software works, or a special case of Corel being worse than everyone else when run on a current version of Windows? Dunno without more details.

0
0

Three expat Brits explain their move to Australia

david 12
Bronze badge

Yes, the casual chauvanism from Aussies can be pretty strong, and often totally unaware. But on the other hand, it's been 30 years since I was in a group that was entirely or even mostly 3rd generation Aussies.

Russion, Polish, Italian, Greek, Vietnamese, Chinese, Slav, English, NZ, Islanders, Filipino, American, Canadian, Turks: Management, professional, or factory floor: if they weren't born overseas, their parents were.

My current workplace has only 1 (one) person with grandparents born in Aus, and 50% of the management positions are filled by people born elsewhere. You could find different, but it's not exceptional.

0
0

Healthcare: Look anywhere you like for answers, just not the US

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: @Tim Worstal

An article on a complex subject, but unfortunately long, discursive, cheap, and poorly assembled. Would have done better at half the length or twice the content. 7 out of 10.

0
3

Page:

Forums