* Posts by david 12

744 posts • joined 6 Jul 2009

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Supreme Court ignores Google's whinging in Java copyright suit

david 12
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Re: Andrew Orlowski article dissing freetards, praising copyrights on APIs soon

Java was, at the time, slow and archaic. As the line went: "All the readability of C, plus the sheer speed of interpreted BASIC". The reason MS's "Java" was a threat was that it was faster and had a better library. Which had an immediate salutary effect on Sun's "Java" development, before they managed to kill the competition, as they have since tried to do with both Google and with the open-source version.

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That shot you heard? SSLv3 is now DEAD

david 12
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Re: Snake Oil, FUD and the security problem known as Web Browser

>there are *NO* server vulnerabilities visible in the SSL Labs Scan.

When I go to that link, it tells me that --

"This server supports SSL 2, which is obsolete and insecure. Grade set to F. "

Along with a string of other grade B and grade C failures.

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MAC address privacy inches towards standardisation

david 12
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"Little thought was given to the risk that the MAC address"

Actually, enormous thought was wasted in the 90's on the risk to privacy and security due to MAC addresses. Like the silly decision to prevent Intel putting ID's into processor (since ignored by every European company selling into the utilities market), MAC's were the victim of a stupid smear campaign that ignored their utility, causing MS to hide them from programs in Win98, requiring you to use a stupid and inconvenient kludge to get the information.

It is still the case that certain tasks, (like sending out broadcast packets on specific adapters on multi-adapter machines) are needlessly complex, and the ignorant "privacy" concerns of the 1990's are one of the reasons.

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Fujitsu shrinks SMB file transfer metadata traffic jams

david 12
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Re: Which version of SMB did they do this on ("and other SMB protocol use")?

Enterprise sites I worked on had remote file servers for all the working stiffs: only management and their PA's had the privilige of working with local file servers. And not at all surprised that some of them would be working with early versions of SAMBA.

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Australia's Senate demands access to NBN business case that doesn't exist

david 12
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Melton

Have you been to Melton? "The Plain is characterised by vast open areas of fertile plain covered with grasslands and grassy woodlands,"

Yes, costings based on Melton are non-representative. Because, (go and have a look), Melton is non-representative.

Melton was (and is) a good place to do base-line costs. New. open, uniform: you can see what the costs are, and were the money is going. Not like real life, which is full of exceptions.

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Firefox preps processor revamp under Project Electrolysis

david 12
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Or, as MS said about IE8 in 2009: "LCIE is a collection of internal architecture changes to Internet Explorer that improve the reliability, performance, and scalability of the browser. It also paves the way for future improvements in other areas, including security and usability."

IE6, of course, was designed on a different UI model. Each tab, displayed on the tab bar at the bottom of your screen, was a different process.

IE7, introduced in 2006, followed the more natural MS Windows model demonstrated by FF, and put the tabs at the top of the application window, where Bill Gates and Nature intended them to be. But they followed the FF example of putting all the tabs into one process. They fixed that in 2009, which was 6 years ago.

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Why did Snowden swipe 900k+ US DoD files? (Or so Uncle Sam claims)

david 12
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"Secret" == "Not very import, interesting, or secret at all"

Secret is the default value for almost everything other than press releases. Material that would, in industry, be called "confidential" or "None of your business" or "Why are you snooping on my desk?" is "secret" in the DoD.

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Vic Govt security standards to launch next month

david 12
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Bureaucrats can check out the standards on the Vic commissioner's website

Bureaucrats /will be able to/ check out the standards on the Vic commissioner's website /when they are released next month/

Perhaps theregister will check in again and tell us when that happens.

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Holy SSH-it! Microsoft promises secure logins for Windows PowerShell

david 12
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finally

>allowing people to log into Windows systems and use software

>remotely over an encrypted connection.

RDC, using RDP 5.2 with TLS (Windows server 2003)?

or

SecurePipes, the older method of logging into a Windows system and using software remotely?

SSH has long been a strange omission. Still, only a MS marketing drone would pretend that there were no earlier alternatives.

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david 12
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Re: troll troll troll

>Yes, but plug a USB stick in, where does it get mounted? On a drive letter,

That is the default, although you can, of course, turn that off, and set it to automount inside a folder

>and one for hotplugged devices

That is the default, although you can, of course, turn that off, and set it to automount inside a folder

Sometimes I think that some people think that knowing about Linux gives them some special insight into how Windows works.

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'I thought we were pals!' Belgium, Netherlands demand answers from Germany in spy bust-up

david 12
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Re: typical

..Of course you spy on your friends. You already know what your enemies think of you...

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Get off the phone!! Seven out of ten US drivers put theirs and your lives at risk

david 12
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Re: Synchro-boxes, disk brakes and isolated interiors are to blame

Which reminds me that on the old car, you didn't take your hand off the wheel to text or eat, because without power steering, it took both arms to drive the thing.

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david 12
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But technically....

"A University of Utah driving simulator study

found drivers using cell phones had

slower reaction times than drivers impaired by

alcohol at a .08 blood alcohol concentration,

the legal intoxication limit."

In other words, using a cell phone for 5 minutes while driving is as dangerous as being drunk for 5 minutes while driving.

I'm not in favour of the death penalty for murder, much less for being a pedestrian sharing a road with a car, but this is slightly dishonest. Drunk drivers are not drunk only for short intervals and otherwise sober. The numbers do not support the claim that testing/calling/using your hands is "as dangerous as" being a drunk driver, because drunk drivers are drunk continously.

I wait for the day when we see an actual meaningful comparison of drunk driving and testing, because that also would be interesting

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Land Rover's return: Last orders and leather seats for Defender nerds

david 12
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Series II

That's what it said on the compliance plate.

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World loses John Nash, the 'Beautiful Mind'

david 12
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Medication

Chlorpromazine was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1954, but he wasn't released from hosptial until 1970? Was he getting any treatement? In 1961 Thomas Szasz argued that psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia do not exist. -- was John Nash a victim of that dead end?

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So why the hell do we bail banks out?

david 12
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Re: What was there being done that was actually criminal? @ Tom 13

>may have been misguided, may not have understood the long-term implications, but weren't crimina

Criminally stupid? The reason that Aus didn't get caught in this trap is that it got in early. Deregulation, and low-start loans to people who couldn't afford them, in the hope and expectation that the rising tide of the economy would pull them out of debt.

But Aus had the good fortune to make those two mistakes consecutively, not simultanously. .Small number of legit loans to people who couldn't afford them, small number of dishonest loans to people they could con money out of.

The USA had that example right in front! They could see what happened with deregulation! They could see what happened with low-start loans! So they went ahead and made both mistakes, and at the same time! They got large numbers of dishonest loans to people with no money!

That's not just ignorant. That's not just stupid.

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david 12
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Re: Maybe another reason?

>If we make the banks small-enough-to-fail we don't have to bail them out

>for the damage a failure could do to the overall system.

This was not the first failure of the American banking system. See (just one example), the "savings and loans crisis". In which the sector was to big to fail. Which is what you get if the sector is made up of a 1000 failing banks, or if the same sector is made up of 3 failing banks.

The banking system is a public utility like water or roads. In Aus, left-side governments started banks because they thought that public utilities should be in public hands. Then left-side governements ran their banks (eg State Bank of Victoria) into failure, and they had to be bailed out.

Simple ideas like Government owned banks, or more-smaller-banks, have already been tried. Whatever their advantages, they have been proven to be not solutions to the public-utility-requiring-bailout problem.

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Sorry, Windows 10 early adopters: Microsoft Edge WON'T block ads at launch

david 12
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Yes, I use tortuise svn. We also use IE.

No, we don't use tortoise as a custom protocol handler: We render svn: in the browser.

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david 12
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Goodbye to my SVN:// protocol

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Why Joe Hockey's Oz tax proposals only get five out of 10

david 12
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USA CGT, Tax treaties

The standard Capital Gains Tax rate in the USA is 15%. And it is forgiven at death. No, you don't even have to balance it out or do anything complex. But you don't have to wait until then -- you can also wipe out the CGT by converting the asset to a pension. Or if your income falls low enough so that you need the money, you can just sell out -- CGT doesn't apply if you aren't paying income tax.

Or any of a score of other lurks. There are a thousand different taxes in the USA, and a thousand different exemptions to match.

Tax treaties are worked out to be reciprocal. It's not going to break anything to have carve-outs for income that is not taxed in any country. It may, in some cases, not even require changes to tax treaties. In other cases, well, this is a G20 international agreement, and like he said, tax treaties are being continously re-negotiated.

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Australian Labor Party toys with a return to fibre, sometime, somewhere

david 12
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Think of the children!

They're still going with their original marketing:

"we will provide health services in the future ... we deliver a world class education to our kids ... we build a strong and growing economy"

This was the model sold by the big ISP's and in particular Optus. It doesn't say anything about Netflix.

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'Rombertik' malware kills host computers if you attempt a cure

david 12
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Re: "spreads through an executable screensaver disguised as an Adobe PDF file"

Right. Let us SHOW THE FILENAME, and also NOT USE THE FILENAME, so that the filename that is shown does not tell us if the file is executable. wtf?

Wait, I've go more! How about marking downloaded applications as untrusted, so that the don't run at all, in any area, telling people that they can't and why?

Um, you knew that screensavers are applications didn't you?

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Macroviruses are BACK and are the future of malware, says Microsoft

david 12
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Re: Sandboxing

The overwhelming majority of the VBA code I've developed integrates seperate database, spreadsheet and word documents. Often (always) using the file system to read and write files, plus the "print system" the "email system" and occasionally main-frame database interfaces.

Sandbox mode does allow small marcros to run harmlessly. Using current software, anything you download is sandboxed, and also marked as untrusted.

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Welcome, stranger: Inside Microsoft's command line shell

david 12
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Just looking for a little Active Directory administration. How do I do it? Oh, here are some examples: In powershell I do it using exactly the same ADO objects I've been using for the last 15 years.

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david 12
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Just looking for a little Active Directory administration. How do I do it? Oh, here are some examples: In powershell I do it using exactly the same ADO objects I've been using for the last 10-15 years.

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david 12
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all you'd end up with was an unusable chunk of text.'

>After typing out an incredibly long command and realising there was an extra letter at the very beginning, all you'd end up with was an unusable chunk of text.'

except it wasn't actually like that. You just backspace through it, delete the character, then replay the characters.

If you had altready attempted the command, you just use the correct Fn key to replay the very long command, then backspace through it

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david 12
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Re: Not dead yet

>seems to be some rule that any new feature has to be invoked by obscure metacharacters.

Not the legacy of the original feeble MS-DOS parser -- it's the legacy of ALGOL, as also seen in powershell, combined with legacy of people who are single-finger typists.

Some people like FORTRAN and COBOL because they can type. Some people like obscure metacharacters because they can't.

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david 12
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Re: re: Windows XP was the first PC operating system to drop the MS-DOS

Also, I think he messed up about Windows ME ??? - one of the great complaints about it was that it wasn't possible to just "boot into a pure MS-DOS prompt by pressing the right start-up bypass keys", because they had removed that feature ???

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david 12
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Fn keys were available from DOS 1 and later. Giving you, well, very very basic command line completion.

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david 12
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Re: paths

Yes, PCDOS 1.x was primarily a floppy disk system, and it always ran programs off the current floppy disk, and did not require a path to do so. When it morphed into something completely different, this started to be a problem.

no, it did not require a path, and dot was never an element of the path. It did become common to put things like root or dot dot into the path, and the order of the path was commonly set for optimum speed, because, until very late in the piece, MSDOS did not cache the file listing, and even on Hard Disks, a path search could be noticeably slow.

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david 12
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Re: the constraint was "you haven't got a text editor"

Edlin was a Line Editor. Which was still a well-known kind of thing in the world when PC DOS was first introduced.

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david 12
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Re: Obscure knowledge got me a job ....

Real programmers use

copy con program.exe

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david 12
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Re: Pipes

For those too young to remember, I'd just like to clarify that you could "see the results before the first one finished". That was not the problem.

The problem was that MS-DOS would only run one program at a time. The "second one" wouldn't start until the 'first one' finished, even though "the results" were ready and available.

And yes, it was possible to work around this limitation of programs run by DOS, but it was a work-around, not a natural part of the system.

Just like (while I'm here), DOS 3.x did support "partitions larger than 32 MB", through resident driver chaining, and from DOS 2.x supported large disks through installable block devices drivers.

Unlike the native support for command line editing and recall, using the Fn keys, which was a natural part of the system, not some little-remembered work-around

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DDoSsers use reflection amplification to crank up the volume to 100Gbps+

david 12
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Re: Prison time will do them good

>Serious prison time and high fines should help educate those who initiate DDoS attacks.

But are unlikely to do so.

Based on centuries of experience, plus decades of peer-reviewed studies, "policing" has an "educational" impact. Punishment, not so much.

Which is why your child is not stuck in a corner with a "dunce" cap and sign when he/she makes a spelling mistake.

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So how should we tax these BASTARD COMPANIES, then?

david 12
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"well, let's only tax profits above the normal rate of profits."

Implemented here in AUS in something that was (past tense) called "the mining tax", since rescinded. What the 'ivory tower big government academics' had failed to appreciate was that government and mining valued the speculative profits at different rates: in mining, profit is not a fungible good.

The mining industry sells to their investors the high-risk chance of speculative profits. That is their market proposition. They make a profit in that market.

In contrast, the government valued "profits above the normal rate of profits" on the same scale as "normal profits"

The effect was that the value to government was much less than the value lost by the mining companies. That was an unsustainable situation.

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Singapore's PM personally programmed C++ Suduko-solver

david 12
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Yes, but is he a Rhodes scholar, with an excelent economics degree, like the bloke with the bike and the speedos?

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Windows 10 Device Guard: Microsoft's effort to keep malware off PCs

david 12
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Re: As much as an MS fanboi that i am,

No, OSX does not have a similar mechanism. This is a HARDWARE ENFORCED mechanism.

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WikiLeaks reveals searchable trove of Sony Pictures documents

david 12
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Sony was <threatened> with the release of these documents. Since the documents have now been released, the threat is no longer effective. Sony is FREE !

And I guess it wasn't that big a threat in the first place.

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Google: Go ahead, XP stalwarts, keep on using Chrome safely all YEAR

david 12
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outdated vulnerable browser?

You could look at it another way: Google already dropped support for IE8. This was (and is) their way of forcing XP users onto Chrome.

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Rand Paul puts Hillary Clinton's hard drive on sale

david 12
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The author has clearly given enourmous enjoyment to a large number of people, and I commend him for that.

But I ask you, the commentators, was it necessary to include the cheap shot (and false) suggesting that she, or her political staff, were responsible for specifying a hard disk for a new server at her ISP* at the time she took up her state department job?

*Yes, I know that her ISP is an affiliated company. Don't dodge the question.

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Videogame publishers to fans: Oi, freetard! STOP RESURRECTING our dead titles online

david 12
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Well, no.

English copyright was designed as industry support, to benefit businesses forced out of work when the government pulled the plug on the (government dependent) censorship industry.

The censors, who had control of copying/publishing, with good existing government contacts, were in a hole when the government decided to stop requiring censorship. To keep them sweet, the government allowed them to retain the copying/publishing control that they had aquired as part of the censorship control.

Dunno how it developed in other countries, except for places like PNG which adopted it for international trade reasons.

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Microsoft's Project Spartan browser is HERE (unless you build apps or run VMs, that is)

david 12
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Re: Poor compliance with web standards

Non-standard features? You mean like NPAPI? JavaScript? XPCOM?

Or are you thinking of REST? And HTML 3.x?

Both HTML 2 and 3 were based on/derived from/inspired by non-standard extendions -- it was a common idea at the time, standard development using the model that gave us Standard C..

Microsoft, like MOSIAC and Netscape, introduced new features. Some of them stuck: some of them made it into other standards and other browsers.

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Australia finds $1 BEELLION to replace No-SQL DATABASE

david 12
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Re: Given IBM's track record...

The [Commission of Inquiry] concluded ... the primary cause of the problems suffered by the Payroll System project was the State’s 'unjustified and grossly negligent conduct'.

Sadly, the government wasn't banned from QLD for gross incompetence and corruption.

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All Mac owners should migrate to OS X Yosemite 10.10.3 ASAP

david 12
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Re: ...you're out of luck.

No, don't try Vista. It doesn't run as well as XP. Try Win7. It runs better than XP.

Personally, do not like Win7 as well as XP, but it runs perfectly OK on those XP boxes that weren't so old that they've already suffered hardware failure of one form or another.

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Microsoft uses Windows Update to force Windows 10 ads onto older PCs

david 12
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Re: Strange

In which case you would have got something more exactly meeting your requirements by turning off the "automatic reboot after update" setting.

Run

gpedit.msc

Go to

Computer configuration| Administrative Templates | Windows Components | Windows Update

Enable

"No auto-restart"

Users who wish to leave auto-restart enabled may still find it useful to change the value of

"Reprompt for restart".

Unless you have users who you wish to force to restart, you might have found the default interval too short.

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LG monitor software quietly kills UAC, dev says

david 12
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>it probably writes data back into its

Fair guess, but given that it's a split-screen video driver, it probably uses admin to modify the "machine" settings..

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david 12
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>It's basically the 'su' feature that Unix has had for decades.

Which is a known and recognised security hole in a system which was created by stripping the multi-user security out of multix.

Anyway, UAC sucks. If I'm not using an account which has the permission to do the action, then all I want or need is a clear fail, not more prompts.

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Netflix fail proves copper NBN leaves Australia utterly 4Ked

david 12
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"dangerously behind"

"dangerously behind" because we can't stream Netflix? That's a risk I'm willing to take.

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Embarcadero’s cross-platform XE8 RAD Studio targets iOS 8, IoT

david 12
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Re: native code compilation in VB

>hey still needed the support of a run-time library

You mean MSVCRT?

Delphi had the advantatage over C that the linker was much smarter, based on the much smarter library architecture, based on the originally different design decisions for C and Pascal.

And I wouldn't agree with the idea that Delphi had only "close to the same levels of performance".Competing compilers from companies like Intel were better than Delphi, they also are and were much better than MSVC and MSVC++.

Modern C compilers have picked some or most of the difference by making the language more Pascal like: C++ was able to go closer to Delphi and Pascal (and FORTRAN) in the compiler and linker design, but it took them a long time to get their, and they've had to do thinks like pseudo byref variables and pseudo keywords to get there.

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