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* Posts by JetSetJim

665 posts • joined 4 Jul 2009

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Like iPads? Like stuff called AIR? Here's our REVIEW ROUNDUP-squared

JetSetJim
Happy

Re: Quote.... It's just an iPad, FFS

> You could say this of anything - my washing machine still washes clothes, my fridge still keeps beer cold etc. - it is probably a lot more efficient and had other 'under the hood' changes but essentially it does the same job.

...and your car may still get 20mpg, just like the 1908 Model T Ford :-)

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Dead Steve Jobs' Apple donut SPACESHIP HQ gets permission to land

JetSetJim

Re: where do you park?

There will be underground parking for a large swathe of senior cultists, and nearby surface parking for the multitude of lowly acolytes, apparently. There's a link to a Jobs PPT (in PDF) here that shows the offsite parking. I think you have to get at the proper building plans to see the underground parking (I've seen them, but can't find them again, this PDF refers to 2,300 basement parking spots, but with no pics)

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Can you trust 'NSA-proof' TrueCrypt? Cough up some dough and find out

JetSetJim
Black Helicopters

Re: Honey Pot

Perhaps they might also pretend to do a very public "audit" of the code - with the added bonus that the members of the public are conned into paying for it....

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Look out, Gartner: Behold the El Reg all-Flash Quadragon™ wonder map-o-graphic

JetSetJim

Complete failure

Everyone knows that any decent scatter chart should be segmented into a 3x3 array, nowadays, so you can easily filter the "middle-of-the-pack" out.

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DEAD STEVE JOBS kills Apple bounce patent from BEYOND THE GRAVE

JetSetJim
Boffin

Re: Regardless of the merits of the Apple patent

According to a Patent Attorney acquaintance, it gets better than this. He could have demo'd the phone, making no reference whatsoever to the bouncy-bounce-back action, not even showing it, and it would still count as prior art if it could be proved that it was in the software load of the phone he demo'd.

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Ericsson adds Dot to the office mobe coverage map

JetSetJim

Re: Dot vs Lightradio

Plus you seem to need to lay fibre to connect up the "digital unit" with the "indoor radio unit". The Dot just seems to be a remote radio head. Additionally, ALU offer an ethernet based indoor small cell, too.

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Boffins have constructed a new LIGHT SABRE. Their skills are complete

JetSetJim

Re: Crystals made of light...

More like gates on the end of footballers driveways for the ultimate bling

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Ministry of Sound sues Spotify over user playlists

JetSetJim

Re: Do they mix?

Spotify needs to release a plugin called "auto-mix" to do the job for any playlist to really wind MoS up. It's not hard, a quick frequency analysis to get the bpm of neighbouring tracks, and then a simple calculation to get the relative playing speeds. Ramp them in/out and Bob's your uncle. Might sound a bit s*it compared to a professional DJ who knows the intro/outro sequences a bit better, but an easy first cut. You could even have tunable lengths for mixing in/out for each track.

There was some fella on Dragons Den a while back who claimed to have patented the above, effectively, but I had my doubts about the value of that when he presented it as it's just some moderately simple maths.

I've often wondered about making something like this to ensure I get tunes to a beat I can run to.

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Eggheads turn Motorola feature phone into CITYWIDE GSM jammer

JetSetJim
Thumb Up

Hmm...

In GSM, you are not actually known to the BSC, you're known to the logical grouping of cells known as a "Location Area" (LA), which will comprise a number of cells (typically all connected to one BSC).

So, before you attack a specific mobile, you have to know at least which LA it is in.

TMSI's change each time the mobile changes LA, and may also change if the mobile does what is called a "periodic location update" (which is not triggered by movement) so this attack isn't that long-lasting.

The attack relies on the attacker responding to the paging message faster than the mobile does. In practical terms, this means locating yourself at an "earlier" base station within the location area, as the BSC will typically clunk through BTS's in the LA one at a time - but the differences are in the milliseconds, so you may be at the mercy of the speed of being able to get radio resources to send your paging response. It's certainly possible, but I doubt it's that reliable.

The article claims the hijack is not detectable, but I'd argue that's not true - the MSC will receive multiple paging responses, therefore a trivial modification is required to detect this in software (and indeed may already be implemented in some vendor equipment for all I know). In addition, the network KPI's on call termination success rate would plunge through the floor (for the "global" attack, anyway) and alarm bells that "something" is happening would be ringing within 30 mins. It would take longer to diagnose, I admit, but it is diagnostically possible to work out that this is happening by examining traces from the BSC.

I'd agree that it's possible to hijack a session in networks where the authentication/ciphering are not implemented, although their claim "an attacker can fully impersonate the victim after cracking the session key Kc" seems a bit brief (perhaps it's feasible, I don't know).

The "Detach" attack is clever, I admit.

The standards changes they propose are unlikely to be implemented - the s/w stack for GSM (and UMTS) is so old, there would be too many different devices that would need their firmware re-flashing. Not economical to do.

Overall, a good bit of fun and potentially a headache for an operator. Buy the phones with cash and your attack can be suitably anonymised, too.

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Firefox takes top marks in browser stability tests

JetSetJim
Thumb Up

Re: Firefox

Indeed, I'm already on FF 23.0.1, so their tests are out of date

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Bureaucrats foil Nestlé's bid to TRADEMARK KitKat's chocolatey digits

JetSetJim

Indeed, on reading the article I fondly remembered memories of the almost identical Norwegian choccy:

Kvikk Lunsj.

Delving into the history, only a couple of years separate their inception (yes the Kit Kat is earlier), but they've both been knocking around for nigh on 80 years, and Freia is now owned by Kraft Foods.

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Elon Musk unveils Hyperloop – the subsonic tube of tomorrow

JetSetJim
Holmes

Re: "The SF to LA route alone would cost only $6bn to build"

The Hoover Dam?

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JetSetJim
Thumb Up

Re: Yeah, good luck.

The Shanghai MagLev train is indeed cool, and wondrously easy to use as a transfer into the city. Use it before it falls over due to shoddy construction techniques - IIRC, there have been a few articles in recent years on the concrete supports not being of the highest build quality.

Apparently they've also extended the metro out to the airport, too, which is a goodly amount cheaper to use (10RMB/£1 rather than 50RMB/£5). The ticket machines can also operate in English, so also rather easy to use (provided you know where you're going).

Either way is a lot more relaxing than the roller-coaster ride of the local taxi drivers. Beware landing around 11pm at Pudong, it's end of shift time and some of the drivers struggle to stay awake while driving....

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Two more counties to get gov-funded bumpkin broadband from... guess?

JetSetJim
Black Helicopters

Re: The telco giant will spend £11m in Oxfordshire

Yeah, but the PM's constituency wasn't there until recently.

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Scalpers gouge China's fanbois for Genius Bar appointments

JetSetJim

Re: easy one to stop

or even just link it to an (unchangeable) iTunes account that has a device attached to it - a no show then blacklists the account.

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Mozilla ponders blinkers for your browser

JetSetJim
Thumb Up

Re: @JetSetJim

That's the one - ta, it was bugging me

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JetSetJim

Done properly, it might actually be quite good. I recall reading a science fiction book ages ago which mentioned something similar - the subscribers "news service" gave them stories about topics they were interested in and a smattering of other stuff that they might be interested in, rather than present them with everything.

Strange as it may seem, the Daily Mail might be a good place to implement it as their stories can easily be categorised/tagged:

Kardashian clan

Royal Baby (admittedly only recently)

Various celebs being "brave" by not putting on makeup

Nature photography (usually excellent, btw)

Immigration

Helen Flannagan's boobies

...

Couple it with the ability to "downvote" topics so that as they keep getting presented to you, you can make it less likely that this topic is presented to you again.

At least in this way the targeting is giving me something I want. With ads I never want to click on any of them, irrespective of the targeting (which is why I use Ad-Block & Ghostery).

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PHWOAR! Huh! What is it good for? Absolutely nothing, Prime Minister

JetSetJim
Paris Hilton

Watershed

"A surprising number of parents simply assume the internet is already filtered, just like the TV has a watershed, and their children are wandering unprotected on an open network parts of which are really quite unpleasant."

So why not apply this filter in the same way as it is on the telly - i.e. turn it on before 9pm, off afterwards (until some arbitrary time in the dead of night)?

Personally, I'd prefer the control to reside in the devices, rather than in the network, but then I'm literate enough to police my kids network connectivity.

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Only 1 in 5 Americans believe in pure evolution – and that's an upswing

JetSetJim
Stop

Re: "and a full 37 percent dismiss human evolution entirely"

I'm sure they have morals, (as an aside, they seem to have plenty of morale, too), but their "good" metrics are not the same as ours.

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Legal eagles pit Apple v. Samsung in thievery test

JetSetJim

Re: This should be done by the networks

There is an EU-wide equipment register for stolen phones - so they have to ship it a bit further afield. Only problem is that this register is not propagated to a wider number of countries.

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Google loses Latitude in Maps app shake-up

JetSetJim
Thumb Up

Re: Oh my god... They killed Kenny!

Glympse

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JetSetJim

Re: Android will become a poor choice soon enough

Try Glympse - it's not "always on", but a nifty "here's where I am for the next X mins/hours" to anyone you select from your address book (phone/email)

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Inventor lobs spherical, throwable camera

JetSetJim

Re: Not new though

Here's some prior art:

http://jonaspfeil.de/ballcamera

http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2012/11/throwable-bouncing-sensors-scope-out-dangerous-situations/

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Snowden: US and Israel did create Stuxnet attack code

JetSetJim
Black Helicopters

Re: "most trusted services in the world if they actually desire to do so."

Uh-oh, Swindon now becomes a target for US drone strikes:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/wiltshire/content/images/2007/10/22/msn_magic_roundabout_470x350.jpg

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Run for your (private) lives! Facebook's creepy Graph Search is upon us

JetSetJim
Coat

Optional

> Just look at how many kids under the age of 13 are actively using Facebook with or without their parents' permission

Will Graph search tell us this?

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Health minister asks elderly patients what they think of data-sharing

JetSetJim
Meh

Bah

Apart from the obvious problems with successive govmts wanting to expand the scope of where they can get money from this mine of information, I've no personal objection to my suitably anonymised medical information being used by private organisations to further proper medical research on the proviso that the info isn't sold like a second hand car, but licensed, and the license terms include some nice (and enforceable) words about derivative medicines/treatments get given back to the NHS (or even the world in general) on very favourable terms (which would need some clever wording to ensure companies can't wriggle out of it, too) .

The govmts track record of making such deals is a bit poor, though, so I have no confidence such a deal would be brokered. It is more likely to be the companies making the govmt pay for the database, then give it to them for free with no strings attached - personal data and all.

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Investors: Oh Samsung. You need to smash those records HARDER

JetSetJim

Re: Curiosity...

I know it's a bit Apples (couldn't resist) and oranges, I was just trying to get a measure of whether the unwashed masses would judge Sammy to be a good corporate citizen, or a tax avoiding git. I'm sure Sammy have ample opportunity to play within the rules to manage their tax bills best if they wanted to, I just have no information is all.

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JetSetJim

Curiosity...

Just curious, but I wonder how much corporation tax Sammy pays - it would be nice to put it into context with the Apple/Google/Amazon crowd.

And what sort of cash pile must they be sitting on by now?

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At last: EU slashes mobile roaming fees

JetSetJim

Re: T-Moblie

The price is set in Euros, so I'm guessing the small differences are fluctuation in currency rates (€ has been between 1.14 and 1.19 per £ for the last few months). The article says 38p/MB and my text says 45.9p/MB. The BEEB coverage says "45 euro cents per megabyte or about 38.5p, plus VAT." I'm assuming my TXTed rate includes VAT

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Our week with Soylent: Don't chuck out your vintage food quite yet

JetSetJim
Pint

Re: Maybe...

Urban myth has it that you can achieve the same with just Guinness and cheese

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All major UK ISPs prepping network-level porn 'n' violence filters

JetSetJim

Re: @ chris n

Anything on the Daily Mail or Fox News, for starters. In fact, I'd rather my 6-yo didn't go to either of those sites to start with :)

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JetSetJim

Re: So in the house with two adults and Junior

Heartily agree - it would be nice if we could set the DNS entries on a user-account basis in whichever OS we were using, though. Obviously the more technically aware kids can get around this, but it would be a good start for the little 'uns (and mine have to use the computer in a public space in the house so supervision can take place).

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Internet pioneer Vint Cerf predicts the future, fears Word-DOCALYPSE

JetSetJim

Re: Vint says:-

Looks lovely - now get MS to write one :)

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JetSetJim

Re: Vint says:-

It would be nice/useful if Microsoft provided a function within each Office application to "update all files in selected folder to the latest release of the application", with a tickbox for searching sub-folders and a tickbox for preserving the old document.

I'm sure there are a lot of ways this can break - e.g. I seem to recall that the implementation of pivot tables in Excel changed in moving to Office 2003, so it might be nice to know about this sort of thing...

Perhaps a first pass to do a scan to see which documents are there, which have simple conversions and which will break. Then for the ones that break, a dialogue that walks you through what you will lose if the conversion process continues, allowing you to decide if you want to convert or not.

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Unemployed? Ugly? Ugh, no thanks, says fitties-only job website

JetSetJim
Thumb Down

Re: I am a munter

Ms Vorderman lost all credibility with me when she started touting for the "consolidate all your loans into one, just with a much larger overall loan-cost".

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'Google IS a capitalist country... er, company'

JetSetJim

Re: Long intro statements

They don't need to do that - it would be easier to randomise each list for each individual call - to the hierarchy would stay the same, just the number combinations to transit to a "leaf-node" would be different each time. And, at random points, you should be asked to enter your account number with the keypad, too.

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JetSetJim

PleasePress1

This fella could perhaps merge his database with the stuff from http://www.saynoto0870.com/ ?

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Microsoft reveals Xbox One, the console that can read your heartbeat

JetSetJim
Coat

Re: Sir

I, for one, am excited about this gesture control of which they speak. I assume that the "spread" move requires one to take the Goatse stance?

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If you've bought DRM'd film files from Acetrax, here's the bad news

JetSetJim

Re: illegal download sites

As I was told, if you sign a DD mandate and give it back to the supplier to present to the bank, you have effectively lost all your ability to cancel it as they can merely re-supply it to the bank to get your money. Seems weird as you'd've though that there'd be an expiry mechanism there (isn't there one for cheques?).

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JetSetJim

Downloading vs uploading

Perhaps this is why they've only been going after folks based on them uploading content - i.e. distributing it, which they don't have a license for.

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So you want to be a contractor? Well, here's how it works

JetSetJim

Re: What about being a sole trader?

The NI bill as a sole trader knocks 9% off your take, plus you get into a situation where you pay your income tax on a window that covers the last 6 months earnings, plus HMRCs prediction of your next 6-months earnings.

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JetSetJim

Re: What about being a sole trader?

Personal liability, as I understand it. Imagine making a coding error that costs the company that hires you £200,000. They can claim that off you personally if you are a sole trader, or off your company if you are in a Ltd Co.

I'm sure there are insurances to be had in either circumstances.

Also, it may expose the hiring company to IR35 investigations, too. When I did a stint in contracting, it seemed the norm for a couple of tiers of separation between my Ltd company and the hiring company.

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Mobile tech destroys the case for the HS2 £multi-beellion train set

JetSetJim

Indeed, most UMTS networks are not built for use at high speeds (HS2 is alleged to be due to rumble along at a clippy 250mph). You might just be able to hang on to a 144kbps connection if you're lucky, but there are going to need to be some funky long-lobed directional antenna deployments to minimise the handover rates.

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Rolls-Royce climbs aboard Bloodhound SUPERSONIC car

JetSetJim

Re: Want One

I was at a Thrust SSC presentation a while back, with Noble & Green, and they were asked a "what it something goes wrong?" type question.

The answer was rather simple - lift the tail up an inch or two (or whatever) and then wet your pants while the car slows down. What lifting the tail does is basically keep it on the ground. They basically reckon that if the car goes airborne, then Mr Green becomes strawberry jam when it comes back down. So they lift the tail while he tries to keep it going in a straight line. I imagine parachutes would be deployed to try and slow down a bit quicker, too, as the brakes aren't that useful at 700mph.

It was a fascinating presentation, though.

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EU wants the Swiss and pals to cough up IT giants' hidden bank info

JetSetJim

> Taxation does NOT create jobs Mr. Politician

Indeed it doesn't, but every govmt wants to tax what people spend every which way, so when those nasty multi-nationals use loopholes to funnel cash out of a country without paying tax, it denies them that segment of tax revenue that could have been collected if the company providing that service wholly operated within the UK. This diminishes the Treasury's revenue, and makes the defence, NHS and welfare bills add up to more than the govmts receipts if this isn't fixed.

The question is, how should govmt be funded? And what should be funded? I'm sure we can all find little (and large) projects that are white elephants, plus examples of wasteful expenditure - but that's not the issue. How does the govmt fund what it is supposed to be doing? The answer is taxation - both on income for the proletariat, and profits for corporations. It's hard for the proletariat to hide their income, but large corporations can easily funnel stuff elsewhere - therefore reducing the "take" for the govmt, and requiring either increased general taxation for those that can't avoid (or "plan") it, or reducing services (or a mix of both). Or they could borrow squillions of quid to let our children fix it.

In short, the system is broken and needs sorting. Yes, the internet is a great inter-country leveller, making it easy for a business to set up shop in a low tax area while selling into a high tax area, so they either need to unify tax systems to level out the global tax demands, or make the transfer of cash between countries for business purposes a taxable thing (somehow, which I appreciate will tread on toes all over the place).

Possibly over-simplistic, and IANAEconomist, so feel free to blow raspberries at my naivety.

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Who is Samsung trying to kid? There will NEVER be a 5G network

JetSetJim

Uni of Surrey

Note that their "private sponsorship" includes names such as Huawei, Telefonica, Fujitsu and ...... Samsung

http://www.surrey.ac.uk/mediacentre/press/2012/90791_the_university_of_surrey_secures_35m_for_new_5g_research_centre.htm

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Apple asked me for my BANK statements, says outraged reader

JetSetJim

Re: Well

Maybe it's a poker site that is plagued by bots scamming the fleshies with their accurate statistical calculations. Angry rant => fleshie => ok to play

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JetSetJim
Coat

Re: cling film

Either

a) don't put the poo in the document feeder - it will jam

b) on a flat-bed scanner, don't close the lid too rapidly (and also use cling film on top of the poo)

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Setanta, ESPN couldn't make UK footie TV work. How will BT Sport?

JetSetJim
Pint

Re: If my math is correct

Don't the match officials get anything? :)

Cheer up, have a beer. I, too, am always astounded by the amount folks are willing to pay to watch a group of chaps kick a ball about. Yes, they may be talented ball-kickers, but many thousand-pounds-a-week good? I suppose they've got to offset for 20-30 years of scrabbling around trying to get a job when they're past it - there's only so many top-tier managerial/coaching jobs, after all, but I have a sneaky suspicion that a bunch of them will employ good "financial advisers" in that regard...

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Identity cards: How Labour lost power in a case of mistaken ID

JetSetJim
Headmaster

Re: The real problem

Your statement that we are citizens by virtue of being born here needs a bit of qualification:

"Even if you were born in the United Kingdom, you will not be a British citizen if neither of your parents was a British citizen or legally settled here at the time of your birth. This means you are not a British citizen if, at the time of your birth, your parents were in the country temporarily, had stayed on without permission, or had entered the country illegally and had not been given permission to stay here indefinitely."

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishcitizenship/othernationality/Britishcitizenship/borninukorqualifyingterritory/

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