* Posts by JetSetJim

1084 posts • joined 4 Jul 2009

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Plastic fiver: 28 years' work, saves acres of cotton... may have killed less than ONE cow*

JetSetJim
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RIPA meatiness

> Perhaps we just need to point out that the RIPA contains traces of beef.

perhaps not beefy, but I suspect plenty of pork may be involved when it comes to contracts

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Jersey sore: Anchor rips into island's undersea cables, sinks net access

JetSetJim
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Re: Redundancy

Oops - typo:

"all in the same conduits"

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JetSetJim
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Re: Luckily the cables are in relatively shallow waters . . .

In fairness, cables do have to traverse an element of shallow waters to make landfall.

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JetSetJim
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Re: Redundancy

Reminds me of a story of a company putting in optical fibre and the plan calling for redundant links. They did have them, but they were unfortunately all in the conduits. Then someone dug up the road with undue care and attention and all hell broke loose.

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Behold, your next billion dollar market: The humble Ethernet cable

JetSetJim
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Re: Pigeons @Lost All Faith

> I think that 90 MPH is peak transmission speed, not average throughput.

The source I linked to in my post states:

Racing Homing Pigeons have been clocked flying 92.5 mph average speed on a 400 mile race.

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JetSetJim
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Joke

Re: Pigeons

Memory density on flash drives is sufficiently good to actually be able to get good overall throughput on a homing pigeon. The birds can average over 90 mph, and rack up 700 miles in a day source. A 45g terabyte memory stick shouldn't be a problem. The RFCs [1] [2] might need a bit of updating, though.

Latency is a bit of a bugger, and "packet" loss can be catastrophic.

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Confirmation of who constitutes average whisky consumer helps resolve dispute

JetSetJim
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Pint

Re: Raise a toast

Part common sense (the average whisky drinker is an average person, on average) and part head-scratcher - I'm interpreting this as "no other whisky maker may use 'Clan' in their branding as it may be confused by a humble whisky drinker with 'Clan McGregor' branded whisky".

If that's the case, then I give you:

Clan Campbell

Clan Fraser

Clan Denny

Or is it just "Clan", in which case I give you The Clan Malt.

Now I'm confused, and I drink whisky. Might have to have one or two to settle the nerves...

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Canadian cops cuff 11-year-old lad after Grand Theft Auto gets real

JetSetJim
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Mushroom

Re: divided highway

> NO head on traffic

depends on which ramp you use to get on it, surely

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100k+ petition: MPs must consider debating Snoopers' Charter again

JetSetJim
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Black Helicopters

Re: Well...

> May I suggest we also reduce packet sizes as well. If they do indeed collect only meta data then shrinking packets increases their storage burden.

I suspect this will do nothing except slow your connection down - they'll be storing NetFlow records, no doubt, which basically say "This IP had a TCP connection to that IP and this amount of data went in one way and another amount in the other direction." Perhaps they'll "enhance" this data with a quick sniff up the stack to grep out a URL, and perhaps try and add some form of hardware signature and payload protocol from request headers and DPI. The use of a VPN will obviously mask a lot of the info, though.

> ill be sure to download and upload to the maximum extent possible on any internet connection I use

If you're really keen on adding load to their work, instead of doing this and wasting your disk space, write a short script to load up random google searches, and then follow links to random results from the searches, with various random header value selections and MAC addresses, and then load it onto a Pi and leave it trundling along. For added fun (& risk) seed the initial google searches with various naughty phrases - how long before someone knocks on your door with a Ram-It?

If you were malicious, connect it to your neighbours open wifi :)

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2.1Gbps speeds over LTE? That's not a typo, EE's already done it

JetSetJim
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Re: Hype

It's additional to LTE, not present in any of the 3gpp specs for it. Ergo it needs shoehorning into the lte specs as the infrastructure for "eTETRA" is lte. These features are requirements of the emergency services that are/were not present in the lte specs. That's all I've been saying, however flippantly

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JetSetJim
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Re: Hype

That was my point. There are features in tetra that are not available in lte, but will need shoe horning into additional specs as the emergency services need then at times.

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JetSetJim
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Re: Hype

Probably stuff like point to point connections without going through much infrastructure, which can be quite handy for the emergency services. Plus there's some phone/software stuff for group messaging which may need extras in the cell sites but I'm not sure.

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JetSetJim
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Re: contention

It's probably a maximum for one user using carrier aggregation and an impressive MIMO array. In reality it would be the total available to all. There'd be some tricks to play with beam steering to make it a bit better, and in a stadium there might be a streaming broadcast channel for event specific feeds (e.g. goal replays and the like), which would add some efficiency for some and cap resources further for others not looking at that.

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Grand App Auto: Tesla smartphone hack can track, locate, unlock, and start cars

JetSetJim
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Re: That's a lot of code

I wonder what percentage contain merely curly braces (opening or closing), or if this is supposed to exclude such lines

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How to confuse a Euro-cop: Survey reveals the crypto they love to hate

JetSetJim
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Black Helicopters

> Hopefully not using rubber-hose decryption - Ed

Oblig. xkcd. Hopefully not too prevalent in the civilised world...

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UK.gov flings £400m at gold standard, ‘full-fibre' b*&%*%£$%. Yep. Broadband

JetSetJim
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Re: Not competent?

> The last 10% of a network costs the same as the first 90%, so your villages and remote locations will be more like £400 a month unless some kind of subsidy comes into play, which sees your £40 become £80.

I am in a village, not in a town, and not particularly close to any major town. Population less than 600. And there's no subsidy involved.

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JetSetJim
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Pirate

Re: Shonky speed illustrations

>> "The Department for Culture, Media and Sport illustrated the point by comparing it to downloading an

>> entire series of Game of Thrones in less than a minute."

> Given that I am not convinced I could shift that much data (although unquantified) across my wired

> Gigabit network in less than a minute.

He didn't say what resolution they were recorded at... 16bit colour, 640x480?

In all seriousness, some encoding of tv shows plop them out at 200-300 MB for an hour's (aka 42mins show + 18 mins stripped adverts) show at a half-decent resolution (or so I've heard). There are 10 episodes per season, so 2-3GB, or 16-24Gb. I've got 100Mbps, so that's 2:30 minimum, excluding protocol overheads - unless the lumps of video are delivered in jumbo-frames.

Is downloading it the best way of obtaining it? Or instead subscribing to a Sky package that includes Sky Atlantic? Enquiring minds want to know....

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JetSetJim
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Re: Not competent?

> Govt Minister says he wants full-fat capable of up to 1Gbps - but how much will the subscriber pay?

I'm on Gigaclear at £40/mo for 100Mbps Up & Down, could pay £70 for 1Gbps, and they're trialling higher rates for more cash, too. On top of that is a use of an IP phone service, as I have no BT in my house and no intention of letting them anywhere near it.

I find it unlikely that other areas would charge significantly more, but could see it being up to double that for the harder to reach villages, and even more for a one off isolated house in the boonies somewhere - unless the govmt actually deliver on making broadband of reasonable quality one of the universal rights that attract subsidies when installing it, unlike the shite that is guaranteed at the moment.

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Amazon's Netflix-gnasher to hit top gear In December

JetSetJim
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Re: The question is...

> Is this modern version of a Mad Max car chase worth £79/year?

On its own, possibly not. I understand Amazon video comes with more than that, though. Still, it's cheaper than a Sky subscription, which seems to bottom out at £20/mo for their crappiest 270 channels

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Three to appear in court over TalkTalk hack

JetSetJim
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Coat

Re: Three to appear in court over TalkTalk hack

Me Three

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Elon Musk wants to launch 4,000 satellites and smother globe with net connectivity

JetSetJim
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While this article is indeed a bit poo, I did enjoy this one of his.

Perhaps he was aiming for some sarcasm but missed?

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JetSetJim
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Re: Shipping

> Iridium is owned by US gov, as military backup.

Erm - Iridium is a publicly traded company, currently worth about a fifth of INMARSAT. US Gov institutions don't seem to appear on the investor holdings pages, either...

The US DoD does account for about a quarter of Iridium's revenue, though (or it did in 2012 according to the wiki-gods)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iridium_Communications

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JetSetJim
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Re: haters gonna hate

Well, there's about 100,000 commercial ships at sea at any one point in time, but I doubt they need many phones on board compared to the billions of GSM/UMTS/LTE phones out there - so in comparison it's quite niche.

Also, you can already get reasonable broadband on a boat via satellite services, so Musk isn't offering anything new here. They are quite modest on bandwidth, though, and latency is likely to be poor - anything that can be done to improve that will no doubt be warmly received, and competition may well lower prices for that market.

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JetSetJim
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Re: haters gonna hate

Ignoring the mild (*) bias in the article, I'd still question the business case for this sort of project. It's similar to the Iridium project which was the beginning of the end of Motorola. You'd need a new radio in your receiving device (I have a sneaky suspicion that LTE/UMTS won't run over the distances involved!) and you'd be competing against regular mobile networks which, for all their sins, offer quite high bandwidth for little cost. Yes, you could fill a niche (currently filled by Iridium users) for explorers and the like who wander around to remote areas where there is no coverage, but to make money on that Iridium had to write-off significant sums of cash as bad debt.

(*) mild - aka severe

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'Pavement power' - The bad idea that never seems to die

JetSetJim
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The BBC did a show, certainly. It took 30 cycle club members to run a kettle, and the 80-recruited members ran out of puff when the oven, vacuum cleaner and telly (plasma, IIRC)/wii were all turned on.

An interesting concept for the program - but currently unavailable on iPlayer :(

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JetSetJim
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Thumb Up

They could at least push it back into the grid on a FIT of some sorts. Perhaps the gym should sign up for a small solar array. but then accidentally connect up all the equipment to a generator that feeds the juice back to the network.

No idea how economic such a scam would be, but would be interesting to run the numbers. Obviously treadmills use power to move the belt, rather than extract power from the gym-rat, but the bikes, cross trainers and rowers could be connected up, at least. You could perhaps even do something with the machines with lumps of metal in them...

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Boffins of the future gear up to build their own beastmode rigs

JetSetJim
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Pi

I wonder how well 100-2000 Raspberry Pi's would fare - apparently they draw about 2W under load (varies, depending on model, plus I suppose you'd need a boat load of networking gear to connect them up, which would eat into your 3000W power budget a little)

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Swedish prosecutor finally treks to London to question Julian Assange

JetSetJim
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Alien

>because wikileaks releases favoured the Trump that he will drop the U.S. attempts to get Arseange

dunno about that - with the famed high security on Trumps mail servers I wouldn't be surprised if there's a mail dump from there hitting wikileaks soon. I suspect at that point Trump will express less than favourable opinions on that site (no doubt also claiming that he's always maintained that position, too).

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Top of the bots: This AI isn't a cold, cruel killing machine – it's a pop music hit machine

JetSetJim
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Paris Hilton

Re: may be possible one day to ask AI to create songs

> Why?

So Cowell & Co can churn out pop-crap much faster than anyone else and saturate the market with yet more drivel, hoovering up all available cash being used for musical leisure purchases online. There will be a small niche market for real music by real people, but they'll soon be ostracised.

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Trump's plan: Tariffs on electronics, ban on skilled tech migrants, turn off the internet

JetSetJim
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Mushroom

Re: And we thought BREXIT was bad

On the plus side, the UK is no longer the global village idiot for the Brexit vote.

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Add it to the tab: ICO fines another spammer as unpaid bills mount

JetSetJim
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Re: The law is there for a reason, it’s to stop companies inundating people with unwanted messages

It would be nice, but the issue is that the companies are set up as limited companies, which protects the shareholders against such things as fines against the company. Break that and limited companies lose a lot of value (and become non-limited). Something else needs to be done

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Smart Meter rollout delayed again. Cost us £11bn, eh?

JetSetJim
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Re: What's the advantage to the consumer?

》 So, what is it, exactly, that we are supposed to gain from the expenditure of the other £10,730M? Surely it wouldn't be remote control of our energy supplies

Mustn't forget all the billable consultants and lobbyist hours

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Not call, Intel – not call: Chipzilla modems in iPhone 7s fall short

JetSetJim
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Re: There's only two reasons Apple is doing this

> The question is whether this reduced performance is a hardware or software flaw.

My guess is that it is neither - instead it is a "patent licensing flaw". QC have a huge bank of patents in this area and Intel would need to licence a large chunk of them to produce an equally performing product.

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And for our next trick, says Google while literally wheeling out a humongous tablet ...

JetSetJim
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Windows

Re: Sorry to be dismissve

We had some expensive windows jumbo tron installed in the office and I don't think it's ever been used except as a desktop extension with an hdmi cable. This looks like the same sort of thing

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Tesla's big news today:
sudo killall -9 Autopilot

JetSetJim
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Facepalm

Re: Seems prudent

I don't think the mainstream press write ups help things...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-37711489

The BBC article leads with "Tesla to make all new cars self-driving"

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Court finds GCHQ and MI5 engaged in illegal bulk data collection

JetSetJim
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Big Brother

Crime and punishment

Not only that, but have their been convictions of other people where this data was used in the prosecution case? In which case should they be declared mistrials?

Or is it all stuff to populate our "files"

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Pound falling, Marmite off the shelves – what the UK needs right now is ... an AI ethics board

JetSetJim
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Re: Slightly off topic but...

> They would tell you that they would be paying x per unit, which was quite often less than your manufacturing cost.

I've even heard of folks entering into signed agreements with Tescos then being rung up at a later point and being told that the price per unit is being reduced. The Tescos buyers are no doubt under much pressure to reduce costs, so they've taken up this strategy with the hope that sufficient numbers of suppliers won't question the legality of this approach.

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Virtual reality is actually made of smartphones

JetSetJim
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Coat

Re: Smartphone 1998

Perhaps it's to be able to say "look how unbiased we are" when asking for a pass to the next Apple shin-dig...

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My Nest smoke alarm was great … right up to the point it went nuts

JetSetJim
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Re: idiots with more money than sense...

> Re: batteries. Our state has mandated that all new construction (since about 1990) have hardwired smoke detectors. No more batteries.

Err - don't they have battery backups inside them for when the fire takes out your power supply before they get a chance to deafen you?

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Early indications show UK favouring 'hard Brexit', says expert

JetSetJim
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Thumb Up

Re: I have said it before, I will say it again

>Stop reading the Daily Mail.

Just this

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Ofcom punts network-sniffing Android app

JetSetJim
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Holmes

Re: Are they joking?

From my tests, if you can see a couple of wifi APs the Google location resolution is down to around 20m accuracy - without firing up the GPS chip at all.

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JetSetJim
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Re: So why download an app whose it's main purpose is to gather data?

Link to app

In fairness, the apps description clearly states what data it collects. As to why - I suspect so they can say more than "a data connection was good here" and instead say "a data session that consumed xMbits of data on a streaming bearer was good here".

Users possibly downloaded it to see their network's status in their area, and were then annoyed by the popup that says "it needs permission for x,y,z and a,b,c", and were then disappointed by the lack of map.

Seriously, how many times does the wheel need reinventing - there are a plethora of apps that do this already, in a variety of different ways. It would be easier for Ofcom to mandate "operators must achieve a specified coverage, quality and capacity across Z% of the country", with suitable definitions for coverage (minimum received power), quality (minimum received signal quality) and capacity (maximum number of call blocks/drops, or some such) and then require the operator prove it to within a certain geographic resolution based on actual traffic data (and not the somewhat flexible radio propagation modelling).

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What a time to be alive: Nissan reveals self-driving chair

JetSetJim
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Facepalm

Limited

But if the "buffer" overflows, no-one will know how to queue for the next available chair...

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Oh Snap! How intelligent people make themselves stupid for Snapchat

JetSetJim
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Windows

Re: I've read the article

From the article, it seems to be some form of camera "app". I think I have one on my phone already, so I'll pass.

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BBC to demand logins for iPlayer in early 2017

JetSetJim
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Re: License Fee

Unfortunately that probably breaks their contractual obligations with geolocked copyright licenses. They need to start amending their standard licensing terms to be able to transmit their licensed content to anyone with a demonstrably valid(*) TV license.

(*) for some metric of "demonstrably valid" which will no doubt change over time. The first caveat will no doubt be "you can purchase a TV license if you are a permanent UK resident", or some such

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JetSetJim
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Holmes

Re: Just stop using Flash!

Ahem:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/html5

Work in progress.... Not complete coverage of the schedule/catalog, plus not all devices/OSes/Browsers

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Silicon Valley’s top exorcist rushed off his feet as Demons infest California

JetSetJim
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Holmes

Better in Latin

The 1977 film Count Dracula. Van Helsing is having a bit of a barney with Drac and starts intoning in Latin. Drac rejoins with "Ah yes, it always sounds so much more impressive in Latin".

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I want to remotely disable Londoners' cars, says Met's top cop

JetSetJim
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Mushroom

Already trialled

The Jeep Cherokee was an early trial, and 2nd phase trials were on the Tesla

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Microsoft deletes Windows 10 nagware from Windows 7 and 8

JetSetJim
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Joke

re: condemned

Condemned by Amnesty International, too

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Wi-Fi Alliance publishes LTE/WiFi coexistence test plan

JetSetJim
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Re: Crazy

> Search how cellular channel reuse works.

Then read up on how LTE works and discover it has nothing to do with cellular channel reuse as all frequencies in a band are available to use by all cells in an LTE network.

I've not read the test spec yet, but have been to various industry gigs describing the aims. In a nutshell, the aim of LTE-U is a way of fairly sharing frequencies with wifi. Under vanilla wifi, if the frequency is busy, wifi will back off. Under vanilla LTE, it will greedily grab the channels - thus stick them both in the same band and LTE throttles wifi. LTE-U offers a way for them to share & co-exist and the debate up til now has been a mechanism for that fairness. Seems like these tests define what the results of that mechanism should be.

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