* Posts by JetSetJim

907 posts • joined 4 Jul 2009

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AI no longer needs to fake it. Just don't try talking to your robots

JetSetJim
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Aha - the Wall-E scenario where everyone turns into fat slobs who don't know how to do anything because it's all programmed into specialist/versatile robots of some description.

Being bored will do us in as a species, although I'd hope that the Worstallian viewpoint that people put out of work by robots will go on to be more economically productive will hold true. But if *everything* is done for us, and if there is no need to be productive because we're all "on welfare", will this happen?

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JetSetJim
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Re: WTF?!

If only.

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JetSetJim
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Re: WTF?!

I suspected as such when I hit Soon enough, the solicitor, journalist and pharmacist will follow the typist into oblivion.

Article littered with typose, so this is probably an early prototype

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'Printer Ready'. Er… you actually want to print? What, right now?

JetSetJim
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Joke

Re: Office Space

It means the little gnome who sits inside the box has run out of letters (in the right font) to typeset what you wish to print. It's a right faff everytime you print to have to go rummaging around for a bunch of Comic Sans "S"s when you overdose on alliterative comedy.

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Research: By 2017, a third of home Wi-Fi routers will power passers-by

JetSetJim
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Re: Non-starter, at least here in the US

>Since this firmware is baked in and you have no choice on how they control it, your only option is to short out the WiFi antennas, and use the ethernet cables to hook up to your own network, and use your own regular WiFi router, this one being entirely within your control.

I prefer the less effort approach of either (a) not even plugging in the supplied router (perhaps having to ring them up saying "your router has died, can you tell me the credentials/parameters needed for my plain white box to connect to my account", or (b) tinfoil + ethernet cable

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Brit censors endure 10-hour Paint Drying movie epic

JetSetJim
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Re: Too easy

I doubt the BBFC have a frame differencer to hand, so it's probably simpler, and cheaper, just to watch the whole shebang than to find one, work out how to use it, plonk this film through it, and write up the results.

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JetSetJim
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Considering it was rated "U", I doubt it did have them (or doubt they were spotted)

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JetSetJim
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Re: 3 hour rule.

The next campaign should be to get it nominated for a BAFTA/Oscar...

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Now you can easily see if a site's HTTP headers are insecure, beams dev

JetSetJim
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FAIL

Re: Hall of Shame

Not there now for me (12:14 GMT), but still scoring an F (removed link as it doesn't seem to work inside html tag, but works fine in copying/pasting from a browser address bar)

Interesting that lots of banks don't score very well on this metric. Can we have more detail to the uninitiated as to the risk exposed by these?

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BT dismisses MPs' calls to snap off Openreach as 'wrong-headed'

JetSetJim
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Re: Publicly owned business

Such radical thinking will get you sectioned, as implementing this will require politicians & civil servants giving a toss about the rest of us.

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JetSetJim
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Mushroom

Re: Roads. Electricity. Internet.

Yup, who needs schools, hospitals and other cool stuff :)

I almost agree with you, though. The only problem is that nationally owned infrastructure is generally mismanaged by a committee. I've no idea why, as it should be able to operate as any other large business.

In theory, you could re-nationalise Openreach, apply the charges set by Ofcom for the supply of circuits etc to non-BT ISPs to BT, and just shovel the govmt subsidies into Openreach rather than BT, and BT can then die off as it's a rather poor service provider.

Openreach can then be given the remit to do stuff to get broadband available to everyone without having the conflict of interest tie-in to BT. No doubt some effort will have to be directed at working out what should drive a change to the infrastructure (e.g. coverage of houses, average achieved speed during peak hours, local demand).

Perhaps BT just don't want to have to talk to the Indian call-centre Openreach uses as they know nothing will get done...

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Google forked out a whopping $16m on govt lobbying last year

JetSetJim
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> 'will those that are bought stay bought?'

I imagine it's more of a SaaS model - "Senator as a Service". Nowadays you rent the votes, and cannot expect to own them. It's all in the EULA*, plain as day.

*End-User Lobbying Agreement

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JetSetJim
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Holmes

I think MapLight runs the numbers on how much it costs to buy a Senator. It's not that much, but will depend on the cause being lobbied for.

Tom Cotton (Arkansas) cost around $1M, according to the NY Times

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Watch: SpaceX Dragon capsule breathes fire during crucial hover test

JetSetJim
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I was wondering how much space there is for fuel - margins for landing might get a bit tight (which I'm sure they've thought of as it's blindingly obvious)

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Trump's new thought bubble: Make Apple manufacture in the USA

JetSetJim
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Re: For a guy that claims to be a "businessman"

If elected president, it will be impossible for him to deliver on many points. But that will be after the election

Surely not! I'm shocked at your cynicism

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EE, O2, Giffgaff, BT Mobile customers cut off as mobile networks fail

JetSetJim
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Re: Emergency Infrastructure

They've been awarded the contract, but probably not started work on it.

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JetSetJim
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Re: Just goes to show...

> Now imagine you port three or four times (as I've done)... Call setup can take a couple of seconds. Why? When someone calls you, the caller's network has to handshake with each network in turn to reach the callee's current network.

I'd hope the s/w was written to first try the "last known good" operator, and not all of them each time. And it may fire them off in parallel.

Mostly, I'd expect the delays being caused by:

a) paging. If you're in spotty coverage, you may need to be paged multiple times for your phone to notice that you've got an incoming call. There are gaps of O(seconds) between the paging messages to give you time to respond on a potentially congested random access channel.

b) more paging (but less likely). If the network has lost track of you, it gradually expands its search within the network to find you - so the first time you're paged, it might only be on cells which aren't covering you

c) LTE, but not VOLTE. Here you have to get redirected down to a lower tech to establish your call. Not sure of the signalling flow, but would expect incremental delay here

d) network congestion (either end of the call). This may redirect the call setup to a different technology, too, which will incur delay in processing

Occasionally, you will also need to re-establish your ciphering/encryption keys to the network, which will incur further delays.

A lot of the delay is the air interface, which can take 10s-100s of milliseconds to transfer a small signalling packet. Once the data is on the wire, it whizzes along, and hardware processing/routing is in the micro/nano second scale (unless you're calling the moon).

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JetSetJim
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Cause

That'll be the terrorists then, easy to do a cyber attack on national infrastructure, just let open reach do your job for you.

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Skype now translates in real-time into seven languages

JetSetJim
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Re: Any commentard reviews?

I'm wondering how quickly it will dissolve into gibberish if, on translation, you repeat the translated phrase back at it.

Translation is hard, but it's good to see the real-time translation services spring up. It would be nice if it also transcribes both sides so that the speaker/listener can highlight to the other party when it goes awry (and even give feedback to the backend how well it's doing).

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Smallish telco Gigaclear gets €25m loan for rural broadband roll-out

JetSetJim
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Re: Another happy customer

Never fear, I'm being sucked back into the fold as my mobile is with EE :(

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JetSetJim
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I'd be pleased if GC were showing the big boys how to do it, and offering something better, but I'd have expected them to have the same problem of funding expensive infrastructure as everybody else.

Perhaps when the BDUK funding dries up, they'll stop digging trenches in roads, but I'd hope that the pricing model covers their operating costs and so existing customers will continue to be served well if they have to stop rolling out new coverage. I'm now paying less than what I was with BT in a previous property, for a service that is nigh on 100 times faster.

At best, in the FTTC-enabled places, you'll still pay more for less with BT.

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JetSetJim
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1) that the business case doesn't really scale, and the economics mean they're only able to infill a few marginal notspots. I also note that they are using BDUK funding - does it stack up without subsidies?

2) They make a go of it, but some Big Scumbag Corporation (name your choice) buy them out, and it all goes to pot.

3) The start to make a go of it, but then a Big Scumbag Corporation (only one name in here) start targeting rural roll out to intentionally nobble them, whilst Ofcom sit and do nothing.

My money's on number 3.

In the village I'm in, GC deployed FTTP just as OpenReach showed up to deploy FTTC - but the plans for the local exchange & cabinets had been known about for quite a while, so it's not news to GC that BT are upgrading cabinets in areas they are deploying into. BT will find it difficult to compete on bitrate, or even price. My money's on #2.

If they go the #1 route, then when the subsidy runs out either they raise prices significantly and customers leggit (although their T&Cs limit price increases to 2% above RPI), or they go to the wall, in which case #2 will happen.

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JetSetJim
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Re: Another happy customer

I was rather impressed when they had an outage caused by their backbone supplier (Vodafone, IIRC), and they had the audacity to text me updates on progress before I'd even noticed. And then continued to give me updates, unsolicited, until it was fixed. The bare faced cheek of it all, I didn't even get the chance to take to Twitter to vent at them.

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JetSetJim
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Good

Happy Gigaclear customer here - BT were too incompetent to supply a line with 3 months notice, the good folks at GC did it the next day (admittedly, circumstances were rather fortuitous). Friendly and knowledgeable tech support located in the UK (Abingdon, IIRC).

Higher bitrate than BT, lower price. Hope they don't evolve into BT's level of (in)competence.

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UK energy minister rejects 'waste of money' smart meters claim

JetSetJim
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Mushroom

Supporting terrorism

Don't forget to mention paedos, too. You're sure to win the argument then

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Outfit throws fit, hits FitBit's hit kit with writ (Apple also involved)

JetSetJim
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Re: and award for openess

A good explanation of UK exceptions here:

http://www.inbrief.co.uk/intellectual-property/defences-to-patent-infringement.htm

"Private Use – If the infringing act is done in private and for non-commercial purposes there is no infringement."

So yes, it would seem some personal use is allowed in the UK.

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JetSetJim
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Re: and award for openess

> You can copy a patent for your personal use so long as you do not sell it.

Not sure that's entirely correct:

Making one unauthorized patented product for personal use could constitute patent infringement

http://ocpatentlawyer.com/3-basic-concepts-of-patent-infringement/

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Alu Alu! Nokia gobbles French rival Alcatel-Lucent in €15.6bn deal

JetSetJim
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Alcatel phones

ALU don't make phones. The brand was flogged off to a Chinese corp long ago. An Alcatel phone is nowt to do with Alcatel-Lucent Technologies, Inc.

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JetSetJim
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Re: Finns gonna pay the fat redundancy cheques again

> Follow the rules to the letter and it should go smoothly.

Hmm - while I agree with the sentiment, in practice, and in France, things go differently. ALU itself tried to make redundancies in France within the last 5 years - basically the second you announce it the whole company (in France), excluding senior management, goes on strike, and that impacts business operations significantly. Net result is that ALU had to dramatically scale back the cuts, and then dragged some offshore jobs into France to partially offset this (and this included the closure of some UK facilities). It's difficult to see how this could go smoothly.

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JetSetJim
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Re: Finns gonna pay the fat redundancy cheques again

They've also done this before with the Wireless division of Motorola back in 2010-11. Lots of cost savings to be had in rationalising product lines, but a big one-off cost of ensuring interoperability for when they have to swap out boxes in live networks, and then "training up" the new support operations in the low cost centres before canning the old ones.

The main savings are probably going to be in the manufacturing area when they get around to combining all the duplicate product lines (if they can). It will be interesting to see which boxes they EOL and what impact that has on existing contracts.

The USA has a big install base of ALU LTE, so that's going to need to be supported & maintained for a few years

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Brit cuffed for Kyrgyz 'horse penis' sausage quip

JetSetJim
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Re: No big deal

It seems he's going to be deported for irregular paperwork, and not for the poor-taste joke

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-35220941

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Riddle of cash-for-malware offer in new Raspberry Pi computers

JetSetJim
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Re: exe file, on a Pi?

The Pi can run windows, there's an image you can use on their download page

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El Reg picked a pack of ace pic-titlers

JetSetJim
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OMG

OMG - I'm the millionth visitor to The Register and I've won a prize!!!!!

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UK ISP Sky to make smut an opt-in service from 2016

JetSetJim
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Re: Here you go

So that's the list of filesharing sites, what about the sites that offend their morals because their are too many flesh tones rendered?

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JetSetJim
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Mushroom

Re: Ambivalent

>Only one way to find out...

>...yes it is.

A brave man indeed, but I'm at work. Still, it is a bit like the big red button with the "don't push me" sticker on it.

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JetSetJim
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Re: Time to ring up Sky Broadband....

Hell, publish the list and lets see what Rupe thinks is too naughty for us proles. I doubt any conflict of interest will show up at all, considering his extensive media interests...

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JetSetJim
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Paris Hilton

Re: Ambivalent

> Why can't I view grannyfanny.com???'

I so hope that isn't a valid URL

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The ball's in your court, Bezos: Falcon 9 lands after launching satellites

JetSetJim
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Pint

Re: That deserves...

Just one? I think a few more...

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In-flight 3G arrives, promises aerial internet at mobile roaming prices

JetSetJim
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Re: Fools and their money?

> Although I was assured that no-one ever actually sent them to HMRC. Presumably it's something they ask for if they choose to do an audit?

Having been thrust into the unfortunate position of having to fill in lots of the tax credit applications for numerous projects for a multinational, I know that the actual timesheets won't be sent to HMRC, but the beancounters will use the rolled up values of hours per project per department (or employee type), and do a glorious Excel SUMPRODUCT equation to come up with their submitted arbitrary number. The timesheet data from everyone involved will then be filed away for N years in the evidence drawer in case HMRC ever asks.

The negotiation phase with HMRC will involve managers harrumphing over what percentages to use in the final calculation of money rebated - in this instance it is helpful to have very precise data (such as from timesheets) as this gives the company better justification to be inflexible.

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JetSetJim
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Headmaster

Re: Fools and their money?

>Never once has there been any demonstrable value

Apparently there's a tax break against R&D spend on projects you can claim in the UK, but you have to demonstrate a reasonably robust method of measuring what that spend was, and timesheets can be used to demonstrate to HMRC a good faith calculation of actual spend on R&D elements of a project.

So that's shareholder value in engineers filling in timesheets.

Now the process of filling in timesheets is another matter. Same as the Dilbert link, I have been in the situation where the bean counters insisted on it being filled in on a Thursday and including a prediction for Friday, that we were expected to correct on the Monday if it was wrong. All that gave was a manglement readout on a weekly basis that finished on a Friday. No value there.

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JetSetJim
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Big Brother

Re: Fools and their money?

> Personally, the hours I spend flying are 'me' time.

An interesting point, as when flying for work technically the hours in the air are work time, so perhaps technically your employer could insist. But then perhaps coverage would be "spotty" in the little Faraday-cage bag you put your phone in...

As to this solution being putting a "network" in the plane, it's probably more like a few small cells connected to a router which satellite's back to a special small cell gateway which can cope with the massive round-trip ping times.

I hope they block handovers when the plane is taking off (assuming some oik will be on their phone at this time, irrespective of flight warnings, or assuming that the airlines have finally allowed electronic devices on take off)...

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JetSetJim
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Coat

They already offer it on landing, on some flights

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JetSetJim
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Thumb Down

Not sure about the business case other than stiffing rich people in the higher classes

>That's a nice contrast with in-flight WiFi's requirement to log to and pay for a new service.

I'm sure an airline can handle that at the ticketing phase and even remove this requirement with sufficient technical nous - EAP-SIM authentication may be able to be abused into allowing it, so all you'd really need to do is give your phone number (and possibly network).

Either on WiFi or on 3G, latency is going to be a pig over satellite backhaul.

With regards to roaming - if I've got a phone supporting voice over wifi, and buy wifi access, I assume this will give calling within my allowance, rather than at roaming rates over an in-flight 3G service

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Windows XP spotted on Royal Navy's spanking new aircraft carrier

JetSetJim
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Re: XP or wallpaper? And.. uhm, so?

It does look remarkably like the chaps laptop is running that screen as there doesn't seem to be a taskbar at the bottom of it. So it's more like a device potentially running XP is being used by a technician who is working on the construction, and it's unclear if it is (a) connected into the local network, or (b) likely to be left connected when the ship is at sea all ready for war.

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Motorola’s X Force awakens a seemingly ‘shatterproof’ future

JetSetJim
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Facepalm

Re: too good to be true?

Bugger - had been to that page but couldn't spot the SD slot support - thanks for the correction. Makes it all the more desirable.

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JetSetJim
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Re: 6.0 "soon"... riiight.

Meh - just root it and go Cyanogen when that build becomes available

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JetSetJim
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Re: too good to be true?

It's "it's as close to stock as you'll get,", so not stock at all. Don't think it has an SD slot either, although you can get a 64GB version for £35 more, and 64 is big enough for anybody, shirly

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JetSetJim
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Blimey

I might even buy a Moto now that the screen on my Nexus has bust. My last one was a PEBL, and even that I got for free.

On the article - I assume there's an SD slot somewhere? And when's it released? Link to product page?

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This is how you count all the trees on Earth

JetSetJim
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Re: Good work, but why worry about CO2

>there'll be a bloke around in the morning to sweep it up anyway.

But if you put it in the bin you'll put him out of work. Bad for the economy.

Unless he's a Schrodinger's Immigrant - stealing our jobs and taking our benefits.

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Brit hardware hacker turns Raspberry Pi Zeros into selfie slayers

JetSetJim
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Mushroom

Re: I want one to block facebook and whatsapp

>I want one too.

But imagine if some nark added forums.theregister.co.uk to the list....

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