* Posts by JetSetJim

945 posts • joined 4 Jul 2009

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Intel told Irish council all was well just before 12k job cuts announced

JetSetJim
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Re: Wonder how much

According to Wiki:

To base its European operations in Ireland, Intel received over IRE£87m in grants from IDA Ireland

From the context, it would appear that this was around 25 years ago, but no date is actually given.

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JetSetJim
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Headmaster

Re: Why does this always come as a surprise to politicians?

Two things - firstly, they may not have thought it all through yet. They may have just said "we need to cut $X from our headcount budget, which is probably Y staff". The senior management will currently be engaged in bunfighting to see whose empire is cut by how much. It doesn't seem like they have even got to this stage.

After that, there's a stage of allocating the cuts to sub-divisions, seeing which factory can do what and working out how best to fill desired capacity with available resource. At that point there will be a rough plan, and this is when the councils/govmts/workers will find out their probable fates.

Following that, in the UK at least, Intel may have to enter into consultancy with the workforce if the cuts are above a certain size. This consultancy may well adjust the plan (although I've not known it to make any significant changes ever), and could potentially get influenced by more govmt cash incentives (if this is legal!). If is no surprise that the party line is "We are not providing site-specific information at this time, and we are still evaluating our plans for Europe."

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What's wrong with the Daily Mail buying Yahoo?

JetSetJim
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Paris Hilton

Perhaps he owns the Vote Leave website?

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Prof Hawking to mail postage-stamp space craft to Alpha Centauri using frickin' lasers

JetSetJim
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Re: Tricky!

> SPACE sharks. . . .

Surely it's the "logical" next iteration of Sharknado.

Or the Muppets ("Shaaaarks Iiiiin Spaaaaace")

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Telstra hauls in Cisco, Ericsson, Juniper to explain TITSUPs

JetSetJim
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Re: 15% increase causes overload?

No that is not a correct reading as I see things. Most handsets are registered on the system as they are switched on. They remain on line until switched off, they go flat or move out of range. The system will be dimensioned on the basis of expected traffic demands and expected new service request demands plus any other relevant factors such as normal surges. Suddenly removing 15% of connections and then all of them automatically trying to reconnect is a very different thing. That is not 'normal' traffic it is a very specific type of traffic all focussed on very specific resources, those associated with control of the network not the traffic on the network.

Indeed, the registration process for a mobile involves it talking to the HLR and exchanging some handshakes, potentially with the HLR generating and delivering new authentication keys back to the user. If this is what was rebooted, it's entirely possible that it fell over trying to generate authentication keys for too many people at once. It's not designed to cope with everyone attempting it at the same time, and there's no mechanism around for telling the mobiles to back off and wait a bit before attempting to register with the system because (drum roll) there's no way of talking to the mobile if it's not registered. As mentioned, you dimension for normal peak behaviour (everyone switching phones on over time in the morning) plus a fudge factor. This won't help if the thing falls over in the middle of the day - you normally do upgrades on such a box in the depths of the night on your idlest day where the impact is minimised.

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Your broadband speeds are up by 6Mbps, boasts UK watchdog Ofcom

JetSetJim
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Re: BT aren't rubbish if you are lucky

I think you mean "BT aren't rubbish if you make a bloody nuisance of yourself and you are bloody lucky".

FTFY.

BT & Openreach are a shambles, for the most part. There are some good people working in the field, but they are crippled by BT processes. I built a house next to a BT pole that the local engineer said had an empty port or two on and gave up trying to get BT to connect up to it after 3 months when Gigaclear strolled through and installed the day after I requested it. Never looked back, and have 100mbps up and down, and a land line with a decent set of features (auto-transcripted voicemail emailed to me, along with a WAV of the message, using the landline from my mobile, and all the other VoIP calling features IMS gets you) - all for less than what BT would have charged me.

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JetSetJim
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Re: Urban areas

On the economics side, IIRC Gigaclear publish roughly how many households it needs to achieve "critical mass" to determine an economic return in deploying FTTP. It's not that many as my village of no more than a couple of hundred households has it. Admittedly, the cost of FTTP may well be higher in urban environments due to digging up paved ground and issues with blocking the road, rather than hiding most of the conduit in soft diggable verges, but even the runs through the roadway were achieved quite rapidly.

On the speed side, YMMV but Netflix in HD to at least one device is 5mbps minimum (https://help.netflix.com/en/node/306) so you'll probably realistically need double that to guarantee it. Ultra HD is billed at 25mbps, but I don't think the uptake of capable tellies is quite there yet. But it will be.

On the other hand, my last house peaked at 1mbps, and everything on the internet was pretty shit. Slow page loads, even email went slowly (sending attachments was a joke). It made it impossible to work from home even - establishing a VPN actually killed the entire connection. In my mind, with the services offered over the internet nowadays, this speed is not fit for purpose.

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JetSetJim
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Just read the Ofcom press release:

"The 27% rise in the average UK download speed was due to growing take-up of higher-speed connections and increasing average speeds for these packages."

So, in summary, the shit connections have remained shit

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JetSetJim
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I have to wonder what the actual distribution of speed is. They've said the mean has shifted upwards, which is nice, but has anything improved for those at the bottom end? Or has it been mainly driven by increases in topline speed everywhere there's FTTC, and the occasional FTTP deployment (BT or not)?

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Govt: Citizens, we know you want 10Mbps. This is the last broadband scheme for that

JetSetJim
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Re: RE: subsidy

Agreed - I was just answering that there *is* a subsidy of up to £3,500 for new installs, but yes, ringing up and saying "my 1mbps isn't good enough, gimme 10mbps instead" is not going to attract that subsidy

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JetSetJim
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RE: subsidy

The govmt/OpenReach subsidises up to this amount for new connections to new premises, as I was told when I was attempting to get BTOR to provide one. A shame they can't manage a drinks-related party in a brewing establishment, so I went to an alternative provider and got a FTTP connection for <£200 connection (admittedly this was luck as Gigaclear was rolling out in my village at the time).

On larger new developments, BT are laying FTTP (apparently), but yes, they're not going to upgrade the last mile copper to the premises any time soon.

I'd ruther have govmt mandate that all new connections must be FTTP, with new adaptors deployed to the green cabs to pipe the fibre into the copper backbone if that's all that is there. Then you could add a rule for "once green cab load > threshold, mandate copper-fibre upgrade on all connections & backhaul". Might be expensive, but it's a far better long term strategy.

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How one developer just broke Node, Babel and thousands of projects in 11 lines of JavaScript

JetSetJim
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Headmaster

Re: Timing

>> whether the brands could be confused, i.e. whether they cover the same 'class of goods'

>By threatening to sue, Kik implicitly asserted that that's the case. Oops... muahahah.

It may well depend on what classes of goods Kik have trademarked with this branding - while they may currently be known for some shoddy messaging app, they may have also trademarked "Kik" in a variety of places/contexts.

A long time ago, there were a few articles laughing and pointing fingers at Mick Jagger for filing trademarks on his name in a variety of classes involving soap and perfume. Lawyer-type back talk was that he did this merely to prevent someone else from doing it.

I still think Kik are behaving shittily, though

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Microsoft files patent for 'PhonePad', hints at future Windows plans

JetSetJim
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Re: Linky

Out of time to add to post, so here go's a precis of the patent (IANAL, but have read a few patents in my time):

It basically seems to be an "invention" that device A auto-detects presence of device B (doesn't Bluetooth do that?). In one instance, device A has limited i/o capabilities (e.g. a small form factor phone) and so control of device A can be made via the i/o interface of device B - e.g. a larger form factor tablet. Of particular note is that the i/o device (B) may have crap compute power, whereas the original device (A)has the processing grunt. So you combine the two and have a Better Experience (TM).

Another pertinent example given is "Consider a game scenario where four players in a room are playing a multi-player game. The phone of one user may run the game and the gamers may interact with the game through their own separate tablets. In one embodiment, the phone may cause different gamers to have different interfaces and different presentations.".

Not sure it seems hugely inventive

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JetSetJim
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Facepalm
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Ben Nevis embiggened by a metre

JetSetJim
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Cracking job by the team back in '49, agreed, but what was the precise height then? Was it 1,343.50, or 1,343.49? The article says it increased by centimetres, but it would be interesting to know precisely how many...

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Data-thirsty mobile owners burn through 5GB a month

JetSetJim
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The answer is more, shorter ranged masts with their own backhaul. This lets you have more users of the same spectrum in a given area.

And much higher CAPEX and OPEX costs for the network....

Networks are complicated, expensive beasts. The operator will first deploy for coverage, and then hopefully monitor what capacity is doing in their network to do infill with extra sites/carriers to boost capacity at "hot" areas, all the while hopefully optimising for subscriber quality on core services - e.g. Voice MOS, and managing profit margins against deployment plans and subscriber churn.

Small cell densification of the networks is being touted as the answer - as a CAPEX they are much cheaper to buy, plus have fewer hurdles to planning permission. But there is still the problem of backhaul availability with LTE sites needing O(100mbps) to run at decent capacity.

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Watch six tiny robo-ants weighing 100g in total pull a 1,769-kg family car

JetSetJim
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Re: Mighty tiny car?

Aye, they're only overcoming the resistance to rolling caused by the bearings in the wheels. The weight of the entire car merely influences the speed at which they can pull it.

Good engineering, though

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Staff 'fury' as penny pinching IBM offers legal minimum redundo payoffs

JetSetJim
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WTF?

Re: Owners matter too

> IBM has to be 100% confident they have clearly followed every letter of the law otherwise they could end up with some rather expensive employment tribunals costing far more.

I would hope that the soon-to-be-ex-IBM'ers are lawyering up. The notice period seems fine - it used to be 90 days for mass-layoffs, but I seem to recall it was reduced to 45. For the amount, IBM *may* be treading a fine line in reducing the offering , but it may well depend on for long long/often the previous offering has remained unchanged. I was once told that because my employer had not varied the payout in 10 years (with it being used a lot in that time), it would be difficult for them to offer anything different as it may become an implied contractual term.

Additionally, there is the complexity of working out if there have been cases of someone being refused the earlier redundancy terms when they were offered for volountary, and then subsequently getting shafted in this round. And if you can find cases like this, you can argue for everyone getting the old, enhanced package.

IANAL, but individually it will cost you <£400 (means tested) to bring a claim to the employment tribunal - but there will be a possibility of being responsible for some legal fees if your claim is judged to be very weak....

Pretty poor show on IBM's account, either way.

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Amazon douses flames, vows to restore Fire OS fondleslab encryption

JetSetJim
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I'd at least like to be given the option. Tesco's forced encryption on their HUDLs, slowing the boot time to ~1 minute or more. As the ones I have a purely for kids games with no data beyond save-games, I'd have preferred faster boot times and no encryption, but I don't get that option.

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Google risks everything if it doesn’t grab Android round the throat

JetSetJim
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Re: So why did it sell Motorola?

Because it made economic sense at the time. Nice juicy tax-write-off enabling purchase, gobble up the juicy IPR, and then flog off to someone else willing to wrestle the Moto-silos and give them money for the privilege.

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More and more Brits are using ad-blockers, says survey

JetSetJim
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Mushroom

Re: Ad free please

So the PRS-equivalent keeps a record of which sites you've been to. Interesting.. I wonder what they'd be tempted to do with that sort of information...

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JetSetJim
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Joke

Meh - 85% of all statistics on the internet are made up. So said Abe Lincoln, and this site is selling a bargain wooden plaque to commemorate this.

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Spanish cops discover illegally parked flying car

JetSetJim
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Re: Rag Week?

Doubt it, but there's loads of drunk Brits, usually.

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We're doing SETI the wrong and long way around, say boffins

JetSetJim
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Re: I do not necessarily agree with the following comment

> pair up the intelligent, whether they like it or not, for the good of humankind, and the planet

Is this the only way you think you can get a date?

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JetSetJim
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Re: Smarter than us

Or they've already been and thought, "blech, not baked yet. Leave it another million years or so"

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Phorm suspends its shares from trading amid funding scrabble

JetSetJim
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Yay

Couldn't happen to nicer people. Hopefully the door will hit them on the way out.

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My devil-possessed smartphone tried to emasculate me

JetSetJim
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Re: WiFi calling

Indeed, the networks are awfully backward in coming forwards with support for this feature. I had a brief glimmer of hope on the chat with one of EE's upgrade folk, who said:

"Me: The website currently says "WiFi calling is available on the iPhone 5c and all later models of the iPhone but is only available on the EE version of Android and Windows devices, which can only be bought directly from us in one of our stores, online at EE.co.uk, or through our telesales team. Android and Windows devices bought from other retailers will not be able to support WiFi Calling.", so you are saying this is not the case for the S7?

EE rep: Thanks for pointing that out as this was the case a while ago, since then wifi calling feature has been changed so as long as a handset has wifi calling built you will be able to use it on EE."

However, on a subsequent call to their customer services, this was disavowed. Will be calling a few more times to see if the votes pile up one way or the other.

On a side note, it does seem that EE support it on more phones than the others. Vodafone require the latest and greatest iDevice only in the iOS space, and not many Androids, for example.

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Yelp minimum wage row shines spotlight on … broke, fired employee

JetSetJim
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Re: At least Murica still has call centres!

Nope - Birmingham is a no-go area for non-Muslims. India is only 14% Muslim

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Between you, EE and the lamppost ... this UK cell network is knackered

JetSetJim
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Re: To EE customers - it could be worse

Could be many reasons to still be with them - perhaps all the other networks have zero bars. Perhaps it's a work phone. I'm in a house with near-zero bars from all operators. May well have to invest in a phone that supports wifi calling - although conflicting messages from EE customer support as to which phones will work (might ring a few more times and see how the votes tally).

Reasons to get shite thru'put: your account profile may be such that you're deprioritised, your phone may not be of the correct category (e.g. if it's old, or a grey import that doesn't have the right frequencies) to use the service better, the network may be misconfigured, an annoying neighbour is sucking up all the resource (unlikely for 5 years, tho).

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JetSetJim
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Re: Bit confused here

A PS data sessions is often referred to as a "packet call", and KPIs include PS dropped call rates, which would roll up various causes in the network.

I'm on EE and couldn't access data between around 2pm and 5pm yesterday, voice (circuit switched) services were unaffected (for me, at least), as this goes elsewhere in the core network (MSC).

As I couldn't get on the network on either 3G or 4G, it's either the link from the packet domain into the authentication server, or they're running a combi-box that is performing MME/SGW (4G) and GSN (3G) functionality, and that fell over in some way.

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Prison butt dialler finally off-hold after 12-day anal retention marathon

JetSetJim
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Re: Hmm... strange... no butt plug phones

Apparently these are rather popular with the incarcerated. I would rather imagine it would be stored inside some latex tube of some description, probably of the "extra-safe" variety to further reduce the effect on sensitive parts

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Plane food sees pilot grounded by explosive undercarriage

JetSetJim
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Flame

Re: These laser strikes...

On first reading I'd thought they were gastrointestinal laser strikes - i.e. a more advanced form of the regular gastrointestinal incidents.

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Solution to tech bros' disgust of SF homeless people launched

JetSetJim
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Re: 2.0 Beta

Surely it would be feasible to write a Greasmonkey script to filter out such stories from all news sites - although I admit the Daily Mail would probably then render as an empty page a lot of the time (thus reducing its value as a comic satire on modern life).

If it has been done, I expect someone to post a link to it in 3... 2....

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FBI says it helped mess up that iPhone – the one it wants Apple to crack

JetSetJim
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iHard

Except the Willis vs Apple suit was made up, even if it did make for an interesting discussion about Apple's T&Cs

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Alcatel drives upmarket with Idol 4 smartphone series

JetSetJim
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It was once a phone manufacturer, and then the French company sold the brand to a Chinese company, who continue to manufacture both PSTN (typically office class phones) and mobile phones.

But now there's almost no such thing as ALU - all their staffers got a Nokia badge on day 1. Not sure which bits of ALU will be kept. Which is ironic for some in the UK, as they "escaped" Nokia-Siemens after Motorola wireless got bought by them.

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Gird your coins: A phishing tsunami is smashing into America

JetSetJim
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Re: How can I resist?

Gullible people, desperate people, vulnerable people. The scammers just target particular events, for example I get loads of "you've missed a delivery" emails just after black Friday, even when I haven't bought anything

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Feds look left and right for support – and see everyone backing Apple

JetSetJim
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Paris Hilton

Re: Let's help you out then :)

According to a USAToday article, which does foam at the mouth a bit, I admit, the phone in question was owned by the county, and the county has given permission for the Fibbies to rummage in the digital innards of it. None of the other articles I've seen mention this, though (or I skimmed past them for TLDR reasons).

So, unless there are flaws in the "reasonable use" clauses within the contract between the county and the deceased, doesn't this boil down to the county asking (via the Fibbies and a court order) Apple for access to their phone? This, Apple has done before, according to various sources that don't cite references.

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Triple-murderer prisoner keeps mobile phone in his butt for a week

JetSetJim
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Re: Love the honesty

Equally, if it was here the prisoner would be straight in to the EU court of human rights, and would probably win.

Interestingly, all that's happened is a metal detector has gone "ping", so it may not be a phone (even if that's the most likely item of contraband to make the detector go "ping").

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AI no longer needs to fake it. Just don't try talking to your robots

JetSetJim
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Aha - the Wall-E scenario where everyone turns into fat slobs who don't know how to do anything because it's all programmed into specialist/versatile robots of some description.

Being bored will do us in as a species, although I'd hope that the Worstallian viewpoint that people put out of work by robots will go on to be more economically productive will hold true. But if *everything* is done for us, and if there is no need to be productive because we're all "on welfare", will this happen?

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JetSetJim
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Facepalm

Re: WTF?!

If only.

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JetSetJim
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Re: WTF?!

I suspected as such when I hit Soon enough, the solicitor, journalist and pharmacist will follow the typist into oblivion.

Article littered with typose, so this is probably an early prototype

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'Printer Ready'. Er… you actually want to print? What, right now?

JetSetJim
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Joke

Re: Office Space

It means the little gnome who sits inside the box has run out of letters (in the right font) to typeset what you wish to print. It's a right faff everytime you print to have to go rummaging around for a bunch of Comic Sans "S"s when you overdose on alliterative comedy.

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Research: By 2017, a third of home Wi-Fi routers will power passers-by

JetSetJim
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Re: Non-starter, at least here in the US

>Since this firmware is baked in and you have no choice on how they control it, your only option is to short out the WiFi antennas, and use the ethernet cables to hook up to your own network, and use your own regular WiFi router, this one being entirely within your control.

I prefer the less effort approach of either (a) not even plugging in the supplied router (perhaps having to ring them up saying "your router has died, can you tell me the credentials/parameters needed for my plain white box to connect to my account", or (b) tinfoil + ethernet cable

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Brit censors endure 10-hour Paint Drying movie epic

JetSetJim
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Re: Too easy

I doubt the BBFC have a frame differencer to hand, so it's probably simpler, and cheaper, just to watch the whole shebang than to find one, work out how to use it, plonk this film through it, and write up the results.

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JetSetJim
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Considering it was rated "U", I doubt it did have them (or doubt they were spotted)

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JetSetJim
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Pint

Re: 3 hour rule.

The next campaign should be to get it nominated for a BAFTA/Oscar...

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Now you can easily see if a site's HTTP headers are insecure, beams dev

JetSetJim
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FAIL

Re: Hall of Shame

Not there now for me (12:14 GMT), but still scoring an F (removed link as it doesn't seem to work inside html tag, but works fine in copying/pasting from a browser address bar)

Interesting that lots of banks don't score very well on this metric. Can we have more detail to the uninitiated as to the risk exposed by these?

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BT dismisses MPs' calls to snap off Openreach as 'wrong-headed'

JetSetJim
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Re: Publicly owned business

Such radical thinking will get you sectioned, as implementing this will require politicians & civil servants giving a toss about the rest of us.

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JetSetJim
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Mushroom

Re: Roads. Electricity. Internet.

Yup, who needs schools, hospitals and other cool stuff :)

I almost agree with you, though. The only problem is that nationally owned infrastructure is generally mismanaged by a committee. I've no idea why, as it should be able to operate as any other large business.

In theory, you could re-nationalise Openreach, apply the charges set by Ofcom for the supply of circuits etc to non-BT ISPs to BT, and just shovel the govmt subsidies into Openreach rather than BT, and BT can then die off as it's a rather poor service provider.

Openreach can then be given the remit to do stuff to get broadband available to everyone without having the conflict of interest tie-in to BT. No doubt some effort will have to be directed at working out what should drive a change to the infrastructure (e.g. coverage of houses, average achieved speed during peak hours, local demand).

Perhaps BT just don't want to have to talk to the Indian call-centre Openreach uses as they know nothing will get done...

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Google forked out a whopping $16m on govt lobbying last year

JetSetJim
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> 'will those that are bought stay bought?'

I imagine it's more of a SaaS model - "Senator as a Service". Nowadays you rent the votes, and cannot expect to own them. It's all in the EULA*, plain as day.

*End-User Lobbying Agreement

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