Feeds

* Posts by CheesyTheClown

262 posts • joined 3 Jul 2009

Page:

No more turning over a USB thing, then turning it over again to plug it in: Reversible socket ready for lift off

CheesyTheClown

Re: It'll be good in about 5 years time...

Agreed...

It's a good thing they're working on a new connector, but from the diagrams, while it appears to focus on usability, it seems like a "half way there" solution which says "Sure, you don't have to figure out whether it's up or down" but still has the drawback of requiring too much precision to get it in the right way.

The edges of the connector and the socket should have been tapered a bit to make sure that if you're trying to plug it in while driving or in the dark, you wouldn't have to wiggle and jiggle it to get it there. The major fail of this design is that it doesn't optimize easy insertion as well.

Apple should start licensing the lightning connector to other vendors. I am a convert who used to buy Apple everything until Microsoft put out Surface which is much better, but Apple still kicks major butt when it comes to cables. They did it right. I'd love to see a Surface Pro with a lightning port for charging and connecting devices.

3
7

Dell slaps Intel Haswell brawn in monster Precision workstations

CheesyTheClown

Dell who?

They're that gray box vendor who ships in black boxes instead right?

I find it somewhat sad that all these years later, Dell is still shipping PCs and servers and their website makes it impossible to figure out whether they offer solutions as well.

0
5

PwC says US biz lagging in Internet of Things

CheesyTheClown

PwC knows what IoT is?

Don't get me wrong, I've met tons of people from PwC and honestly, I wouldn't trust them to sit the right way one a toilet seat. I wasn't aware that they new what this Internet thing was.

1
0

Thirteen Astonishing True Facts You Never Knew About SCREWS

CheesyTheClown

Re: What?

I was curious... What contributions? It appears they bought patents. Did they invent anything?

1
0

Listen: WORST EVER customer service call – Comcast is 'very embarrassed'

CheesyTheClown

I have actually charged companies for my time

Honestly, I spent three hours trying to sort out a billing problem with my cell phone provider because their customer representatives pull stunts like this.

I took the time to find the correct method to invoice them and billed them my normal business rate of $300 an hour for the time used as well as the charges that they hit me with which needed to reversed, a total of $2200. Then I hired a collections firm to go after them and the fees increased to $2900 and I got paid.

10
0

Boeing to start work on most powerful rocket ... EVER!

CheesyTheClown

Boeing huh?

Why not give it to Lockheed instead? I bet both of them can come in 10 years late and 500% over budget.

Who in their right minds would give either Boeing or Lockheed a contract these days?

27
4

Intel reveals its FrankenChip ARM killer: one FPGA and one Xeon IN ONE SOCKET

CheesyTheClown

Re: Many FPGA vendors + ARM

Not necessarily, I would imagine they can get tools from Mentor, produce their own compilers and remember that Intel has shipped FPGA in all their processors for over a decade to deal with potential processor bugs. They're just making a much bigger FPGA this time.

0
0

So you reckon Nokia-wielding Microsoft can't beat off Apple?

CheesyTheClown

Lots of great info... But...

Let's be brutally honest here. Nokia and many others lost their asses because they sold phones and operating systems and platforms.

What I mean is simple. Nokia never understood that Apple and Nokia kicked their asses not by making a better phone. The phone part is easy. They competed on fashion and media. The phone and OS simply wasn't relevant.

Apple started with music. Then movies. Then apps. Then books. They learned how to profit by becoming an international media distributor. They sold first on their terms and delt with the legal fallout after and just crushed all the other distributors in the business.

The phone is no more the core product than a purse is the core product to women who buy stuff to put in them. The phone is simply a fashionable way to put their stuff in. While profit on the sale of a phone is nice, it's all about what it is carrying. That's why apple is so focused on guaranteeing their profits on sales of media.

Samsung succeeded on Google's back. Ask Opera and Mozilla who have almost completely financed their desktop profits on peddling Google searches. Samsung made a phone that served as a fashionable tool to have the power of Google at their finger tips.

What has Nokia done? Sold phones. When they sell you one, they'll work to sell you another. Windows Phone could have happened, but even now, you are stuck with Bing, Internet Explorer and other substandard tools. There is no incentive to developers to deploy on Windows Phone either. Symbian and other Nokia platforms were worse.

So... Why do writers keep thinking the phone is what matters? I hate my iPhone, but thanks to services and media, it simply sucks less than the other options.

8
7

Oh Sony. Have we learned NOTHING from SuperAIT?

CheesyTheClown

Wow... What a crappy author!!!

1) Beta succeeded on a massive scale (far more profitable than VHS) Sony sold tens of billions worth of Beta over a period of 30 years. Ever watched a VHS or DVD? That was mastered on DigiBeta. Every non-U.S. TV studio has tens of thousands of Beta, Beta SP, DigiBeta, HDCAM and HDCAM SR tapes sucking up massive physical storage space. The local TV network by here has a giant warehouse here with close to a million beta tapes which cost $30-$100 a piece to buy... From Sony. Want to replace them? No problem! Just find a hard drive system able to store a million hours of footage at 250GB an hour... And is reliable. BTW, MTV used Beta for all music videos which filled multiple warehouses.

2) Sony tape formats aren't about data storage. They're about film/video storage. A modern film requires 10TB+ to transmit in master format and substantially more for raw asset storage. A single film will be copied onto hundreds of tapes for distribution to post production houses around the world. A massively overpriced proprietary format is a good thing since it's the preferred method of delivery by companies like Buena Vista who found the best DRM is the kind which requires special machines which cost obscene amounts to own. They love $50,000+ tape systems for raw footage delivery. MPLS networks are still to slow for this type of stuff.

Get your facts right... You're looking only at the surface and what you would buy.

1
2

EU: Let's cost financial traders $400m a day, because EVIL BANKERS. Right?

CheesyTheClown

I don't think investor is a fair term anymore

I have been trying to learn more about investors over the past decade. I've talked with starters, educators, millionairs and a billionair. What I have concluded is that stock trading is not investing. Stock trading is gambling. A large group of people, a generally under-educated "mob" simply follow trends and attempt to gamble on the gossip related to a company.

Until high speed trading, people would watch the news, read the papers, read blogs, etc... and wait for anything to be said publicly about a company. The news would then cause people to buy or sell, generally stocks related to companies they don't even slightly understand (such as Google, Cisco, etc...) and a trend will hopefully occur. The trend could then be used for short-selling shares on the way down or quick trading on the way up.

High speed trading removed rumors and gossip and simply algorithmically trade based on much narrower trends which have no logic or reason behind them. Traders/Investors would then simply gamble on a developer's ability to write a system that might statistically identify trends and act upon them.

So now, even less than ever before is the stock market based on the actual performance of a company. Instead it's based on the behavior of the trends. No education is needed by the investors and just a "big ol' set of balls" is needed to gamble and risk large amounts of money.

Here's the kicker. I was asked to write a trading system for high frequency trading. I was asked to do it irresponsibly and on insane timelines. The investor would provide the money (considerable amounts), I would provide the tech. I explained the importance of dry run, monitoring systems, cut-off systems, micro-accounting systems and more. I explained that there is no such thing as perfect code and an algorithm like this needs to be tested not just in the context of monitoring the market, but relative to how it would impact the market. He said ... "You're full of shit. I talked to a guy last week who said he could do it in two months". He hired the other guy. Yes, four years later, the system tends to make barely a profit.

This type of system and code is irresponsible. The thought process behind it is irresponsible. If people want to make a living gambling, then make a new BitCoin currency and gamble on that. But these people gamble on food, they gamble on our livelihoods and no... they don't produce profit for the planet. Only for themselves.. at the expense of those around them.

They always talk about pension money. Let's be really honest here. What good is tripling the value of a pension when the result is to increase the inflation before they retire by 3.5 fold. Their behaviour causes artificial inflation in the market which exceeds the growth of their investments. They leave their customer with less purchasing power than they started with. But they do however collect healthy commissions for doing so and are able to spend the short-term gain while it's still worth something.

1
0

VMware starts invitation-only NSX training

CheesyTheClown

What exactly is NSX?

Ok... it looks a little like VXLAN. There's nothing on VMware's site that explains how this integrates with the non-virtualized network. It looks just like a layer-2 over layer-3 solution. How does it handle multicast? Does this mean I have to use their specialized "yet another inconsistent" web gui? Is there integration with vSphere?

Does it comply with any standards? Can I for example make use of a Cisco/HP/Juniper gateway when linking with non-NSX networks?

It seems to me like VMware doesn't know this or you would think they'd make it pretty clear on their web page.

1
0

Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?

CheesyTheClown

Fantastic... this is going to be such a FAIL!!!

Cloud resources are NOT as mobile as guys like this think. Most companies depend on MPLS or dark fiber connections into the data center of their choice to guarantee quality of service. As a result, it can take months or more to be able to reroute traffic efficiently to a secondary party.

Computing resources are far too easy to simply build for yourself as well. Call a company like Cisco or HP (or if you're really really desperate, DELL) and ask for a data center in a box and they can ship it. If prices fluctuate too heavily because of market trading, customers will just go back to building their own data centers which will be extremely harmful for the planet.

Also, computing resources drop in value almost daily. How would the handle this? There's not a single system that makes any sense for this type of trading. Each time Intel or AMD release a new CPU, the value of CPU cycles drops because cheaper hardware can process more information. RAM drops fast as well.

Yep... this is pretty amazingly stupid. I should build my data center out in preparation of the fallout. I could probably make a fortune by just picking up customers who want predictable service and prices.

1
1

Is this photo PROOF a Windows 7 Start Menu is coming back?

CheesyTheClown

Please make it optional... some people aren't idiots

Honestly, I thought that the Windows 8 start screen and lack of start menu was one of my favorite design choices in Windows in years. I personally have Surface Pro tablets and also many Windows 8 desktops. I have rarely encountered technologies that improved performance and user experience like the Windows 8 start menu does when used properly.

I guess the problem is... too many of you whiney little bitches can't learn new stuff. :(

1
10

Microsoft shunts top exec Julie Larson-Green sideways to make way for Stephen Elop

CheesyTheClown

Ugh!!! So much for new management

Surface is an awesome product. Xbox is interesting even when consoles are lame. Stephen Elop should never be in charge of anything. He's the biggest joke in the industry. How can you expect that guy to do anything cool? His version of cool is a bright yellow telephone which he presents while wearing a tie and saying "the poor people in the third world will love this"

0
0

Bolshy investor pushes Juniper Networks into restructuring plan

CheesyTheClown

Re: Hedge fund restructuring

Odd... As a Cisco guy (not employee), I've seen virtualization increase sales and profits per port substantially. I guess those virtual networks don't come with a replacement for virtual cabling.

0
0

IBM handing pink slips to Israel-based Diligent devs - reports

CheesyTheClown

Ahh business!

Buy a foreign company... Progressively move the technology and products to your main location, then fire everyone who made it to begin with.

Are we forgetting the next step? Disgruntled ex-employees use this as an opportunity to develop a better product, a transitioning tool and and leave you supporting only your die hard customers?

1
1
CheesyTheClown

Even if I agree...

Are you suggesting that the developers are terrorists too or that they should be punished for guilt by proximity?

P.S. Not that I agree

1
2

'No representation without taxation!' urges venerable tech VC

CheesyTheClown

Worked well for Rome

By giving patricians a much higher voting weight than plebeians, it worked great for Rome.

Oh... Maybe someone should look up Milo and Claudios, pretty sure that wouldn't happen again.

0
0

Google promises 10Gps fiber network to blast 4K into living rooms

CheesyTheClown

Re: Carp

I am a little confused by your response... I was there with you until you made the comment about reading speed and then discounting the benefits of higher speed due to 4k market.

First of all, at 270mb/s SD looks absolutely frigging awesome. Raw SDI signaling of SD video is truly amazing. I used to work a lot with film masters and often watched in original quality and it was insanely better. Higher frame rate is better. I recently saw raw 4K footage (which is heavily compressed since no one records at 12Gb/s) and raw 2k footage, both on 65" screens capable of 4k from 2 meters. Guess what? No difference.... Well until I looked at test signals which showed line art and hatch patterns.

4k is just not interesting outside of movie theaters.

So... 10Gb/s business case. To start with... Because we want to know if we can. For the moment, 4k is the only use case. At the rate which technology is evolving and the world is using it, real-time broadcast becomes less interesting except for sports and emergency information. So, we don't even need 10Gb/s for video.

Where can we use it?

- Offsite hard drive storage

Not so interesting since Google is also building Chrome which idealistically would run the app in the cloud too, so you only need bandwidth for remote desktop type of transfers.

- Remote gaming

Because running high frame rate games remotely is laggy, so eliminating latency issues with brute force instead of QoS makes sense. After all, QoS only works if you extend the trust boundary to the client which would be a nightmare.

- Video conferencing

Works pretty good at 384kbs in most cases, 9mbit for awesome quality, so even DSL should be fine. Most issues now are at the endpoint, not the network.

Honestly, I have no idea what the business case for 10Gb/s are. I personally don't notice the difference between when I'm on 1gbit at home or at a customer who has 40Gb/s access. The issue tends to be that the servers I connect to aren't fast enough to handle the load.

P.S. Downloading a film on iTunes from a PC with a 10Gbit NIC and a 40Gbit Internet connection rarely gives me more than 3Mbit rates.

1
0

PSST! New PCs with Windows 7 preinstalled are out there – and will be into 2015, at least

CheesyTheClown

Some companies can't move

I personally love Windows 8... I like 8.1 a little less since they made the start screen more moron friendly (people hooked on Windows 7). I think Microsoft has developed a truly amazing new system and for the smarter people, it's insanely fast and efficient. I even have been seeing many people switch back because of it.

That said, I was talking with some friend who are upset about the official death of Windows XP because of issues related to their inability to move. Applications were written which were millions of lines of code by consultant firms and are too big to rewrite and are not able to be recompiled (not sure why). There are applications which shipped with dongles for anti-piracy which can't be installed on anything newer than Windows XP as well. Some people might say "stupid asses shouldn't have bought software which uses dongles", the alternative of course was not being able to do the job.

I don't see any good technical reasons that someone needs Windows 7 instead of 8. I haven't found any applications which ran on 7 but not 8, but there may be a few.

Oh... Since when has HP ever been shy about shipping 10 times as many products as a sane company could actually support? Look at their network in line now... Wow!!! Even their top networking guys don't have a clue about even what OS is running on their equipment.

1
10

Imprisoned Norwegian mass murderer says PlayStation 2 is 'KILLING HIM'

CheesyTheClown

Re: He previously complained bitterly about the lack of hand lotion.

All of the parents are Norwegian, but many are "footballers". I've learned the hard way during a father-son game of football when my son was 3 that Norwegians compartmentalize. When I was passed the ball, a normally very passive father smashed me in the chest with his shoulder, laid me out, took the ball and kept going. I was like "Isn't this supposed to be a friendly game?", the other guys explained that football wasn't a game, it's a sport and the kids should learn that. I later watched two boys, about eight years old practicing a football move where their fathers were offering tips. The move was how to smash into another player and steal the ball in a way that would hit hard enough to knock the other kid down without getting penalized for it. The fathers were saying "Good job, now try this".

One of my neighbors worked as a prison guard of ABB's holding leading up to the trial. He told me that the biggest problem was keeping him alive. They had to make sure he didn't kill himself and that no one got access to him.

Most Norwegians believe (rightfully so) that prison is about removing criminals from the public until such time as they have been rehabilitated. They then make an honest attempt to help rehabilitate them and ease them back into society. When they are released, they have programs such as student aid and others to help them reintegrate into the world.

All that being said, I don't expect ABB to make it more than 10 steps from the prison when he is released. One of those footballer fathers is going to be there waiting.

1
0

Microsoft may pick iPad for first release of Fondleslab Office™

CheesyTheClown

Re: sounds familiar

I can't speak from internal knowledge, however I have developed software (large scale) on both platforms. I can honestly say from experience that Mac OS (pre X) APIs were amazingly difficult to develop for in C and C++ compared to Windows (even 16-bit). This generally was because Apple never bothered to add APIs for many tasks and also because when they did, you often had to spend ages searching through header files for functions since documentation was terrible at best, missing in most cases.

An example would be a simple task of changing a window title. You'd write code in assembler to wait for the CRT refresh, then alter the memory location of where the fixed length window title was stored before the screen was redrawn. This was the officially unofficial way of doing it because there was no API to change the title after the window was initially created.

Probably the biggest job involved in transforming NeXT Step into a Mac OS was development of the Carbon API which finally made full APIs for app development on OS 9 and later OS X. It was insanely difficult because the old Mac OS code was so littered with pre-object oriented APIs and other legacy garbage. Even the simple concept of a message loop didn't exist in the old OS.

OS X was a nightmare for developers since the good APIs were off limits from a C application and nearly impossible to reach from a C++ application. ObjC could call C which could call C++, but it didn't work well in reverse. This was solved around 10.4 or 10.5, but until that time, companies like Microsoft had to write Carbon applications because otherwise they wouldn't be able to reuse code from their other platforms.

If I were to speculate, Microsoft would probably have Mac versions done before Windows versions because they had 1/10th the features. No COM/OLE, no scripting, no support for apps like Visio, no publisher, etc... Office for Windows was just had many more features which had to work. Office for Mac was used mostly by individuals where Office for Windows was a business application.

6
0

Is FCoE faster than Fibre Channel? Who knows? Just run your own tests

CheesyTheClown

FCoE and FiberChannel are both disgusting

As a long time operating system developer, protocol developer and most recently networking guy (pays a lot better and you don't have to think), I have to finally call bullshit on the whole iSCSI, FC, FCoE battle.

It's amazing how the networking world has forced us into buying overpriced junk to compensate for underlying issues which are caused by using a block communication protocol from the 1970s. We're buying all these fancy schmancy systems for transmitting and receiving SCSI over faster medias and forcing network MTUs to be increased, forcing single pathing, forcing insanely short latencies all because SCSI is a piss poor network protocol and should be abandoned.

This isn't 1978, it's 2014 and we should stop focussing on fixing this crap and instead design a block protocol which works awesome over normal networks and even better over reliable Ethernet.

A block protocol needs to have a basic 5 functions :

Open

Close

Seek & Read block(s)

Seek & Write block(s)

IO control.

In addition, it should be possible to queue reads and queue writes. Blocks shouldn't be fixed sized and shouldn't assume they need to map to physical hardware block sizes. Algorithms implemented by Doug Lea and optimized by others such as Lars Thomas Hansen are ideally suited for scalable block allocation and LUT virtualization.

As a massive bonus, to scale wider, it the protocols should have a high level block device zoning system as well as enumeration system.

Oddly, the amount of work that's gone into half assed solutions to hacking the SCSI square peg into the modern storage round hole has been a disaster. We are NOT at the mercy of OS vendors to support alternative boot protocols. We only need to implement remote block device support in the virtualization environment and on a server.

I have experimented with this using QEMU and VirtualBox and found it to be insanely simple to implement. My algorithms are not as well optimized as you would get from the Ph.D.s, but I was able to boot all operating systems with zoning, security, line encryption and more within less than a day of coding. In addition, I saw no reason to be forced into using "Big storage" from vendors like EMC and NetApp.

There needs to be a networking group made up of people who understand networks, how networking people think and also protocol design and block device technology in order to replace SCSI since SCSI is an ancient dog with flees.

2
1

Hands up if you have one good reason to port enterprise apps to ARM

CheesyTheClown

Re: An ARM world would be nice, but...

LLVM?

Would be nice if someone implemented a "fat-elf" (dwarf is already taken) shared library/executable format that could store x86, x64, ARM 32 and ARM 64 all in a single file. Would actually be child's play. Then just package an LD which can link fat binaries generated by four cross compilers.

0
0

Apple cash stash dash results in Icahn v CalPERS bitchfight

CheesyTheClown

Icahn and corporate governance?

When has he ever done anything in the interest of a company or the people who work at them?

Every time I've ever seen him do anything, it seems his only interest is to make a quick kill no matter the consequence. I hate the occupy Wall Street bullshit view about 1%ers, but Icahn is hellbent of giving them grounds. He's a predator, a very very successful one, but a predator all the same.

Hopefully he'll drive interest in the share, make his quick kill and sell out. But honestly, I can't imagine how his methods aren't illegal under insider trading. He invests in shares, the hypes the shit out of the share by making people want to rush and get in on the kill and then makes his kill at a peak. This is no huge deal except he invests large enough amounts and has so much impact that he is personally timing when the share will rise.

1
1

Windows Phone app devs, this is for you

CheesyTheClown

Too bad it's Nokia :/

Honestly, I'd consider it if there was a decent Windows Phone out there.

I've bought 4 Windows phones so far. One for development (it was practically free), one for my son, one for my daughter and one for me.

A little more than a year later, my kids now have iPhone 5Cs and I'm watching a tracking number for my iPhone 5S which I ordered. It's not that I think iPhone is so great, in fact, I'm pretty damn tired of it. I think Windows Phone is a far better platform software wise. But...

1) Most of the apps for Windows Phone are the crap apps you get from competitions like this. It's by far the easiest phone to develop for and yet, no one seems to bother. And if they do, they don't bother doing it well.

2) Windows Phone App Store has to be the only store app more crappy than the Apple App Store when it was remodeled. It's so piled with crap it's horrible.

3) Microsoft seems to feel there's a good reason to not make apps available outside the U.S.... this has me totally baffled.

4) There's no good GPS programs for Windows Phone... I here Nokia made one, but I wouldn't buy a phone designed by Nokia no matter how much you paid me. Wow! It comes in yellow and blue! And if you put a case on it... what color is it then? Was anyone thinking?

5) 3rd party phone vendors keep "value adding" the phones. Samsung, LG, HTC all seem to think they should spam the phone with their own branded apps. Just don't... it's cheeky and awful. It feels like buying a Core i7 desktop from Office Depot because you need at least that much power to still start your web browser after all the preinstalled apps start.

Microsoft bought Nokia.... the company who defined the term "What do you mean we don't get it?" and while all the other successful vendors tried to make their phones cool, Nokia put Stephen Elop and Sweating Steve Ballmer on stage wearing suits saying "We made this phone for the poor people in India" followed 5 minutes later with "Isn't it awesome!!!!"

Microsoft needs to simply shutdown what remains of Nokia or turn their whole company into an app developer and then tell their Surface team to make something cool.

8
8

Coca Cola slurps millions of MAC addresses

CheesyTheClown

What are you going on about?

I have twice registered for MAC addresses in the past. Both times I was given 16.7 million addresses because that's simply how it works. Stop making mountains out of molehills.

MAC addresses are made of two parts, the OUI and the vendor assigned portion. Each part is 24-bits. If you pay the registration fee to IEEE, they provide one or more OUIs to the registrar based on need. A single OUI is 16.7 million addresses.

Is it inefficient... sure, I was given no 33.4 million addresses of which we used about a thousand altogether. But this is not like IP addresses. It's not so easy to run out of them.

0
0

F-Secure won't speak at imperialist lackey RSA's 2014 conference

CheesyTheClown

Why does it matter?

I always liked happy holiday since it covers Christmas and New Years in one shot. Didn't realize logic and laziness is an issue for you guys. :)

1
1

HP mounts channel attack on EMC: We're a Bugatti, they're a VW bug

CheesyTheClown

Looks good, costs a fortune, requires specialists?

If I remember the VW bug, it ran forever, anyone could fix it, it cost next to nothing to own and with a Porsche engine, it hauled ass.

Bugatti, though I have no personal experience with it costs a fortune, requires extremely expensive specialist mechanics, requires booking appointments weeks ahead for service and most parts are not available after a few years and have to be special ordered or machines.

Was this the point they were making?

2
2

Yes, you ARE a member of a global technology elite

CheesyTheClown

Re: Now consider...

What percentage could actually read and understand a Donald Knuth book?

4
1

That Google ARM love-in: They want it for their own s*** and they don't want Bing having it

CheesyTheClown

Legacy 16-bit support?

Uhhh... Since when did Intel put 16-bit support into the core again?

Also, ARM has its fair share of legacy crap as well.

Also, to be fair, ARM will work just fine in the server. Whether there is any power to he saved is a different question. Intel hasn't been sitting around and just letting ARM catch up. While ARM has been getting faster, Intel has been lowering power consumption... Hell, my Surface Pro 2 gets 7 hours on a charge and it's fast enough to emulate 200 Cisco routers.

I think you'll find the greatest advantage of ARM is the ability to also run as big-endian. There are billions of cycles to be saved by using big endian. Most compilers don't optimize endian translation. Most internet apps perform a massive number of operations in big endian. AVX is a bit of a mess in endian related tasks too.

Intel is also closer in reality to performing 16x16 matrix transpositions than ARM. So large scale video and image processing (very very common task for companies like Facebook and Google). If Intel implemented an AVX instruction set able to function on columns as well as rows, ARM would have a really long way to go to catch up on power vs. performance

1
0

I KNOW how to SAVE Microsoft. Give Windows 8 away for FREE – analyst

CheesyTheClown

Save Microsoft?

I just checked their annual revenues and it seems that for the past 3 years at least, they have made a $20 billion net profit.

At which point was Microsoft in trouble and needing saving?

Oh... you're talking about the share which really has nothing to do with how well the company is doing?

0
2

It's true, the START MENU is coming BACK to Windows 8, hiss sources

CheesyTheClown

Ugh!!! Yuck!!!

The start menu is for loser babies. I like the new interface and would prefer that we don't get the damn thing back :(

2
18

Indestructible, badass rootkit BadBIOS: Is this tech world's Loch Ness Monster? VOTE NOW

CheesyTheClown

Re: Uh ... computer says no.

Last time I programmed for CoreAudio on Mac (a long while back), the audio driver had a fixed sampling rate of 48Khz and the audio card's crystal had a interesting drift.

That would be 2.4 samples per bit. This is certainly suitable for sampling a sine wave and the .4 makes it likely that you wouldn't even have to be in phase. Of course, you'd need to run some form of digital signal processing to reproduce the peaks. You'd need additional DSP high pass filters to extract any actual data from the signal. We'd probably need some additional time to make it work so that PLL could kick in. Of course, there are other modulations methods for transmitting data over sound waves, but they're going to be SLOW!!!!

Now, in order to make this work, you'd have to have code running at all times on all audio cards and/or drivers and/or OS kernel audio implementations and/or BIOSes running what I'd imagine would need to be a 20 point filter for everything to work.

I just love this nonsense.

Oh.... but you said square waves... that makes it more realistic.

Can someone please get Zack Brown from the Linux kernel over here. He needs to make some comments to bitch slap some people around.

0
1
CheesyTheClown

Re: Uh ... computer says no.

Well, to be fair, I do have a microphone connected to my video workstation with a microphone which does actually have a 100-22,000Hz frequency response range. I've tested on a scope as well.

What I love is the suggestion that there would be some special code which would contain code to run a filter to extract ultrasonic from an "ultrasonic signal". I'm pretty damn sure that Nyqvist would have a blast with this. Next we'll here there's a DSP PLL to compensate for sampling rate issues on these sound cards. :)

0
0
CheesyTheClown

Re: Just too possible!

I heard from a respected homeographic doctors that drinking water with the essence of gold will change your DNA to make you appear as a direct descendant of King Midas himself.

Respected security researcher ... that's too damn good. :) I love this stuff.

William, do you drive around a van with your name and photo on the side and a nifty slogan like "PC Problems? Call the Dr. Data!"

Thanks, I needed a great laugh.

5
1
CheesyTheClown

Re: Exactly.....

Damn it, that was my line!

0
0
CheesyTheClown

Re: I call bullshit

Come on now...next you'll tell me the tooth fairy, santa claus and intelligent business grads are all fake too.

Get real :)

3
0
CheesyTheClown

No it's not

No, it's not technically plausible.

Next dumb comment please?

3
1

Apple under CEO Angela Ahrendts? Hmm ... (beard stroke)

CheesyTheClown

How about giving people an excuse to upgrade?

I know more than a few people who still use iPhone 4 because they're waiting for something new.

0
0

Surface Pro 2: It's TOOL-PROOF and ultimately destined for LANDFILL

CheesyTheClown

Disagree

I bought two Surface Pro 128GBs and a Surface 64Gb. I didn't even notice the price. It wasn't important. I understood when buying it, if it broke, it was a gonner.

I think you need to see who the target audience of a machine like this is. It's a well engineered machine which looks awesome, weighs very little, has a replaceable keyboard, has an awesome screen, has good battery life relative to the specs and size, is really versatile in general. It has made my life amazingly better. I tossed my MacBook Air 11" and iPad G3 and Samsung Series 7 Slate because now I have one machine which does what I needed three machines for earlier. If it cost $3000 a machine and wasn't repairable, who would care?

I already ordered a 512GB Surface Pro 2. Can't wait to get it. Better battery and more storage... it's like Christmas.... in fact, it'll probably be Christmas.

I guess some of us prefer to pay a bit extra for something that improves our lives.

3
11

Fiendish CryptoLocker ransomware: Whatever you do, don't PAY

CheesyTheClown

An alternative hack... but in the spirit

If you take 10,000 files (or less, I'd need a proper sample set to work with) and make them sequential patterns, the given that you have g sub x and intend to recover g sub y when in possession of G sub X and G sub Y, then you encrypt the large data set using g sub x and G sub XY and factor characteristics of the common exponent the logarithms... I'm not conveying this right. I see it mentally, but am not good at wording. I read part of the paper you linked which takes a similar approach and might actually even shorted the brute force attack remaining.

Using my method, you construct a tree of common traits of possible key values based on the fact that you're actually in possession a single private key and both public keys. It's something I came up with when Diffie identified another weakness in the keys.

The main idea is that the Diffie Hellman Problem is called a "hard problem" not an "impossible problem". We already have more information available if we have the client's private key than the algorithm accounts for. We also have the ability to encode known sequential or patternistic data sets. This means we should be able to attack the algorithm by identifying common traits of the cipher when comparing the algorithm, the data sets and the outputs produced. This of course would be infeasible without the private key used for encoding.

I've always had issues coping with the DHP when the encrypting private key is included in the algorithm. After all, it should be theoretically possible to reverse much of it. After all, unless you actually specifically drop data making it useless to begin with then you should be able to work backwards through it.

I'm guessing someone smarter than I can probably hack more of it algorithmically, I have major limitations in that field, but I am pretty damn good at factoring based on producing tweaked data sets to build search trees or sets to brute force.

Let's face it, there's a reason we key cycle 3072 bit keys... it's because they should be recoverable by someone somewhere as their sample sets grow... in fact Diffie makes direct reference to this in the original paper and later articles. We're simply expanding the known sample set and exploiting the inherent weaknesses.

0
1
CheesyTheClown

Kinda lame

If they're using DH (likely) and they're using the same keypairs to encrypt and decrypt all the files, pause the machine, backup and copy a crap load of small word files to the machine and let it run its course. Once you have enough sample data with both source and scrambled and you have the local keypair and you have the remote public key, tree search the key bits and factor to a brute forceable length. Then GPU farm the remaining bits of the missing private key. Then decrypt.

what's the issue?

1
2

Former Nokia boss Ollila: Stephen Elop was second-choice CEO

CheesyTheClown

Uhhh... and even now he doesn't get it.

There is no room for a handset maker in the smart phone market. Never was.

Samsung is a strange bird because so far as I know, they have absolute control over every component in the telephone. They make flash, ram, CPU, batteries, screens, etc... This means that unlike other handset sellers, they can make a huge profit per handset. But even then, Samsung is pretty much THE Android phone. Even though Google bought out Motorola's phone division, it seems that Google is happy letting Samsung make the initial profit from the phone.

Apple sells their phone as an accessory to their more profitable streams of apps and media. They are making fantastic amounts of money off of add ons. I'd love to find out what percentage of Mac sales and accessories they make just from selling PCs to developers of iPhone and iPad apps. What about the tons of money made from licensing chargers and accessories?

Google makes money from search, the store and more. Not the phone.

So, how does a handset maker with a handset maker mindset compete against companies who just don't care how many phones you buy as long as you buy from the stores?

The only place for a handset maker today is in selling feature phones to the non-smart phone people. Things like tossers and plan freebies.

Could Nokia have developed a competing platform to take on Apple and Google? I highly doubt it. They always come out strong and get cold feet if it doesn't show returns on day one. They have never had any proper long term foresight. They always made it about the phone, not the platform.

The Windows Phone cock-up is probably more about Nokia's inability to establish an image. Their "coolest" advertisements seem to focus on a demographic of people who watch stock tickers. Even their release of phones have the two fats Steves on stage wearing ties. Then when they should be targeting teenagers and young adults and American welfare/food stamp recipients who have iPhones, they talk about selling the budget model to developing nations.

It's amazing how they never once understood that it simply wasn't about the phone anymore.

0
0

CEO of Brit fashion bods Burberry lands Apple job for retail, online sales

CheesyTheClown

Re: Fashion company to fashion company... duh..

So, you're saying that :

Burberry woman understands fashion, I.E. branding. Make it look special, milk the customer on the accessories, get them to come back for more and more.

Dixon guy doesn't, he figures that all that matters is what happens in his part of the store because that's where his results are measured so who cares if you buy all the addons, it doesn't show up on his quarterly reports?

Yeh... tech vs. fashion :)

0
0
CheesyTheClown

Fashion company to fashion company... duh..

Dixons guy was crap because he was a tech guy. Apple is a fashion company first, tech second. She's probably better suited for the job than Tim Cook. She probably gets it.

1
0

Oracle says open source has no place in military apps

CheesyTheClown

Might have some valid points

I don't think the paper says straight out "open source is bad". It seems to focus on the idea that private companies may already be able to support open source better than running your own division to do so.

It is questionable whether the DoD can in fact run any large scale software projects successfully internally. I don't care whether its based on open source or not. I am 100% sure, they can do it better than Lockheed, Boeing, Honeywell or other contractors. Oracle may well be better suited to manage projects than DoD. I think it's a toss up really.

Whatever the case, the DoD would at least be able to handle revisioning and have a staff auditing incoming software changes that up to this point, they probably didn't. So even if it's a room full of DoD enployees maintaining a distribution based on CentOS or Ubuntu and only letting changes in which are verified at a code level, it could be a good thing.

Now the question is, where would the military get the coders who are skilled enough to audit as such?

1
0

Hollywood: How do we secure high-def 4K content? Easy. Just BRAND the pirates

CheesyTheClown

This is such a dumb ass method

I developed a watermarking algorithm two years ago which survived re-encoding, functioned over the broadcast network and actually managed to allow geographic location of who leaked a stream from broadcast to the local exchange. Best thing is, the viewers in the test group we ran it against couldn't tell the difference between the original sources and the watermarked video. We reencoded the files up to 10 generations and could still always identify the markings. It even survived HD to SD conversion and back. Even better.. survived qcif rescaling.

This design was stupid since it's so easy to bypass. You don't need to compare against the original. What you need instead is to confuse the detection software. How? Get two copies of the same film from two different accounts and compare them together and find the differences and obfuscate them further.

This is not rocket science... It's just math. Could my system be bypassed? Sure... but the way I marked the video made it almost impossible to do so without understanding the pattern of picture alterations I made. So even if you started mixing from multiple different sources, each source it was mixed from would be be identifiable.

I am a huge fan of watermarking. I hate DRM. I like to be able to get content and use it however I'd like. I have no problem with people sharing videos with their friends and family. It's when people rent or borrow a movie and then put it on the pirate bay I don't care for.

That said... the Pirate Bay has evolved into something we all need to some extent. It's a video archive. It's a place where almost all video and music can be found. I love that. Too bad there's no good official source for the material.

0
0

Investor lobs sueball at BlackBerry, says it 'misled' shareholders

CheesyTheClown

Yes they did

I met many people who loved their BlackBerrys and wouldn't have anything else. They were sure that new BlackBerrys would catch on.

On the other hand, they also wear suits... and actually think that's cool

0
0
CheesyTheClown

Re: I always viewed the stock market as "intelligent high stakes gambling"

I disagree... an intelligent stock market investor would identify means of altering the value of a share and no gambling at all. I know it is supposed to be illegal, but that's only an issue if you get caught doing it.

1
0

Page: