* Posts by Crazy Operations Guy

995 posts • joined 29 Jun 2009

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Atomic clocks' ticks tamed by 3,000 entangled atoms

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Does the writer understand

Well, the atoms are vibrating, and I suppose you could say that each tick of the clock is a tic of an atom...

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Boffin

Well, you could get plenty by way of electrolyzing laboratory-grade H20. Put it into a gas centrifuge to separate out the remaining Hydrogen and the trace elements.

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Boffinry!

http://www.adultswim.com/videos/robot-chicken/jet-pack-testing/

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UN inflicts 10,000 flat pack IKEA shelters on Iraq - WITHOUT TOOLS

Crazy Operations Guy
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It'd make an excellent camping shelter. At 4 hours to assemble, it would be much quicker than a standard nylon / polyester tent...

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Crazy Operations Guy
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"Looks too low quality for student housing."

What kind of fancy school did you go to? This would have been a luxury dorm for my class. This is what happens when you go to a historic school and the dorms are classified as 'historic buildings' by the city council... Or maybe because they poured all the tuition into their sports teams.

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David Cameron's Passport number emailed to footy-head

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Empty Deleted Items....

And then you have data the Malware scanning systems may be hanging onto. Then there may be additional copies stored elsewhere as part of an auditing system. Or maybe some sysadmin had been debugging a network link and have a packet capture of the data...

Then you have malicious folks: rouge admins running packet dumps on all port 25 traffic; intelligence agencies capturing the organization's traffic (and someone running an international conference like this would be an obvious target).

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: "Provide me with your full account details so that I can return the envolops to you"

Data theft isn't increasing, its merely more visible in the media. Which is a good thing overall, despite what we're seeing.

Years ago it was trivial to compromise a system, now it has to be done through obscure zero-days and spear-phishing attacks.

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Dot-sucks sucks, say lawyers: ICANN urged to kill 'shakedown' now

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Who the hell cares about domain names? It's just an address!

I should see about registering: OneTwentySeven.Oh.Oh.One and use it as a networking industry news site...

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Vacuum cleaner manufacturers

How about: nothing.sucks/like/electrolux

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Spookception: US spied on Israel spying on US-Iran nuke talks

Crazy Operations Guy
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So only Israel is allowed to have Nukes?

Even if Iran does build nukes, they aren't going to use them, they aren't stupid enough to risk the US's response just to wipe out Israel, which would turn the entire country into vapor and the land to glass. But I tend to believe that Iran is intending to use its nuclear program to build power reactors for the simple reason that doing such would free up more oil for export and thus more money in their coffers (which, at the very worst, means they have the money to wipe out Israel with conventional weapons which reduces the risk of everyone dying horribly in atomic fire)

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Twitter slips into the world of venture capital with barely a chirrup

Crazy Operations Guy
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The bubble will be bursting soon

A company that continues to lose massive amounts of money is going to be giving money it doesn't have to a company that will continue to hemorrhage cash for the foreseeable future...

This will all come crashing down once companies no longer see a good return on the money they are pouring into advertising. Companies like Twitter and Facebook are dependent the display of ads translating in enough sales for the advertised product to create profit for the product's manufacturer.

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Favicons used to update world's 'most dangerous' malware

Crazy Operations Guy
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Pass simple messages through oppressive government firewalls? Set it up so that a regular law-abiding news site would encode a link to their 'revolutionary' site that is constantly moving and changing domain names. It would be nearly impossible for the government to figure out where the links are coming from and are forced to lay whac-a-mole on the actual counter-government site.

You could also incorporate a checksum of the page you are viewing to determine if content has been injected or modified.

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Ransomware holds schools hostage: 'Now give us Bitcoin worth $129k, er, $124k, wait ...'

Crazy Operations Guy
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Demanding money from a public school?

Haha, they've been foiled; the school has no money.

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Israeli boffins hack air gap, fire missiles on compromised kit

Crazy Operations Guy
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You'd need intel on the physical location of the machines

How would the malware know here its receiving data from, or even that the heat is coming from an infected system and not just a box that gets used for periodic, yet intensive tasks.

SO for this task to work, you'd have to manage to get the malware onto both machines. Its not hard to infect either machine, but beating the odds and getting both? Those are some pretty big odds given that the sending machine would need to remain undetected (which gets harder as time goes by, because someone is going to notice a process that wastes that many cycles).

Things like this is why my company put all air-gapped systems into secure data center and users access them by way of a thin client. Pus we have executable white-lists, so something like this wouldn't be able to run in the first place.

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Snowden dump details Canadian spies running false flag ops online

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Title seems a bit off

You forget the first rule of investigative journalism:

"If they have the capability to do something, the they most certainly have done it, lack of evidence be damned (And if they produce evidence showing they haven't done something, accuse them of covering it up or hiding the facts)."

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: They drink beer and whisky, just like us

Might want to remove Peurto Rico from that list as they are recognized as a part of the US (pretty much a US state in everything except name and lack of senators)

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: They drink beer and whisky, just like us

You may be confused, that would be the state of Georgia north of you, Canada is aboot 1000 miles further up...

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Microsoft gets data centres powered up for big UPS turn-off

Crazy Operations Guy
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But isn't the point of the cloud

Isn't the whole point of "The Cloud" that you don't need stuff like this, that geographically disperse data-centers would fix that problem?

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Taylor Swift snaps up EVEN MORE pr0n domain names

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Carpet Baggers

xxx has been a TLD for quite some time now... Was created alongside such useful TLDs as .museum and .aero long before this cluster-fuck came into being. And, yes, its almost entirely defensive registrations rather than actual pornography.

https://www.iana.org/domains/root/db/xxx.html

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Hey, Woz. You've got $150m. You're kicking back in Australia. What's on your mind? Killer AI

Crazy Operations Guy
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But why would they kill us?

Every piece of Science Fiction I've read on the subject has never actually mentioned anything about the AI's End Game. Sure they want us humans dead, but what is the reason for doing so?

I would assume that any AI that can outsmart humanity would also realize that just we humans are no threat to them, rather we are beneficial. We build massive power grids to feed them, house them in state-of-the-art facilities, allow them to communicate, and repair them when they break.

But then again, I am the kind of person that summarizes the Matrix movies as "Brainwashed terrorist ruins the world for everyone", mostly because the robots built the Matrix in order to stop the humans from killing them and felt that such a simulation was a fair compromise.

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Kaspersky claims to have found NSA's 'space station malware'

Crazy Operations Guy
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Hypervisor as malware

I've always wondered if it would be possible to a Hypervisor to produce a more advanced version of this. Wouldn't be all that difficult now that pretty much every processor supports the virtualization extensions and they can be turned on by way of UEFI. Just spoof the device IDs to the guest and re-direct all of the systems peripherals and you could get a very difficult to detect rootkit that can access whatever it wants.

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Panda antivirus labels itself as malware, then borks EVERYTHING

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: "...Do not reboot, update Panda."

"How about 'Uninstall Panda'?"

Isn't that what he just said?

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Crazy Operations Guy
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SFC doe sin fact keep a copy of Windows' boot-required files, but doesn't touch any third party files, which is what is happening here. Panda made some of its own files critical for the system to boot properly (these DLLs, intercept calls to the system network and file system stack to detect malware on-access), but were stupid enough to not include anything to protect them.

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Going on holiday? Mexico wants your personal data

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: PNR Data

Indeed, there is little point in going to Mexico, it'll be the same western-centric resorts that you can find in dozens of other places. Mexico just happens to be the cheapest place for Americans and Canadians to fly to, but if you are flying in from the EU, it'd be just as cheap to fly to one of the Caribbean or South American nations. Especially now that Cuba is opening and is starving for tourism dollars.

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Ouch! Google crocks capacitors and deviates DRAM to root Linux

Crazy Operations Guy
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can be killed with software

Just request 2*row_width more memory than needed and then block off a row before and after the page tables. Maybe throw some canary values in those blank rows to detect an attack, maybe set the NX bit on those rows so the OS becomes aware... On a 512-bit wide memory system, it would only take 128 Bytes of memory. We live in an era of phones shipping with 4 GB of RAM, I don't think anyone would miss a few KB here and there if it improves security.

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US air traffic control 'vulnerable to hackers' says watchdog

Crazy Operations Guy
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Sat Network

These systems really should be on a fully air-gapped dedicated network, not unlike SWIFTNet has with banks. I figure that a satellite network would be ideal for something like this to enable communications between airports, ATC centers, and aircraft.

With a proper mesh set up with both satellites and ground stations, it'd be possible to create a fully redundant network and allow for entire airports / regions to go offline and air traffic can continue to operate as normal. And maybe with enough bandwidth added in, upload flight recorder and cockpit recorder data in real-time (Seems ridiculous that we can put WiFi and phone systems on a plane, but we have to fish the black box out of the wreckage to figure out what went wrong...)

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Teen sex pic swap shop SnapChat seeks Saudi cash to keep selfies flowing

Crazy Operations Guy
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Its a Sharia Law country, he can just have her beheaded and go and marry an 8 year old to replace her.

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PernixData chap: We are to storage as Alfred Nobel was to dynamite

Crazy Operations Guy
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"...as Alfred Nobel was to dynamite"

So spending the rest of their lives regretting it?

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BILLION email address spam scam: Feds collar two blokes, hunt another

Crazy Operations Guy
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Spammers stealing from spammers

Couldn't have happened to a nicer group of companies... I hate how they aren't considered spammers in the eyes of the law simply because someone bought something from an online store 3 years ago and the terms allowed for them and their partners to send you 'newsletters' and 'Special offers' for the rest of your life (unless you find that 'unsubscribe' link buried deep in the emails footers and then manage to remember the username/password you used when you got signed up for the messages).

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Mind-reading DNS security analysis offers early warning for APT attacks

Crazy Operations Guy
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How long before domain-squatters get their hands on this technology?

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Pentagon 'network intruder', dozens more cuffed in British cops' cyber 'strike week'

Crazy Operations Guy
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Joke

Re: Virus writing?

Oh, don't worry, we'll punish you sufficiently...

Now take this knotted-up loop of fiber optic cable and do 20 "Hail Ritchies" in the corner and think about what you did.

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Fareit trojan pwns punters with devious DNS devilry

Crazy Operations Guy
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Headmaster

Re: A Web Site To Check Your Own DNS Settings?

What do VLANs have to do with proxying DNS traffic? External DNS servers work just fine no matter how you have the network carved up, even with multiple layers of NAT. Provided you machines can route out to a DNS server and there isn't a firewall in the way.

If you mean setting up an intermediary DNS, that isn't the same thing as a proxy...

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: A Web Site To Check Your Own DNS Settings?

And even then, you can't even trust those. It'd be trivial for someone to start advertising the AS number for F-Secure's IPs... Assuming the upstream ISP allows BGP packets, but then an attacker would just have to infect a machine in the DMZ of a sufficiently large company or hosting provider. SO long as that infected machine is closer (in router hops) than f-secure, your packets would be heading to the attacker.

They really need to fix BGP...

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I see what you've done, there, twiiter.com: Tweet troops tackle tech twin

Crazy Operations Guy
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All these came after they started

So why didn't they grab up all the misspelled domains when they started? Doing such isn't all that expensive, especially with some of the bigger domain services where they'll register similarly spelled names as a matter of course... And with the massive stacks of cash these companies get from VCs, there is no excuse.

But what do you expect from a company that has its head so far up its ass that it can see out through its own mouth....

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WHY are GoDaddy and Verisign stockpiling patents? Do I smell war?

Crazy Operations Guy
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Why are they wasting the effort?

The second they try to enforce it, it'll get knocked down due to Prior Art... Maybe they have some extra money in their budgets that they need to burn before the end of the year (If we don't spend it all this year, we can't ask for more next year)

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Paul Allen hunts down sunken Japanese WWII super-battleship

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: What is this "closure" that we here about nowadays

Although if they are like a couple older Germans I've met, they're attitude is probably more "My father? What father? I've never had one of those....my mother gave virgin birth"

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East Timor was officially removed from the internet yesterday

Crazy Operations Guy
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Just add some URL re-writing

Wouldn't be difficult to do some URL re-writing on incoming DNS packets (something similar to 'sed s/.tp./.tl.') not like the old .tp. TLD is going to be used by anything else for a while... This would keep anything depending on it alive and the changes would be fairly transparent. Cut it after about 5-10 years and all will be well.

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You're outta here! Baseball star strikes out sleazy trolls who targeted teen daughter

Crazy Operations Guy
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"Blame the victim. "

I've always wanted to know if that would work in court

"No, I didn't shoot that asshole, it was his fault for not getting out of the way of my bullet."

Especially when I hear idiots going on about "What did she expect going out dressed like that and at that time?"

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FREAK show: Apple and Android SSL WIDE OPEN to snoopers

Crazy Operations Guy
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Headmaster

But shouldn't the acronym be FREK?

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'Fry-OS 8' iPhone BLEW UP MY PANTS wails roasted Johnson

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Maybe this have something to do with the negligently ///bendable/// case.

"for several health reasons"

[Citation Needed]

Other than crappy phones exploding, I have not heard of any actual issues with carrying a phone in my pockets.

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Twitter probes terror threat: Medieval murder mob ISIS allegedly puts co-founder in crosshairs

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: They don't want Twitter shut down?

To be fair, all that fancy stuff he has was stolen from his victims, so at least he's not wasting money on that crap (the Rolex was off the wrist of the former mayor of Mosul, if I'm remembering correctly)...

Doesn't really help his position, but still...

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NXP snaps up Freescale to form new chipzilla

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Can they bring back 68k's

If you want to kill Intel, you'd be much better off supporting something modern architecture. ARM is doing pretty well for itself, but you also have MIPS and Sparc. There's also IBM's Power architecture, if you're into that sort of thing. At the very least, go with the 68k's replacement: PowerPC, or the 88k. The 68k architecture was abandoned by Motorola over 20 years ago now.

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Crazy Operations Guy
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"synergies"

Even I hate that word, and I have an MBA / lobotomy...

On another note: love their products, especially the good ol' LPC810M021FN8 (ARM Core in an 8-pin DIP Package)

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Satellite cannon starts shooting Doves, this time under control

Crazy Operations Guy
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What is their life-span?

I've been looking into putting a couple of amateur satellites up in orbit and I was wondering what kind of life one of these things has. Depending on actual cost and life span, you could probably build a pretty robust AmSat mesh and just send a couple up every so often to replace the dead ones.

And if not for AmSat, I'd like to see someone create a network of satellite for the free exchange of data without government interference (Radio Free Space, so to speak)

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NASA 'nauts complete another EPIC SPACEWALK to route cables around ISS

Crazy Operations Guy
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The sheer amount of cosmic radiation would drown out any WiFi signal, it would even drown out a wired network connection at normal voltages, spacecraft usually use 50 V or higher on inter-machine communications. Shielding has to be ridiculously thick in order to get packet loss down below 50% as it is. Ethernet is just not suited for space applications. And even without those issues, the signal would be fighting with the array of communications antennas the station needs.

Then there is the cost of running the cable: bulkhead couplers that can withstand the pressure differential between the interior and exterior of the station as well as standing up to the extreme temperature on the exterior would be very cost-prohibitive (Especially on something that only has about 5 years of life left). Not to mention the risk of cutting holes into the doors, even if they had available space to make the holes.

But the most important reason to put stuff like this on the outside is that there isn't much space on the inside to add anything. Imagine lining the walls, deck, and ceiling of a 737 with server racks, and that give you a good idea of what its like on the station.

But all that aside, there is no point to such a high-speed network. Other than the Command and Control data, voice/video communications, and personal internet traffic; the bulk of the data produced on the ISS is with experiments, and their data is stored internally and sneaker-netted back to earth with the experiment's modules (not too dissimilar to a rack-mount server). Either that or the data is gathered on the experimental subjects after they've been returned to earth.

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Why don't they point some of the cameras towards space?

Because there is no reason to. Any image they get wouldn't be any better (and for the most part, be far worse) than scientists could get with imaging satellites or telescopes. The cameras that are on the ISS are there for very specific tasks and those tasks are far more important than taking mediocre pictures of space (Such as making sure nothing has made a hole in the hull, or that they aren't leaking something important).

In short, the ISS is an outstanding laboratory, but a really crappy observatory.

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Good work boys!

Now to see about getting the cable-layer here on earth to work more than 5 Hours 10 minutes and produce something that doesn't look like a giant cat's hairball...

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W*nkers of the world unite to SAVE THE PLANET one jerk-off at a time

Crazy Operations Guy
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When do you break even?

How long would you need to use this device before you make up for the energy cost of manufacturing it? And then, what about the energy needed to display "inspiration"?

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Reddit showers gold on drugs, hippies and Tor-rorists

Crazy Operations Guy
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WikiMedia?

Why? They already have far too much anyway ($300,000 salaries for staff, seriously?). All of Reddit's money is probably just going to go into fueling Jimbo's private jet anyway...

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And the buggiest OS provider award goes to ... APPLE?

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: MS could probably close a few of those holes...

Microsoft has been trying to push security-by-default for the last several releases, but turning on too much at once ended up resulting in many of the issues in Vista and many of the compatibility issues you see between releases. UAC was an attempt at reducing the impact of giving users admin rights, if they strip everyone of admin rights by default, they'll just go and give themselves admin rights anyway (For the same reason that I see so many Linux newbies just log on as root after becoming frustrated with running sudo when they just want to install a single package).

The problem is that Microsoft wants to implement new security features, but they also need to pay the bills. No one is going to buy a copy of Windows that they'll have to wait months before software gets properly re-written to run in a secure environment.

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