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* Posts by Crazy Operations Guy

658 posts • joined 29 Jun 2009

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YES YES YES! Apple patents mousy, pressure-sensing iVibrator

Crazy Operations Guy
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A mouse that gves you dozens of ways to interact with the machine

But you still have to hold down a key on the keyboard to right-click...

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Face-recog tech spots US fugitive wanted for 14 years ... from a photo

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Joke

What a horrible monster!

Teaching American "English" to citizens of other countries like that...

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Spin doctors crack 'impossible' asteroid hurtling towards Earth

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Re: Prof. Hubert J. Farnsworth

Far enough out and we can get the year to be 420 days long; then we'd no longer have leap years, each day would fall on the same day of the week every year and all 12 months would be exactly 35 days.

The only problem is all the immature idiots that would laugh at the number...

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AMD's first 64-bit ARM cores star in ... Heatless in Seattle*

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Re: "That instruction set has been traditionally profitable but still a curse around Intel's neck"

Well, not just Intel. The entire computing industry has been struggling under x86 since its inception; a horrible compromise of making a simple, yet powerful machine that a home user can work with. I predict that we'll be suffering under it for many years to come because of the extreme momentum it has.

ARM is doing a good job of replacing x86, but it'll be a long, brutal battle.

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Why compare it to a Xeon?

A fair comparison would have been to the Atom C2758; 8-Cores @ 2.4 GHz, 20 W and competing in the same space (low-power server chips)

And if space is a concern, SuperMicro managed to cram 112 of the bastards into 6U box: (http://www.supermicro.com/products/MicroBlade/)

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Chromebooks to break out of US schools: Netbook 2.0 comeback not just for children

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they can shift their focus from managing devices to managing something much more important —

More important things, like figuring out something to do, other than sit on their thumbs, when Google's cloud goes down or they don't have an internet connection.

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Stephen Hawking biopic: Big on romance, not so much with the science?

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Joke

If I wanted to see an arrogant man with a high-IQ destroy his marriage for 2 hours, I'd go to a Mensa meeting...

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CryptoWall! crooks! 'turn! to! Yahoo! ads! to! spread! ransomware!'

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And crap like this is why I've been working on a module for Squid to block all '.swf' files from entering my network and a second module to scan all other files to drop files containing JavaScript/macros/etc. in files that otherwise shouldn't contain code (JPGs, PDFs, Word Documents, etc).

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Anonymous wifi the latest casualty of Russia net neurosis

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New idea for some "malware"

I should write some kind of application that by all accounts, looks like a botnet client. The program would then connect to some random IP/port to appears as though its getting instruction, then just grab a specific file off the user's device and post it to a public blog. The file it grabs would of course be written by the user of the device but make it appear as though its some kind of payload that a botnet operator would be interested in.

Then the user would have the excuse "It was the botnet that posted that, not me" when the thought police come by. At the very least, the Russian government will start to bring the hammer down on botnet operators and the like.

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Wait, an actual QR code use case? TGI Friday's builds techno-restaurant

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TGI Fridays, badly mitating Applebees *again*

My local Applebees has had a table-side device for nearly a year now that allows you to order (both initially and during the meal for more drinks / appetizers), pay, and even summon a server without the need for QR codes or even a smartphone.

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Check your Clungene, Irish women warned

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Better false positives than false negatives...

I'd think that a false positive would be the far better alternative since the preparations for pregnancy aren't harmful (Vitamins, cutting certain out certain foods, etc) whereas being pregnant but not knowing can cause all sorts of problems.

Of course anyone that suspects that they might be regnant should see their doctor and get a much better test done.

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Facebook wants Linux networking as good as FreeBSD

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Re: Simpler Solution?

"any engineer working to improve the Linux network stack is improving the data centre, mobile users and a small number of desktop user at the same time"

That assumes that they push their code upstream. They could just fork the kernel, and since they aren't distributing anything with Linux in it, they can keep the improvements to themselves while staying in compliance with the GPL.

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AVG stung as search revenue from freebie scanners dries up

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Re: I stopped recommending AVG

I tend to recommend MS-SE for the fact that it gets updates through Windows Update. I've found that the fewer things that need to be done to update a machine, the more likely the machine will stay healthy and protected.

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China in MONOPOLY PROBE into Microsoft: Do not pass GO, do not collect 200 yuan

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Re: Mac?

The Mac version certainly, android version not so much, but its on par with most of the other office suites available for Android.

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Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers

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Re: Oh Goody, Chinese Knock-offs On Their Way

I've always felt that neither side was right in this war. Sometime I think someone should imitate Solomon and threaten to convert the whole area into atomic vapor unless they disarm and live in peace.

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Kickstarter tin-rattlers offer reboot of '80s Integrated Space Plan megagraphic

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Re: Boots on Mars and break a leg

Better yet, decelerate at the rate it would be on Mars, and get the astronauts pre-adjusted for the reduced gravity. Make it slow enough and they'll never notice.

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NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw

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An improvement to NoScript

I wish NoScript had the ability to have domain-specific white lists. What I mean is that I would like to allow Facebook's scripts when I'm on Facebook.com, but disallow them when I'm shopping for stuff on Amazon, or vice-versa.

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New BOMB detect-o-tech 'could give sniffer dogs competition': TRUE

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Re: "... difficult to arrange a test with actual PETN or TNT ..."

Indeed.

In many cases governments will lone out samples of these explosives to researchers (just need to call around and ask). Or as a better test, get a copy of a terrorist handbook and make it the same way that they do.

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Secondhand Point-o-Sale terminal was horrific security midden

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I've found that PoS, inventory control, time/staffing systems, and any other systems deployed to stores end up failing due to one of two philosophies (Well over 90% of my clients are guilty of at least one):

'Configure it until it works, then never touch it again until it breaks'

This usually happens when a technician setting up a new system does the bare minimum to get it to work; ofter leaving in default passwords, leaving encryption options turned off, and little to no monitoring set up.

'Make it simple enough for a store manager to fix it'

I see this a lot at large chain stores where systems are shipped out to stores. Companies will try to cut support costs by configuring systems so that they can be set-up by a local contractor (Usually low-skilled) and then be managed store managers so that they only have to send out skilled employees in only the most serious problems.

Either way the systems are as secure as a wet cardboard boxes and nothing will be done about them without a serious breach and immense amounts of effort/money.

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Facebook in new 'experiment' drama: Will users buy it?

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If you are using Firefox Sync, then it will automatically install AdBlock for you And most of your other add-ons too). Too bad it seems to have amnesia when it comes to your preferences for search engines though...

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ALIEN BODY FOUND ON MARS: Curiosity rover snaps extraterrestrial

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Re: Point of Order

But what if its found to have come from Earth? Like some random ejecta from the collision that created our moon, or some other meteoric collision.

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Don't put that duffel bag full of cash in the hotel room safe

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This is why you pay your employees well

It baffles me at how many companies I've been to that have very paranoid levels of security put in place, yet they pay their security guards, janitors/maintenance staff and help desk workers crap wages. In my career as a security consultant, I've seen so many thefts of data by rival companies paying-off low-paid employees.

In one case a security guard and a help desk drone got paid at least a couple hundred thousands dollars each by a foreign company to steal some chemical formulas from my client. Since neither of them triggered any alerts, no one found out about it until after the two of them and their families were long gone. They were corrupted by the simple fact that neither of them were getting paid well enough to support a family.

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'We screwed up' sighs Sony bigwig after gaming portals collapse in DNS cock-up riddle

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Re: I KNOW HOW THE INTERNET WORKS.

Then they just need to register the TLD '.sony', problem solved.

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Redmond may buy security company it says is wrong about AD flaw

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NTLM Authentication

You mean the authentication method you have to manually turn on for an AD Domain/Forest set to Windows 2000-native functional level or higher. So unless you are still running NT4 or haven't bothered to properly configure Active Directory, you're in the clear.

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XSS marks the spot: PayPal portal peril plugged

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"There's no evidence that any of these attacks actually occurred."

Just because there is no evidence, that doesn't mean something didn't happen. The vulnerability allows running scripts on back-end system, it wouldn't be too much of a stretch to think that that might include the ability to interact with the logging system or run a basic line editor to delete the specific log entries.

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Dodgy Google, Yahoo! SSL certs nuked in Windows – finally

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Re: Something needs to be changed in how certificates are trusted.

That's why I would want the lsit to be used as part of the certificate verification process. If the certificate isn't on the list, then it is considered invalid and throw an error; for that certificate to be useful, it has to be acknowledged.

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Something needs to be changed in how certificates are trusted.

I've been toying with the idea that the CA's public key should be added to a website's DNSSec records, allowing for verification that a particular CA is authoritative for a particular domain.

Or maybe require CA's to publish both a list of all certificates they have issued so that any can theoretically audit a CA's trustworthiness. If the list is properly formatted, it would be possible to make this part of the certificate verification process.

Hell, I would settle for a browser plugin that shows me the history of what certificates a website has presented in the past.

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Crazy Operations Guy
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I can understand a CA getting duped into issuing a bad for a small, relatively unknown, website; but something as big as Google? That would have to happen due to an astronomical level of incompetence or malfeasance. Either way they have permanently lost my trust and the entire CA gets pushed onto my untrusted list on my proxy server (My proxy performs man-in-the-middle type inspection of all packets entering or leaving my network and drops anything signed with an untrusted certificate).

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Miscreants leak banking baddie's secret source

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Joke

"several IT criminals have been inspired"

Not really news, Oracle has been taking my money for many years now.

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Plucky Rockall adventurer prepares to leave islet

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"British Antarctic Survey"

I think they might have gotten a little lost....

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Infected Chinese inventory scanners ships off logistics intel

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[Citation needed]

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Future Apple gumble could lock fanbois out of their own devices

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Re: stupidity upon stupidity

Indeed. It would be absolutely useless for me, I'm a Technical Adviser to an Outsourcing Company's Sales / Contract initiation team, so I spend half my time at home and the other half in various cities around the world where one week I might be in Berlin, next I'd be in Seoul, then off to Sao Paulo, Maybe San Francisco after that.

Even if I went to the same places constantly, it'd still be useless as I carry two phones: a work hone and a personal one, they are so thin and light nowadays that I barely notice I already carry Micro-USB cables for my external hard disks, battery packs, etc.

Now if might be useful if the location was calculated as distance from my pocket...

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VC who wants to split California REVEALED as Silk Road Bitcoin slurper

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: " San Andreas fault line"

Someones been watching too many movies. The San Andreas fault is part of a subduction zone; so rather than splitting off and floating away, the two side of the fault line are being pushed together. Over time California will become smaller and much more mountainous as the edges Pacific Plate crumple up against the North American plate.

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FTC: T-Mobile USA took '$100s of millions' in bogus txt charges

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So about those other companies raping consumers...

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PayPal says sorry: Fat fingers froze fundraiser for anti-spy ProtonMail

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A fat finger...

...at the end of a particularly well-known 'long arm'

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British and European data cops probe Facebook user-manipulation scandal

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Would they be liable

Would Facebook be liable if someone they manipulated committed suicide or murder on or around the the time of the experiment?

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REVEALED: The sites blocked by Great Firewall of Iraq

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Big Brother

Domain level Blocking

When has Domain level blocking actually stopped anyone? Even if you were to block all DNS traffic except to controlled DNS servers, then people will just distribute hosts files (And that is not even addressing the issue of VPNs, TOR included). I was getting around domain-level blocking in elementary school, and I didn't have much motivation to do so, how do you think it would fare against a bunch of militants trying to get people to fight in their holy war?

I wonder when governments are going to realize that censorship of the internet, or any other media, will never work and doing so only fuels uprisings and dissent.

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Facebook: Yes, we made you SAD on PURPOSE... for your own good

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: "Facebook are prepared to distort reality"

Doesn't Apple have the patents for that?

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Aereo presses pause on 'tiny antenna' TV-streaming service

Crazy Operations Guy
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Ridiculous

I don't see where any harm is coming from, in fact the original broadcasters are getting more money. The video stream isn't being modified in any way other than being compressed into a packet stream, so the advertisements remain but are now being seen by additional eyeballs (And without the transmitter needing to pay for more towers or electricity to bathe us in their signal).

The only harm could come from the cable losing out on people that would have bought cable service for just the local (And freely available) channels. In my mind, this is akin to a TelCo suing Skype for damages.

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What a whopper, LG: Feast your eyes on this 77-inch bendy TV

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Good I/O Design - I've heard of it!

Most people don't want to see cables sticking out the side of their electronics. If you want to be able to access a port without going behind you can plug in a short extension cable, or just buy some extra regular cables and have them hang out in front of the TV,

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New MH370 search zone picked using just seven satellite 'handshakes'

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Re: Goes along with my theory

err, that would *west*ward

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Holmes

Goes along with my theory

When I first read about the flight I had thought it was a simple accident rather than malice:

Wiring catches fire, knocking out transponders and other comm gear

Smoke fills cockpit blinding and suffocating pilots

Panicking pilots accidentally turn the plane eastward

Pilots fall unconscious and let go of the stick

Aircraft engages auto-pilot since pilots are no longer responding

Aircraft keeps going until it runs out of fuel and crashes into the ocean

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Send Bitcoin or we'll hate-spam you on Yelp, say crims

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Re: Given the loose definition of terrorism...

I'm speaking from the perspective of the government, there have been numerous congressional hearings saying that scams have cost America billions and all that rot.

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Given the loose definition of terrorism...

And that they are threatening using mercury to contaminate their restaurants, could the recipients of these letters forward them over to Homeland Security? It'd be nice to Guantanamo Bay used to imprison scammers rather than 'terrorists'. Funny how scammers have done more economic damage to America than terrorists, yet the government ignores one and spends trillions on the other...

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Patch looks like Microsoft FAIL, quacks like FAIL, is actually quite good

Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Probably just updating certificates or something

Do not understand how PKI works? Microsoft certificates and certificate authorities are signed by a third party CA, Baltimore CyberTrust, who may be the ones that use OpenSSL.

It is likely that Baltimore CyberTrust will be re-issuing certificates and revoking the old ones as a precautionary measure in the astronomically low chance that anything was actually compromised, so Microsoft needs to get the new ones in the hands of their users before BCT revokes the old ones.

I assume you posted anonymously because you are embarrassed by the fact you don't know a damn thing about what you are talking about.

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Probably just updating certificates or something

With Heartbleed a few months ago and that the patches for OpenSSL would be done getting applied right now, I think this patch is Microsoft revoking old certificates and rolling out new ones to be on the safe side. Having it separate from the other updates makes sense if they don't want it to end up in the middle and kill any secure session with the Windows Update servers mid-patch or mess with code signing or something.

I know that Microsoft doesn't use OpenSSL, but whoever supplies them certificates might.

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US Supremes just blew Aereo out of the water

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Re: Used to be a remedy for home sickness

I don't have a DVR of any sort (Abandoned Cable/Satellite years ago) so neither solution works for me. Now to find some recording software, a decently supported tuner card and a DTV antenna. I just hope that I can get a signal in my apartment.

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Re: Judges are too old

Indeed. I've been comparing Aereo's service to setting up an antenna and then plugging in a thousand mile extension cable.

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Crazy Operations Guy
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Used to be a remedy for home sickness

My job takes me away from home half the time (One month at home, one at customer site in some random country or city) and I use the Aereo service to watch local news and locally-produced shows to ease the stress of being away from home. I suppose now I have to buy a TV tuner card and try and get some software in place.

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