* Posts by Richard 22

207 posts • joined 26 Jun 2009

Page:

Oops: Bounty-hunter found Vine's source code in plain sight

Richard 22

Re: Wait a minute.

The article doesn't say the keys are in the code - it says that the keys are in the docker image. Even if they weren't in the image they would have to be available to the image, and in this case you'd have full control over it.

4
0

Torrent is a word, and you can't ban words, rules French court

Richard 22

Re: I think the world would be better off...

Can't see a French court banning the word Paris...

6
0

Microsoft joins battery-saving browser bandwagon with Edge claims

Richard 22

Re: Cherry picking

Which platform are you running which doesn't have a choice of browsers? Linux has Firefox (and derivatives) and Chrome/Chromium. (opera?). OS X has Safari, Firefox, Chrome (Opera?)

1
1

New Firefox versions will make you activate all new add-ons – except one hacker favourite

Richard 22
FAIL

The BBC have an html5 beta version of iplayer;

http://www.bbc.co.uk/html5

5
0

Google spews critical Android patch as millions of gadgets hit by Linux kernel bug

Richard 22

Re: That covers Android 6.0 (most versions)

I should have said - the fix first appeared in 3.10.82

https://git.kernel.org/cgit/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git/log/fs/pipe.c?h=v3.10.82

0
0
Richard 22

Re: That covers Android 6.0 (most versions)

So I had a quick look - it turns out that this patch has been in the 3.10 LTSI tree since June 2015, and it is in fact already in 3.10.84. The log for the relevant file at the 3.10.84 release is here;

https://git.kernel.org/cgit/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git/log/fs/pipe.c?h=v3.10.84&id=f1178e991adbe6ea8a7524c8c83fa479dc26c765

The top commit is the one referenced by the Google advisory. So although Google have only just pushed a patch for this, the Sony Android 6.0 release is already covered.

0
0
Richard 22

Re: Excuse me?

Poorly worded article.

Needs the kernel updating to one with the patch. Nothing more, nothing less.

0
0

Firefox will support non-standard CSS for WebKit compatibility

Richard 22

Re: Noooooooooooooooooo

Thanks for the informed comment and reasoned argument.

This appears to be a very sensible and pragmatic move for firefox. Presumably for a bunch of already agreed and finalised standards all that would be required is for firefox to support the -webkit and non-webkit prefixed versions of the CSS, presumably bringing it into line with webkit browsers which I'm guessing don't remove support for -webkit prefix as soon as the standard is finalised.

Short of getting every website author to go and clean up all their sites to ensure only standards compliant tags are used, and to ensure that they keep these up-to-date while also ensuring backward compatibility of their sites on older browsers, this appears to be the best way of ensuring Firefox remains relevant as an alternative rendering engine. This is important to ensure that webkit-based browsers don't completely dominate and thus begin to ignore standards altogether (as happened with IE back in the day)

7
9

Amazon vendors flog thousands of rooted, malware-laden tablets

Richard 22

Re: Allwinner?! That's a funny way to spell MediaTek.

The headline was pure clickbait. If they'd named the tablet manufacturers or Allwinner then nobody would have clicked on it. I assume these tablets are not only sold through Amazon - I'm sure they could have written the same story with ebay rather than Amazon.

2
2
Richard 22
FAIL

Re: Allwinner?! That's a funny way to spell MediaTek.

No. This is tablets sold _through_ Amazon the retailer, not Amazon branded tablets. I had assumed it might be those from the headline, but then I, you know, read the article.

Amazon's quality control would be very unlikely to let this happen on their own-brand devices, and their update mechanisms would definitely allow them to fix it quickly. And they would fix it very quickly to prevent damage to their reputation.

Also - MediaTek is a Taiwanese company, not a Chinese one. But don't let that stop your ranting.

18
0

One Bitcoin or lose your data, hacked Linux sysadmins told

Richard 22

Poor quality ransomware

It appears that for this attempt at least, the files are decryptable without paying the ransom;

https://lwn.net/Articles/663955/rss

0
0

Apple killed our app say Chaos Computer Club

Richard 22
FAIL

Re: Well Duh!

This isn't a hacking app. It's an app which allows people to watch video streams from a conference where some people may be discussing security issues (including hacking) which may or may not be related to iOS.

They allow the YouTube app which allows access to the same videos and a whole heap more.

0
0

Time Lords set for three-week battle over leap seconds

Richard 22

Re: Why stop there?

But base 10 is a dreadful system, chosen purely because we happen to have 10 digits. 12 is a much better base since it has a greater number of factors. It would be better to simply move the entire metric system over to base12

As a software engineer I'd be quite happy with base 16 either.

Hexadecimal time please!

14
0

Google stock buy-back: You'll groan when you realize where that $5,099,019,513.59 figure came from

Richard 22
Stop

Re: God's net worth

The Catholic church isn't God though, just one of the franchises.

9
0

Amazon Echo: We put Jeff Bezos' always-on microphone-speaker in a Reg family home

Richard 22
Thumb Down

Re: Kieren, out of interest, how old are you?

I believe Echo has been particularly popular with the older generations, as it allows them to interact with technology and the internet in a natural, personal way, rather than via a computer. However I'm guessing that's not what you were referring to with your "different generations".

8
3

Kill Flash: Adobe says patch to fix under-attack hole still days away

Richard 22

Re: Slow news day?

The BBC are trialling html5 video currently. I don't think their slow transition has to do with incompetence, more to do with not wishing to break things for their large userbase and hence treading cautiously.

2
0

iOS 9 security blooper lets you BYPASS PINs, eye up photos, contacts

Richard 22

million to one chances...

...happen 9 times out of 10

(with apologies to the late, great Sir Terry Pratchett)

0
0

UK.gov mobile not-spot coverage project set to be completed in the year 2155AD

Richard 22
Stop

linear progression

Interesting that based on 2 data points of 2 in the first year and 6 in the first you assume a linear progression true for the next 140 years.

The progression I would like to pull out of my arse is that they will perform 3x more mast installs than the previous year each year (this has the advantage of exactly fitting the 2 points we have already). Based on this I see that after 6 years there will be 728 masts installed serving 145600 people (200/mast).

Numbers - they can tell whatever story you like...

0
0

Sign of the telly times: HDR shines, UHD Blu-ray slides at IFA

Richard 22

Re: UHD Blu-ray is already sunk

Physical media is still required for maximum quality until broadband speeds catch up. 4k netflix is ~15Mbps, but a high quality HDR 4k stream would require several times that. Most people's broadband just isn't up to that.

Whether any of this increases the enjoyment of the content is another matter...

29
1

Russian regulator bans PornHub for its ‘illegal pornography’

Richard 22
WTF?

Re: There is prob a gay video

That Putin / Obama comparison is way funnier than they realise. It took me some time to work out that they seem to be deadly serious.

7
0

They’re FAT. They’re ROUND. They’re worth almost a POUND. Smart waaatch, smart waaatch

Richard 22

Re: Perspective

You clearly haven't been following the fashion in watches then. That Huawei one is probably considered a ladies watch in some circles...

2
0

Windows 10 grabbed about five per cent market share in August

Richard 22
Thumb Up

Re: So What!

> Neither need the you (The User), to ever touch the CLI. So your arguments can, and should be discounted!

Well said that man. Desktop linux no longer requires the normal everyday user to touch the command line (and hasn't for years). Mint is perfectly usable by a normal user without ever requiring a terminal (my wife uses Mint daily in this manner - she wouldn't know where to start at the command line).

I'm a developer, and perfectly at home at the command line - I still prefer to use GUI tools most of the time for the cases mentioned above (apt-get? no, synaptic unless I know the exact name of the thing I want to install, chmod through the permissions tab in the file manager etc). Everyday actions shouldn't require sudo - and even if you're doing something which requires you to use sudo every 5 seconds, so what? Only the first one will require a password. GUI tools which require a password will pop up a password entry dialog - Windows does precisely the same thing for things which alter system files.

Most instructions you find on the web for installation will give the command line to type, which can be intimidating for new users, but it is the only thing guaranteed to work on all distributions. However, most distributions also include some kind of "Software Center" for graphical discovery of new software to install.

18
1

Twenty years since Windows 95, and we still love our Start buttons

Richard 22

Windows 3.1 was awful

Surely the main reason why people accepted Win95 was that prior to that Windows was godawful. Confusing, ugly, unreliable, unremittingly bad. Windows95 was a huge improvement in usability, and that got refined right up to Windows7 (with some Vista and ME bumps on the way). Windows8 was trying to fix a problem most people didn't have when using a computer (ie work better on the touchscreen most people don't have).

11
1

And on that bombshell: Top Gear's Clarkson to reappear on Amazon

Richard 22
FAIL

Re: Oh well, at least you get to watch some fun TV whilst waiting for a delivery...

> this being a UK website discussing a UK TV show which has been ousted from the BBC

Have you heard of this phenomenon called the "world wide web". World wide being the important bit here...

Also - Top Gear is a UK TV show in origin, but was also one of the BBCs biggest exports, so again, not really just a UK show...

There's no comment on the article over whether the Amazon Top Gear would be UK only or not - I suspect not.

2
1

Even Microsoft thinks Outlook is bloated and slow

Richard 22
WTF?

Re: Outlook for Phones

> Simon forget to mention that he is not talking about the desktop version, which runs very well thank you...

Really? Bloated and slow seems like a perfect description of the desktop version. It's an awful, confused bit of software which would benefit from throwing in the bin and being redesigned from scratch.

8
13

Microsoft: Stop using Microsoft Silverlight. (Everyone else has)

Richard 22

Re: Eurosport

ITV4 FTW (if you're in the UK). Eurosport cycling commentary is crap and their online player is even worse than the ITV one, if they even bother to put all the stages on it (I missed half the Giro due to them not putting all the stages on their eurosport player).

0
0

Linux Mint 17.2: If only all penguinista desktops were done this way

Richard 22
Stop

17.0, 17.1 and 17.2 are all based on the same Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release, so they all have Long Term Support for the core system components. They are all marked as Long Term Support releases on the linux mint website (until 2019 - ie the same as the underlying 14.04 system). So just because they've released a newer, better version doesn't mean you have to update - it doesn't affect the support status of previous releases. They've only really updated the desktop components anyway, plus a few packages. If you've standardised on 17.1 and it's working then there's nothing requiring you to update.

0
0

Time to face the Apple Music: Spotify looks worried, and rightly so

Richard 22

Spotify also have a family offering (half price for additional accounts on the same bill).

The main thing I like about spotify is the number of devices it works on - I've personally used it on linux, windows, android, iOS, symbian, fireos and two different amps from different manufacturers. There's many more devices out there with it as well. I don't see anyone else with the same breadth of device support. Apple certainly isn't going to.

4
2

Amazon cloud to BEND TIME, exist in own time zone for 24 hours

Richard 22
FAIL

Re: Yes.

Entirely novel and new are distinct concepts.

The first wristwatch was an entirely novel thing. The Apple Watch is a new thing.

The first democratic election was an entirely novel thing. The recent UK general election is a new thing.

The first use of time smearing to compensate for leap seconds (who ever did it) was an entirely novel thing. Amazon using in this specific case is a new thing.

0
0
Richard 22
WTF?

So News only encompasses entirely novel things? By that logic all news bulletins would be extremely short - we had an election 5 years ago, so why report on the one this year? People are murdered all the time - why bother to report on a new one? Reporting of things which haven't happened yet, even if they are similar to things which have happened before seems valid, and may be useful to users of the service in this case - at the very least it appears that there is relevant information in the article to EC2 users.

8
0

Amazon creating 500 ‘fulfilling’ jobs in the UK

Richard 22

Re: So...

As mentioned in this years annual shareholder letter, Amazon does use robotics in their fulfilment centres to increase densities;

https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1018724/000119312515144741/d895323dex991.htm

"Our worldwide network of fulfillment centers has expanded from 13 in 2005, when we launched Prime, to 109 this year. We are now on our eighth generation of fulfillment center design, employing proprietary software to manage receipt, stowing, picking, and shipment. Amazon Robotics, which began with our acquisition of Kiva in 2012, has now deployed more than 15,000 robots to support the stowing and retrieval of products at a higher density and lower cost than ever before"

Not fully robotic, but robot assisted.

1
0

Breaking news: BBC FINALLY spots millions of mugshots on cop database

Richard 22
Coat

Re: What purpose?

The Daily Mash has a suggestion on the "different purposes";

http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/society/narcissistic-britons-worried-they-might-not-be-on-police-photo-database-2015020394995

1
0

Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix

This post has been deleted by a moderator

It's official: You can now legally carrier-unlock your mobile in the US

Richard 22
FAIL

Re: Ironic

Jailbreaking and carrier unlocking are 2 completely separate things. The former involves hacking the OS - one reason being to allow pirated content to be played, but there are many other reasons.

Carrier unlocking is what is under discussion here, and that simply allows mobile phones to be used on networks other than the one on which they were originally purchased. Carrier locking of phones has been going on since the early days of GSM. It has always been possible to buy (carrier) unlocked phones - that doesn't mean you can play pirated content on them.

2
0

HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert

Richard 22

Re: Raw Data

I think you misunderstand - he's saying that the data is not of direct use to the Genius Bar tech support in their day-to-day activities of supporting users. He's not saying that they (or anyone else) would be incapable of putting together a tool to extract said data and use it for other purposes, rather that there doesn't seem to be a legitimate use for the data for tech support.

That's how I read it anyway.

8
1

Conformist Google: Android devices must LOOK, WORK ALIKE

Richard 22
Stop

Re: History repeating...

Pardon me - didn't Google _create_ Android, and release it as Open Source to the AOSP?

I know you're trying to draw a parallel, but it seems more like a right-angle to me.

1
2

Microsoft C# chief Hejlsberg: Our open-source Apache pick will clear the FUD

Richard 22
Stop

Re: Sheds a single tear

> Errr - are we reading the same article?

> Where does Javascript come into it?

Page 2 - the bit about Typescript? Or perhaps you weren't reading the same article...

8
0

Spotify boasts 10 million paying subscribers ... Um, is that all?

Richard 22
WTF?

Re: Happy to pay

What are you blathering about?

0
0

EE boffin: 5G will be the LAST WORD in mobe tech – literally

Richard 22

Re: Whats the point of super fast mobile broadband..

One word. Three. They have an all-you-can-eat data option, and enable 4G for all their subscribers at no extra cost. They're a little behind on the rollout compared to EE, but their DC-HSDPA speeds are pretty darn good too.

4
0

Go ahead and un-install .Net, but you'll CRIPPLE Windows Server 2012

Richard 22

Re: Yeah no kidding...

The text is ambiguous at best. remove/reinstall could indicate that it is talking about removing and then reinstalling, or it could mean remove _or_ reinstall.

It's not really clear why you'd want to (permanently) uninstall .net. The fact that it is used by so much of the system means that unless you don't want those bits you shouldn't uninstall it. That would be like uninstalling Microsoft Office because it was too big and then complaining you couldn't open Word documents. Presumably it would be possible to write an alternative set of APIs, GUI shell, command line etc and run it on the Windows kernel. But why bother when it's all there in .net and it's _dependent_ utilities.

1
0

Be prepared... for your Scouts-loving sprog to become tiny spin doctor

Richard 22
Stop

Re: What media relations badge?

You seem to be letting facts get in the way of a (good?) story. You may have come to the wrong place.

1
0

Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed

Richard 22
Stop

Re: Your observation is flawed

No I think you misunderstand. The vulnerability allows _all_ the memory on the device to be leaked (albeit in 64kb chunks). There could be _anything_ in there - I guess any web traffic sent in plain text will be visible (presumably anything encrypted in the browser would be fine)

3
1

Windows XP is finally DEAD, right? Er, not quite. Here's what to do if you're stuck with it

Richard 22
Stop

"The half-dozen or so people I know running XP on home computers haven't applied patches for years / ever. Nor have they been hacked."

Interested to know how you know they haven't been hacked? The type of people who don't apply security updates probably aren't likely to be the best at determining if silent keyloggers etc are installed on their machine, or their machine is being used as a spambot etc. We're well past the days of viruses making themselves known to the user by printing messages and randomly deleting files.

16
5

Say WHAT? ATVOD claims 44k Brit primary school kids look at smut online each month

Richard 22
Stop

Re: And yet....

I assume that the downvotes were because of the implication in the comment that the research in any way proved that 6 year olds were looking at porn. Even if the figures are accurate, they are for the 6-11 age-range. It's highly likely that most if not all of those would be at the upper end of that range (10/11 year olds).

And their surveying techniques have to be called into question. They indicate the figures are partially drawn from tracking online usage - how do they know who was using the computer? How do they know it wasn't an older sibling or their Dad (surely not).

2
0

Microsoft to push out penultimate XP patch on March Patch Tuesday

Richard 22
WTF?

Re: UK .gov websites ?

[citation needed].

Which UK government websites? I've never seen anything on the ones I've used which mentions a browser, let alone mandates one.

0
0

Samsung brandishes quad-core Galaxy S5, hopes nobody wants high specs

Richard 22
Stop

Re: Anyone know what it is using for water resistance?

IP67 can survive being dropped in a sink or a swimming pool. Not designed for prolonged submersion.

I have an Xperia Z1 Compact (IP55/58) and before that had a Xperia V (IP57 - ie same waterproof capabilities as the S5, but less dust resistant), and it's very useful to be able to wash your phone in the sink if it gets a bit dirty, and to not have to worry about getting caught in an unexpected rainstorm (which is what killed my Nokia N8).

1
0

Nokia launches Euro ANDROID invasion, quips: 'Microsoft knew what they were buying'

Richard 22

Here maps for Android?

I wonder if there's any chance they'll produce a Here maps for (generic) Android. The ability to get mapping and routing without a data connection is something Google maps is sadly missing, and most (all?) of the decent full-blown satnav replacements are too expensive for my infrequent usage requirements.

2
1

Elite Systems pulls ZX Spectrum games after deluge of 'unpaid royalties' complaints

Richard 22

Why would they need to join the Bluetooth SIG? Surely that's just for people wishing to implement bluetooth chipsets? My guess is that this is just going to use an off-the-shelf bluetooth chip. Do you need to be in the SIG to use Bluetooth branding or something?

2
0

UK picks Open Document Format for all government files

Richard 22
FAIL

Re: Important change

"You seem to want to actively lock out one (Microsoft). "

No - MS office also supports ODF, so they aren't in any way locked out. I think ODF has wider support across other applications than OOXML, so ODF does seem a more sensible choice.

19
1

Facebook app now reads your smartphone's text messages? THE TRUTH

Richard 22
WTF?

2 Factor Authentication?

Can someone explain to me how 2 factor authentication is of _any_ use if the second factor of authentication is sent to the device you're logging in from?

2 factor authentication relies on not only knowing a secret, but also having access to a distinct physical device which only you should have access to. If you're logging in from that device in the first place then it becomes useless as a distinct physical device - only the secret provides any security in this case. The fact that the facebook app then automatically reads the second factor kind of highlights how pointless this is. Better to disable 2FA on that device and therefore not require the READ_SMS permission.

Unless I've missed something about how the 2FA works in this case (I've never used it for facebook).

0
0

Page:

Forums