* Posts by Joel 1

130 posts • joined 25 Jun 2009

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Today's smart home devices are too dumb to succeed

Joel 1

@Goblin

"Bulbs grow, lamps glow."

Lamps glow if they have a source of illumination inside them - you can plug in your electric lamps and turn them on as much as you like, but without a lightbulb, they will glow not at all.

If you are looking at oil lamps (or lanterns) then substitute wick and oil for bulb and electricity...

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HP slaps dress code on R&D geeks: Bin that T-shirt, put on this tie

Joel 1
Trollface

Stand out from the crowd

In an environment where everyone is wearing T-shirts and jeans, shake things up a bit and come in wearing Edwardian shirts and waistcoats. Or maybe Nehru suit - no tie required. Dressing up in a dress down environment can be more fun than the other way around. Plus, management thinking you might be going to an interview keeps them on their toes.

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All wristjobs are as insecure as $#@%, reveals unsurprising research

Joel 1
Facepalm

This isn't a report

They don't report on which devices they tested. They also don't even say if they tested the iWatch, just that they tested "10 of the top smartwatches" not the top 10 smartwatches. Did they test the Pebble? Did they test any of the Swiss Chronograph with smart functionality?

This is PR guff and doesn't give any details which might allow you to draw some conclusions. They don't even say when they conducted the research, or which versions of the various OS's were used. Was the iWatch even released at this point?

And the Reg article is shoddy as well - it says 100% of smartwatches have flaws. 10 is not 100%. A touch of sampling bias methinks as a minimum. Alexander Martin should be ridiculed in the same articles mocking the credulity of journalists reporting that Chocolate helps you lose weight.

There might well be vulnerabilities across the board. I think someone should research this issue, as there doesn't appear to be any extant research published.

Doh!

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The Great Barrier Relief – Inside London's heavy metal and concrete defence act

Joel 1

Re: Soooo ermmm

Still got golfballs at Menwith Hill....

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Attention dunderheads: Taxpayers are NOT giving businesses £93bn

Joel 1

@James Anderton

"Incidentally if you are plowghing a field, pottering about on a canal, digging a hole, fishing for herring, consuming gin on your floating palace then you will also be receiving this "gift" from the taxman."

Actually, if you are pottering about on a canal, you now have to pay duty on the diesel you use. If you also use diesel for heating, then you get that without the diesel - you have to allocate a percentage of your fuel that you use for heating.

Thus, liveaboards pay little duty, but cruisers pay much more.

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Subaru Outback Lineartronic: The thinking person’s 4x4

Joel 1

Re: Subary servicing

Diesel outback came out in '08, so his experience pre-dates it. A world of difference between the petrol and diesel models, and the US version is effectively a different car with the same name...

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Joel 1
Thumb Up

Re: Questions

Absolutely. I bought mine for the higher ride height (to deal with flooded bits of roads) and the ability to negotiate farm tracks and a bit of crossing fields. In fact, as we then proceded to have large dumps of snow just after I bought it, I can verify that it handles snow in the Yorkshire Dales far better than many "4x4s". There is a reason why they have a strong following amongst farmers...

Currently on 160k miles on an 09 plate, and it has been very reliable. I'm beginning to have to swap out wheel bearings, but I think that is acceptable on this sort of mileage. Economy on the diesel is good (in 2009 it was class leading) running at 45.9mpg (measured) over the 160k miles, and stretching to 48 or so on a long run. And it looks like a standard estate, rather than an SUV, and behaves well on the road.

Mind you, the price has increased 50% or so since I got mine, when it was c.20k rather than c.30k now. But you don't get hosed on "options" - the price of the trim levels pretty much includes everything. Might well look at another when this one retires, but that's probably in another 100k miles or so. Probably the favourite car I've had so far.

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Joel 1

Re: Subary servicing

Diesel Outback has a cam chain - no replacement required (160,000 miles and counting)

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Online gov services are mostly time-wasting duplicates, says EU

Joel 1
Flame

@Kubla Cant

"Yes, but there are a significant number of sites where some bastard UI developer from hell has gone to the trouble of disabling copy and paste in these fields"

Not only that, but numerous sites try and tell me that my email address incorporating +siteidentifier is not a valid address (which it is). Why can't they read the RFCs to find out what is valid, instead of randomly guessing?

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The insidious danger of the lone wolf control freak sysadmin

Joel 1

Re: Internal wikis - do they ever live up to expectations?

Yes, internal wikis can very definitely live up to expectations. But the first thing to emphasise is that sharepoint ≠ wiki.

Particularly with managed service or on-call, a good way to build up your wiki is to put your new engineers into the oncall rota early on, but with an experienced engineer to also be on call if the newbie gets stuck. First port of call is the wiki. Then, if still not sure how to deal with the alert, call the experienced engineer. Nothing like that for giving the experienced engineer an incentive to update the wiki!

Get your new engineers to document anything that they have had to ask about. Makes it easier for next time.

Employ engineers in their 40's - need to wiki everything as you want to remember the next time you have to deal with an alert at 3am, and the memory is not what it was!

Move people between teams - again an incentive for making the wiki better while you try and get up to speed.

Make the wiki easily searchable - if it is easier to search than ask, people use the resource. The more useful it is, the more people are likely to update the wiki.

Change the culture to one of expectation that it will be on the wiki. As a sysadmin, get fed up of answering the same question, and wiki it - then point people to the wiki.

Ideally you make it into a resource that people use in the same way they do Google. Why not use it?

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Elon Musk pours more Kool-Aid into Powerwall

Joel 1

@Weapon

I'm assuming you are not UK based. In the UK, there are a number of factors which can make a smaller install preferable.

The first issue is roof size - can you fit >4KWp on your roof? The majority of UK installations (by number) are <4KWp. Most houses won't fit >4KWp.

Secondly, you can install up to 4KWp without having to ask the power company for approval - beyond 4KWp the power distribution company has to consider if the grid is appropriately sized to take the power (assuming you are grid-tied).

Thirdly, the FIT in the UK reduces the rates for installations >4KWp. So for many people, 4KWp is the sweet spot for installation, assuming your roof can take it.

Also consider that the best return is when you are substituting for your own electricity use. Most households have base loads below 1KWp <http://www.mpoweruk.com/electricity_demand.htm>, so it is only when you throw on the kettle, or electric oven etc that you get to use all your own power, even with a smaller system. And it would be rare to run a kettle all day...

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Don't panic. Stupid smart meters are still 50 YEARS away

Joel 1

@AC

"A smart meter data describes in detail your usage pattern so it is a perfect tool to deduce are you at home"

Nope, it would give the information about whether the sun was shining - at the moment during the day the energy flows the other way.

However, I'm more than happy to stick with my old analogue meter, as it spins backwards when my panels are producing more than I'm using - I've informed the electricity company, and submit monthly meter readings that are negative in summer, but no-one seems to be bothered.

My meter is actually a reconditioned one that is 19 years older than my house - I thought they were supposed to swap them out every 15 years, but 16 years and still no sign of it. Maybe they are holding off for the smart meter rollout...

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Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV: The new common-as-muck hybrid

Joel 1
Headmaster

Re: @Boltar...A lot I could live with...

"Besides which a Subaru outlander estate is a favourite with farmers who really do need proper offroad vehicles."

If you check out the title of the article we are commenting on, you will see that the Outlander is by Mitsubishi.

The Subaru Outback (of which I have one at c.156k miles) has been a joy, one of the major pluses being that it looks and behaves like an estate rather than an SUV, but has better AWD than most SUVs.

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Tesla Powerwall: not much cheaper and also a bit wimpier than existing batteries

Joel 1

Re: Inverter?

The Nedap Powerrouter has this functionality - indeed, many of the inverters designed for the German market now do this, as the market there is moving away from FIT. The householder wants to use as much self-generated power as possible.

http://www.powerrouter.com/en/producten/frontpage.html

They also do a retrofit model...

http://www.powerrouter.com/en/powerrouter-familie/powerrouter-unifit.html

The Tesla batteries also aren't hugely revolutionary - alternatives already exist:

http://www.akasol.com/en/storage-for-renewable-energies/neeoqube/

A Nedap setup will allow 5KW or 3.7KW peak loads (according to model).

A lot of the cost is tied in to the intelligence of how to handle the charge/discharge, particularly when electricity is charged at different rates at different times (which includes self-generated power). What you really want is something which can determine when you are generating more than you are using, and only store that electricity. The problem with the Nedap solution (in this country) is that the power is stored directly, and doesn't pass through the inverter to go through the generation meter. Thus you don't get your FIT payments until it comes out of your battery. Thus you pay for any inefficiencies.

Mind you, it does open up the possibilities of charging batteries elsewhere and putting them into the system fully charged to then be used and pass through the generation meter at full FIT earning potential. Seems like a lot of effort for a small return...

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High on bath salts, alleged Norse god attempts tree love

Joel 1
Coat

Re: Did the copper shout

Since the Tasering failed twice, he must have been providing too much resistance...

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First HSBC, now the ENTIRE PUBLIC SECTOR dodges tax

Joel 1

@GitMe...

"Similarly, why are government staff subject to income tax on government salaries? Surely an equivalent value to net should be paid and so you eliminate the need to calculate tax and all the staffing needed to handle it."

Doesn't work for employee's tax, as not everyone has the same tax code - will vary based on other earnings, child benefit, owing tax, pension contributions, Gift Aid etc. Very difficult to work out what the net value would be.

The only part which does apply is the employer's NI - why does the public sector have to pay employer's NI? I remember seeing a headline that the increase in employer's NI was putting a strain on School and NHS budgets. Seems crackers to me - complaining about increased public expenditure due to an increase in public taxation...

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Enough is ENOUGH: It's time to flush Flash back to where it came from – Hell

Joel 1
Trollface

@Manu T

Now if only we can get malware authors to use apps the way they were intended, instead of using undocumented and unintended functions. Because that's just malicious...

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BYOD is NOT the Next Biggest Thing™: Bring me Ye Olde Lappetoppe

Joel 1

@jason7

It is not unknown for skilled workers to supply their own tools - joiners/stonemasons will often supply their own tools.

My concern is that often the company budget for IT is far lower than what I would prefer to pay. I use the equipment day in/day out, and I am more than happy to pay out to have the spec of machine I want, rather than that deemed necessary by the bean counters.

Many times in the past I have paid out myself to max the RAM on the company machine rather than go through the pain of trying to push the justification through the purchase system. RAM is too cheap to worry about. When you can double the RAM for under £50, why worry?

No-one has yet complained that the inventory software reports too much RAM. No security issues either.

It is always disappointing as a contractor to be working on the supplied system that has 25% of the performance of my own system. But there you go. They pay enough for me to put up with it (although I did sneak in an extra 4Gb stick of RAM I had lying around - one has some standards).

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LEAKED: Samsung's iPHONE 6 KILLER... the Samsung Galaxy S6

Joel 1

Re: Why should Apple be worried?

@JEDDIAH

After today's announcement, I really don't think Apple will be bothered by Android eating "more and more of Apple's lunch". Apple just seems to be getting bigger and bigger platefuls, so I'm not sure what Android is eating - the plates and napkins perhaps? Apple certainly doesn't seem to be going hungry.

Perhaps there are two separate markets developing? The Android one is certainly bigger by volume, but the lunch that is being eaten is that of feature phones. Android at the low end has certainly supplanted that. At the high end, both Android and Apple are growing, and possibly disconnected. Growth in one doesn't necessarily cannibalise the other - the growth can come from the low end feature phones as people decide that actually they want more than something to make phone calls with (do people still do that?)

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Which country has 2nd largest social welfare system in the world?

Joel 1
Headmaster

Re: Sorta - Stalinist?

"Private rail isn't a great comparison, as they didn't actually allow for any competition (if I want to go to London, I have to use a Southern train), plus they are required to run the trains throughout the day, even mostly empty."

Not completely true (although I grant you, mostly true).

Grand Central is an open access rail company providing a few additional direct routes to London from Sunderland and Bradford. This is in competition to East Coast. If you want to travel York to London, you have the choice of East Coast or Grand Central (although there are only a few GC trains a day). So, they allow for competition, just there mostly isn't any.

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UK slaps 25 per cent 'Google Tax' on tech multinationals

Joel 1

Re: I'm confused...@AC

"And by the way the British Empire INVENTED imperialism."

I think the Romans might have something to say about that... and the Persians ...and the Chinese

Oh, Ming the Merciless also wants a word. And I hear that a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away...

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BOFH: Everyone deserves a little DOWNTIME

Joel 1

The one advantage...

The one advantage of doing it over GPRS - if the data network is being accessed, you can't make phone calls, or more critically, have inbound calls to interrupt you.

Occasionally slow and steady wins the race...

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Google bags OBSCENELY LARGE Times Square ad space for New Year's

Joel 1
Headmaster

Re: Don't think you meant that...

@Eddy Ito

According to the "folks who should know"

“Pixel density of 2,368 x 10,048 — the highest resolution LED video display in the world of this size, dwarfing 4K ultra high definition pixel density by 15 million pixels”

They clearly don't know...

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Joel 1
Headmaster

Don't think you meant that...

" The obscenely large adverts will be displayed on the highest resolution LED of its size in the world, with a pixel density of 2,368 by 10,048, far higher than 4K ultra high definition."

Don't think you meant density - or do you mean a ridiculous level of ppi?

Thought not.

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Naked and afraid: that's how Telstra's Wi-Fi security makes you feel

Joel 1

False security

If you are connecting to a public wifi hotspot, wifi encryption only secures you as far as the base station. You could be connecting to a fake base station (using the same publically known password), or being monitored on the wire when it connects to the router, or monitored at the ISP or anywhere else.

If you want security, use end to end encryption. Don't rely on the false security of an encrypted wifi network. Better to be unsecured and use end to end encryption. Everyone can snoop my packets, but anything important is encrypted. Use https when needed. Use imaps. Use ssh.

Oh, and if you login to el Reg from a secure network (ie your home) then you can stay logged in using cookies. But of course, you use disposable account details for your commentard account anyway. If someone wants to post as me, not the end of the world. And if something libellous gets posted? Well, plausible deniability...

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Why can't a mobile be more like a cordless kettle?

Joel 1

Give a phone enough cable...

I bought myself a 10ft braided cover lightning cable. Works brilliantly - when charging in bed I have complete freedom to use it at the same time should I want to change alarm, browse the web, read an ebook etc. I used to have a dock, but actually consider the long cable much more useful.

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3D PRINTED GUNS: THIS time it's for REAL! Oh, wait – no, still crap

Joel 1
Coat

Re: Tanks

"But a lemonade bottle full of petrol with a piece of cloth for a wick will do nicely"

Would be utter crap - most lemonade bottles are plastic, so useless for Molotov cocktails. You need a wine or beer bottle or the like... They even come with government warnings on them :-)

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Why Comrade Cameron went all Russell Brand on the UK’s mobile networks

Joel 1

"Their purpose is to build out at least a 2G network into those areas which would be so unprofitable that the existing providers would not do it."

2G?? What's the point of that? Who uses mobiles for phone calls these days? Even if they do, having a data network means that you can make calls as well.

Actually, didn't one of the 4G frequencies O2 won come with a coverage requirement?

"Ofcom has attached a coverage obligation to one of the 800 MHz lots of spectrum. The winner of this lot is Telefónica UK Ltd. This operator is obliged to provide a mobile broadband service for indoor reception to at least 98% of the UK population (expected to cover at least 99% when outdoors) and at least 95% of the population of each of the UK nations – England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales – by the end of 2017 at the latest."

What will that coverage look like? The roll out of 4G at 800 MHz is likely to be able to have far better coverage than 2G/3G.

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Big Retail: We don't hate Apple, we hate the credit card companies

Joel 1

Re: Time for the Fed to fix ALL CC Processing

"If you have a debit card there should be no "processing fee" because that debit card is the same as cash. You are effectively writing an electronic check each time you use the card."

Sorry, what? Cash processing isn't free - businesses have to pay to deposit cash. This is why they started doing all the cash back offerings at the till - it allows them to deposit some cash for free, as the debit card charge is a fixed amount, so no marginal cost for doing a bigger transaction.

Even electronic transactions often aren't free for businesses. Banks charge for all transactions, just less for an electronic one.

The fact that consumers have "free banking" is a relatively recent phenomenon.

Where credit card companies are prepared to sacrifice margin, they often do this via bribes (sorry, cashback) to the customer. Thus Amex do very good customer bribes, but charge high fees to retailers. So, customers want to use Amex, but retailers don't want to accept it. Small retail outlets often don't accept Amex at all.

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Jeff Bezos rolls up another $437m, lights Amazon's cigar with it

Joel 1
Pirate

Re: Really?

"Maybe we should just give Jeff Bezos a knighthood (or whatever floats his boat) and ask him nicely to fix the global tax system."

Fix it for whose benefit? I though he was already trying really hard to fix the tax system?

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Indie ISP to Netflix: Give it a rest about 'net neutrality' – and get your checkbook out

Joel 1

Re: @mathew42

The problem is that it is not about the amount of water delivered, but the capacity to deliver water.

You might be able to fill a swimming pool using a garden hose, but it will take days to do so. You probably would prefer to pay for a sufficient supply to be able to fill it in hours rather than days - same amount of water, totally different demands on infrastructure.

Bandwidth is the requirement for the end user. Bits used is of concern to the provider for their transit cost, together with bandwidth capacity to meet the peaks of demand.

Bandwidth is a fixed cost, transit cost is a variable one.

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David Cameron wants mobe network roaming INSIDE the UK

Joel 1

Roll out decent data coverage

Rather than rushing around blathering about switching off analogue radio, by getting everyone to migrate to DAB, spend the money (and spectrum) on rolling out a decent data network across the country, and get radios to transition to network devices that can stream using apps like iPlayer Radio, or the multitude of dedicated radio apps.

Who cares whether the program comes via packets or a radio transmission? Having a decent data network would be far more useful than the equine zombie that is DAB...

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Google Nest slurps your life into the Matrix? The TRUTH

Joel 1
Coat

Cloudy streaming

"Dropcam allows streaming video to be sent over the cloud.....

The cameras could detect grey skies and decide to ramp the heat up, for instance."

I assume the cameras wouldn't be able to stream any video if the skies were blue and cloudless...

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Android is a BURNING 'hellstew' of malware, cackles Apple's Cook

Joel 1

AC Re: Really?

>(apart from sometimes making phonecalls when they can find a cell tower - their radios are very poor).

I seem to remember the AnandTech in depth reviews suggesting that the radios were in fact rather good.

I can only assume you are making your comment from the US - the phone network there is rather poor in general, hence the emphasis on "cells" rather than "network"

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But... you work in IT... Why aren't we RICH?

Joel 1

It's for photos and videos

What we use it for, is for sending/receiving videos and pictures (especially now I have a grandson). The danger with iMessage is that you accidentally move away from wifi and it goes as an expensive MMS (not included with bundled SMS) - doubly a problem if you are abroad. The advantage over Skype is that Skype requires the other person to be logged on to Skype and to accept the inbound picture.

The other area it worked well in was in forwarding on a picture - it didn't need to re-upload it, saving data volumes.

However, now it's been bought by Facebook, I will be deleting my account and taking up with Telegram which is pretty much a drop in replacement with the added bonus of encryption options.

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What's up with that WhatsApp $19bn price tag? Answer: Voice calls

Joel 1

Actually my family's main use of WhatsApp is sending videos/pictures around instead of MMS - too many networks charge extra for these, when it should really just come out of the data bundle. But it's only marginal - slightly easier than emailing them, or sharing with dropbox.

Advantage over Skype is that I can send the picture when convenient to me, and it is received at the other end when convenient for them. With Skype, it wants to have a real time confirmation to send/receive the picture.

Looking at Telegram now to replace WhatsApp.

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I've seen the future of car radio - and DAB isn't in it

Joel 1

Re: Caching will only get you so far

Actually, recently switched to EE (because of the appalling Vodafone 3G coverage) and drove down the A1 from Harrogate to London streaming 6Music catchup on the iPlayer radio app on my phone. No problems.

Don't have DAB in the car. Not sure why I would want to?

Makes me think, rather than having a dedicated service like this Rara cloud service, why not just go for a in car system which offers internet and allows people to access what they like? As 4G rolls out, it will offer better service and coverage than 3G (or DAB, come to that), and more to the point, the IP backend connectivity will be more future proof than a DAB service which will just end up with a legacy installed base when we want to move to something better.

Concentrate the money on providing decent nationwide IP connectivity, and then you can dispose of these new "obsolescent" broadcast technologies that they are desperately trying to get people to adopt.

Analogue radio + IP looks like a much better way forward than trying to drag people kicking and screaming to DAB when they can't prise the Trannies out of their clenched fingers.

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Fanbois, prepare to lose your sh*t as BRUSSELS KILLS IPHONE dock

Joel 1

Re: Meh

Meh, bog standard USB ports (you know, the sort that comes on PCs), are the real standard. You plug your cable into the charger that outputs to a standard USB port (and not one of these B, C, micro or whatever interfaces) and you are laughing.

The last thing I want is a proliferation of chargers that end up in a non-standard male connector. If all chargers had a female USB A socket on, then there would be less waste of charger bricks, and it would be a lot easier when you go abroad.

At the moment I can plug a lightning connector into the charger that came with the old Dock connector for my iPhone 3G, or into the charger that came with my wife's nook, the USB output of my Duracell battery charger (to run from AA batteries), the USB output that came with my car charger, or the USB output of my BioLite stove (and charge off twigs and wood). I can also plug the uUSB cable for the Nook into the USB output of my iPhone charger.

There is a standard connector, and it is USB A - it is what is on the other end of all the sync data cables. This allows you to dispose of the requirement for multiple differing switched mode power supplies.

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Three offers free US roaming, confirms stealth 4G rollout

Joel 1

The interesting 4g...

...for rural areas will come when the 8/900MHz LTE starts rolling out. This will have far better penetration of buildings, so better for covering large areas.

Less important in urban areas as bottleneck more likely to be number of handsets per cell than strength of signal

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Microsoft's EAT-your-OWN-YOUNG management system AXED

Joel 1

Compared to what?

I've heard of companies which aim to ditch the bottom 5% of employees. The problem comes if the bottom 5% of your employees are better than the best you can attract to new positions!

This also assumes that there is no benefit to being familiar with the company practices and culture. Mind you, at companies like these, I can see why that might be the case.

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One year to go: Can Scotland really declare gov IT independence?

Joel 1

Gchq has 3 disclosed locations?

That must mean that GCHQ Scarborough must be über secret then. Just as well there are no road signs in case you miss the turning. Oh wait,

http://goo.gl/maps/gSj7d - don't go to Streetview

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US Republican enviro-vets: 'Climate change is real. DEAL WITH IT'

Joel 1
Headmaster

Re: @itzman solar comment

As solar is often used locally and generated locally, it doesn't appear on the gridwatch stats - it can only be determined in arrears when people report their generation stats.

There is ~1.5GWp installed on domestic and business premises according to https://www.renewablesandchp.ofgem.gov.uk

This is electricity that won't go anywhere near the metering that is reported on by NETA (source for data on gridwatch). It is produced onsite and used onsite (or in near vicinity).

My panels produced 20KWh today in North Yorkshire. Whilst that is insignificant, multiplied by the 400,000 installations, it begins to add up. With a demand today of ~30GW, solar is probably in the region of 3% or so, which isn't including the output of the solar farms, who won't be running on FIT.

So should be worth mentioning, and there are an awful lot of roofs left in the country. Why don't all warehouses cover their roofs with them?

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Terror cops swoop on couple who Googled 'backpacks' and 'pressure cooker'

Joel 1
Coat

I'm not slacking off...

My code's compiling!

http://xkcd.com/303/

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Russian cargo ship drops off spacesuit puncture repair kit at the ISS

Joel 1

Of course there was someone in...

Their spacesuit has a hole in it.

It's like waiting in your pants in your hotel room for the trouser delivery service to provide replacement pair after splitting the seat. You ain't going anywhere. It sucks to be David Bannister.

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No scientific consensus' on sea-level rise?

Joel 1

The rise and fall of sea level

There was an interesting article in New Scientist <http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21829151.900-where-melting-ice-means-retreating-seas.html> which detailed the effect due to local gravity from the ice mass.

Basically, the large mass of ice attracts water to it, so the water piles up against the ice sheet flanks. If the ice melts, this mass is removed, and so this attractive force disappears, and the water slumps back. Thus, around the melted ice cap, the sea level can actually fall.

As we are talking about water, this change in level will happen very rapidly. People have been aware of land rebounding from under the weight of icecaps (still happening today from the last ice age), but that happens on a much longer time scale.

Of course, the water that leaves the areas around the ice caps has to go somewhere, so other areas will experience much greater sea level rises than suggested by the change in mean sea level. It also makes a difference which ice cap melts first...

As with so much of this area, it is far more complex than you would initially expect.

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PM writes ISPs' web filter ads for them - and it must say 'default on'

Joel 1
Headmaster

Re: When I were a lad.

If your school had a proxy server when you "were a lad", then you clearly still are!

Eee, youngsters today, thinking that schools had access to t'web. I remember the joys of ascii porn being passed around on fanfold paper round back of t'bikesheds.

You were lucky! We had to get our porn on punchcards, line them up and then project light through them onto t' darkened walls of coal celler where we 'ad our lessons...

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Intel waves LONG TENT POLE, pokes Data Domain boxes with it

Joel 1
Trollface

Great clustering!

I'm impressed! Throwing ancient computer hardware from a moving plane at thousands of feet and they land within feet of each other! And that includes one which has its parachute deployed, thus varying its descent rate! I'm truly impressed at their ballistics skills.

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BT scores £146 meellion more UK.gov cash to fibre up Balamory

Joel 1

Far too important…

Always makes me laugh when someone phones up:

"Would you like to save money on your broadband?"

"Don't be silly, it's far too important to piss about with cut price services. Last thing I want is a cheap service. What I want is a decent service. I'll stick with what I have"

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Apple to cough up $100m after kids rinse parents' credit cards on apps

Joel 1
Coat

Re: Sort of agree

"my son can't buy anything without entering my pin, even for inapp stuff."

Why on earth would you be giving your son your PIN to enter? Surely that defeats the point? And I would have thought you would want to prevent inappropriate stuff anyway, as it is, like, inappropriate.....

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