* Posts by Will 28

137 posts • joined 24 Jun 2009

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LinkedIn sinkin': $10bn gone in one day as shares plummet 40%

Will 28

Optional?

I'm not a tax expert, but I'm reasonably sure you don't pay tax on an option until you take it (in fact even then I'm not sure what you have to pay, surely the bulk of the tax, if not all, is when you sell those shares?). I also don't think you can sell options, just elect to buy the shares at that price.

However I'm no expert on the matter...

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Microsoft’s Get Windows 10 nagware shows signs of sentience

Will 28

I'm still running 8.1, no updates pushed

I wonder if you're looking too carefully at the vocal community. I run 8.1 on my machine and the get10 thing is a notification. It's still 8.1 there's no pressure or anything.

Are you sure you're actually getting good stats here, or just heresay?

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Cache-astrophic: Why Valve's Steam store spewed players' private profiles to strangers

Will 28

Do we have any comment from the ICO?

Normally when someone spews customer data out to unintended sources we're told the ICO will investigate. Do they apply to Valve? I would have expected so, but cannot find them on the list of companies under the jurisdiction of the ICO.

Were The Register able to get a comment? I couldn't even see where to email to ask them.

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Firefox-on-Windows users, rejoice: Game of Thrones now in HTML5

Will 28

Silverlight end of life in 2021?

If you believe MS I assume that is? It's end of life right now for everyone else. Chrome won't run it any more, Firefox will ditch it very soon, even the new Windows browser "Edge" won't run it.

People are rushing to ditch SilverLight right now, I very much doubt it will be around beyond next year. In 2021 when it officially ticks over, nobody will notice.

It's shame in some ways. Hate MS all you like, detest plug-ins as much as you want, but I doubt that many people would say they wouldn't like a cross browser supported XAML driven web site with a strongly typed language backing it. It speeds up dev time enormously. My hope is that someone brings in some kind of XAML to HTML framework (it gets suggested by various people, but I don't ever see anyone really committing to it).

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Microsoft to OneDrive users: We're sorry, click the magic link to keep your free storage

Will 28

Re: Disingenuous little f*ckers

MondoMan, it does indeed say that. As a result I decided to go ahead with keeping the storage, then I would go and disable the app.

Unfortunately it was lying. I have searched for about 5 minutes now. I can find no option to change this. You'd think it would be in the "Options" section, but I assume that somewhere via some other menu I have to find the "Account Settings" screen.

They have either lied, or made it very difficult to find.

EDIT: Found it, it's not in the one drive options, you need to click your profile picture, go to edit profile, then click your picture again and there's an option for "Account Settings".

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Doctor Who: Oh, look! There's a restaurant at the end of the universe in Hell Bent

Will 28

For me this summed up everything that Moffat is getting wrong

I appear to be in the minority, but in my opinion, every Moffat story seems to have the same flaw. He's planned out some scenes, then he has connected the scenes. He hasn't remembered to actually make a story. We had the scene where The Doctor returned to Gallifrey and confronted Rassilon. Having done this they very swiftly skipped through a quick note that Rassilon might come back, some mentions of the prophecy, then onto the scene where he rescues Clara. Some quick shots of people panicking and running around, then we're onto the scene where they're walking around the matrix with all the old favourites jumping out. Then a Clara to Doc conversation to lead onto the scene in the tardis...

I could go on, but personally I watch these episodes and feel like I'm just being pulled around into little bits of script. The actual plot to the episode was very weak, just a lot of suggestions of a plot, which is what he's been doing right through his time scripting. I keep finding myself saying "Ok, where are you going with this then? Oh, you're not".

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IT manager jailed for 5 years for attempting dark web gun buy

Will 28

@AC - Entrapment - not perfectly acceptable

I'm not a lawyer, but even a quick google of the subject shows that you're not entirely correct here. Cases have been dismissed in the UK on the grounds that they were entrapment. It sounds as though the case you're highlighting where they actually persuaded the person to commit a crime, the judge should have thrown the case out.

From my brief read on the subject, it appears that police are allowed to create an opportunity for a crime (leave goods unprotected then arrest the thief, or run a shop on the dark web that can be contacted for gun purchase), however they cannot encourage you to commit that crime. So I assume that they could not leave some goods unprotected, then pay someone to go and steal it for them. However it's up to the judge to conclude that was done, you cannot submit it as a defence to the jury.

Once again - not a lawyer, just breaking down the results of a quick search on the subject.

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Doctor Who's The Zygon Invasion shape-shifts Clara and brings yet more hybrids

Will 28

Re: "this story is influenced by current affairs"

Kate Stewart wasn't caught out by the "not-a-cop-anymore" Zygon, as I expect we'll be amazed to discover next episode.

Hell, if Queen Elizabeth the 1st can kill one then I'm pretty sure a unit operative can.

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It's all Me, Me, Me! in Doctor Who's The Woman Who Lived but what of Clara's fate?

Will 28

I think you guys are being unfairly harsh on Rufus

He wasn't telling jokes, he was acting out a person telling jokes. If he was just being genuinely funny then the acting wouldn't have worked. It's a bit like when someone in a film / tv show is then "in a play", they have to convey the story point that they are acting. Similarly so, he was acting out a person that wasn't a comedian, that was making cheap gags in order to delay his execution. Would it have been more convincing if he'd come out with a finely polished routine?

I thought it was actually quite well done. He conveyed the sense of desparation well, trying to find anything to keep him alive.

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We can't all live by taking in each others' washing

Will 28

Re: TTFN

A real shame to see you go Tim, I've really enjoyed your articles. Guess I'll have to start following your blog now, it was easier for me to have the articles distilled and produced on schedule.

I hope you advised the new elite of El Reg to get economists with contrary views to write some articles - you could get to dish out some of the commentard magic in the other direction.

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OH GROSS! The real problem with GDP

Will 28

So is it actually a good idea to measure it at all?

Given it's a figure that we almost all agree is at best a guideline, and is open to some pretty significant distortions, does it have value as a figure? It's all very well to say it's the best we've got, but when you put a figure on something people tend to go absolute on it. To an economist GDP may be a guideline with (un)known variance, but that same figure once reported will get reported by an economics journalist to a readership of vaguely informed people (us), who will then repeat such figure to completely uninformed people and then suddenly it's a rock solid measure of our economy.

Let's not even start on how politicians use it.

Is it the best measure we've got, when "no measure" is taken into account as an option?

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Top VW exec blames car pollution cheatware scandal on 'a couple of software engineers'

Will 28

Re: modern configuration management systems are wonderful

You can sneak code in if you really want. I don't believe it happened in this case, but a driven developer is usually able to smuggle a change through without being spotted. It can be as simple as using a build server account, or even as unfair as just accessing a colleagues machine (often via a share that the naieve colleague has agreed to) and altering some files to piggy back a change on a legitimate changeset.

I don't think it happened here, but I don't agree with those saying that a good change control system could prevent this 100%.

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Will 28

So we can safely conclude...

...that there might be other pieces of unauthorised code lurking in VW's engine management systems. In fact if it's possible for engineers to sneak in code to so fundamentally affect the workings of the engine without anyone noticing, it doesn't seem possible to deny that someone could potentially have placed code to make the engine explode on a particular date.

To my mind he appears to have said that as a matter of security all VW cars with an engine management system (which I assume is just about all VW cars), must be immediately recalled.

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Dear do-gooders, you can't get rid of child labour just by banning it

Will 28

Re: Paradox?

I think you're seeing a paradox because you're looking at these two things from opposite directions. If you're going to look at drugs as being that the person providing the drugs can command a higher price, then you have to look at the child labour as being the person offerring the labour can command a "higher" price (i.e. not pay as well).

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You want the poor to have more money? Well, doh! Splash the cash

Will 28

Re: The child sized elephant in the room

Indeed, a good illustration of the added complexity that we seem to be avoiding in the discussion.

Just to be clear, I was not seeking to be one of those people who make you feel wrong for having many children. I think when I said you could "easily argue that...", I intended something more along the lines of "lazily dismiss this factor by saying that...".

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Will 28

The child sized elephant in the room

It strikes me (and therefore is probably irrelevant) that most discussions on reducing poverty and ensuring a fair distribution of wealth always conveniently ignore one of the biggest financial costs to a family, which is the kids. I can see why, as Tony Blair demonstrated with his education x3 speech, once you start pulling on the parenting strings, people lose objectivity.

Without this consideration it kind of makes all the rest seem redundant. It's all very well to guarantee an income to an adult, but if they've got 3 additional mouths to feed then they're signficantly worse off than the person that doesn't. You could easily argue that kids are a luxury, but there are unplanned pregnancies, and if there's a moral imperative to help the adults out of poverty, surely it applies to the children too? There's also the economic point that we need to keep fresh people coming through to pay for those retiring.

I'm not suggesting I have an answer, just that without it taken into account we're not really addressing a real world problem.

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So Quantitative Easing in the eurozone is working, then?

Will 28

Re: When do we get to win?

I understand the whole hedonic adjustment thing. I suppose I'm more pointing towards inequality, but more specifically how the current economic policies appear to be motivated by keeping wages down. This comes back to my point, when is there a time when they should go up? We never get a "times are good, lets reward you" moment. Only times are bad so we must stagnate, or times are good, so we must slow things.

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Will 28

When do we get to win?

I might have ranted about this before, but there's something nagging me about all this economic policy. When times are hard we all need to tighten up our belts and accept that pay rises and improvements to our wealth are not realistic. Then as times improve, the banks increase interest rates to stave off the risk of "inflation busting pay rises".

I know Tim's argument has been that we dictate our pay by providing that level of value for our work, but I can't help but feel that there's economic policy stacked against us here. It's further aggrevated by the fact that those interest rate increases haven't staved off the inflation busting pay rises of the FTSE board room members, something the ASI came out in defence of.

Sorry, rant over. Interesting article Tim.

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So, was it really the Commies that caused the early 20th Century inequality collapse?

Will 28

Destructive growth?

A good article Tim,

I did like the point about making things to blow things up not being economic growth. It made me think as to whether or not the arms trade is contributing to growth or not. Is the net effect of the arms trade on the global economy a positive or negative one? On one side we have the obvious advantage that we've made something (for example a bomb), on the other hand we've got the disadvantage that it will ultimately destroy something. In between we have the potential advantages/disadvantages that our "will" is being enforced, and we perhaps get global security.

I suppose it actually comes down to a basic question of "is it ever necessary to fight a war". Still, got me thinking, which is sometimes a good thing.

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Forget Big Data hype, says Gartner as it cans its hype cycle

Will 28

Is there any room for rolling off the slope of enlightenment and down into the valley of verified bullshit?

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Hey, folks. Meet the economics 'genius' behind Jeremy Corbyn

Will 28

Re: At least you declared an interest this time

No, abusive means exactly what I meant it to "using hurtful language". What I find astounding is the inability of commentards to actually understand the term. Similarly so your lack of understanding that I was not criticising Tim.

He was making a personal attack. He even said it. I thanked him for saying that, for declaring his interest such that we could move on to the discussion. I even noted that I percieved his declaration as softening his stance.

Abusive: You're an idiot.

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Will 28

Re: At least you declared an interest this time

There was a definite personal focus, and you cannot take the article without accepting that it is attacking (to a point) the person rather than the argument. Tim admits this, which was actually what I was thanking him for.

As for other times he's done it: This was particularly bitter and in my opinion uncalled for: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/03/04/evgeny_morozov_why_does_he_bother/

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Will 28

At least you declared an interest this time

My thanks to you Tim for making it clear that you were biased on this one. I find your abusive articles much more palatable when you make it clear that it really *is* personal.

I also suspect that in doing so you actually make the article less abusive, as you've been far ruder about other articles and people in the past. Perhaps your clear bias prompted an attempt at impartiality (or perhaps because he accused you in that other article of ad hominem and straw man).

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Hands off, Apple! Irish dev studio sues over alleged iWatch infringement

Will 28

Re: But why file suit in Milan?

I was talking to a friend of mine in the pub about this. While that may seem an indication that this information is not high quality, I'd note that he is a patent attorney that deals with exactly this sort of thing.

Apparently the Italian trademark legal system is the least efficient and most arkward one to deal with. If you were seeking a settlement and wanted to make it least appealing to contest this, you'd go there as the costs and annoyance to a business would be much more.

He also suggested they had a very poor case because iWatch is such a weak trademark (watch is useless as a trademark because it's descriptive, and everyone's putting an "i" in front of things), but I'll leave it to him if he wants to come on here and share the rest of his view on this :).

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Attention dunderheads: Taxpayers are NOT giving businesses £93bn

Will 28

So how didn't he get it?

I often wonder with your articles, if they didn't get your point, or if you didn't get theirs. It's not that I disagree with your article, we just haven't seen his response to you, or any indication of "how" he hasn't understood what you're saying.

Depreciation of assets isn't a complicated concept, we learned about it in GCSE business. The tax rules surrounding that, and the concept of only taxing profits are so simple, that I struggle to believe that when you're directly explaining this to a researcher that has been doing a research paper in this area, he is left scratching his head. Did he in fact make some other argument for why these should be considered subsidies, or did he flat out not get the concept of time?

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Why is that idiot Osbo continuing with austerity when we know it doesn't work?

Will 28

Re: Worstall? Lefty?

But you are a lefty, you just believe in right wing ways of achieving your left wing ambitions.

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So why the hell do we bail banks out?

Will 28

Re: Why not nationalise all the banks?

This in fact goes to one of my very central questions about government. We keep being told that our public sector can be privatised in order to benefit from industry efficiency / productivity.

Most of us hear this and think - "can't you just get it right as a public company?".

Tim, I ask you a very simple question, why can't a public sector company compete?

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Law changed to allow GCHQ hacking ... just as GCHQ hauled into court for hacking

Will 28

Retrospective Law?

I thought that it wasn't legal to apply changes to laws retrospectively? This was why that broadcaster was given a very light sentence for child abuse, because he'd done it when the law was less severe.

Perhaps there's some difference when an act is amended, or perhaps when it's done through the statutory powers they used. Please let me know if you know the actual answer?

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Amazon cloud threatens to SMASH the fundamental laws of PHYSICS

Will 28

30 Days to back out - there's your limit

If we assume that you're using that service as the sole storage for your data, and you have a download speed that averages 1MB/sec (and there's no throttling). That means you've would only be able to get 2.5TB of data off in time when you close your account (or when it is closed for you, perhaps because Amazon decide the offering is not viable). So a sensible user would assume you actually have a 2.5TB limit (even then only if you have as good an internet connection as a 1MB/sec avg 24/7), as you cannot dependably retrieve any more back from it.

2.5TB is still pretty good for cloud storage mind you.

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Improved Apple Watches won't get more expensive? Hmmm

Will 28

But Tim, didn't you classify the iPhone as a veblen good?

Seems to me that if said classification is accurate then it makes sense that there's no hedonic adjustment. People are paying for something they could get for cheaper, and are buying a brand rather than functionality. So improvements to functionality do not change the value of the good, as it was not what was dictating it?

Seems a bit silly though doesn't it. So I guess that the iPhone and iWatch are some kind of hybrid, only able to maintain their status as a veblen good by also keeping semi decent functionality.

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It's not easy being Green. But WHY insist we knit our own ties?

Will 28

Re: The problem with markets

I think you've missed the problem. It's not the markets, it's the fact we're human.

In a perfect world (Tim's world, it would seem), such risks would be accounted for and be factored in, as they are in a lot of industries. The desire for profit would be tempered by the knowledge of the risk that it would all be lost if conditions changed. Thus we would account for such loss of crops, or specialist skills, or customer demand.

In this world, we see those that take risks rewarded, so we take disproportionate risks. We don't see the ones who were not rewarded, often enough, because they aren't around to tell us about it. Thus humans fail the market, and thus the market fails it's humans.

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Chipotle insider trading: Disproving the efficient markets hypothesis

Will 28

Re: May I remind you...

I'm not very well read on all this economics theory Tim, so please do explain where I've gone wrong here, but it strikes me that you've just disproved you own article.

If no-one (or not everyone) has perfect information, then those pieces of information contributing to the ups and down of the prices must have an effect based on the proportional distribution of the various pieces of information. Thus the full fat flavour of the EMH was holding true as well, it was just that the distribution of the information that the two insiders had was so small that the effect on the prices was minimal, but still an effect (their trades surely would have moved the prices just a little).

Please do correct me. I very much enjoy reading about all this stuff.

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GoDaddy in doghouse over puppy-flogging Super Bowl ad

Will 28

So GoDaddy is supposed to be animal friendly?

Wasn't this the same organisation where the owner (and/or CEO?) went out and personally hunted and shot and killed an elephant in Africa in order "To protect the villagers livelihood"?

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Erik Meijer: AGILE must be destroyed, once and for all

Will 28

The reason I've seen most agile projects get into trouble

I've seen agile implemented with varying degrees of success, and produce products with varying quality, quantity and delivery time (not necessarily exclusive). It's been my observation that the main thing that causes agile to be majorly neutered is when people start seeing it as an "answer" that will make their life easier.

One particularly disastrous project I saw (and was involved in cleaning up) the team said "We're going to be agile now, so we don't need to plan anything". They then proceeded to each take a bit of the system, not talk to each other, and code it. In that case they didn't know what agile was, but even when people do, they want agile to just go off and fix that problem for them. I'm sure everyone on an agile project has encountered someone saying "We're agile now, so I don't have to do x". As the article said, that's not really what it was about.

In my opinion the only way agile works is if everyone in the process, from analysts to designers to developers to testers to managers to customers, invests time and effort in doing their bit for the process. Agile requires more ongoing effort than waterfall because with waterfall you produce the deliverable for your step, then head off down the pub. Agile requires everyone at every level spending time every week from day 1 to quite a way after day of release.

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One year on, Windows 8.1 hits milestone, nudges past XP

Will 28

I upgraded from Vista to Win 8.1 last month

It's better. You could argue that's like watching only odd numbered star trek films, but I use win 7 at work, and there's really not a problem with win 8.1 compared to that either. Its way faster than both Vista and Win 7, it's stable, and it runs everything I want to. Can't complain about it.

Worth upgrading from 7 - no. However when you're on Vista (or as someone suggested they were, still on XP) it's not only a better OS, it actually runs stuff you need to use nowadays. In my case the forced upgrade came from needing to use Visual Studio 2012 (will not install on Vista). I can see why 8.0 was hated, but 8.1 is really quite smooth.

The only annoying thing for me is that other people with these high res laptops are automatically being put into 125% dpi scaling which is making my job as a developer way harder (admittedly, I should have accounted for it, but wpf is not really helpful with that and I thought I could get away with it).

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Star Wars: Episode VII trailer lands. You call that a lightsaber? THIS is a lightsaber

Will 28

Re: I'm pretty sure it won't cut your hand off

But that would take the attacker's hand off making the guard "useful".

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Will 28

Guards are good

Yes, Guards on swords are useful.

The silly thing is that the guard on that sword is strong on the edges, and fundamentally vulnerable on the bit you refer to (getting your fingers rapped). This part is of course mechanical and as we saw in the Phantom Menace with Darth Maul, it can be chopped (conveniently) in two, so this one I assume breaks up into three. So a useless guard against the thing it's guarding against.

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Will 28

I'm pretty sure it won't cut your hand off

It was my initial reaction as well, but I've been thinking it through, and it would actually be pretty hard to chop your own hand off with the guard of your sword. The angle you'd need to get your wrist to would be an incredibly weak position, and nobody would consciously (or even accidentally) do it.

Perhaps those more experienced in fighting with broadswords could correct me, but as someone that has practiced martial arts, and does know the basic shape of such techniques, I just can't see how you'd do it (or for that matter, why if it were the case, broadswords had any kind of guard in the first place).

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Down in the Dell, Compellent and EqualLogic are stirring

Will 28

New partner?

Ok, that's 2 dell adverts in one day.

I am confident you won't publish this, I just want to let you know that I am sorry that you've sold out so badly. TheRegister once reviewed products and actually talked about them, weighing pros and cons. There would be analysis and evaluation of products. Bygone days from a time when the tech press was already massively subjugated, but we could count on a magazine called TheRegister.

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New Dell FX2 chassis mixes 'n' matches server innards

Will 28

Reads a little bit like an almost carbon copy of a press release

Did you even see one? Maybe I'm wrong, you might be an enthusiast who's really excited about this new kit. However when an "article" doesn't even suggest there might be a negative about a product, readers get suspicious. You could at least have said "Drawbacks? none that I've come across so far." Or "regurgitated press release, oh yeah that's how I do my job".

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Did HP just tip its hand on Autonomy? Spoiler: It was a busted flush

Will 28

The problem with your theory

People generally want to write off losses they haven't made. HP actually blew $10bn on the deal, and they really don't have anything to show for it.

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The Windows 8 dilemma: Win 8 or wait for 9?

Will 28

Re: Boring

This is not boring, it is a very interesting article. I run windows Vista, it cost me £200, I don't think it's as bad as people say and would happilly keep using it for 3 more years. However MS decided not to support VS2012 on windows Vista, as a software developer I need to be able to use that (especially as work computers are rubbish and I want to get my much more powerful home computer compiling our code).

So I need to upgrade, question is do I upgrade to win 7 for probably about £100, and have this problem again in about 2 years time, or pay what's likely to be about £200 to jump to 8 now it might be usuable, and kick the can a bit further down the road.

This article contained useful information for me, though I'm still not sure now the spectre of a win 9 has be dangled in front of me - damn that last paragraph.

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Pension quango's £18.5m project FINALLY goes live... 2 months late

Will 28

£18.5m, 2 months late - this is fantastic

Seriously, for a massive overhaul of their IT systems, with costs in the millions, a miss by two months is really not even noticeable. It sounds like they have actually done a really good job (delivery wise, though you did mention performance issues).

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TrueCrypt turmoil latest: Bruce Schneier reveals what he'll use instead

Will 28

Re: smoke and mirrors

Your argument put simply. TrueCrypt worked. It cannot unwork, so much as to find that it didn't work. If that is the case you would hope the open investigation would find that. To suggest it does not work without reason is odd. If there is a vulnerability, you have to wonder where, as it's just using standard algorithms.

My position is that until proven otherwise, Truecrypt (the thing using a variety of algorithms and hashing codes) works. Maybe that's naive, but then maybe we didn't send Edward Snowden to the moon.

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Top Brit docs wade into GP data grab row, demand 'urgent' NHS England talks

Will 28

There are rumours that you're not fully opting out anyway

According to the following: http://medconfidential.org/how-to-opt-out/ , opting out just removes some more information from what they send, it doesn't stop them sending it.

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15,000 London coppers to receive new crime-fighting tool: an iPad

Will 28

The cost effective option?

I hope this is a joke I haven't got. Why on earth would a policeman need designer gear? Are those app devs that they're getting to write the apps all happening to be skilled in Objective C? There's a huge amount of traction in the developing countries for cheap tablets. Perhaps buy up a load of old Surface RT tablets that no-one wanted. It's just as easy to write up a report on it, and they'll be a hell of a lot cheaper.

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Google and Samsung bare teeth in battle for LANDFILL ANDROID™

Will 28

I think you underestimate MS benefits from this

As companies try to tie you to their services, it increasingly breaks consumer confidence. My last 3 purchases have gone:

iPhone 3G

Galaxy S2

Nokia Lumia (recent, so I can't be sure if it's a great improvement)

Each time I moved because I was pissed off with the constraints of the device. My iPhone would not work without pledging my undying loyalty to iTunes and binding everything to Apple. I moved to the open platform, suddenly Google Play would periodically start on my phone, and I couldn't uninstall it, it appears contract phones from 3 are not able to. Then other google services started running in the background, without any user interaction. So I move to a windows phone. Granted it doesn't tell me what's running, but so far it seems to be much easier to customise than the "open" platform that is/was Android. What I can be sure of is that those other two systems are driving people away by trying to take too much from them.

Just saying, the more Google tighten their grip...

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Ahoy, scalliwags! FBI claims another haul of Silk Road booty - $26m of it

Will 28

Innocent until proven that your defence lawyer represented someone else we don't like

Seriously guys, why the final paragraph about his representative? The man may have represented people that may have been bad people (I don't even know if those accused were guilty), but is it really fair to tar a man with that? I find it unlikely that he was able to do any substantial research into his representation, and just used a lawyer he was advised to.

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Coding: 'suitable for exceptionally dull weirdos'

Will 28

I want to meet the interesting people

I'm happy to accept I'm dull, though Willard's post here already shows that he was just using that term to provoke. However what I really don't get, is that for all the people that do genuinely look on me as a geek, or a dull wierdo, is what do they do that's so interesting?

Are these people arriving at work riding a kangaroo? Do they enter the office jumping from a plane, then parachute in through the 5th floor window? What do they do???

If you're interesting, or know anyone who is interesting, please write to me with the answer at "this post, the register forums, Vulture Central, London".

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How to spot a coders comment

Will 28

Cruel coders comment thus

This still exists in our codebase, I've checked the source control history, and it has not changed since the migration 4 years ago, I still don't know what it is talking about:

// Note: Important, when changing this remember to

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