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* Posts by Jim 59

1176 posts • joined 24 Jun 2009

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RIP net neutrality? FCC boss mulls 'two-speed internet'

Jim 59
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Re: A Very Strong Stink of Corruption

Seems to be overwhelmingly against the public interest. Imagine if they did this with the road network. People would be manning the barricades.

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Shocking new low for SanDisk – 15nm flash chips rolling out its fabs

Jim 59
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15nm

About the same distance a man's beard grows in 1/8 of a second ?

(1mm/day)

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Dell charges £5 to switch on power-saving for new PCs (it takes 5 clicks)

Jim 59
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Dell

Fair enough, it's a rip off. But just to be contrary, a techno-phobe who earns (say) £20 an hour might think it worth spending £5 to save 2 hours of his time.

It narks me more to see Comet selling Ethernet cables for £20

http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/computing-accessories/accessories-and-bags/power-cables/pc-cables/sandstrom-scat61512-cat6-ethernet-cable-15m-12567143-pdt.html

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Google adds a sense of history to Street View with archive footage

Jim 59
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Free chocolate !

Lots of excitement about what Google giving us. Not so much about what we give them in return.

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Enterprise storage will die just like tape did, say chaps with graphs

Jim 59
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Wikibon

I checked out Wikibon and their website. I love their excitement, enthusiasm and openness. In the interests of balance however, it is worth noting that they have only 5 employees and appear to be really just a small internet tech forum, founded in 2007. This does not make them a world authority on tech trends.

"server san" does not appear to be a thing outside of Wikibon (google), and their definition of it seems to be a renaming of "nearline storage" that people got very excited about in 2008.

Why would a small company puff such a feint idea ? Maybe I lack the vision thing.

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EU: Let's cost financial traders $400m a day, because EVIL BANKERS. Right?

Jim 59
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Re: Speculation

A complex issuue indeed, and with a whole fleet of vested interests circulating around. On the one hand we have the banks, who damn near trashed the western world a bit ago, facing off against the EU, a body which could drain an olympic sized swimming pool of gravy in 10 seconds. The EU is probably narked that London is Europe's biggest financial centre, so anythong to put the mockers on that is fair game for them. The traders, as Mage says, have never generated a penny of actual wealth in their lives, and make a living by digging holes and filling them in again. The pension companies continue to have it good, largely because, incredibly and uniquely in 2014, they are allowed to charge for pensions in secret and abstract whatever they want from your pot without even setting out the figues in an invoice. Whoa there I have reached MAXRANT, an algorithmic constant which stops commentards from going completely doolally and then--

Oh er, and yeah good article.

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EE & Vodafone will let you BONK on the TUBE – with Boris' blessing

Jim 59
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Alas for the El Reg headline writer

What happened ? Is it true he retired to become a bikini inspector in California ?

El Reg Editors' Lolz Lacking

- Comely Commentard Calls it out

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Github cofounder resigns after clearance in sex-harass probe

Jim 59
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No AC, too much tarring with the same brush there. Richards was an extremist nutter IMO but Horvath is reasonable. They are very different.

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Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: Great changes, but sssh don't mention the...

Jim 59
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the look and feel of an OS designed for a 5-year old using a laptop or tablet.

Surprising how many distros are still following the "make-my-pc-look-like-a-giant-iphone" design model, even though release after release shows the folly of it, including the recent Windows 8 / Metro debacle.

... the Mir graphics stack which Canonical is hoping will one day support both its desktop and mobile offerings.

Stop it Canonical. Stop it.

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Most Americans doubt Big Bang, not too sure about evolution, climate change – survey

Jim 59
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Americans == totally thick

...and they've got the Nobel prizes to prove it.

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Jim 59
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Rant bait

14:02 El Reg baits headbangers

14:03 Headbangers successfully baited

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WTF happened to Pac-Man?

Jim 59
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Play on emulator

eg. mame. It's the only way.

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Spanish village called 'Kill the Jews' mulls rebranding exercise

Jim 59
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Re: This message brought to you by religion

it's not the "religion" part, it's the "organized" part that's the problem.

Darned right. Which is why I went to the disorganised church today. First off, half the congregation were facing the wrong way, then the priest started off reading his dry cleaning list before the PA system broke down, people were bumping into each other on roller skates, somebody was throwing confetti for some reason and then a big bag of flour fell onto--

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Jim 59
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Re: @ Don Jefe

To all those blaming "religion" for all badness, you might as well blame shoes. Shoes have been present at every atrocity, and have enabled every evil act, have they not ? Failing that, perhaps blame science, which gave us the hydrogen bomb. Or blame engineering, without which we would not have the machine gun, tank, warship, or Exocete missile. No. We fall to evil becuase we are human beings, that's all. Accept it, and stop trying to pass all the blame to some vague external agency.

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Jim 59
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Re: 14th century?

Hi Register you have come close to commemorating Good Friday by publishing a story that could, to an unsympathetic eye, appear designed to provoke sectarian divisions in order to generate clicks. Being a long term fan of both Haines and El Reg, I know this is the last thing you would want to do. I hope your advertisers see it in the same way.

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Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters

Jim 59
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Re: Spam

Yes I know about email client filtering. I was making the point that spam was once used only by scammers but is increasingly used by legitimate companies.

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Jim 59
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Spam

An increasing amount of spam comes from legitimate businesses. Buy a windscreen wiper and the garage will spam you. Often you can turn off the spam but sometimes not. Paypal has lost customers by spamming them unwanted "activity" reports monthly. Where you can deactivate the spam, it always involves jumping through hoops and the company always has an incentive to start spamming you again at some point.

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Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker

Jim 59
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Not sure if you are aware of Mumsnet's solid left-wing credentials, but founder Justine Roberts is married to Ian Katz, BBC Newsnight editor and ex deputy editor of the Guardian, the paper from which Newsnight takes its senior staff.

While at The Guardian, Katz (says wikipedia) oversaw a campaign to influence the outcome of elections in Clark County, Ohio to help swing the 2004 US Presidential election against Bush and in favour of Kerry. It was not successful and it was not popular with Clark County voters who, surprisingly, don't like foreigners interfering in their election process.

Roberts studied "PPE" (Politics, Philospohy and Economics) at Oxford, a fairly new subject also studied, at Oxford, by Labour MPs Angela Eagle, Maria Eagle, Ed Balls, Yvette Cooper, David Milliband as well as PM David Cameron.

Funny how many of our leaders went to the same school, lived in the same street, studied the same (slightly naff) subject at the same place, are in business together, living together, are related to each other, (often concealing the fact with maiden names). It perhaps explains how come much party policy, large swathes of the BBC, media public institutions are papered over with an unthinking groupthink so uniform you can't see the join. Sorry for the lengthy off topic rantathon.

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Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS

Jim 59
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Re: @asdf The desktop deadend.

Can I do a major version upgrade of Mint yet without backing up/reinstalling from scratch/restoring? No? Bye then!

Just my view but version upgrades are naff, better to wipe and install. A mega upgrade tends to leave behind a patchwork.

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Jim 59
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Re: @asdf The desktop deadend.

Good news, looking forward to Mint LTS. Install it, get everything working then look forward to several years of stability. I recently started running a business on my PC and regretfully must say good bye to Fedora after 6 years. The bleeding edge is not compatible with business use, where any instability is an utter bloodpressurey nightmare rather than an inconvenience.

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Red Hat bets on 'Project Atomic' for its container-loaded server future

Jim 59
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Docker

I am struggling to see the difference between this and other lightweight containers, eg Solaris zones.

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Misco Shared Services Centre drone brands customer 'insane'

Jim 59
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Offshoring

This is what happens when you offshore. You get what you pay for. Bit harsh to highlight Misco's cockup in a national magazine though.

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Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS

Jim 59
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Twitter

A bit of silent running on Twitter might not come to badly for El Reg, considering some of the headbanging tweets published in their name.

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Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray

Jim 59
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Re: Not Engineering

"...that subset of people, who know a particular recording well on their own system, will likely be able to discern a difference between a properly mastered 24 bit recording (not just taking a 16bit recording and resampling it at 24bit, that would be pointless) and a properly mastered 16 bit recording, all other things being equal, of a recording they already know well. They do sound different and the ear is surprisingly capable of discerning even tiny differences in the right circumstances. I"

Hi AC the myth of people with "golden ears" has log been used to sell preposterous "hifi" equipment. (I am not talking about those with good pitch or equalization / mixing talent). Some have claimed to hear the effect of tying a knot in the speaker cable. The well known effect of "experimenter expectancy" surely operates. The difference is there, but in perception only, it is a psychological effect. Which is why the claims never survive a blind test.

I don't object to that really, I just don't like seeing people being expensively duped, particularly people who are artistic, sensitive, knowledgeable and committed to music, high culture and black jumpers and (dare i say it) not too technical. And I like it even less when the chicanery tries to pass itself off as Engineering. It isn't.

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Jim 59
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Re: Not Engineering

Hi Betacam you might "hear" a difference when you know which source is making the sound. Double blind you would not.

http://douglas-self.com/ampins/pseudo/subjectv.htm

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Jim 59
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Not Engineering

16 bit CD is virtually faultless within the ability of the human ear. Certainly 24 will not correct anything audible. It is not engineering but a gimmick to snare the wealthy and gullible, as if they haven't been milked enough already by 35 years of nonsense in the high end domestic "audiophile" market.

Just buying bigger speakers would improve most people's experience. However that isn't something people want to do, especially as house sizes have decreased over the years.

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Adrian Mole author Sue Townsend dies at 68

Jim 59
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Adrian Mole

Being a couple of years older than Moley, I enjoyed the original diary, as well as finding it slightly embarrassing. Adrian's problems are pretty ageless and have been encountered by 14 year old boys probably since the stone age. Very funny. Vaguely remember him raging against somebody called the "stick insect", think it was his dad's girlfriend.

Townsend was not a trained writer. Born in Leicester in 1946, Townsend had lived what most of us would consider a “conventional life” before she had hit 25: she left school at 15, was married aged 18 and had divorced and was living as a single parent with three children at the age of 23

Getting married at 18 and being a single parent by 23 were certainly not conventional events in the 1964/69, although they are fairly common in 2014.

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Spy-happy Condoleezza Rice joins Dropbox board as privacy adviser

Jim 59
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Dropbox Privacy Advisor ?

It's the Dropbox users who need the advice, not Dropbox.

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Anatomy of OpenSSL's Heartbleed: Just four bytes trigger horror bug

Jim 59
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Re: I didn't ask for no heartbeat...

Conservatism is right. A Debian server of mine is safe from Hearbleed, purely because it is still on Debian 6. I haven't upgrades to 7 yet, even though support runs out in a month or so.

For secure systems, a balance is needed so that the system does not become too out-of-date, but not too up-to-date either. These low level libraries contain some of the most important code in the world, it seems, and they have perhaps got the balance a bit wrong this time.

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Jim 59
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Re: OpenSSL is open source, most financial institutions don't use open source encryption.

GaryDMN is not totaly wrong. A bank who was a client of mine used SSH products from a well known software company. Those products are not affected by the current vulnerability because they rely on a combination of Openssl 0.9 and the company's own authored TLS libraries.

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Jim 59
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Re: I don't get it..

Hi Tombo software will never be totally secure, any more than code will ever be perfect. I think open and closed source are both good, but your citing of 2 bugs in 25 years is hardly an impressive argument against FOSS.

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Jim 59
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Re: I don't get it..

Modern kernels tend to leave memory unzerod even when after it is "freed", often for virtual memory / performance reasons. Even though the memory is free and available for re-use, pointers are maintained to it in case the same data is needed again soon afterwards. Eg. Solaris 10. Upon being malloced/added to a different process, it is then zerod, obviously.

This instance seems to be a case of a process requesting data from a legitimate partner process, where the two already have a legitimate, authenticated relationship. So I am not sure how the kernel/system could prevent that. It doesn't know about the application's (openssl) data design.

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Internet is a TOOL OF SATAN that destroys belief, study claims

Jim 59
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Pint

Douglas Adams

Now there's a guy who really knew where his towel was.

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Jim 59
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Re: Build schools not temples!

But off course...

Pretty neat lol if that was deliberate, bb.

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Jim 59
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Can't see any direct connection between t'internet itself and religious faith. You can surf to your local church site just as easily as any other.

"The early Catholic church frowned upon translating the Bible into languages other than Latin... because it's easier to control a flock of parishioners when only the priest can translate life's instruction manual."

The "peasantry" could not read Latin because they could not read any language. Previously, information had been passed down generations using the "oral tradition". By the time of the early Christians, there was a standard "world" language available: Latin, spoken and written throughout the Roman empire. It was therefore a no-brainer to write your early books in Latin, especially if you were Roman or a Roman subject, as the early Christians were, and especially if you were taking your books to distant Roman colonies, as they were, and particularly if you were trying to convert Romans, as they were.

Latin of course later became the, er, de-facto international language for science, mathematics and art in Europe, used in every serious writing from the Lindisfarne Gospels to Newtons laws of motion.

The first English translation was made in the 10th century by Aldred, a scribe and priest. It made the gospels more accessible to but widespread bibles could not happen until after the invention of printing 400 years later.

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Bendy or barmy: Why your next TV will be curved

Jim 59
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Pincushion effect

Was pincushion distortion, if it exists outside curved TV sales meetings, reduced by the old fashioned curved (outwards) CRT screens ?

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I QUIT: Mozilla's anti-gay-marriage Brendan Eich leaps out of door

Jim 59
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Re: Animals

@bolccg your basic view is reasonable, but you promote it using the tools of extremism - labeling Eich an "overt homophobe", denouncing as "raging homophobes" anyone who might be thinking of contradicting you. And comparing Eich to an active antisemite, thus smearing him with all the horrifying historical connotations. So he is labelled, smeared, and condemned, as well as sacked. Debate is shut down because those who might have spoken out do not want similar treatment. You are immutable. You have won.

Extremism begets extremism and fear. Say no to it, and say "yes" to open debate, reasonableness and common sense. Applies to both sides.

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Jim 59
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Re: It's a shame

Wow. We do indeed live in politically correct times. Chap sees gay marriage as damaging to traditional marriage, makes donation, sacked. Extreme, extreme, extreme. Though there may be valid arguments on both sides, or you may think just one side, always say no to mindless ideological extremism, and a big fat yes to common sense and moderation, every time. Applies to both sides.

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Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest

Jim 59
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Seems like goodies vs baddies to me. May actually improve child's sense of right and wrong.

Won't do much for their English literature though. That dark character is a mash up of Dracula, Batfiink and darth Vader.

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That's it, we're all really OLD: Google's Gmail is 10 ALREADY

Jim 59
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Great but not for business

Webmail is possible the best ever web invention, and Gmail is gr8. But this article reads like it was written by Google. Google docs/collaborative tools are spoken of at length, without even a mention of the many ineluctable arguments against their adoption by business, which circulate around loss of control, ownership, security and secrecy.

How would Google inc. like to put its critical business documentation on somebody else's server, in another country, under alien laws? Eg. Tax returns ? Redundancy plans ?

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BT Tower to be replaced by 3D printed BT Tower

Jim 59
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LOL. The photo background shows how the London skyline would look if a small number of architecture consultancies were just allowed throw up a collection of cheap, brutalist, mindless buildings in a random variety of styles and positions, with zero sympathy for the surroundings, historical setting or the human inhabitants. Imagine if that really happened.

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Can you tell a man's intelligence simply by looking at him? Yes

Jim 59
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"...based on still photos of 40 male and 40 female"

Just 80 subjects and the males were a different age range to the females. Not scientific.

Also in the example photos, the male is simply frowning in the first photo and smiling in the last.

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Tesla firms hot bottoms: TITANIUM armor now bolted to Model S e-cars

Jim 59
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Joke

Twitter

@gowmana (Twitter) "The comments section in the Register are a marvel of geeky oneupmanship: http://t.co/3dCctXbIfa"

No no no gowmana I know of several internet forums that are much more geeky and oneupmanshippy, for example http://www--

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Spin that disk drive forecast, Gartner: Watch those desktop units dive

Jim 59
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Disks

You can have my Winchesters when you take them from my cold, dead hands.

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Microsoft: Let's be clear, WE won't read your email – but the cops will

Jim 59
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Re: Will you read the goddam article?!

Thanks for explaining "so I can understand". Just to clarify: the blogger was not just a passivie recipient. Sender and receiver used MSN Messanger to arrange the drop, before using Skydrive to transport the data.

Even if the blogger was not in prior collusion with the rogue, it wouldn't make any difference. That T&C clause about passing your data to "law enforcement officials... to aid the investigation of a crime" does not say the crime has to be yours.

I fail to be outraged or surprised by Microsofts actions. Clear text handed off to a third party for delivery has never been secure, not since the invention of writing, not now and never will be. And nor should it.

The puzzle is why so many serious commentators believe that should be somebody else's unpaid job to keep their secrets. Even when they are not paying the messenger to keep quiet, even when the messanger has said the data will be divulged if the occasion demands, and even - get this - when the message is used to wound the unpaid messanger.

However I am less happy about the new/future MS policy of just allowing the police direct access. That is a different story.

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Jim 59
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Good Grief

Surely a deal of naivety on display in this article and the comments. Most jobs I have taken, and internet services I have signed up for, always contain a clause about "all bets are off if you break the law", ie. your data is private but not if you use it to steal, plan a bank job, or whatever, in which case it goes straight to the local police. Would you honestly expect otherwise ?

On the employee side, would it be reasonable, for example, for a guy to work for Siliconchips.inc, and secretly ship the company's designs to a confederate in Somalia, and then start blubbering when the company gets suspicious, reads their coorporate email and finds out ? WTF ? Employee used company time and property (mail system) to break law (steal designs), threatening the company's future and the livlihoods of everyone who works there. In my view it is fine to snoop the mail in this case and in the Microsoft case, and probably entirely legal but I'm no expert.

"By going into Hotmail without a warrant and turning over some of the contents to the police they really challenged their users' expectations about what level of privacy they were going to get out of Microsoft," ...Kurt Opsahl told The Register"

Oh stop it Kurt. Stop it. If anyone has expectations of serious privacy in this area, the expectations are unwarrented and bizarre, the the individuals are in need of some education. In fact they are probably still at school. If you want privacy, do what everybody does: use PGP, TLS and a host of other apps designed for the purpose. A whole industry is waiting to server your privacy needs.

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GNOME 3.12: Pixel perfect ... but homeless

Jim 59
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"I said nothing about the importance of a spreadsheet..."

Oh yeah ?

"Not everyone tits about with spreadsheets for a living"

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Jim 59
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Big desktops

The basic problem big desktops (big in lines of code) is that every 5 minutes they want to get right in your face and scream "I'M HERE!!!".

And for Pete's sake KDE stop calling it "your computer". And stop asking me if I want to "Leave ?" when I instruct you to shut down the system. And then don't give me a slippery moving icon ribbon where hitting the shutdown key is like a duck shoot so then I am back on the desktop and try again and now eh? "Leave ?" ? What no I am not leaving, you are, and what now ? Please will you just f-- okay okay okay I am holding down the power button, holding down the power button, holding down the power button, holding down -"

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Jim 59
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@ cmannett85 - The criticality of data is not a function of its format (spreadsheet, programme code, whatever), but of what it represents. Your C++ code might the latest patches for air traffic control software, or just your own recipe for a decent curry. A boring spreadsheet could be nothing, or a document you are legally obliged to keep updated and accurate, eg. tax records or the company books or the recipe for Coca-cola.

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Hot, young under-25s: Lonely slab strokers who shun TV

Jim 59
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TV

15 year olds are watching slabs in their bedroom

65 years olds are watching big telly downstairs

Could this be because 15 year olds are too poor to afford their own house and massive TV.

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