* Posts by Jim 59

1896 posts • joined 24 Jun 2009

Linux greybeards release beta of systemd-free Debian fork

Jim 59
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Fixing a problem on wheezy:

- look in text file. See error message. Take action

Fixing a problem in jessie (systemd):

- your main challenge here is in finding the error messages in the first place. This will usually be more complex a task than either the underlying problem or the remedial actions needed to fix it. Often you will just give up and take a series of guesses as to what the problem might be. Your third or fourth guess will be correct and so after trailing a number of solutions, a fix is at hand. Rather like trouble shooting Windows.

Got no axe to grind, just hate bad engineering.

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Silent Nork satellite tumbling in orbit

Jim 59
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@Downside Well said to your whole post. Although I dislike the description "pantomime baddy", which is often applied to Kim Jong-un these days. It reminds me of Idi Amin, former president of Uganda, who was sometimes described in similar terms. He even played up to the "evil teddy bear" image, some say, in order to distract from what he really was - a psychopathic, mass-murdering dictator.

Amin, when he wasn't killing up to half a million people, awarded himself a doctorate of law as well as the Victoria Cross. There were even rumours he was a cannibal. Did he deliberately make his own evil cartoonish ? Who knows. Either way, Kim Jong-un seems like a photocopy.

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Snapchat TITSUP on heels of Google App Engine outage

Jim 59
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Joke

Snapchat down

Oh no. Think of all the money they will be losing. Every second of downtime is profit lost.

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Amazon's new drones powered by Jeremy Clarkson's sarcasm

Jim 59
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Drone delivery? Not a chance

Obvious, ongoing publicity stunt. The real "drones" are the poor people working in the Amazon warehouses.

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NetApp adds in-line dedupe to all-flash FAS arrays

Jim 59
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In the home

I'd love a dedupe home NAS, so I can save space storing all those mp4 files - oh wait. No. Well then my massive FLAC archive, surely...no, can't dedupe that either. Well what about that massive archive of ISO images, I can, no, hang on,er... mp3, flv, encrypted backups, no, no, and no... jpegs no, gif no...

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Jim 59
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Re: Dedupe

Backups of said data will still dedupe well.

Don't use a dedupe array as a backup target, tempting as it will seem. Yes, you would save tons of space. But for backups, you actually *want* to have multiple physical copies of the data, Not one physical copy and many logical copies (which is what deduped data is). If those physical blocks die, you could lose not just a single backup, but all generations of that backup within the deduped domain.

I guess another reason that dedupe isn't widespread is that storage is just so cheap now. Even for primary enterprise storage, what you pay for is the speed rather than the capacity. "Big data" might be a better candidate.

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Jim 59
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Dedupe

Dedupe is still alive? It never seems to have lived up to its promise somehow, not since those heady days of 2008, before Data Domain was gobbled up by EMC.

Dedupe is a Nirvana, in theory. By now it was supposed to be everywhere: even in ZFS and Linux. One of the problems is that encrypted data can't be deduped, and encryption is becoming the norm in some areas. Corporate desktops (or at least laptops) are now usually encrypted. So is data held in the "cloud".

What happens to a 100TB array if somebody dumps 20TB of encrypted data on there? Do the inline ingesters just dumbly thrash themselves to death trying to dedupe/undedpue it, or do they know what they are dealing with and somehow skip those blocks? Compressed data almost as bad, eg. nearly all media files.

It seems that non-compressed, non-encrypted data will soon be restricted, perhaps, to internal corporate office servers. And who wants to buy a fancy DD SSD array system for that mundane stuff?

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Pope instructs followers to put the iPhone away during dinner

Jim 59
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Back in August, the Pope warned that "chatting on the internet or with smartphones, watching TV soap operas" was not improving the quality of life but was "distracting attention away from what is really important" - like worshiping an all-powerful deity and overseeing a global network of adherents in dresses.

Really? Sub-Hopkins troll bait in The Register now?

Perhaps El Reg should spend more time writing, making phone calls and actually talking to people, and less time reading Twitter, chatting on the Internet, browsing Buzzfeed...

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Jim 59
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Re: The Pope

Most of them, especially the children DIDN'T sign up....they were indoctrinated from birth, and never had the chance to reject this evil religion.

And why shouldn't parents indoctrinate their kids? That's what parents are for. My parents "indoctrinated" me with plenty of stuff, most of which turned out to be true and very useful.

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Jim 59
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Re: Expert

There are many things to criticise the Catholic church for but this guy seems to be a good one overall

Benny's a good egg. Even if he is Argentinian.

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Jim 59
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Re: Burn 'em all

Or how many times have I seen a family...mother, father, and x number of offspring sitting around a restaurant table, each with some sort of electronic device in their hands, their heads bowed, pecking away at the screen...and no one is talking to anyone else at the table.

Nice. Very sociable. You might as well sit in cupboard eating crisps.

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Jim 59
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Re: new use for old stuff

Yes, the Pope has stated what we all knew, ie. staring at a glowing slab 23 hours a day might not be too healthy, and actually interacting with people such as your family/friends/house mates might be better, especially around meal times. He's not wrong. Slabbing or reading a book at the table has always been bad manners anyway.

Parents will likely agree with the Pope. Some teenagers (who are, of course, even more infallible than his Holiness) may disagree. Parents! Stand firm!

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Brace yourselves. Huawei’s launching an HCIA product

Jim 59
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Re: Am I missing something?

Aren't all these appliances similar to blade architecture with shared components?

Blade systems eg. HP c7000, do not provide shared storage in the box (except for each blade's boot disks), but instead use an external SAN.

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Coding with dad on the Dragon 32

Jim 59
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Re: Learning.

Ah, the good old days when you could buy a computer at newsagent's, switch it on and enjoy. Without being your own systems administrator, installing AV, worrying about drivers, running out of storage (more cassette tapes always available), worrying about encryption, security, phone bills, compatibility with other systems, OS crashes, BIOS problems data backups, wireless strength etc...

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Jim 59
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I would like to point out a couple of the errors in this article. But I can't, because, simply, Dragon 32 owners are never wrong about anything, ever. One can only congratulate the author on 33 years of utter win.

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PC sales will rise again, predicts Intel, but tablets are toast

Jim 59
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Re: Get real!

If you want to know what your private data looks like at Google or Microsoft or any of the other places that collect it, then picture a giant sand dune. It's in there somewhere, one or two grains.

No problem. It's called data mining and re-identification. And it's all covered by the Google and MS terms and conditions.

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Jim 59
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Rich

Paragraph 4: It used to be the case that people upgraded their PCs every two years or so...

What! You Londoners are so rich.

Most people renew their PC every 6 years, after Windows has slowly strangled it by installing oceans of unwanted guff, killing performance so much the hapless user can hardly log in anymore. The simple solution of reinstalling Windows from disk is no longer possible for home users. They must take the PC to the shop for a "clean up", or buy a new one. Most buy a new one, not wanting to share their pr*n collection with the local laddo.

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Jim 59
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Re: Get real!

Agreed. It's fine storing your accounts in the "cloud", so long as you are paying the provider, under a binding contract which will hit them with big penalties after any data breach or data loss. But using a "free" service is something you should only do occasionally for data you care nothing about. Anyone doubting this can read the Google/MS/Dropbox T&Cs.

Sure, use Google docs to write flyer for the local fete. But remember, it is part of Google now, not your flyer. You get what you pay for.

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KeePass looter: Password plunderer rinses pwned sysadmins

Jim 59
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Re: Windows-only

Ditto on Android - keepassdroid

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Jim 59
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Re: Still better than a password-protected MS Office document!

So, when deciding whether to use a web-based or local password manager you have to assess whether your machine or the web company is more likely to be compromised...

Unless you are *paying* the cloud provider to hold your data securely, under a contract with appropriate penalties should there be a security breach, there isn't really any security at all. What I am saying is, the free cloud providers have no interest in your security, and owe you nothing, because you are not paying for the service. Anyone in doubt of that can see the T&Cs.

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Xiaomi preps Linux laptops for the post Christmas sales rush

Jim 59
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Mint

I am also a Mint 17.2 user. To whom it may concern: it runs fine on my MXI cx61 laptop. Except that the wireless was poor. To fix that I bought one of these mini dongles

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B010AKMF3Y?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s01

which was also poor until I followed the procedure on the following page

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/reserve-7

Rock solid now.

Regarding eggsnow, they have some good stuff. I am tempted by their mini, fanless servers.

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Jim 59
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Er, will they be on sale in the UK?

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Dad who shot 'snooping vid drone' out of the sky is cleared of charges

Jim 59
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Re: Bullit County

Good ol' boy!

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Online pharmacy slapped with £130,000 fine for flogging customer data

Jim 59
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Flogging customer data. That's a paddlin'.

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Sony Xperia Z4 4G Android tablet – gift of sound and vision

Jim 59
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Re: Updates

I bought a S3 (outright) when it was launched. Updates stopped coming 2 years later. Makers release successive generations of phones but we all know the only real advantage of the new, almost unchanged model is that the older one isn't supported. A bit of a swizz.

A bit like Ford refusing to make spare parts for any model more than 2 years old.

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Jim 59
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Re: "Just slide the tablet along the docking channel by half an inch."

Surely you mean by 0.0907 linguini?

Don't understand these modern units. Can I have it in cubic Welsh football pitches.

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BLABBERGEDDON BEGINS! Twitter lays off 8% of its workforce

Jim 59
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The same is true for an alarming number of large internet companies.

Eg Snapchat. Their business model consists of coaxing large investment groups to bung them every few months so they can go on, well, messing about with computers for a bit. The service is impressive, it just doesn't make any money.

The register makes a bigger profit than Snapchat and Twitter put together.

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Jim 59
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Re: 4000 employees?

What does a 150-character message board need 4000 employees for?

Nothing if it is just hosting 10 users and receiving 3 posts a day. But to have a billion people logged in and reading, and 1 million tweeting every minute, requires a monster infrastructure. Which needs a monster datacentre. Which needs a monster company. Which needs a monster HR dept, a monster office, a monster... see where I am going.

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Ring Chime: Needy wireless doorbell or $30 bling t'ing?

Jim 59
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Re: Main problem round here

Royal mail package deliveries prefer to just put a card through the door. No knock, no delivery, no bell, nothing.

The card says something like "we tried to deliver your parcel but nobody was in. Please call at the depot". A more accurate wording might be "we didn't try to deliver your parcel, here's a card, come and get it". Easier for them I suppose. 20 seconds saved for them. 8 mile round trip for me.

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After Burner: Sega’s jet-fighting, puke-inducing arcade marvel

Jim 59
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You're saying the Sinclair Spectrum isn't a computer? Outside.

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Jim 59
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It was home computing wot "killed the arcades"

*All* arcade machines were *not* "$125K"

You can buy a car for $10000000 - has that killed motoring?

No but it might kill the showrooms if many of them bought 10 million pound cars and were unable to sell them/recoup the outlay.

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Jim 59
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Sega was the king of good music. My favourite, Quartet - great music, great game.

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Jim 59
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250000 plays. Assuming 50 plays a day, that would be 5000 days to break even, or 13.6 years.

Seems too much. Surely it can't have been that expensive ?

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Jim 59
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After Burner debuted an updated version of Sega’s most advanced arcade hardware: the X Board. Featuring Sega’s custom “super-scaler” graphics chipset running at 50MHz, the hardware rotation and scaling abilities of the board were quite sensational: up to 256 sprites in each frame, thousands of sprites scaled within a second, and all output at 60 frames per second.

So that's how they did it. I used to watch over people's shoulders while they played this game at Sunderland Polytechnic, or just watch the demo mode, and wonder how the makers could *possibly* move all the graphics around so fast.

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Researcher messes up Wi-Fi with an rPi and bargain buy radio stick

Jim 59
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...when paired with a Raspberry Pi and a small amplifier, can block 2.4Ghz transmissions for up to 120 metres.

Possibly of more interest to parents than hackers.

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PC shipments slump in Q3, thanks to free Windows 10

Jim 59
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Win 10 ? Doesn't it send all you base to redmond?

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DDoS defences spiked by CloudPiercer tool - paper

Jim 59
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Perhaps when we all go to IPV6, if it ever happens, and IPV4 is turned off, everyone will get their own permanent IP address. Perhaps largely killing the anonymity required for ddos?

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4K catches fire with OTT streamers, while broadcasters burn

Jim 59
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Hmmm. This article smells a bit adverty?

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Google Chromecast 2015: Puck-on-a-string fun ... why not, for £30?

Jim 59
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Let the data flow

"The following things suck:

Watching video over wireless"

Ah, that'd be why Netflix and Amazon Prime have been such disasters.

The protocol you choose to connect your devices has nothing to do with the service provider. I have WD TV Live, Raspi2 Kodi, Sony Bluray all offering these services and all wired. When I change the WD TV Live (say) to wireless instead, it is less reliable and clunky to use. For example, rewinding generally isn't possible. And if any other family member is doing wireless stuff, get ready for disappointment.

Wireless is good but not if you have the choice of wired. Switches are 10 a penny these days. Let the data flow.

Okay the Raspi2 doesn't do Netflix at the mo.

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Jim 59
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The real point is that, at £30, Chromecast is a true impulse purchase, so why not avail yourself of one?

Er, becuase competitors are the same price? Roku is £34 at Tesco complete with Netflix, iplayer and bundled remote handset.

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Jim 59
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Re: Streaming devices need to be wired and come with a proper remote IMO

Some people don't like having 7 remote controls.

Harmony remote FTW. And if people don't like having 7 remotes, they will like having 6 remotes and a smartphone app even less, especially when they notice universal remotes can't emulate smart phones.

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Jim 59
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The following things suck:

Watching video over wireless

Phone apps masquerading as remote controls

Streaming devices need to be wired and come with a proper remote IMO.

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Linux kernel dev who asked Linus Torvalds to stop verbal abuse quits over verbal abuse

Jim 59
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Re: The problem is, usually Linus is right

Although I don't like the whiff of PC at the tail end of her reported statement, she has a good general point about internet behaviour. People are much ruder and more aggressive in typing than they are face to face. A bit like they are in cars.

If Linus and this dev met face to face, their interactions would be considered, mild and polite, even if they disagreed strongly. As the world goes forward with people cooperating through their keyboards but never meeting, keyboard rage is a problem. Apart from being unpleasant, it makes people unhappy needlessly and the work also suffers.

I can't see a solution. However, PC censorship isn't the answer.

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AdBlock blocker biz bought

Jim 59
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Re: One word

Agree with Mark 85.

Once they get the green light, larger advertisers must pay ABP a fee for their ads to appear in people's browsers.

A regressive business model. It could be argued that what ABP has done is (a) to release a "virus" that attacks legitimate (albeit annoying) advertising software, and (b) demand a sum to re-enable it again.

Couldn't it be classed as extortion, just like wheel clamping is in Scotland ? Impeding legitimate business operations then demanding money to remove the impediment ?

Admit I use Adblock for all sites except El Reg.

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Hyundai i30 Turbo: Softly, softly, catchee Audi

Jim 59
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Hyundai's are now good looking cars, especially around the front, where many other cars are now a tarted up mess.

It will be interesting to see which manufacturer becomes first to drop the rising shoulder line, an annoying design cliche that serves no purpose other than to block rear visibility. It won't be Hyndai.

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Roku 4 specs leak: Yes, it's got 4K streaming and a games controller

Jim 59
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A media streamer needs to have proper power & be able to watch all sources. But this is never going to happen. The market is doomed to be a series of low powered machines with budget CPUs and clunky interfaces, hamstrung by whatever temporary media deals the manufacturer can pull off at the time. Notwithstanding the quad core in this one.

The market is so poor that many are nudged towards the illegal route - torrenting, kodi-enabled hows-your-father in a Pi2, media PC or similar.

And the BBC contribute to the situation by being very restrictive about what the iPlayer will run on, in order to protect their 1930s funding model into perpetuity. How much they had to pay Apple for that "i" we will never know.

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The BBC's Space: A short history of 21st Century indoor relief

Jim 59
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"digital"

When I was a nipper, "digital" was even more of a magic word than it is now. More specifically, "digital watch". They were even more popular than smartphones are now. Not much cheaper though.

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Indianapolis man paints his ball every day – for FORTY YEARS

Jim 59
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Never go paint balling with this man.

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Jim 59
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Re: For life.

It was.

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Things you should know about the hard work of home working

Jim 59
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Re: Agreed but you forgot loneliness.

I worked from home 2 days out of 5. 5 days would be hard. Even with 2, I found a daily trip to the local cafe was needed to avoid cabin fever.

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