* Posts by Jim 59

1823 posts • joined 24 Jun 2009

Travel back to the 19-Z80s this weekend

Jim 59
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19-Z80s

"19-Z80s"

Good one.

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The Raspberry Pi is succeeding in ways its makers almost imagined

Jim 59
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@Trixr re: Grandad

I get the impression that the story is set in Australia. I live in Canberra, and...

Whoops. My cynical "Grandad" joke was only meant to be a joke, not to upset this cheerful thread. Like Trixr, I also guessed the Australian thing and the great distances there. I confess to owning 2 Pis myself, and to using one of them to spy on my own empty house when I'm not there. And to being the author of several if the Pi Internet guides accessed by these kids. It's true that webcams are no substitute for a visit but everybody knows that anyway.

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Jim 59
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Grandad

"I can bring up a web browser, and take photos inside grandpa’s house. Has he moved his coffee cup today? Is the telly on? At least then we’ll know he’s okay. And I can even type messages” - she changes focus to a textbox inside a web form - “that show up on top. We used ImageMagick for that part...here, you can see it in our code.”

ie. "Yipee! Now we don't have to visit Grandpa !"

Sorry about that.

"Completely at home with Raspberry Pis, these kids Google around for the things they don’t know how to do - because when you’re 11, you don’t know what you can’t do."

Perhaps not that different from programming your Dragon 32 in 1984, from a computer magazine.

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The most tragic thing about the Ashley Madison hack? It was really 1% actual women

Jim 59
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Re: Dating sites

the ID was bombarded by other men, the number of messages went into multiples of 10 within an hour. That certainly did not happen the other way 'round!

Yep. That's what happens when men outnumber women 50 to 1. Each man sends 25 witty messages and gets back one disinterested acknowledgement. Each woman is inundated and has no time to answer all messages, or even a small proportion.

Pretty terrible for both sexes. The men obviously waste their time. The women probably don't want to check their inboxes.

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Jim 59
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Re: How Many Men Actually used AM?

Having used Internet dating sites, I have always suspected that the number of men dwarfes the number of women. I have no proof, but the user experience suggests it.

Having far more men than women is the norm IMO, which is why they don't function anything like portrayed in TV adverts etc. It does not work well for either sex. Somebody should start a site that admits only the same number of men as women, and use that as a selling point. Big bucks await.

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Twenty years since Windows 95, and we still love our Start buttons

Jim 59
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Re: while enabling ... the Windows Store

Hi Terry 6, Linux is different from Windows, and there will be strangeness for first time users, especially non experts. But in some ways new users will find it easier than Windows: No viruses, no popups, no malware scanners, no bloatware, no adverts, no nagging. No software installing "free" evaluation copies of itself. No awful slowing down as the system gradually sinks beneath the weight of these things.

We have all been called on to help friends/family with Windows, and half the task has usually been to clean off the reams of rubbish that has installed itself over the years. Sometimes we even find that several competing nagware/evaluation packages have become installed, each interfering with the other and both nagging the user, hourly, to purchase the full version. The less expert the user, the more of this stuff is usually found. Software companies do this deliberately, of course. Computer shops in many UK towns make a modest living just from "cleaning up" Windows PCs.

Linux is different but equivalent. Anything you do in Windows, there is a way to do it in Linux. Not the same way, but an equivalent way, sometimes requiring the learning of a few new concepts. For the beginner coming from Windows there is strangeness, but the added simplicity might make up for it.

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Jim 59
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My Dan 486 DX (4 MB (yes, MB)) of RAM / 120 MB disk / S7 video / VESSA bus was top of the line and ran Quake & Doom beautifully. Windows 3.1. Turbo button. And it opened "Word" just as fast as a modern PC does.

I remember the week '95 launched. There really was a sense of a corner being turned. At the time, Microsoft was everybody's friend, not a creepy monopoly, and their strange policy of ignoring the Internet had not yet done any damage.

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Jim 59
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Re: NT - Long filenames

Long filenames were a kludge, but what a relief it was to break out of the old "8.3" file name limitation. It is strange, when you think about it, that 8.3 continued for so long. I mean it would barely have been acceptable in the early 70s, let alone 1994/5.

Another top notch Windows 95 feature: right click context menus. Nice to use and time-saving.

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Jim 59
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"Windows 95 introduced long filenames and a redone user interface including the taskbar and Start menu, replacing Program Manager in Windows 3.x."

At the time, those were killer features. Proper multitasking and a start button. That basic UI really solved the UI problem, and continues to this day in desktops such as MATE. Windows 95 was indeed a pleasure to use. The start menu let the user see where everything was, without looking.

Windows 8 in contrast baffles the user, and has been deservedly rejected.

Which shows that people really do like new features, when those features are good, and dislike them when they are bad. Who knew.

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More deaths linked to Ashley Madison hack as scammers move in

Jim 59
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Re: I have to admit, I'm impressed

Wait to see how it was done before being impressed. The hackers might have been roaming freely round the Ashley LAN for months. Might have been given the passwords. Might even be employees.

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Jim 59
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Re: Meeow

I don't like husbands who cheat on their wives, or vice-versa, but I don't think they deserve to die, do you? Especially the lonely, despairing death of a suicide.

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Web Summit looks at new homes ... this time with sun and decent Wi-Fi

Jim 59
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Turn it into an outdoor festival and shove it in Phoenix Park. Now that'll test the WiFi.

Amsterdam? No proper Guinness.

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Does Linux need a new file system? Ex-Google engineer thinks so

Jim 59
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Re: About time there was...

I used VAX/VMS file versioning in '88 at Sunderland Polytechnic. It was nice, but never seen it since. For a few very important files, I have scripted a poor man's solution.

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Jim 59
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We've all needed a new file system since about 1992, viz some kind of tagged file system that frees us from the directory structure, while still somehow preserving it. Something equivalent to a nosql database. But this is still a vague fantasy.

In the real world, I'd like ZFS-style deduping please, and optimisation for both flash and rotating drives. The deduping alone would allow us to bin 99% of the worlds disks. Maybe that's why it hasn't taken off in the way everyone expected.

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Intel's Compute Sticks stick it to Windows To Go, Chromecast

Jim 59
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Just had a thought. This thing might be a good way to get a proper browser on your TV, if it is fast enough to run explorer quickly.

The RPi2 runs a browser much quicker than the Pi1, but it is still too slow for serious browsing.

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Jim 59
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Re: Yours will be for movies over ethernet?

I just don't "get" the reasoning being this Pi love-in. It's not an open system by any stretch of the imagination, and there are much better comparable systems out there. Heck,...

The Pi is an open system by the accepted definition of that term over the last 35 years. Viz, open systems based on Unix vs. the bespoke systems they partly/largely replaced. This doesn't mean that every single byte of software has to be GPL.

What makes the Pi/Pi2 better than almost all competing products is the enormous support base and user base that now exists around the world. Products like the Mintbox are technically great, but the support base is non existent by comparison. When OS upgrade time comes, this matters.

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Jim 59
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I would have thought that blatent advertising of somebody's own product, which is against the forum rules, was much more socially unacceptable than anything I've posted.

The post was informational and relevant to the story, not the contrived plugging you imply. I read about the guy's alternative product with interest.

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Jim 59
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Without a wired network, it isn't going any place but behind domestic TVs. And even then you will want a network USB adapter for decent streaming performance. A general purpose server it ain't. And with Windows 8.1 on board, it won't be any kind of server.

How does the CPU in this compare to that in the quad core Raspberry Pi 2, which also costs about a third of the price and has full server credentials? Or indeed many of the small fanless PCs now appearing on Amazon (which cost a bit more) ? Or with the banana Pi, which also offers gigabit ? The inclusion of a fan will rule it out for some of the home server crowd, like me.

Not particularly bad, just can't see a reason to buy this thing TBH.

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Using complicated electrical devices to curry favour with brats – the new black?

Jim 59
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Paying your children to pass exams is chav parenting. Better would be to spend time with the child, helping them child with maths (or whatever), or if you can't, spending the money on a tutor.

Sorry about the chav thing.

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Jim 59
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Re: To True...

The reward was a significant amount to help me get my first 'pc' to help continue my studies (a couple of years earlier I really badgered them, wanting a BBC/acorn, it was the pinnacle of IT to me then, how little I knew (didn't get it, of course).

It was the pinnacle of expenditure too. If you are talking about 1984 or thereabouts, a BBC B was £1200 in today's money, more than the parents in the article are offering. And that's without the essential monitor and keyboard.

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Youth Hostelling with Chris Eubank becomes TV reality

Jim 59
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Back of the net.

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Amazon UK conditions 'exhausting', claims union

Jim 59
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" On the way home, I got a flat tire. Whilst kneeling on the cold, wet ground, changing it, my only thought was: 'This is so much better than going back to Amazon one more day'.""

Yep. That's a bad job.

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Mozilla testing very private browsing mode

Jim 59
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Re: Works for me, too

After 22 years of web browsing, I don't think I have ever intentionally clicked on an ad, paid any attention to ads or purchased anything as the result of an ad. Has anybody ?

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Exploding Power Bars: EE couldn't even get the CE safety mark right

Jim 59
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Vulture seems to be inferring rather a lot from microscopic errors in the CE logo. Which the company has acknowledged and says it has corrected. They wouldn't give Vulture an internal document. Not that surprising, why should they? Not brilliant but not particularly outrageous there.

This is the best part of the story: "Specific concerns raised within EE in the documents seen by The Register included variable quality..."

I think perhaps you need to say more about what these docs were, who wrote them and when. CF Private Eye.

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Pi-eyed: Microsoft ships slimmed-down Windows 10 IoT Core for gizmos

Jim 59
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Re: I'll take a look.

I've got an unused raspberry pi 2 sitting in it's box I'll give it a try over the weekend.

I upvoted you for being rich. Buy me a boat.

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Dying cipher suites are stinking up TLS with man-in-the-middle vulns

Jim 59
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Always thought it was a bit annoying that SSL/SSH documentation is detailed and rigorous, but regarding ciphers, just sort of vaguely refers to "your locally installed ciphers" or similar. A bit ago I noticed my backups were still using CAST5. CAST5 is obsolescent and should probably not be used in 2015. PGP/GPG isn't about to tell you that, however. It will happily use any old ciper without a peep. Nor do the man pages provide much guidance.

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Introducing the Asus VivoMini UN42 – a pint-sized PC, literally

Jim 59
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Re: Footprint

Just bloatware, surely?

Sitting in front of a Red Hat 6.6 box now. It's a full network server and runs a desktop too (via VNC). OS size about 5.5 GB, and that includes 1 GB of log files.

Just checked a Windows 2008 server here, OS size about 12 GB.

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Cloud computing’s refuseniks: How long can they hold out?

Jim 59
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Attribution?

Lol. Has Vulture really published an article based on "survey" without identifying the survey, when it took place, or who carried it out, what the sample size was ? With no kind of attribution whatsoever, not even a link ?

"I read one recently, though, in which..."

"... questioned in the particular survey I read are of the belief..."

Now that really is cloudy.

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Big, ugly, heavy laptops are surprise PC sales sweet spot

Jim 59
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Re: Why now?

Home users replacing aged tower systems with "desktop replacement" laptops might have an impact.

...certain graphics intensive business applications, so aren't counted as workstations...

I would be interested to know what these applications are. Can't think of any except for high end CAD/CAM/CAE.

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AIDS? Ebola? Nah – ELECTRO SMOG is our 'biggest problem', says Noel Edmonds

Jim 59
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<What an idiot.</i>

Screw you pal. You don't even know how many Magpie annuals are worth a 1000 piece jigsaw of John Noakes with Shep.

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Jim 59
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Re: Bollocks

Most of what he says here is not "a broad statement of physics", it is a load of new age nonsense that appropriates the language of physics.

I disagree. He doesn't mention "new age" or "life force", these are terms introduced by you. Yes, there is some made-up daftness (empPAD, "wrong sorts of electro-magnetism", Ebola). However, much of his statement regarding energy would find qualitative agreement among physics teachers.

We shouldn't get too snooty about people without physics O/A levels. They can understand some things without necessarily using the correct academic language. To people like Stephen Hawking, we probably all sound like Edmunds.

Swap Shop fans back me up here!

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Jim 59
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Re: Magnets...

But Electrosmog is pure nocebo.

Isn't he just talking about man-made electromagnetic radiation ? Which is indeed everywhere, all the time ? Not to mention all the natural stuff.

Sunlight: call it electrosmog if you like.

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Jim 59
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Edmonds is nowhere near as far, far, far out as Icke. And if one reads the story with a bit of thought, most of what he says here is just a broad statement of physics, apart from the EMPpad bit. For example, the bit Team Register have emboldened is just a statement of the law of conservation of energy.

Yes, physicists don't use the term "electr smog", but we certainly are living in a bunch of radio noise. You could call it a sea, or a field, or a smog...

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HAM IN SPAAAAAACE! ISS astronaut contacted by Gloucestershire bloke in garden shed

Jim 59
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Astonishing and brilliant.

"former lorry driver plotted the approximate path of the ISS using Michael Lodge-Paolini's-"

say whaaaaaaaat? Bloke should get an hon. degree from somewhere or other.

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Sengled lightbulb speakers: The best worst stereo on Earth

Jim 59
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The wifi extender might be more interesting. But then again, the light will have to be permanently on at the switch, and mains plug unix have ot covered anyway.

'happen mains plugs are better for IOT anyway ? Better than lighting units I mean. You could probably have a more beefy speaker plugging straight into the wall. More solid/stable too.

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Jim 59
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Re: inside out

1970's Hi-Fi brochures often had a picture of a lamp on top of a loudspeaker.

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The Q7: Audi’s big SUV goes from tosspot to tip-top

Jim 59
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Review

It's usual for independent car reviews to include a negative comment or two, and a couple of comparisons to competing models. Rather than a string of uniformly positive statements topped off with a friendly invitation to "...drop into an Audi dealer... ".

Has Vulture actually been at the wheel? Or just at the Audi press launch ? How did Vulture established that the car has "...class-leading dynamics..."?

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Internet, schminternet: Boffins propose private 100Gbps HYPERNET

Jim 59
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Smarr adds that one internet-connected server at the University of California recently received 35,000 false login attempts in a single day.

To be fair, a single Wordpress server can get this from one attack in a few hours. It isn't a rarity. The Register probably get far more.

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Linus Torvalds warns he's in no mood to be polite as Linux 4.2 drags

Jim 59
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Re: Give em' a break

Daresay the Reg would have done a few more checks if they were programming a spaceship.

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Lottery chief resigns as winning combo numbers appear on screen BEFORE being drawn

Jim 59
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Re: Stupids play now

Anyone wishing to hide payment "off the books" could hardly pick a worse choice than rigging premium bonds, which provide a clear and very public audit trail leading straight to the "winner". The plan would also require a large number of people to be in the conspiracy, with the accompanying large risk of one of them talking or blackmailing.

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Ford's parallel PARCing: Motor giant tries to craft new tech just like Xerox

Jim 59
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Rather like the flying car that the media has been guaranteeing for widespread adoption every year since about '94. The self driving car is getting to be the new "year of the Linux desktop".

One trend that seems more certain is the increasing buzzfeedification down at Reg Towers.

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Pope loses grip on Antarctica: Clergy withdraw from austral landmass

Jim 59
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Judging from the events of New Year's Eve a few years back, it's the British Antarctic survey who are in need of salvation, not the Americans.

Strangely not on Google now, but some sort of fight broke out, resulting in broken jaws and at least one boffin being helicoptered out and then flown onwards to hospital in Argentina IIRC.

UPDATE found it http://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/dec/27/usa.barbaramcmahon

Was those pugilistic Americans after all, not the sturdy British chaps.

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HP slaps dress code on R&D geeks: Bin that T-shirt, put on this tie

Jim 59
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Re: Now that will upset people

How dare they encrust the creativity of engineers with some petty dress code. Dress codes are for those menials who-

...should avoid turning up to the office in ...shorts, baseball caps ...sandals and other open shoes

Oh ...er, yeah on second thoughts, ban it. Ban it all. Ugh, sandals.

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Unhinged Linux backdoor still poses a nuisance, if not a threat

Jim 59
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http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/02/10/linux_backdoor/

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Bill Hicks: 25 years on from the cult comedian's big break

Jim 59
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Re: Very dangerous

The author should probably have mentioned Lenny Bruce earlier that the penultimate paragraph. LB's wikipedia page is a great read. Both blokes are fascinating. Not to my personal taste as it happens - I prefer my politics neat, without the satire/rage mixer. I hope they make that film of BHs life.

Lenny Bruce faced much higher levels of censorship in the 50s. So much so, he remained virtually unheard, but his name lives on today. Strange to think that censorship was fought against for decades, gradually reduced, then suddenly replaced by a much more virulent, PC derived censorship, out of all proportion to the original.

Now we seem to have the worst of both worlds. On the one hand we are downing in extreme hard core porn, while on the other you can't say what you think, and even muttering a single word can get you sacked and ruined. I hate to say it, but did Bill and Lenny (et al) unwittingly contributed to that situation?

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Cops baffled by 'canal corpse' that turned out to be COCONUTS

Jim 59
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Hate it when people palm their coconuts off on somebody else.

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Are you a Tory-voting IT contractor? Congrats! Osborne is hiking your taxes

Jim 59
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Well done on the first half page of this article, which is a clear well written summary of the contractor position and the proposed changes. I'm a contractor, and think the modest tax increase is not unreasonable.

IR35 is a different matter. It is deliberately wooly and a classic piece of FUD. Muddy waters instead of clear rules. I don't mind which way the rules go as long as they are clear. Most contractors become contractors for the independence and extra cash, not the possibility of tax avoidance.

Regarding the Professional Contractors Group, now called the Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed, many contractors believe this organisation no longer serves their interests.

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Happy NukeDay to you! 70 years in the shadow of the bomb post-Trinity

Jim 59
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Re: unintended consequences

"Historically I'm probably the last person alive to see a thermonuclear explosion with my naked eyes," he said. "The last explosion was a long time ago but for those that actually saw it, we all had the same experience, which was to turn us into peaceniks."

Leonard Cheshire VC was a witness to the Nagasaki bomb, after which he resigned, opened a hospice and spent the rest of his life in charity work and conflict resolution.

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Did speeding American manhole cover beat Sputnik into space? Top boffin speaks to El Reg

Jim 59
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Re: Orbit?

If the object exceeded escape velocity, it would not enter any shape of orbit around Earth, it would just carry on until it hit something or got captured into orbiting another body (thinking about it, it probably would orbit the sun).

Not exactly, if I understand Wikipedia right (and it's explanation is not the clearest). The object would escape earth if launched directly upwards. After escaping earth, it would have to contend with the Sun's much greater gravity, and might start to orbit the Sun. If launched at an angle, the object would achieve "escape orbit" from earth, a parabolic path but not a closed shape, which I don't quite understand the sequence of events.

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Jim 59
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Re: Not likely

Especially, perhaps, if it is already half vapourised and extremely hot at launch.

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