Feeds

* Posts by MeRp

174 posts • joined 24 Jun 2009

Page:

OkCupid falls out of love with 'anti-gay' Firefox, tells people to see other browsers

MeRp

To someone who makes tens or hundreds of millions of dollars a year, a $1000 is the same as the rest of us a couple quarters to something; it is not a major commitment.

The attitude that if you're not with me then you're my enemy pervades so much of society, but it is especially strong amongst "gay rights" advocates, it seems. Even if someone so much as disagrees with a single point, they are thereafter to be considered gay bashers who would be content if the laws advocated unlicensed nuisance hunts on homosexuals.

In case you couldn't tell, that was an exaggeration. But it was only slight. I have a friend who has this exact attitude, and, being that I'm pretty much moderate on the topic (ie gay marriage, to me is just like any other marriage: it shouldn't be any of the Fed's business), she comes off as thinking I'm Satan, only more evil. She uses the same argument; that if one doesn't care enough about gay people to let them marry, then they probably also don't care that there are crimes against humanity (targeting homosexuals) ongoing in Uganda. That is patently false.

As for America bashing; you will not see me doing it.

0
1
MeRp

Fully 8% of the relationships started on OKCupid are homosexual marriages? Not just homosexual relationships, but actual marriages? That's quite a lot.

Or was the OKCupid statement trying to imply that, because this guy was against homosexual marriage that he is also against homosexual relationships and believes that they should be against the law? That is quite a stance to apply to someone based on a single political donation.

1
1

Middle England's allotments become metric battlefield

MeRp

RE: Middle England's allotments become metric battlefield

Assuming you are referring to one or two specific former colonies (US and Canada), you are incorrect both semantically and in your assumption.

Semantically: in the relevant colonies they are called; baseball field and ice hockey rink. Here pitch is what the pitcher (akin, but not identical, to the bowler in cricket) does.

Problem with the assumption: While ice hock fans and basketball fans generally have some idea of the size of their relevant play environment, baseball fans do not. As a highly irregular shape, with widely varying dimensions, most would never think to try to use a baseball field as a relative measure.

Far more common than any of those, though, is the football field. It is a different size than a football pitch (similar, but not quite the same), and, usually, rather than being used as an area measure, it is usually used as a length measure. Very common for ships.

0
0

Brawling neighbours challenge 'quiet' cul-de-sac myth

MeRp

I can tell you, from first hand experience, that cul-de-sacs in the US and Canada (and presumably other first world countries) are indeed very very quiet. Even extremely busy main highways are quiet. Of course quiet is always relative; I'm using "typical filipino small city street" for comparison. Nothing in the first world apart from heavy construction or rock concert is "loud" by comparison.

0
0

Fancy a little kinky sex? GCHQ+NSA will know - thanks to ANGRY BIRDS

MeRp

Re: Just monitoring you purchases

After watching that movie, my friend discovered that she had several copies of that book (including one in her bed's headboard shelf), but she had never read it. It kind of freaked her out.

1
0

Philippine govt to hacktivists: Please don't hit your shiny new site

MeRp

Re: The Philippines

My wife is from the Phils; every time MILF is in the news in a noteworthy enough way that it bears mentioning to my friends and associates it draws a chorus of snickers and smiles. Everyone loves a good MILF.

0
0

Candy Crush dev stuffs EU 'candy' trademark down gob

MeRp

Re: Outrageous

The trademark filing has it covering all kinds of non-software things. Notable in its inclusion is "Headphones," which retroactively makes Skullcandy headphones a violation of this trademark. I'm sure other instances could be found.

2
0

Haribo gummy bears implicated in 'gastric exorcism'

MeRp

Re: coffee straw???

That hot straw thing is not what is usually meant by a Coffee Straw; usually it refers to a "stir-straw"; a straw that is actually not meant to be used to drink with (though it is occasionally used that way), but, rather, to stir your hot beverage in order to incorporate additives into the solution; e.g. sugar and cream or non-dairy creamer. They are typically red and quite thin, often two co-joined small straws in order to increase the surface area of the side.

Here is an example that is white, with a red stripe: http://www.webstaurantstore.com/suffixitem/48550/BX.html

1
0

Amazon, Hollywood, Samsung: PLEASE get excited about 4K telly

MeRp

Re: Waste of time

64K sounds great, but no one will ever need any more than 64K....

3
0

Ubuntu desktop is so 2013... All hail 2014 Ubuntu mobile

MeRp

Re: what a superficial, dumb and negative article

Furthermore: tiling window managers.

0
0

US Department of Justice details Kim Dotcom evidence

MeRp

Re: let me be the first to say ...

RE: "How about we redistribute your possessions against your will?"

If you can make unlimited copies of my possessions, still leaving me with the originals, and redistribute them to everyone who cares to have them, please do! I would love it if I could give my house to every homeless person on the planet, but still own it, that would be awesome.

4
0

Baywatch babe Pamela Anderson battles bullfighting

MeRp

I'm not really for or against bullfighting. It doesn't seem entertaining to me, but boxing certainly can be, so who am I to say. Either way, while bulls may be sentient (able to feel, specifically pain in this case), that is not to say that they are sapient. Also, it may be worth noting; other things (apparently) able to feel on some level or another include trees, insects, vegetables, etc. I'm not sure sentience (in the sense of the word that bulls are sentient) really should be a major factor in these (or most) types of decisions.

0
0

Travel much? DON'T buy a Samsung Galaxy Note 3

MeRp

Lame, guess it is one more thing to make me hesitate on this, since there's a not-insignificant chance that I'll want to take my phone to the Philippines during its lifetime.

0
0

Apple iOS 7 remote wipe: Can it defeat the evil scrumper scourge?

MeRp

Needed for android

Unfortunately for something like this to happen on Android it would have to be implemented by each individual hardware manufacturer. Currently, at least with TWRP custom recovery, you can lock down both the OS itself, as well as the recovery mode, however you cannot lock down the bootloader. For samsung this is "Odin mode" or download mode, but it varies for each manufacturer. If they added the ability to specify a pin for that mode (that you needed to enter on the device when you put it into that mode), then this would give coverage for Android phones.

The biggest problem with Android not having this is; without the majority of smartphones being immunized to being stolen, then you cannot really get the herd immunity that Apple is looking for here; just because it is worthless to steal an iDevice doesn't mean that thieves won't grab any and all devices that appear to be smart phones and just toss the worthless ones into the local canal/sewer/etc.

0
0

Your encrypted files are 'exponentially easier' to crack, warn MIT boffins

MeRp

Re: Always wondered if this is true

The second application of a decoder ring would have no additional benefit. Decoder rings are purely transitive, so 1st transform plus 2nd transform is equivalent to some 3rd (single) transform. I believe that even the 3DES method would not help; 3DES does DES, then reverses the output of that, and DES again on that, then reverses that and does DES one more time (thus: triple DES). Reversing it each time does improve its encryption for DES, but, I believe, it would not for decoder ring style encryption.

1
1

Latvian foreign minister speaks out against giving up alleged Gozi writer to US

MeRp

Wait, wait, wait! Now how does Dr. Victor von Doom play into all of this again?

0
0

Ubuntu boss: I want to make a Linux hybrid mobe SO GIVE ME $32m

MeRp

This seems perfect for my wife, if only I can convincer her that the sapphire screen is like jewelry. Being able to go phone to desktop for the stuff she does (web stuff), seems like a no-brainer for her use case.

It would eb cool for me too, if only I could run eve-online on it.

0
0

Confidence in US Congress sinks to lowest level ever recorded

MeRp

My representative, like most of the rest, is a terrible pork-barreling protectionist, double-dealing, corporate whore. I vote for someone else every time, and he wins over and over; 18 years and counting. Of course his opponents all seem just as slavishly corrupt, so perhaps that is why no one bothers to elect someone else.

2
0

Pyongyang Photoshop tomfoolery shows wet Norks, skirts blown up

MeRp
WTF?

Holy sweet mother of Jesus

They got to get a handle on that crack problem in North Korea.

Oh, you're saying these weren't produced by people smoking some tainted crack cut with draino and LSD? Well, ok.

0
0

Angry commentard mobs to feel Facebook jackboot in site tweak

MeRp
Meh

@David W

Er, you agree with your friends on everything? How boring.

1
0

SanDisk cops to malfunctioning Micro SDs in Galaxy S3s

MeRp

Damn.. I think I threw mine away; why hang onto a burnt-out worthless sdcard?

0
0

iPad Mini vs Nexus 7: inch makes all the difference, says Apple CEO

MeRp

Re: Re: Nooooo....

That gizmodo article is kind of enlightening; I tried it with my Galaxy S3, and I could reach the whole screen when I held it with thumb in center (as the article shows), or all except an icon's size on the upper right if I held it in a natural way. That explains why the iphone feels so awkward for me; it is too small for my hands. I must have the hands of a 7ft human (according to the article); I use my phone one handed all the time.

I guess it just goes to show: there is no one right size for everyone, a variety of sizes and price ranges is better for the consumer than a very limited one, who woulda thought the economists were ever right?

0
0

Liquefied-air silos touted as enormo green 'leccy batteries

MeRp

@imanidiot Re: @proto-robbie

Speaking from first hand experience (ie, I have both a nuclear power plant AND a crap ton of windmills in my "back yard"), I have to agree that the nuclear plant is far less impactful on the aesthetic of the area. Windmills, when installed, have to be everywhere; every ridge of all of the surrounding hills/mountains (highly variable term based on the altitudes that you are used to) has to be covered in the windmills. If you happen to like the hills/mountains or the overall horizon, then, with windmills, you are out of luck.

Having lived next to two different nuclear plants, I can say; they need not be any more aesthetically unpleasant than any quirky architect's grand design.

0
0

Solar, wind, landfill to make cheapest power by 2030

MeRp

Re: Gas?

The only Nuclear decommissioning I've any personal experience with is the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant in Oregon. It's decommissioning cost is estimated to be roughly $230 million (they still have some non-nuclear related buildings to remove, and of course the spent fuel to continue to store). Construction costs were roughly $500 million.

It seems that your rough estimate is inverted in this case; decommission costs roughly half of construction.

0
0

Oz has to go nuclear, says Adelaide U scientist

MeRp

Please...

Build enough Nuclear power plants to supply the world's base-line electric needs + 10%, along with ready-to-go plans for more to keep up with the massive increase in demand that will come with cheap energy. Please build them in my back yard. Everyone who wants to be employed can move here; the few who are concerned about more nuke plants can move away (we've already got one).

Then everyone can stop debating about it and get on with the leap in progress that more energy could (and has) provided us.

I guess I'm just a YIMBY.

4
0

Anonymous hacktivists dump 1.7GB load slurped from DoJ site

MeRp

Re: Worrying...

It is quite possible that any/all of the data "leaked" was either already publicly available, or, worst case, easily obtainable with a FOIA request. If either or both of those is the case, then why worry about the data stolen?

2
0

Dell forges GPU-enriched virty rack workstation

MeRp
FAIL

Doesn't make any sense at all...

Looking at both Dell's unrealistically weak example spec and the author's dream spec, it strikes me that, for the price, you'd be way better off just buying desktop machines. Dell's spec is silly, but obviously intended for a single person, but, for $2700, you could set up a much better desktop pc than the spec they provided. As for the author's; it looks like it is meant for 2 workstations, so, if we take the $34000 budget and split it into 2 we get two $17000 workstations; the listed spec is pretty weak compared to what you could set up with $17000 for a desktop machine.

0
0

Ever wondered how many limp todgers to the mile?

MeRp

Re: Beer!

You beat me to it: 1 Keg of Beer is equivalent to 39.11592192474 Average Amount of Urine Produced/Human/Day

0
0

Judges probe minister's role in McKinnon extradition saga

MeRp

Probable Cause (as legally defined in the US) and Reasonable Suspicion (as legally defined in the UK and US) are not the same; Reasonable Suspicion is a much weaker test: with Reasonable Suspicion you need only have some explanation of why something is probably amiss (for example, someone in a dark ally looking like they are trying to hide something), whereas with Probable Cause you actually need proof that something is amiss (for example you saw that they are trying to hide a baggy of white stuff).

Given that, it appears that, legally at least, the treaty IS actually one sided: since it is easier to get arrested in the UK it is easier to get extradited from the UK. However, once they get extradited from the UK to the US the Probable Cause part takes over, so it is also easier to get exonerated. This implies that, while there will be more extraditions to the US, there will be more convictions, as a percentage, amongst those extradited to the UK.

2
0

MPAA threat sparks White House petition for bribery probe

MeRp

Apparently, since I use Linux as my os, I'm not allowed to sign white house petitions.

0
0

Does your smartphone run Carrier IQ? Find out here

MeRp

Find out where, now?

0
0

Obama says his birthplace is 'in Asia'

MeRp

If you want to get technical about it none of those are in Asia; they are all part of Oceania. The only parts of US that are in Asia are military bases and embassies.

1
1

Kindle users can 'borrow' an extra book - forever

MeRp

not quite...

Amazon Prime in the US is $79; very close to £49 at Google's reported exchange rate as I write this. Also worth noting; the reason Amazon often does not give this kind of benefit to those outside the US is because the owners of the content do not allow it.

0
0

US survey: 1 in 5 telecommuters work an hour or less a day

MeRp

Children aren't a distraction for telecommuters because...

Anyone with children knows that they will get nothing done if they try to telecommute, therefore they do not telecommute unless they are already sufficiently motivated to not get anything done anyway (regardless of children).

3
0

Prototype iPhone 5 lost in bar, right on schedule

MeRp

radio station transmission power

The power of the transmitters of licensed radio stations is public record. Part of what they have to do to get their license.

0
0

US Marines not allowed to fart in Afghanistan

MeRp

Jarhead is ok...

I think devil dog is more entertaining, though. And, of course the perhaps too obvious "bullet sponge" is always a great way to identify them, after all, the purpose of US Marines is to eliminate the enemy's ammunition stores, generally by absorbing as much of it as possible, so the Army can roll in and not have to worry about armed opposition.

3
0

Careless tweets cost lives, warns MoD

MeRp

Obviously...

In the second video the lady is so happy to see her visitor, it must be her other son, who is in a SWAT team... he's always so busy, she's just happy he could come to visit, even if it did have to be during a quick lunch break.

2
0

Heavy coffee drinking wards off deadly cancer in men

MeRp
FAIL

re: Shame

except for two niggling problems. The first is kind of obvious; you are speaking only of an average number of heartbeats in a lifetime - any individual, of course, could have more or less. The second tiny (itsy bitsy, really) issue is that your whole premise is total cobblers: mammals do not, in fact, have the same number of heartbeats per lifetime. Humans, for instance, average around 2.21 billion, whereas small dogs average around only 0.53 billion.

reference: http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/watkins/longevity.htm

If you then say "well, all humans have the same average number of heartbeats per lifetime," then I reply with: all humans also have the same average hat size, so wearing a hat that is too big obviously must shorten your lifespan. You should only wear hats that are too small.

0
0

Google lobbying to make driverless cars legal in Nevada

MeRp

Re: Yeah - I wondered about that...

I'd be willing to wager that the law indicates that anyone in the driver's seat cannot text (or less specifically, cannot use an electronic device requiring the use of their hands or the ilk)... and that Google wants an exemption that says that, if that person is not in control of the vehicle (ie; it is a robot car), then they are not bound by such a restriction.

1
0

NASA restores Pluto to league of planets

MeRp

Likely...

Given that NASA is an American institute, they would be unlikely to wave two fingers at anything, unless they were attempting to indicate a love of peace. For the implied purpose, we (Americans) would be far more likely to employ only a single digit.

Since this article appears to be more for bemusement than for serious enlightenment, I'd say that both the reference to the two finger salutation and the mere facts of the case can be safely ignored in the spirit of enjoyment.

1
0

Is there anything to find on bin Laden's hard drive?

MeRp

To be fair...

Seal Team 6 (as it is formerly known) has a fair number of Marines in it; given that it is the Spec Ops destination of choice for the entire Dept. of the Navy, of which Marines are a part.

0
0

US Supremes deal death blow to class action lawsuits

MeRp

...that is

That is exactly what the arbitration clause in most service contracts is; you may not sue us; you agree to binding arbitration instead.

3
0

Cops raid man whose Wi-Fi was used to download child porn

MeRp

bigger?

Well, there are over 300 million Americans (restricting ourselves to the usage meaning people from the USA), and, it seems to me, growing the usage of wifi from 115 million to 201 million in a "couple of years" when that is one of the biggest growing computer related tech areas during those two years doesn't seem unusual, nor does it seem to require any excessive immigration or annexation of a continent.

2
2

RAF Eurofighters make devastating attack – on Parliament

MeRp

AV8B...

It IS too late to rummage them out; the Typhoon has used it's austere bombing capabilities on that bin too.

2
0
MeRp

Sure...

It has "austere bombing capabilities" - austere being defined as being capable of destroying undefended and indefensible scrap. Handy, that. You know, just in case the junkyard wars people make a military move - you can get their parts supply chain.

8
2

Google hits 'prove we killed no Afghans' – Assange™

MeRp
Stop

So...

You don't think it is irrefutable that Jesus is famous (at least in part) for having his hands pierced? Whether that is historically accurate or not is rather immaterial, is it not?

George Washington is famous (in part) for saying that he cannot tell a lie, even though that tale is not historically accurate. Thus, there are Google hits that roughly correlate with that.

0
0
MeRp

To be fair...

Isn't Jesus known for having blood on his hands in a more literal sense? Something about nails piercing his skin or some such?

4
0

Office workers: 'The best way to upgrade a PC is to smash it'

MeRp

It seems...

If you actually need the device to perform your work, then the fastest way would HAVE to be to break it. All of the other ways involve you continuing to be productive, so the company doesn't have to worry about lost time.

That being said; it is also the riskiest, I think, since you would, most likely, be fired if you were caught, and the likelihood of being caught seems somewhat high.

0
0

Mummy, mummy, there's a nuclear monster!

MeRp
Alert

Note to mention...

The possibility of a critical failure in the strong force within our bodies; if it failed at the wrong moment (any moment), the result would be instant death! Precautions MUST be taken!

2
0

Australians can’t read or count

MeRp

I couldn't help but notice...

There is definitely a pessimist vs optimist thing going on with this story. The original interpretations of the report (by other journos) are all squarely in the pessimist camp (oh, woe is me; Australia is in the suck). The author also falls in this camp, though a bit more ambiguously.. but he does imply that, while it is un-exceptional for the situation to be like it is, there are all kinds of people who suck.

I say: around 50% of Australians NEVER make a mistake when dealing with arithmetic, holy shit OMG, Australia kicks ASS!!!!!. What a high rate of perfection!

1
0

Page: