* Posts by The Original Steve

407 posts • joined 24 Jun 2009

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Are smart safes secure? Not after we've USB'd them, say infosec bods

The Original Steve

Re: @ The Original Steve

Um, Windows doesn't either...

Not since 2001 anyway, when XP was released.

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The Original Steve

Unbelievable

As much as I may get slated for saying it, I'm not shocked - or even object - to the use of Windows as the OS for this sort of device. Windows, as well as Linux, BSD, QNX and others would be fine for the job. All of the above platforms are used in embedded environments, including safety critical appliances.

However, using one that is so, so old is unforgivable. On top of that, using vanilla USB is plain stupid, and I'm also assuming that the OS is set to autorun when the stick is inserted. Unless they are doing something clever and essentially bypassing the OS or exploiting a vulnerability then the reason this can be achieved is because of one thing - piss poor configuration.

I don't care what OS they are using, but if it's set to auto-execute anything plugged into the UNIVERSAL serial bus, and the environment is running privileged then it's totally irrelevant what platform the vendor has used. If it's a vuln in the OS then the vendor should be using a patched and up to date platform, and also additional measures should be in place regardless.

Even if you get into the OS and can spin up a shell or GUI, then why should that just give away access to the safe? Maybe after hours and hours, but by getting into the existing / current session should not be enough anyway. The control software should be secure, require all sorts of authentication and authorisation....

It's very easy to slate Microsoft, but actually I fail to see how it's the fault of the OS here. The vendor is exposing USB, on a platform built 14 years ago, without good security best practice once you have a session.

Shit security by shit design.

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Ford's parallel PARCing: Motor giant tries to craft new tech just like Xerox

The Original Steve

Re: Meh. @ Terafirma-NZ

My motor, which is a new already BMW 1 series (so the cheapest range they do!), scans the road signs and alerts me if I'm doing the wrong speed. Not GPS and maps - it uses OCR to read the road signs, displays them on my dash and tells me if I'm speeding.

And multiple lanes is a problem already solved. Again, my motor (and many more) have lane detection. It knows what lane I'm in and tells me if I'm in the wrong one.

My point is that most of your objections are already covered technically speaking. Just need to join the dots and iron out some kinks.

Exciting times!

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We put Windows 10 on a small fondleslab: STILL not ready, 3 days to go

The Original Steve

Re: Pester Power

"BBC iplayer radio on a Windows phone will flatten its battery overnight. Even if you've exited the app."

Um, no.

I use iPlayer radio daily, normally in the morning. If you exit the app (rather than just switching) then the application is closed and my Lumia 930 will keep chugging away for the rest of the day and won't need a charge until I'm ready for bed.

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The Original Steve

Better...

Build 10240 is on the right track, and thankfully as MS have de-coupled the first party apps from the OS in terms of updates so bugs in Mail and other apps can be updated via the store in the background pretty quickly.

Can't say I've used Win10 on a small tablet, but I have been testing it since Jan on a Linx 10, and in the last month I've also installed it onto my Dell Inspiron hybrid laptop/tablet device.

On both of these devices I've actually found it to be incredibly stable. I haven't been able to replicate the issues mentioned in the article, however I have come across a couple of problems elsewhere. (e.g. I can't edit the TCP/IP properties in the GUI for a VPN connection...)

Overall it seems like a big improvement on Windows 8.1, both for touch and non-touch devices alike. I haven't recommended people to upgrade from Windows 7 to 8/8.1 as I didn't feel it brought enough to the party vs the changes in UI / learning curve for most people. However it looks like W10 will be easy enough for end users to get used to (compared to 7) and brings enough goodies to warrant the upgrade.

UI aside (everyone is fixated on the UI, which whilst important is only one aspect of an OS) Win 10 feels like a big jump, particularly from Win 7 in areas of performance and manageability. The revised areas of start screen / store / apps from Windows 8/8.1 is a huge relief, and now makes enough sense for it not to be a 'blocker' in terms of recommending the platform to end users.

Whilst the first party apps aren't the best, not in any area to be honest, they are mostly good enough for the majority of users. Yes, Mail is crap compared to Outlook or even Outlook.com or GMail, but it's good enough for basic email use. I use Outlook 2016 preview on my laptop, signed into the domain, but have my MS account hooked up and use Mail for day-to-day operations on my personal mailbox.

There's some massive gaps that MS need to address. OneDrive placeholders is a huge issue for me, Groove Music needs some basic features adding (MP3 tag editing, seamless playback etc.) and Edge needs extension support (coming soon but not soon enough).

However ignoring Windows 10 on it's own, and looking at it by comparing to Windows 7 and Windows 8.x then it looks very promising. The servicing model of the applications means they should be getting regular updates which is overdue and will make a huge difference based on the updates done during the Insider Preview programme.

Think I'll give it 6 months, see if there's anything major reported and looks at rolling out a small pilot. Genuinely does look like the best release (at RTM) of Windows and the future roadmap looks equally promising.

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Even Microsoft thinks Outlook is bloated and slow

The Original Steve

Think I'll stick to Lync / Skype for Business thanks...

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Feel like you're being herded onto Windows 10? Well, you should

The Original Steve

Re: Why not, Steve laddie ?

Then I suggest turning those features off via GPO...

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The Original Steve

Win 10 looks and operates in a very similar manner to Win 7. I'll give it 6 months of testing myself (have been as an insider since start of the year) and if there's no major known issues I'll be recommending it and deploying it.

The UI is far more similar to W7 than 8.1, same architecture since Vista in terms of deployment (.wim), same sys requirements and unless the devs are dicks and check for a winNT version number then drivers that worked as far back as Vista should be fine too.

Tried it on a Linx 10, a 5 year old i5 home built HTPC and now on a new Dell touchscreen laptop and not had a single issue driver wise.

If you're on XP still or even if you're on Win7 I don't see why you'd not be looking at Win10 within a few months.

Worth pointing out that now it's "as-a-service" there is no 'service pack' so pointless holding on for that to happen.

Skip 8/8.1, carry on with Win7 for 6 months then look at the landscape.

Architecturally there's not any major changes since Vista, so why not?

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Microsoft sprints to finish, emits possible Windows 10 RC build

The Original Steve

Re: Microsoft were betting on Intel reaching 10nm sooner, for 'Phone' use.

Huh? Windows Phone / Windows 10 Mobile is for ARM only.

Tablets are x86. Based on my use of my Linx 10 the Atom seems adequate in terms of power vs. performance. Get a couple of days which I think is reasonable.

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Everything you know about OpenStack is wrong

The Original Steve

Skeptical

I can only offer a view from the standpoint of a "user" of OpenStack - I haven't read up on it nor implemented it. However our co-lo, datacentre and connectivity partner have been deploying OpenStack for a good 6 months + and we had an urgent need to deploy a Windows VM with 2Tb of storage as we've ran out of capacity on our co-lo SAN.

They had just announced their OpenStack platform as being production ready, so we looked at building a Windows 2008 R2 VM with Exchange 2010 on it as part of an existing DAG.

Way, way more trouble than it's worth. Now my basic / limited understanding of the platform does cause me to think that OpenStack runs "services" rather than VM's - similar to Microsoft's Private Cloud using SCVMM - so running an Exchange VM probably isn't a fair test.

However from an "end-users" point of view the entire experience was dire. Utterly terrible. Some bits that stand out:

- Terrible UI. Basic functionality in the web UI, rest is via shell

- Very complex. The open source boffins running it were in over their heads and struggle to understand it

- Doesn't play nice with Windows guests. At all. Drivers were a bloody nightmare

- Modularity is nice - powerful, but also brings with it complexity

- Performance was poor using Ceph. Although the 3rd party says this is due to a defragmentation that was running at the time. Regardless the disk IOPS are much worse on the VM on OpenStack with Ceph than a Hyper-V host and a Lefthand SAN.

- The overall experience I got had me going away thinking it's very immature

It's an interesting project, but the limited experience I've had with it so far leaves quite a bit to be desired. Lots of potential, and I'm sure if you've got dozens of open source experts to hand, lots of time and of course the budget for the hardware then you'd be laughing... although you could say that with nearly any "private cloud" or modern day "infrastructure platform".

Feels like it needs a couple of years to grow before I'd consider looking at it seriously for medium sized organisations.

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Smartphones are ludicrously under-used, so steal their brains

The Original Steve

Continuum

Actually sounds rather interesting... Not entirely novel, but if the execution is right...

Intrigued.

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Dyre times ahead: Zeus-style trojan slurps your banking login creds

The Original Steve

Is it not a bit pointless?

Not sure about other banks, but with Barclays you have to use two factor to logon rendering this sort of keylogging malware moot.

YMMV, but I'm sure other banks enforce similar countermeasures.

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ONE MILLION new lines of code hit Linux Kernel

The Original Steve

Re: wait for it...

"...leaving you without a sane way of interrupting a failing boot in order to get into safe mode "

Other than pressing F8 you mean?

Or letting it fail three times in which case it will jump to recovery itself.

But yeah, those things - as well as changing the boot order in the BIOS to recovery media (PXE, USB, optical etc.) - aside it's really, really hard to get into safe mode. /s

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UH OH: Windows 10 will share your Wi-Fi key with your friends' friends

The Original Steve

Going to get slated, but...

... I actually think it's a pretty good idea to be honest. I qualify that statement by saying that I'd be much, much happier if I knew exactly how it worked - particularly around prevent LAN access to people who have access to your Wifi.

But really, this won't impact corporates (and if it does then the problem is with your implementation of Wifi rather than Wifi Sense - you should be using 802.11x over PSK's FFS!).

So it's actually going to be for consumers over businesses that will be impacted by it. And if MS are storing the key encrypted at rest and over the wire, as well as it only being shared in a non-visible way to your address book with WAN access only.

To be honest, with the track history and how much is "sensitive" data is stored on cloud services (iCloud, Google, OneDrive) a PSK that's limited to WAN only access and shared with people in your address book only - that you can change / revoke - doesn't bother me that much.

Considering that with Chrome your web-based passwords are sync'd via Google Cloud, and with IE / Edge your credentials are sync'd with OneDrive as the store then my home Wifi PSK seems fairly "safe". Well, safe enough.

Until otherwise stated, at present you need to be in my address book and have physical access to the Wifi signal. Even then it's just WAN access too.

I have used this as an owner of a Lumia 930. My brother has a Lumia 1020, whilst my mum has a 730. Works really well - just seamless... They pop over and turn on their Wifi.... and voila - internet access without the need to shout out keys.

Also have a Linx 10 tablet that I've been running Windows 10 Insider for a few months. Again with this - always have Wifi access without dicking about with keys. Have tested it out with some test scenarios and indeed, there is no LAN access. Haven't investigated why, and as a techie I'd really like to know how this is achieved, but on the surface it seems useful.

Sure, there maybe a potential / possible security issue - but in reality and so far it all seems good. Worth noting that it's not shared with Facebook by default. You have to explicitly give consent for just that one type of sharing.

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Webmail password reset scam lays groundwork for serious aggro

The Original Steve

Um... Not quite as easy...

At least Outlook.com, and I suspect others, don't actually tell you the mobile number of the mark. So you'll need three things:

1. My mobile number

2. The email address associated with said mobile number

3. End user stupid enough to send a verification code they haven't requested to someone asking for it that they weren't expecting either.

This isn't a "hack" or "scam". It's Symantec thinking of any possible way to trick someone. If they are such a moron that you get verification code you haven't asked, AND then ALSO forward it on as well then you're too stupid to take part in society and your computer licence is revoked.

Bah! 5:18 on a Friday and still in the office. Can you tell?!

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Feature-rich work in progress: Windows Mobile 10 build 10136

The Original Steve

Impressed

Previous builds have been pretty poor on most fronts - which I suppose is fair enough as it's alpha / beta - but this build is much, much better. Running on a Lumia 930 and think I'll be giving it a run as my "daily driver". Even works better with the car Bluetooth than 8.1 and the previous 10 builds!

Long as those "Universal Apps" come along seems like WP10 or whatever the hell its called now is a reasonable contender for 3rd choice on mobile OS. Good thing.

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Config file wipe blunder caused deadly Airbus A400M crash – claim

The Original Steve

Re: Lack of imagination when thinking up things that can go wrong.

For this sort of thing a simple information warning should be more than enough. No action needed, but you can still have lots of checks. Like my car tells me if a tyre is flat, but wont stop me driving.

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Sysadmins rebel over GUI-free install for Windows Server 2016

The Original Steve

Re: and in the real world...

"there is a huge legacy of windows based server-side software that is not in any way command line based - including IIS and Exchange for example."

Totally, utterly wrong.

Exchange 2013 is ALL PowerShell. Every action you do in the web-based GUI is just running PowerShell in the background. And if you've managed more than a single Exchange 2013 server, or just done some of the more advanced stuff with it you'd soon realise that the GUI in Exchange 2013 only shows about 60% of what can be done.

Mailbox permissions, IP-less DAG, testing replication etc. ALL in PowerShell. There is no GUI.

IIS also can be managed without a GUI too. Server Core on 2012 R2 fully supports IIS 8.5 without a UI on the local server.

System Centre suite (SCVMM, SCCM, SCDPM, SCSM and SCOM) are all based on PowerShell. Same with SharePoint. Active Directory, HyperV and pretty much every single part of Windows can be managed without a GUI by using PowerShell.

I believe SQL 2014 also uses PowerShell for the non-TSQL elements too. (Although I haven't used that myself)

Microsoft is pushing ahead for ALL server and infrastructure products to have their management layer done with PowerShell. The GUI in current and future products are simply running PowerShell commands. The majority of functionality and configuration cannot be done in the GUI alone, with the only way to fully manage MS Server products will be PowerShell. The GUI is purely for the day-to-day admin tasks by Servicedesk. The actual infrastructure administrators are / will be expected to manage their solutions using PowerShell.

If you can't manage Windows Server with PowerShell, Event Viewer, Server Manager, Services and Device Manager then you shouldn't be managing a Windows Server. (Or any Server other than Small Business Server / Windows Server Essentials)

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Long, sticky summer ahead: Win 10 will be with OEMs by 31 August

The Original Steve

Re: system requirements:

Not sure about the other two examples, but Win7 style backup and start menu are definitely possible in Win10. Start may not be exactly the same as Win7 out the box but you can make it so via settings or GPO.

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Win Phone to outgrow smartmobe market for next four years

The Original Steve

Ringtones

May I suggest instructions for your version of OS:

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/winphone/wiki/wp8-wppersonal/how-to-add-custom-ringtones-on-windows-phone-8/c1614e43-eb7a-4fd5-a79d-8c2b9f6982bc

To be honest, you shove on a MP3, WMA or M4R file into the ringtones folder (either via the file browser, OneDrive, plug it into a PC and use Windows Explorer etc.), then the ringtone is in your list.

Go into the contact and assign it. Or go into settings and change your ringtone for the whole phone.

Other than it being in MP3 or WMA I don't see how it's any more difficult than Android...?

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Microsoft goes cloud KERR-AZY, chops Windows Server to bits

The Original Steve

From what I've read on the source it's actually Windows with:

- No GUI, same as server core

- Managed via PowerShell, and WMI like current Windows

- Has it's Side-by-Side (SxS) store removed, something you can already do

- Same API's as current Windows

Sure, there's other differences, but most of what is mentioned is similar to what a good admin can already do to a 2012 R2 box.

*BSD is awesome, but it won't play anwhere near as nice with AD, GPO's, my existing management tools and scripts as Server 2012 R2 - plus a large chunk of apps / roles should also work fine.

Containerisation is new (although App-V doesn't seem off the mark), bit the rest is similar to what a competent admin can already do.

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Midlife crisis, suck ingenuity? Microsoft turns 40; does the dad dance

The Original Steve

Re: what a lot of people..

I was referring to the Internet as a whole rather than the WWW. Was involved in getting my uni hooked up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Internet

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The Original Steve

Re: what a lot of people..

"The ubiquity of Windows' low-quality, backward interface lowered people's expectations of technology almost to the point of absurdity..."

I agree.

Although I somehow doubt Linux in it's state in the 90's (or now to a lesser degree) alone would have created the consumer PC market as it stands. In which I mean the size, benefit to the global economy and the millions of jobs it's created.

Is it the very best OS for xxx? Probably not.

Is it the easiest consumer platform - both in terms of it's distribution and easy of use? You bet your ass it is.

The cost of a 5 man shop using Linux or OS X on the desktop would be significantly higher if it wasn't for Microsoft. Setting up a homegroup, or even muddling along with Small Business Server is viable through point and click. This cannot be said for Linux, and the cost for Apple kit would be higher.

Windows is not the best tool for the job in every situation. In the same way that a Ford Focus isn't the best car for transportation. But it's ease of use, versatility and price has made widespread computing possible and accessible for millions worldwide. Other OS's will be better suited to running a firewall, a high-load public web server, or a dozen other tasks - but for grandma to browse facebook and check her email, or for a small business to have the ability to have what was once enterprise features for a couple of hundred quid is something that the industry as a whole can be proud of.

Accessibility is something I take pride in, and think the community as a whole should take credit for. Windows has helped to remove the technical, expert, geeky shroud from computing, particularly in the consumer and small business markets. This has led to more people getting into it by having access to the training wheels it provides, and more devices means more jobs, more eyeballs on the web, and more people to communicate with via computers. How is that not a good thing? As much as I pine for the web as it was in the late 80's, being used by geeks, for geeky things - the Internet now would not be anything like it is today if so many people were unconnected from it. The web would have less use if there is nobody to Skype with, send emails too or share bullshit on facebook with. The more people that use it, the more resources are ploughed into it, making it a vibrant, exciting ecosystem.

Without Microsoft what would consumers be running instead? And with that answer, how easy would it be for my 60 year old mother to install a print driver, or a small business to setup an LDAP with group policy-esq effects? With Windows, this is possible without being an expert, and without dropping to CLI's - it's EASY to perform these tasks.

Competition is a wonderful thing, and I run a heterogeneous environment as a hammer isn't the best tool for tightening a screw - but for generic business workloads and consumer use Windows, for me and millions around the world, is the best fit.

Windows isn't all that. But neither is the Ford Focus.

But it's good enough for the masses, and the fact the masses can now tap into this incredible communication and content-creation world that we - as IT professionals have created - has to be a good thing.

For that Microsoft, I thank you.

Happy Birthday.

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In-depth: Supermicro's youngest Twin is a real silent ice maiden

The Original Steve

Supermicro

Thanks Trevor - insightful and entertaining as ever.

Can anyone vouch for Supermicro in the real world? We're a MSP and usually resell Dell or HP and bang on Windows, but I'm giving serious thought to a 1U Supermicro + enclosure with Windows Storage Server 2012 X 2 as a single solution starter SAN... Looking at < £10k and it would be the same storage plus additional features as a HP LeftHand starter SAN we resell for over £30k!

I'm comfortable with Win Storage Server doing its bit - bit we've never used Supermicro before and wondering what we're missing...

Thanks - Steve

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BT gently returns to mobe biz with cheap SIM-only swoop

The Original Steve

Re: Do the BT plans allow tethering?

Nope - read a similar article on neowin which quoted a BT bod via twitter that said they won't support it.

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Sit back and let someone else manage your telephony

The Original Steve

Necessary?

I was surprised by how easy it was to get Lync setup and working. Have another client who is using a hosted system in the cloud and they have no end of performance issues, as well as lacking some features too.

Nature of voice needing low latency, and with modern PBX systems having all sorts of extra features I'm skeptical that cloud hosted telephony is suitable for anyone other than sub 30 user environments.

Larger than that and the use case for the advanced features (exchange integration, call recording, logging etc) makes a good enough case for your own PBX on commodity x86 kit. Linux and now Windows is reliable enough and various systems are easy enough to setup and use compared to traditional analogue / digital systems with all their proprietary guff.

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Nokia boss smashes net neutrality activists

The Original Steve

Re: Tosh

What public internet? The internet is a network of networks. The ISP in question peers with all the big boys, it's not closed off - you have to be a member and pay a subscription - like every ISP.

The issue in some areas is competition - not neutrality.

I can pay Be or A&A twice what I do for TalkTalk and get excellent speeds as they have invested more per subscriber in terms of capacity.

All of the above ISPs can interconnect and peer using LINX or other peering org. I pay for the connection to the peer point via my ISP, and the supplier / host can pay for their connection the other side.

Neither should in my opinion prioritise traffic.

If I want less 'buffer face' I'll pay for a better ISP.

Crap connection? You need better competition, not QoS.

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The Original Steve

Tosh

I used to work for an international not-for-profit ISP. We connect at national levels to NGOs, education and very large charities / health orgs. E.g. JANET in the UK.

Our connections provide low latency, high speed services so things like specialist consultants in the UK can supervise operations in disaster areas or countries with less skilled doctors. Also used for edu's to do video confs and similar stuff.

National NGOs pay for the connection, and as such they get a much better connection than using their normal national incumbent which would provide too high latency / low bandwidth for their needs.

However we don't prioritise traffic, but we sell to people who need such a service.

The net can be neutral in that ISPs provide one speed / latency - ASAP. One can then choose whichever ISP provides the better network for their needs and budget.

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Acer enters Windows Phone fray with cheap Liquid M220 mobe

The Original Steve

Re: Seriously? Still on about apps?

Need to look at your bank then. Barclays have a cracking app, and a quick peek in the store shows apps for NatWest, RBS, TSB, Metro, Halifax and Lloyds.

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The Original Steve

Re: Seriously? Still on about apps?

Nokia Transit:

http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/store/app/nokia-transit/5e41c972-de66-47f0-95bf-06eb115b3e48

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Windows is TAKING the TABLET market... what's left of it, anyway

The Original Steve

Re: I'd consider Surface more of a super ultrabook than a tablet

Those $200 also buys you a lighter device (inc keyboard 0.24kg), a rather good touchscreen, faster processor cores (1,4 vs 1,9GHz) and 2 x 5MP cameras.

Valid point about using the Surface keyboard on your lap. Although I think you'd struggle more trying to use the MBA standing.... ;)

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You'll get sick of that iPad. And guess who'll be waiting? Big daddy Linux...

The Original Steve

Re: I'd try Linux mobile

Same experience here. Moved to Win Pho 8.1 after getting tired if having to manage my partners and my own android phones. We haven't looked back since.

Apps are an issue still, but much better than it was. Most apps I want such as for utility bills I've pinned the web page to start and enabled autocomplete for the credentials - works nearly as well.

I hear Droid is getting better, but a few extra apps and starting to try and match iOS and WP8.1 stability just isn't enough of a lure right now.

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Attackers planting banking Trojans in industrial systems

The Original Steve

Re: Why use Windows ?

Because the OS is secure enough. Good security applies to all platforms (physical security, access control, least privilege, firewalling, separate networks, patching etc).

Windows, as with Linux and *BSD based platforms are equally mature and secure enough for industrial workloads. It's not the platform that's the issue - it's good security practices that lets these things happen.

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Goes like the blazes: Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 late 2014 edition

The Original Steve

Some nice unique features

"I have exactly the same problem and am bemused that the Outlook OWA doesn't have a default mobile-friendly format."

You need Exchange 2013, renders OWA for mobiles very well. Fraid 2010 sucks. Could always use ActiveSync instead.

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Docker: Sorry, you're just going to have to learn about it. Today we begin

The Original Steve

AppV

I'm sure I'm wrong, but what is the difference between Docker and AppV exactly?

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Docker part 4: Microsoft CAN'T ignore it. Aux armes, citoyens!

The Original Steve

I presume you never found the "Export Configuration" button in the Shared Configuration option?

Or: Backup-WebConfiguration -Name "My Backup"

With the equally hard to decipher command: Restore-WebConfiguration -Name "My Backup"

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El Reg reanimates Cash'n'Carrion merchandising tentacle

The Original Steve

Agree - a rebranded Cybertool or similar would be awesome.

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SAN gang at Nimble jump in Fibre Channel pool, but how big will the splash be?

The Original Steve

FC - I love it

Wish it was more widely adopted. Just having it as a dedicated, separate network, totally independent of the "network" is what's needed in a highly available VM environment. Granted, a well designed Ethernet network with full redundancy and QoS can come close for a LOT less, but if you can afford it then FC all the way.

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BlackBerry comeback: BES12 server revealed – it will manage ALL THE THINGS

The Original Steve

Nice

But software seems pricy for what it does. Most of the features can be done with Lync. Think we'll stick with Lync 2013 and MobileIron - cheaper and does very much the same.

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Microsoft, Docker bid to bring Linux-y containers to Windows: What YOU need to know

The Original Steve

AppV

Not having a *nix background I'm going purely on the odd article like this one, but what makes docker so much better / different than AppV?

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Get NAS-ty: Reg puts claws to eight four-bay data dumpsters

The Original Steve

Re: Or alternatively... Fractal Node 304 case

I did the same but threw some SSD's in too, installed Win Server 2012 R2 as HyperV core to a USB 3.0 stick and created a NAS VM on it. Storage tiering, dedupe, compression etc plus can create other VM's too.

Great chassis. Recommended.

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Nokia Lumia 735: Ignore the selfie hype, it's a grown-up phone

The Original Steve

Already exists

You can search for exchange contacts too.

Call recording does work - I have a working app on my 930.

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iPhone 6: The final straw for Android makers eaten alive by the data parasite?

The Original Steve

Emerging markets

And low priced devices are coming under attack by the Lumia range, particularly budget models by the unknown smaller ODM's. (Loads are coming out at the minute since MS ditched license fees).

Personally I see iOS at top end, Samsung have the lions share of mid and high end outside of iOS, with HTC taking the leftovers at mid-market and Lumia taking a decent chunk of the budget ene, particularly in emerging markets. Sony are mad carrying on as they are, and Sammy would be nuts to drop their devices (which are excellent).

I wouldn't discount WP in the BRIC's and other emerging markets and the West's budget segment, seems to be a lot of traction currently.

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First Irish boy band U2. Now Apple pushes ANOTHER thing into iPhones, iPods, iPads

The Original Steve

"Great. But the problem with that is that these features are on Android devices, and I haven't got time for all the fiddlarsing about that Android demands. Nor the clutter, and the all over the place interfaces."

Then try a Lumia, something mid range like an 830. Particularly if you throw on the dev preview. Has all the features iOS8 is touting minus the price and lack of HW choice Apple give you and none of the issues,you mentioned with Android.

Plus NFC that you can use! ;)

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New Lumia mobes nudge Microkia ever closer to biz customers

The Original Steve

Already exists

Have your own SharePoint farm, publish out OneDrive for business (on-prem, part of SharePoint) and if you want to go even further you can use SCCM to manage your own private app store too.

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Vodafone pay-by-bonk launch may signal iPhone 6 NFC plans

The Original Steve

Snap

Same - in everyway!

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Not even CRIMINALS want your tablets, Blighty - but if that's an iPhone you're waving...

The Original Steve

Stating the obvious

But Shirley is the phone is in ones pocket then the thief can't know the OS it's running... Is there a greater proportion of Droid devices in DE compared to iOS and the opposite in the UK... Sounds a bit odd that a thief will actively target a device. By their nature they'll take what they can get.

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Stand clear! Will HTC's One act as a defibrillator for Windows Phone?

The Original Steve

Not sure I agree with the author

I just got a Lumia 930, and my colleague got the One M8 (Android). On the looks front even he conceded that the 930 has it hands down. The M8 seems well built, but it's not particularly "pretty".

The "app gap" is pretty much there. SkyGo and Virgin maybe MIA, but the overwhelming majority of users will be content with what's on the market. Even Barclays have a fully featured online banking client (at last!), eBay, Dominos, uTorrent, Plex, Vine, even El Reg has an app on the WP store. (Although it sucks). There really isn't much left at all now - I understand that the SkyGo app is in development and should be out in the coming months too.

Same with feature set.... Direct WiFi sync (lack of) is annoying, but if you use SkyDrive then that solves that. Better VPN support, text reader (e.g. SMS, web page reading out loud) and better attachment features for emails are the only things I can think of that I'd like to see. 8.1 latest update really has feature matched the current marketplace and added a few USP's too.

Like to see another OS in the mix maybe, the more that are pushing for market share the better. Just need MS to speed up development of WP and I see no reason why it shouldn't fly going forwards.

Not sure what the lie of the land is these days... will the HTC M8 get Nokia's HERE app suite? If not then sticking Nokia is a no brainer, if it goes then seems like a pretty good handset. Not sure about that flap though...

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