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* Posts by SleepyJohn

147 posts • joined 23 Jun 2009

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Dotcom owns up: my name was 'poison'

SleepyJohn
FAIL

It was not just Dotcom at fault

Internet Mana was thrown out by the electorate because it was seen clearly as a corrupt and cynical manipulation of the democratic weakness inherent in MMP, solely to give Hone Harawira a pot of money to finance his personal ambitions, and Kim Dotcom a power base from which to personally attack John Key. Harawira was just as responsible for this travesty as Dotcom, and fortunately it backfired spectacularly, giving both of them precisely what they deserved.

'Middle NZ' supported John Key as they clearly see him, whatever his faults, as a safe pair of hands, capable of adding up 2 + 2 and getting 4.

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Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills

SleepyJohn
Headmaster

Re: If they say yes... "Who knows what the organ grinder will decide?"

And if the UK Government refuses to accept Salmond's undoubtedly preposterous demands? I understand that a 'Yes' in this mockery of a referendum will lead to negotiation between Scotland and the UK with a view to the granting of independence, not the automatic gaining of it.

The wording of the question is interesting, too. It says "Should Scotland be an independent country?", not "Do you want Scotland to be an independent country?" I can see many loyal but intelligent Scots saying 'Yes' to the first dream but 'No' to the second reality. There seems to be considerable scope for a massive fudge here, designed to just shut the Scots up.

Perhaps Scotland will become an independent country that amicably and sensibly shares all aspects of its infrastructure and governance with its larger neighbour, thus effectively preserving the status quo and keeping the EU handouts coming, while deluding the woad and sporran brigade into believing they are finally free of the hated English.

Salmond can boldly strut to the front of the stage and announce that he has, bravely and singlehandedly, saved tens of thousands of jobs and many millions of pounds by ordering the English to move their submarines half a mile down the loch instead of all the way to Portsmouth. And so on.

Then Hollywood can rush out Braveheart 2 in time for Christmas, telling the Scots how the Scots won the Great Battle to drive out the English and gain Independence. And the Scots will all live happily ever after.

PS: and if a single deciding vote comes from a witless 16 year-old glue-sniffer on the Benefit, then Salmond's new voting age will doubtless be lauded a success.

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Boffins attempt to prove the UNIVERSE IS JUST A HOLOGRAM

SleepyJohn

Re: Interesting times

"Building on the work of previous researchers, trying to build a platform high enough to glimpse the far-off ocean of Truth."

Which is essentially a fancy way of saying that science is never right, only slightly less wrong than it was before. Explanations are not the same as truths.

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Brit Sci-Fi author Alastair Reynolds says MS Word 'drives me to distraction'

SleepyJohn

Re: How Awful is it? Export to PDF

Yes. After getting fed up with my wife constantly complaining that her MS colleagues opened her Linux Textmaker DOC files and found bullet points in the wrong place I asked if they needed to edit them. No, she said. Then send them PDFs, I said.

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Cracking copyright law: How a simian selfie stunt could make a monkey out of Wikipedia

SleepyJohn

Re: Recent news on Page 2 - the Knowledge Economy

Or as the computer engineer wrote when asked to justify his charge of $500 for chalking a cross on a component with the instruction "replace this" -

- for chalking cross on item -- $00.01

- for knowing which item to chalk it on -- $499.99

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EU justice chief blasts Google on 'right to be forgotten'

SleepyJohn
WTF?

Hiding information NOT an impediment to Free Speech? Seriously?

Dear God, is there really anyone on the planet who genuinely believes the EU is enforcing this for the benefit of the peasantry? In a democracy any idiotic ruling like this will be mocked, twisted and generally made to look as stupid as it is, and the authorities will be forced to reassess its obvious shortcomings.

Not in the EU. Their attitude is: "How dare you question our rulings!" Or in Eurospeak: "I will not let them abuse this crucial ruling to stop us from opening the digital single market for our companies and putting in place stronger protection for our citizens." (Er, Google is not stopping you doing any of those things.)

The arrogance and deceit of that emotive Eurobabble alone should be cause for concern, never mind the obvious stupidity and deliberately indefinable vagueness of the ruling. Any criticism of the EU or its unelected bosses can now be deemed not only blasphemous but also out-of-date, irrelevant or not-in-the-public-interest, and thus be hidden from the people.

And that does NOT pose a danger to Free Speech? Commenters here would rather risk political subjugation than rejection by a stupid employer over an ancient photo on the web? Seriously?

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Google's 'right to be forgotten': One rule for celebs, another for plebs

SleepyJohn
Big Brother

And we thought straight bananas were ridiculous

The notion that people can 'own' publicly available information about themselves makes straight bananas look quite sensible. I feel I am living in a heightened Monty Python sketch about commonsense lying flat on its back with its feet in the air.

The only real thing in this tidal wave of emotive, factless twaddle about 'out-of-date, irrelevant, unimportant, not-in-the-public-interest' and other supremely indefinable types of information, is the certainty that the final say on what EU peasants will be permitted to know lies with the EU's politicised 'Supreme Court'. Anyone who is not concerned by that should wipe the stardust from their eyes and grow some brain cells.

Google is right to make a mockery of this dangerous nonsense. Not only does it hand a powerful censorship tool to the EU, but it also degrades the extraordinary, free service that search engines provide for ordinary people, even those consumed with such hatred over them making money that they have lost sight of what life was like without one.

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Has Europe cut the UK adrift on data protection?

SleepyJohn

The EU was instigated by the Nazis in the 1940s

Thanks for the link - a riveting film. I have just watched a bit as it is bedtime in the deep south where I live but I will certainly continue it tomorrow.

One thing I would mention is that he did not go back far enough in his search for the origins of the EU. The initial germ was planted long before the European Coal and Steel Community in the 1950s. It was apparently planted by the Nazis in the closing stages of the war when they realised they were going to lose and decided to lay the groundwork for a new United Europe, which would adopt different tactics to the fire and brimstone methods that had failed them. This was based on a plan originating from the German company IG Farben in 1940.

The first President of what would evolve into today's European Commission was a prominent Nazi lawyer called Walter Hallstein. Google 'nazis and EU' for a lot more disturbing stuff like that.

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SleepyJohn
Big Brother

Someone runs this show, and it's not the muppets on stage

The British were tricked into joining what liars like Edward Heath convinced them would be a friendly trading cooperative, by a self-appointed European political elite who knew exactly what it was always intended to be - a dictatorial European Super-Power controlled by a single, economically powerful country masquerading as one of the team. What is it the Scots say about 'he who pays the piper'?

Instead of cowing the peasantry with bombs and bullets as the last lot tried to do, the EU very shrewdly chose the weapon of stultifying bureaucracy - it is cheaper, does not damage the infrastructure, does not kill off the cannon-fodder, and is more effective at sapping the will and clouding the judgement of the people. The EU's non-stop, mind-numbing bureaucratic diarrhoea is easy to mock, but it is an essential, and carefully manipulated part of this process.

There is no place for Britain, with its long history of freedom and democracy, in this lumbering, bullying behemoth. And the notion that, despite its infrastructure, expertise, economy and global connections, Britain could not survive outside the suffocating Euro-monster, is simply ludicrous. The last European dictatorship that invited Britain to join was rebuffed with disgust, and this one should be too.

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Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?

SleepyJohn

Re: It's Troll time! - it's synonym time, or not

"unlikely to move its thousands of employees out of Scotland" does not have the same meaning as "will definitely not move its business out of Scotland"

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SleepyJohn

Re: Realism - Currency Unions

Presumably the significance of a formal Currency Union with Britain is that it would be the Bank of England that would have to spend vast amounts of money to rescue the pound should an independent Scotland get in a financial mess? This I understand is precisely why the UK Chancellor will not offer one to an independent Scotland - the risk of failure is deemed too high.

It was, paradoxically, precisely this risk of failure that caused the EU to offer one to all who adopted the Euro, as it gave the EU the power to dictate the terms on which it would bail out miscreants - such as taking complete political and economic control of their countries. So perhaps an independent Scotland should be pleased with the UK Chancellor's refusal as otherwise it would effectively become a vassal of the UK (as the small Euro countries are of the EU) rather than the honourable partner that it currently is.

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SleepyJohn
WTF?

Those who most want separation tend to least understand it

.Salmond: "We will have a currency union with the pound" : The Pound: "Er, no you won't, you're far too much of a risk"

Salmond: "We will automatically become full members of the EU" : The EU: "Er, no you won't, we already have a queue and you'll be at the end of it"

Salmond: "We will be wallowing in money from North Sea Oil" : North Sea Oil: "Er, no you won't, read the small print in our contracts"

Salmond: "We Scots are absolutely wonderful and wear kilts, so we should be independent" : Many Normal People: "Er, why? For whose benefit?"

Would you abandon a cruise liner (albeit with imperfections) for a small boat in uncharted waters with a buffoon at the helm? I don't think the quiet majority of Scots will be sufficiently swayed by sporrans and haggis and silly American movies to do that. I used to live there and the greatest enthusiasm for separation nearly always came from those with the least understanding of its implications.

The social and economic risks are literally incalculable. And for what exactly? No-one is banning bagpipes or Burns, or burning the books; there is no impediment to their culture; their best politicians pretty much run the UK anyway. They probably have more independence and power and money now than they could ever get on their own. Unless it is a ploy to lever increased devolution (a far more intelligent ambition) it seems totally insane to me; like divorcing a perfectly nice, working wife because some tart on the bus hitches up her skirt and smiles at you.

Talking of the EU, I recall that the original objective of 'independence' was simply to secure a direct line to EU handouts, avoiding Westminster. Is that Mr Salmond's great romantic vision of kilted independence - just another EU welfare junkie? He does realise, surely, that the EU's 'financial encouragement' of minorities is firmly based on the 'divide & conquer' principle? And that they may not let him in anyway? Or does he, more cynically, simply care only about his own 'fifteen minutes of fame'? Either way I think a "YES" will give the author rather more to worry about than his broadband speed.

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UK.gov's Open Source switch WON'T get rid of Microsoft, y'know

SleepyJohn
WTF?

Er, what was this article actually about?

There has been some interesting discussion in the comments here, but I still have no clue what the point of the article was. I moved to New Zealand a few years ago and have finally changed all my electrical plugs to ones that fit the NZ sockets. This means I no longer have to buy plug adapters from a specialist UK supplier, and can just pop into any local store for a standard plug.

Perhaps I should add a thousand or so words to that paragraph and sell The Reg a breathless article about freetards having to face the fact that UK plug manufacturers, although I am no longer personally beholden to them, have not been specifically banned from making and selling plugs that will fit into my standard sockets.

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ICO: It's up to Google the 'POLLUTER' to tidy up 'right to be forgotten' search links

SleepyJohn
Big Brother

Ludicrous bureaucratic stupidity?

At which point in time does history become 'out of date' I wonder? Will all events in the EU now have to come stamped with a 'Use By' date? What will the Hindus make of that?

Someone will have to be given control over what in the EU is deemed 'out-of-date', 'irrelevant' or 'not in the public interest', and thus be denied to the public. I wonder who that will be? Google? Or a court specifically instructed by the EU to make decisions that will increase the EU's power over the people?

Despite outward appearances, this is not ludicrous bureaucratic stupidity; it is carefully-crafted groundwork for a censorship regime, masquerading as well-meant lunacy. The political muppets that strut on the EU stage may be bumbling idiots but those pulling their strings are not. Anyone who seriously believes this has been done for the benefit of the people should stop taking the soma.

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Google de-listing of BBC article 'broke UK and Euro public interest laws' - So WHY do it?

SleepyJohn
Big Brother

WHY do it?

Google are vilified for showing links and for not showing links, for making judgements and for not making judgements, for informing journalists and for not informing journalists. They are vilified for obeying this fatuous ruling and for not obeying it, and are now being vilified for showing up the unutterable idiocy of it. They are even vilified for efficiently running a business that provides the peoples of Europe with a hugely valuable, entirely free service without which most of them could barely operate. Vilified? Really?

This shambolic, insoluble mess was caused by the ECJ, not by Google, and it is the ECJ that should be asked - WHY do it (when strongly advised not to by your own legal team)? EU citizens should question the agenda of this so-called 'court' that now has absolute power over what publicly available information they will effectively be permitted to see.

There is a big picture here that is considerably more important to the average citizen than the stupidity of a 30 year-old who actually wants to work for someone stupid enough to judge him on a teenage indiscretion.

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When PR backfires: Google 'forgets' BBC TV man's banker blog post

SleepyJohn
Big Brother

Why did the ECJ make this ruling?

As the ECJ was apparently advised by its expert legal team not to do this, one must ask oneself why it did. There may be a clue in the Maastricht Treaty, which instructed the ECJ to 'return verdicts that further the cause of European integration'.

Whether there is any connection between that and the provision of a legal mechanism to control the people's access to information (albeit with an ostensibly high moral purpose for the benefit of some of said people), I don't know. However, the fact that it is so loosely formulated that it requires the ECJ to interpret it - which seems odd given the expert legal advice it has access to - should be disturbing. Some might think it deliberate rather than incompetent.

I remember when research that Google freely gives me in .001234 milliseconds would have taken weeks of trailing about major city libraries at vast expense. And Google is vilified for earning money by doing that? By metaphorically wandering round the global village reading public noticeboards and making the information easily available to all?

This is a very dangerous, far-reaching ruling made by an authority that appears to be absurdly stupid; but clearly is not. It understands perfectly the hugely powerful control over the dissemination of information that it has effectively given itself, being the final arbiter of any disagreement. Google is right to warn us that our searches, and our writings - indeed, our view of, and interaction with the world - may now be censored by the EU's Supreme Court under the guise of the farcical notion of a "right to be forgotten".

Anyone who thinks Google poses a greater threat to them than the EU should stop taking the soma.

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'Inaccurate' media misleads public on European Court's Google ruling

SleepyJohn
Big Brother

Self-interest? Google?

"And like any powerful corporation, it may have an agenda of self-interest"

And immensely powerful, unelected, unaccountable quasi-governments do not?

Who will be the final arbiter of which historical facts are to be hidden from the peasantry? Because hiding the truth from the people is precisely what this is about, carefully disguised with emotive pandering to ex-students who want to cover up their peccadilloes, and unconvincing assurances that 'matters of public interest will not be affected'. Well, the very court that has just effectively given itself that arbitrary power is the same one that not long ago decreed that any criticism of the EU should be viewed as blasphemy!

I think Google reporting the existence of everything that is on record, together with us having to live with and deal with our own pasts, is a great deal healthier for society than having our reality censored by the dysfunctional, unaccountable and dangerously dictatorial EU. You would have to be blind not to see that the EU oligarchy has its own "agenda of self-interest", and that its ambitions are orders of magnitude more to be feared than Google's.

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Cocky Spotify drops time limits on free listening, skint music-lovers cheer

SleepyJohn
WTF?

Re: Much like tape recorders did I suppose.

"how to make money from the music itself, which (presumably) is the issue"

'Presumably', of course, is the key word here, is it not? I do not see why a musician should care in the slightest how his money is earned - advertising on radio/streaming services, selling merchandise, live shows, or whatever else the future might bring - they all indicate that people like his music and want to both listen to that music and relate to him.

Making money by 'selling' a song as though it were a bag of carrots seems to me to be mostly in the interests of the grasping middlemen who neither create music nor have fans who want to buy t-shirts with their faces on. Real musicians should be delighted that the internet enables them to shake these parasites off their backs, enabling them to connect directly with those fans who want to connect with them.

"how can we flog crap with our band name on it?" Easy - build up a fan base that wants to spend money on such things. Then get off your arse and go and play in their towns. And as they all troop out of the venue flog them a DVD or digital download of the show, and a few other mementoes. "Exit through the gift shop", as those who understand these things might say.

Here is a thing: I would have loved to have gone to see Leonard Cohen when he played in Auckland recently to rave reviews, but could not make it for various reasons. Afterwards I thought I would buy a DVD of the show to make up for missing it. Very likely there were thousands of others in NZ, and possibly millions worldwide who thought the same thing. So how do you think I got on with this apparently simple wish?

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SleepyJohn
FAIL

Much like tape recorders did I suppose.

"the internet will suck the creative content out of the world"

My son was recently told at school that most of the jobs that will be available to him when he leaves have not been invented yet. It seems to me the same can be said of ways for artists to monetize their work on the internet. As long as the inventors ignore the sort of drivel spouted above. Which I am sure they will.

Anyone else remember payola? When the pop music bosses paid slush money to the equivalent of Spotify in return for advertising their songs.

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Gay hero super-boffin Turing 'may have been murdered by MI5'

SleepyJohn
WTF?

Re: RE: Men in dresses

They see women wearing dresses not men, so a man in a dress is odd, and from the few i've seen in a dress, they look damned odd...

I saw a few wandering down a street on a CCTV once, just as they came across a drunken moron who, thinking they were transvestites, decided to beat them up. Sadly for him they turned out to be professional cage fighters going to a fancy dress party.

So, to go back to the article, things are not always what they seem.

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How much did NSA pay to put a backdoor in RSA crypto? Try $10m – report

SleepyJohn
Big Brother

... said the spider to the fly

Those without their heads in the sand can see exactly the same thing going on much closer to the English Channel.

PS This was a reply to @Graham_Dawson's comment "Want to know a funny thing" - don't know how it got here. However, it sits quite well after the Russian thing.

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We're not destroying the music biz: Spotify

SleepyJohn
WTF?

Re: Harder to make a living?

Free access to:

-- gazillions of pounds worth of global marketing and publicity

-- a zillion pound worldwide digital distribution system

-- gigazillions of pounds worth of free technical advice

-- a captive audience of literally billions

HOW is this a good thing for a poor struggling musician trying to publicise his work?

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SECRET draft copyright treaty LEAKED: Meet the Trans-Pacific Partnership

SleepyJohn
Go

Re: Beep beep - Governments representing us?

Is there any evidence for the assumption that governments have ever represented the people? I suspect this is highly doubtful. This is the old saw about 'is crime rising or is it simply being reported more openly?'

While the internet has the power to enable particularly corrupt gangsters like American Big Media and its lackeys in the US government to control the world in order to slake their own mindless materialistic greed, it also enables us the people, courtesy of the likes of Wikileaks, to expose and damn them. It should also enable us, courtesy of the many exceedingly clever people the internet lets us connect with, to defeat them.

There is a story in fairy-tale land about 'killing the golden goose' which should be instructive to us, trying to deal with an organisation so consumed with and blinded by greed that it cannot think rationally. The MAFIAA's golden goose is us - we, the people. We are the ones who lay its golden eggs, and if we stop doing so it will wither and die. If we don't, it will be our civilisation that withers and dies.

If some crappy video of a farting cat can get the interest of millions of people, surely some clever folk can produce a meme to fill the public with such revulsion for corrupt American Big Media that millions will be persuaded to stop buying from it. Then perhaps, like the proverbial phoenix, real art and creativity can be encouraged to rise, above the ashes of the current grasping, sickening dross. Remember the Ratner story.

A massive, world-wide boycott of the next blockbuster movie, which smug MAFIAA bosses confidently expect to give them a financial orgasm, would send a useful shot across their bows. Big Media is hellbent on turning us all into literal slaves, trapped forever in terror of "stealing' some thug's copyright whenever we open our mouths. It has to be stopped. Is this the sort of 'civilisation' we want to pass on to our children?

"Daddy, was it you lot who handed these bastards control of our world?"

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MPAA, RIAA: Kids need to learn 3 Rs – reading, writing and NO RIPPING

SleepyJohn
WTF?

American Big Media running school brainwashing campaign

A school system officially peddling insidious, manipulative propaganda from a despicable, money-grubbing cartel that is barely distinguishable from Organised Crime? Every corrupt social blight in the US must be rubbing its hands in glee at the prospect of these floodgates opening for access to the malleable minds of little children.

"Just sign that cheque, sir; I'll fill in the amount. The classroom is first on the left."

How do parents feel about schools using their children as commercial cannon-fodder?

That this is being taken seriously enough to actually discuss simply beggars belief.

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IT'S ALIVE! IT'S ALIVE! Google's secretive Omega tech just like LIVING thing

SleepyJohn

Like an intermittent high tension leak from a sparkplug

Yes, wouldn't disagree with that, other than to observe that, theoretically, if one knew every tiny factor that influences the oncoming weather one could, theoretically, predict it with precision any time into the future. In practice we never know every tiny factor so can only make a best estimate, and try to prepare for other possibilities. As a long-time offshore sailor I have spent many hours doing exactly that.

I think the same applies to Google's systems. Accumulations of microscopically small, unforeseen inaccuracies can at times cause the system to make a decision that the programmer would not expect. But, as clean_state said in response to your earlier post, there is nothing weird or biological about that. It seems more akin to my car running slightly rougher than expected because of an intermittent high tension leak from a sparkplug.

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SleepyJohn

Is the weather alive?

As a layman it seems to me that this system's behaviour is not 'unpredictable', just not currently completely predictable by Google. Someone earlier compared it to meteorology. This, again, is not unpredictable; it simply has so many complex factors affecting it that even the best of human weathermen are currently unable to fully predict the precise resultant effect of them all.

To infer from this that the system is 'alive' is on a par with claiming that the weather is alive. Even calling it weird seems a big stretch. Which is not to say that we should be any less concerned about the potential dangers of such immensely powerful and currently unpredictable systems than we are about the potential dangers of immensely powerful and currently unpredictable weather.

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Facebook fans fuel FAGGOT FURY firestorm

SleepyJohn
FAIL

Re: A car maker's nightmare - The Ford Faggot

And here is an American's take on it, complete with:

"Yoni photographic transfer on a Volkswagen hood attains a level of pictorial literalism that may preclude the automobile’s use as a kindergarten taxi".

Which may amuse some readers. He can even sell you a book about strange words.

Honda renamed the Fitta (Swedish for c**t) to Jazz (Black American slang for semen)

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SleepyJohn
Boffin

A car maker's nightmare - The Ford Faggot

I believe car manufacturers spend millions on research to avoid such marketing mistakes as designing Ford Faggots in Britain then advertising them in America. I can't be bothered researching now but I believe there have been a few hilarious mistakes over the years. Look here:

Dodgy car names

If you are currently driving to Spain in your Mitsubishi Pajero, turn round now.

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Swedish teen's sex video fine slashed: Unwilling co-star girlfriend furious

SleepyJohn

"It was "smygfilmat" - i.e. a hidden camera"

Am I the only one who read this in an earlier post?

http://mobil.dn.se/nyheter/sverige/osannolikt-att-hd-tar-upp-sexfilmsdomen/

Can't read Swedish so cannot check the link. However, as others have said, if it is true then it deserves a lot more than a slap on the wrist and a fatuous judge's comment to the effect that "teens will be teens".

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'Silent' staff stood by as £100m BBC IT project tanked – DG

SleepyJohn
WTF?

The best fertiliser is the farmer's wellies

Perhaps these managers should be sent to agricultural college, where apparently they are taught that the best fertiliser is the farmer's wellies.

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British spooks seize tech from Snowden journo's boyfriend at airport

SleepyJohn
WTF?

Re: Obama still not strong-arming, then, I see

"Interestingly enough even the semi-literate, gay bashing asshats at Fox News had the class to say 'Greenwald partner' not boyfriend or lover in their articles..."

Er, why is this interesting? Or classy?

Would you have made the same criticism if the journalist had been a girl?

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SleepyJohn
Big Brother

'Avaricious gangsters controlling USA rule peasants with terror'

'Boyfriend of journalist involved in release of classified information NOT stopped in airport while travelling with laptop on trip financed by journo's newspaper'.

Really? Who was sacked over that negligence?

This is just a symptom. The sickness is in the title. These Americans do not see terrorism as foreigners inflicting terror on their people, but as an excuse for themselves to inflict terror on their people. Just like the street-corner gangsters they emulate. "Nice life you've got here. Be a pity if anything happened to it."

The Statue of Liberty should be done under the Trade Descriptions Act.

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Report: NSA spying deals billion dollar knockout to US cloud prospects

SleepyJohn
Big Brother

Re: Physics can disagree all it likes ...

@mybackdoor

I believe the original poster was making the point that 'having the right to bear arms' is, in truth, likely to place you in greater danger from the US Government than not having it, due to the ease with which it can justify shooting an armed man. A cynic might therefore conclude that it is in the interests of the US Government to encourage the bearing of arms, as it is then easier for it to kill off nuisance people without its corporate pals losing money due to the neighbours disgustedly taking their business elsewhere. This would undoubtedly make the corporates 'happy", and I expect they would pass some of that 'happiness' onto the Government..

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SleepyJohn
FAIL

Physics can disagree all it likes ...

... but it will not be physics that gives the order: "Shoot to kill these dangerous armed crazies who are trying to destroy our wonderful country" - an order less likely to be savaged in Court than "Shoot to kill these unarmed old grannies on their way to Bingo".

So, yes, shooting armed citizens is morally and legally very easy. A cynic might believe that the US Government is quite happy with that situation.

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Who's who: 12th Doctor has been chosen, will meet you on Sunday night

SleepyJohn
FAIL

Dr Who's flippancy should be a front, not a character trait

Well, if it is another ADHD 11 year-old with a Lego screwdriver and the intellectual depth of a greenfly larva I shall, sadly, have to give it a miss again.

Unless Mrs Who appears, of course.

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Ex-prez Carter: 'America has no functioning democracy' with PRISM

SleepyJohn
Black Helicopters

An American seeking Political Asylum in Russia? You couldn't make it up

"Seriously, if people run away from your country and ask for asylum in China and Russia, something went horribly wrong"

I recently read a comment somewhere about American 'justice' in response to someone saying that in civilised countries you are considered innocent until proven guilty:

"In America you are considered guilty until proven rich"

Snowden get a fair trial in America? I certainly wouldn't put my money on it. I don't know much about Carter but "America has no functioning democracy" certainly gels with my reading of the news in recent years. The people running that country exhibit the mentality of street-corner gangsters.

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Spotify strikes back at Radiohead - but artists are still angry

SleepyJohn
WTF?

The artists may be paid a pittance but I doubt their owners are

"the recording royalty is returned to the record company and those details are under NDA"

My teenage son uses Spotify all the time now that he is in a city with fast internet. I am sure the very notion of 'owning' music will disappear quite soon due to such streaming services. Instead of manipulating millions of impressionable teenagers into parting with cash to 'buy' songs, pop singers will now have to deal with streaming services, apparently largely owned by their own record companies.

"Some of the world's largest music companies are among the owners of Swedish streaming music service Spotify, with the record labels buying their shares for a pittance, according to financial documents obtained by Computer Sweden" -- PCAdvisor - 2009

And try this for a discussion of vested interests: will-artists-be-paid-if-spotify-goes-public

Same old criminals collecting the dues then. And all for an investment barely more than the cost of a new tea trolley. Despite the deceptive headline, Spotify as such is not the artist's enemy here.

2
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Ferocious fungus imperils future of British gin and tonic

SleepyJohn
Unhappy

Re: @James I like Gin in one, and only one, place. -- and no guns!

Chickens and eggs come to mind. Perhaps New Hampshire doesn't feel the need for strict gun laws if it has civilised people living there.

Having said which, it seems clear to me that the problem with Americans and guns is not legal but cultural - they seem to worship violence in any shape or form, the more sadistic the better; and appear at the same time incapable of distinguishing between real life and Hollywood movies. Throw in easy access to guns and you have a lethal combination, as many schoolchildren discover every year. I bet the survivors would like to live in a country where the future of gin and tonic is more perilous than the future of yourself.

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Kim Dotcom victim of 'largest data MASSACRE in history'

SleepyJohn
Thumb Up

Re: Accusation should not equal guilt - except for copyright infraction

It is also worth noting that, as far as I know, the only people in this ludicrous and disgraceful debacle who have been found guilty of any illegal behaviour are those who attacked Dotcom. The NZ authorities were clearly fed a farrago of lies by the US government and instructed to 'put the frighteners on him' by staging a farcical Hollywoood show when apparently all they had to do was phone the Diplomatic cop in the mansion and he would have opened the door for them; but since then the country has redeemed itself noticeably by its fair and just treatment of the man. And however shady his past, or fat his stomach, he deserves the same justice as anyone else; or the country concerned is not fit to lick even his boots.

But then the NZ government is presumably not being paid by those whose corrupt and lucrative business model is seriously threatened by his entrepreneurialism.

“Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed, to me: And I'll strip their wallets like a heartless whore”

What a horrible country. I wouldn't hand over my worst enemy to them.

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Tech aristocracy joins conflab with Secret Rulers of the World

SleepyJohn
Big Brother

We don't need no 12 foot lizards for a conspiracy

We are expected to believe that an organised mob of the richest and most powerful businessmen, bankers and politicians in the world does NOT meet to work out a way to run the world solely for their own benefit?

These people must be delighted to be called '12 foot lizards from Space', 'Illuminati from the 15th Dimension', 'The Bilderbergers' and suchlike as it makes the mass of the populace laugh at the notion of a conspiracy; when in truth there quite clearly is one - the rich and powerful conspire to subjugate the masses in order to increase their own wealth and power at the expense of the masses. And there they all are - in Watford (presumably not at "Watford Gap, grease on the plates, it's a load of crap").

These people effectively already virtually rule the world, so the potential for them to morph into a 'New World Order' seems self-evident. It is a shame Dr Who has spent the last fours years as a demented adolescent on Speed, or he might have been able to do something about it.

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Doctor Who? 12th incarnation sought after Matt Smith quits

SleepyJohn

Re: 12th? Dr Song?

This was supposed to be in reply to Mycho further up the thread.

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SleepyJohn
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Re: 12th? Dr Song?

Perhaps it will enable him to regenerate as a sharp, sexy, fascinating, highly intelligent woman, which will make a refreshing change after four years as a babbling, witless, teenaged American Soap Opera Idiot.

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SleepyJohn
Pint

Re: New Dr - "might as well have cast a sperm in the role"

Quite. As a wise, deep-thinking but eccentric 900 year-old Time Lord he would make a very good spoilt teenage brat on a moronic American family sitcom. Throw in the ludicrous 'prepubertal' Pond and the show became totally unwatchable for me. I had hopes for Clara as she seemed interesting, but has so far acted like Pond playing the Cheshire Cat. The recent sighting of the truly wondrous Mrs Who has persuaded me to watch again; perhaps she will return now that her husband's Babbling Teenage American Idiot phase is finally over. Whatever replaces this please let it be a Doctor with depth and edge and intellect. And properly eccentric rather than just fatuous.

Or has this whole period been a sort of 450 year flashback to the Time Lord's Medallion-Man Mid-Life Crisis, and I have completely missed the subtlety of it?

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P2P badboys The Pirate Bay kicked out of Greenland: Took under 48 hours

SleepyJohn

Re: Hey Grandad, my pal Jimmy says ...

I was referring to my grandchildren referring to these days as 'the old days', in the fond hope that their generation will rid themselves of the parasites currently trying to wrest control of the internet from the people.

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SleepyJohn
FAIL

Hey Grandad, my pal Jimmy says ...

... that in the old days the internet was controlled by American gangsters and corrupt governments. That can't be right, surely? Is that why my teacher calls it the Second Dark Age? A second era of "cultural and economic deterioration" that accompanied "a period of low activity in copying"?

She said that in those backward days people were so stupid they could not understand the difference between digital patterns flashing across the internet and plastic discs carted around in trucks. She was laughing so much she could hardly get the words out.

Was it really as horribly stupid as that, Grandad?

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Gov report: Actually, evil City traders DIDN'T cause the banking crash

SleepyJohn
Boffin

It is just musical chairs

I think it is a mistake to get too complicated about the banking system. In the final analysis it is just financial musical chairs: it matters not how few chairs there are (deposits) as long as the music keeps playing so that everyone does not want to suddenly sit down at the same time (withdraw their deposits).

If you want lots of ordinary folk to be able to dance round the chairs buying houses and setting up businesses and generally keeping the economy vibrant, you should forget the chairs and concentrate on playing the music. Eventually everyone will realise that we don't actually need chairs (money) at all, just music.

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Take that, freetards: First music sales uptick in over a decade

SleepyJohn
WTF?

Re: Consume this. -- and this, and this, and this

"There's more consumption than ever, but the value isn't being captured." -- What a hideously corporate phrase. Says it all, doesn't it?

"Take that, freetards: First music sales uptick in over a decade" -- Er, what? Are we looking forward to a reasoned article here? Sounds more like a cry from the dunce's corner of the nursery. Watch out for the flying Lego bricks.

Music lover ....... Musician. The internet joins the dots directly for us now. The corporates can go back to selling insurance scams to vulnerable old ladies, or shovelling tarmac onto their perfectly satisfactory driveways.

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Look out! PEAK WIND is COMING, warns top Harvard physicist

SleepyJohn
FAIL

Re: Stop the tea party [break out the beer]

Balance comes from having lots of different people with lots of differing views, not from one sanctimonious twat who thinks he knows it all. I believe the old Soviet government used to run a newspaper called 'Truth'.

And I knew an old sailor who swore that the reason the weather is getting windier is that there are fewer sailing ships in the oceans sucking it all up.

And I believe windmills are so unreliable they have to be backed up by coal-fired power stations constantly running in highly inefficient standby mode, probably producing more atmospheric pollution than if they just ran full power and produced the electricity themselves.

And as for an energy source that can apparently power the whole country from the contents of a cup of tea, and has killed fewer people over the years than crazed donkeys on the way to the airport - who needs that?

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Bob Dylan's new album is 'Copyright Extension Collection'

SleepyJohn

Re: copyright laws are now anti-public

"You think with no copyright everyone is going to share your work more? Why?" -- Because they can, they might.

"Generally speaking criminals don't imprison people" -- Really? You must live in a nice place.

I never said my lack of repute as an author was due to copyright issues. I merely made the point that I am a lowly peasant and not some rich artist who cannot bear the thought of anyone experiencing his work without paying him, even decades after he produced it. As others have said before, my plumber does not bill me every time I flush the toilet, yet to a rich singer with water spraying all over his million-dollar mansion at two in the morning a plumber is probably more precious to him than a platinum disc.

In the final analysis, it seems clear to me that the current copyright regime can only be maintained through ruthless, dictatorial control of the internet by the American MAFIAA, and I am sure few here would think that a good thing. Even with such a global dictatorship I see no possibiity of the thugs stopping people sharing digital information. Therefore copyright needs to be changed, and abolition is a bold change that I, and others, think would be of long-term overall benefit to the majority of society, because it would create a fresh starting point for new concepts. The MAFIAA may not have grasped that the world has changed since the 1950s, but I think most others have.

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