* Posts by AndyS

535 posts • joined 23 Jun 2009

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Switch survives three hours of beer spray, fails after twelve

AndyS
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Struck me as an odd sentence. Surely the author meant to write:

Oswald's a Brit, so when he says "football" he means "football."

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Heathrow Airbus collision 'not a drone incident'

AndyS
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Lester, where were you on the 17th of April?

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The Internet of Things edges toward a practical reality

AndyS
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Re: "There are countless problems" ... Indeed.

> Code (Software is merely the current state of the hardware)

> Idiot (pedantry is merely the current state of the moron)

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AndyS
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What about "length of support."

The idea that a light switch should stop functioning because the company you bought it from decides it is no longer profitable to "support" is is ludicrous, and yet Google has just done exactly that.

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IBM says no, non, nein to Brexit

AndyS
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Re: So get your facts straight

Actually I quite enjoyed John's little racist rant. It shows quite nicely, without the veneer of respectability, what a lot of "leave" voters really think.

It's the old adage - perhaps not all people intending to vote leave are small minded racist bigots, but you can be sure that all the small minded racist bigots are voting leave.

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Ad-blocker blocking websites face legal peril at hands of privacy bods

AndyS
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@Manolo

> You really think EU is not owned by business?

Compare the situation for consumers, employees, parents, people with an illness, passengers, etc (ie "people") between the EU and the US, and there is virtually nothing in common. Sure, the EU may consult with business too, but the US is simply in a different league from the rest of the world when it comes to treating their own citizens as a disposable resource.

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Blighty ranks 38th in World Press Freedom Index

AndyS
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Re: Moderator comment

You may have deleted my comment, but you can't stop me upvoting you!

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Embattled 123-reg flings six months' free hosting at angry customers

AndyS
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Re: "this is something we take extremely seriously"

Does anyone really believe the 67/115,000 number? Someone suggested that they were cherrypicking numbers - 67 physical machines, out of the 115,000 virtual machines, which would probably be a few percent of their business (how many VMs on a server?).

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Lock-hackers crack restricted keys used to secure data centres

AndyS
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Re: Locksmithing in Colditz

From a quick Google:

In one highly organized lightning operation, the actual lock was removed and the notches in the key blank were sawn to the exact depth required. The key worked and the lock was replaced. Having opened the principal door with his cruciform key, there were two further doors and more lock-picking before Guigues reached the actual parcels store. Every visit was a major operation involving seventeen men each with a different role to play. Fredo's first poy was to order from his wife two parcels of tools. When they arrived he intercepted them, replacing them with innocent parcels before distribution (and examination by the Germans) took place...

...Eventually the Germans installed an electric alarm on the locks of the parcels office. But this was no thread to Fredo and his clandestine visits because he intercepted the circuit before the installation was complete, carrying it through to the floor above...

Fascinating stuff. Might need to get that.

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Ubuntu 16.04 LTS arrives today complete with forbidden ZFS

AndyS
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Re: LTS?

OK, I misread the OP as saying the legal problems would start after 5 years. He's still spouting nonsense though.

Even if the ZFS issue is found problematic, that won't end support. Worst case scenario I can think of is that they'll stop distributing ZFS with new downloads, or similar.

And as I pointed out, even if Canonical goes under, the product won't die.

Where does anyone get the idea that this could kill the product as it stands? That is pure fantasy.

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AndyS
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Re: LTS?

> 5 years support or until the lawyers wade in over licensing.

What? Is this something I've missed, or can you actually point at anything that resembles what you're blabbering about?

The licence doesn't end after 5 years, Canonical will stop supporting it. Unlike with XP, you're free to set up a company to continue to support it yourself after that time, and sell support in any way you see fit.

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Video folk, you'll love the 96TB, 2.6GB/sec LaCie 12big HDD

AndyS
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Re: Leap into failure

No, but nobody will find out for another 3 years, so you'll be grand!

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Windy Wanaka wallops NASA's Super Pressure Balloon launch

AndyS
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SPB

Is it just coincidence that these balloons share a TLA with The Reg's esteemed Special Projects Bureau?

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AndyS
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Re: I'd like to lend NASA a word

In December last year, someone from our Achieving Excellence department said in an engineering meeting "Going forward, as we cascade into the progression of the next phase of the project..."

What he meant was "Next year."

I've seriously considered a buzz-word bingo board, for any time anyone from that department steps into a real meeting. It would include "sub-team level", "lads", "cascade", "team board", "keep the wolf from the door", "going forward" etc. These are all said, with a straight face, daily. I wish these people would read Dilbert, or watch The Office, just to get an ounce of self awareness. It's embarrassing.

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Flying Spaghetti Monster is not God, rules mortal judge

AndyS
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Re: Excellent

His comment about basing a religion on what is clearly a work of fiction seemed almost pointed. Since he's a judge, and so words aren't picked by mistake, and since he's clearly well versed in these topics, it's obviously a deliberate "read between the lines" link. It will be interesting to see if this is, or can be, used as a precedent against the DC-10 / volcano / alien cult.

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IT suppliers: Amazon is starting to pay its debts. Some of them, anyway

AndyS
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Hmm.

I wonder if I can use the same technique for settling my bills when I buy things from Amazon?

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SpaceX's Musk: We'll reuse today's Falcon 9 rocket within 2 months

AndyS
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Re: use a SWATH barge! !

I always find it amusing when arm-chair surfers tell the world's leading engineers how to do their job.

I suspect someone working for Musk has access to Wikipedia, and maybe even knows a thing or two about hull designs.

It's like every article on any future technology (self-driving cars being a particularly hot one), where every second comment starts with "I wonder if they've considered..." or "Did they think of..." Yes. Yes they did.

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AndyS
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Re: Pricing's gonna change...

What possible advantage would there be to having a farm in orbit above the planet it is serving?

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London to Dover 'smart' road could help make driverless cars mainstream – expert

AndyS
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Let's think. Centre of the UK motor industry? North West.

Where will we put some new technology? I know, just outside London.

Great thinking from our progressive government, once again.

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Taking an artsy selfie in Stockholm? You might need to pay royalities

AndyS
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"... they should be forced to add a plague..."

Should the pox be on the performer, or the viewer?

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AndyS
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What absolute insanity. If you place something in a public space, it is public. That should be the end of that debate. Otherwise the act of displaying an artwork actually erodes the use of public space.

If this decision sticks, I would suggest to all public bodies in Sweden that there should be a waiver agreed with artists before their artworks are displayed in public.

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FAA doubles Section 333-exemption drone ceiling to 400 feet

AndyS
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America

"Land of the Free" (TM) (C) (limitations may apply)

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This chap's maintained an Apple game for 32 years – from Mac to iOS

AndyS
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Um... He's retired. Presumably on a pension.

Taking up a hobby in retirement is pretty common, you know.

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Ben Nevis embiggened by a metre

AndyS
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I do hope the gentleman's car wasn't harmed leading up to this discovery.

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Apps that 'listen in' to your mobile get slapped by US watchdog

AndyS
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Re: Ah yes. Targetted advertising

>What's wrong with buying from Edinburgh Woollen Mill?

More to the point, what's wrong with only buying jumpers once a decade?

I bought my favourite jumper in 2001.It's now the perfect age for working in the garage, or the garden, so gets worn almost every day.

I bought a new jumper when I started my new job, in late 2015, as I felt I needed to make an impression. It should do me through to 2025 or so, I guess.

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AndyS
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Re: Actually, it works just fine.

I don't think Shazam uses ultrasound though, does it? I thought it just recognised the run-of-the-mill audible sound.

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Storks bin migration for junk food diet

AndyS
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Re: Are they sure its just food?

Reasonable question, I suppose it's answered by what usually drives the migration. For storks, I guess the results here show it is food, however I've certainly read stories in the past about other migrations being broken by changing weather patterns, or at least food availability caused by changing weather patterns. There are several species of migratory butterfly in the Americas, for example, which are starting to get lazy as the regular seasons get a bit mushy.

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'Just give me any old date and I'll make it work' ... said the VB script to the coder

AndyS
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Re: Finding dates and times in text

Have you tried training it to play Go yet?

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Who'd be mad enough to start a 'large-scale fire' in a spaceship?

AndyS
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Re: Why would NASA want to turn a strip into a crisp? (Or into smoke)

The construction may be non flammable, but there will always be flammable things, and sources of ignition, around. Books, Li-ion batteries, clothing, bottles full of exotic gases and fuels, etc.

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AndyS
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Re: I hope

There were several fires on Mir. I think the real problem is that, although what you say sounds sensible, nobody really knows for sure. What if there's a slight air current? Presumably the air conditioning needs to move air around continually. What if the burning material is moving? What if the fire itself generates air currents due to out-gassing of the burning materials?

Although a fire may struggle to reach the intensity of a fire on Earth, in a small, limited environment even a small fire could, for example, potentially eat all the available oxygen very quickly, as you point out. That may not be good for the fire, but it's probably not particularly good for any people nearby either.

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Why should you care about Google's AI winning a board game?

AndyS
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Re: Meatbag pride hurt - meatbag spit dummy

>I'll hail our AI Overlords when one of them ... ignores the rules to produce a good result by following a procedure it was trained to 'think' wouldn't work.

That's exactly what this one did though - see the comment by Lee Sedol, quoted in the article, that 'the AI was making moves "that could not have been possible for a human being to choose."'

I get that it's cool to be skeptical, but this is an astonishing breakthrough, and 90% of the people in this thread decrying it evidently don't understand the game, or don't understand the current stage of AI development.

Saying "yes but can it decide it doesn't want to do the laundry on Tuesdays any more" is meaningless drivel when a machine is designed for a single task. Were the first flights by the Wright brothers pointless because they didn't go into space? Were the first computers useless because they couldn't show a graphical interface? Likewise, are the early stages of real AI unimpressive because they can only drive a car / have a conversation / play a complex game of strategy, and can't decide they'd like to learn sword fighting?

Nobody is saying "AI is solved," so stop arguing against that. But the fact that a significant wall has fallen, and perhaps 10 years earlier than expected, is genuinely ground breaking.

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Brit teen bags $250,000 in first World Drone Prix

AndyS
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Let's think. Pilot, Navigator. Mums (2). Technical fellows (electronics: 2, mechanics, including 3D printer operator, 2). Transport / Logistics folk (2). Umm... Caterers. (2).

So, I can get to 12. Unless they're all under 18, in which case I guess there are a few more mums, but even then that would only bring it to 22.

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AndyS
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Re: It would be more fun

It would also be more fun with real quadcopters, with people in them. Or hoverboards. Or maybe even quantum-drive hyper pods.

However, this was for remote controlled quadcopter drones.

Do you make similar comments on every sporting event? Football, eh? That would be more fun if contact was allowed. Formula One? Pah, limited engine size? What's that all about?

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UK plans robo-car tests on motorways in 2017

AndyS
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Re: Could be worse

>At first, I wondered what on Earth robot cars had to do with the budget

Actually, through Innovate UK, some very good R&D is being done in a large number of areas. They provide grants, and also a very structured and focused project framework, which encourages private companies and academia to cooperate towards stated goals.

I've not read the budget, but I assume it's going to put a lump of money into this sort of model, which has been very successful in other areas.

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Fail0verflow GitHubs PS4 Linux loader

AndyS
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This is about as useful as commenting, on a review of a Mondeo, "I don't need a Mondeo as I already have a Vectra. I have a quad bike too, and the Mondeo can't really do the same things my quad bike can do."

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Microsoft seeks Comcast subpoena to nab activation pirates

AndyS
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Voluntarily

> The intelligence is gleaned from activation information voluntarily shared with Microsoft.

What, as in Windows-calling-home voluntarily?

Is that what this is being called now?

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Don't snoop on staff via wearables, says Dutch privacy agency

AndyS
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Re: Oh really?

> Any company with even the remotest sense of what is right would already have known where the line was.

Since this is self-evident, I assume either:

a) we don't know the whole story (eg the company set up a server for employees to monitor their health, but since it was a company server they also had access to it... or some other convoluted story) or

b) this company is severely dysfunctional.

Hmm. Maybe b) is just as likely as a).

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AndyS
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Re: Be seeing you

> I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed or numbered.

Is that a quote from something? I assume I'm missing context, because in virtually every company over about 100 employees, staff are given numbers, briefings and debriefings are common (if not daily) and everything is indexed.

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Knackered Euro server turns Panasonic smart TVs into dumb TVs

AndyS
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Re: Time for my new Expression

<pedant_mode>blue</pedant_mode>

It's still called the red shift effect, regardless of which way it's going though.

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Everything bad in the world can be traced to crap Wi-Fi

AndyS
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Re: free wifi that requires passwords ?

> DO tell us HOW... :)

On my phone (Wileyfox Swift running Cyanogen OS), go to settings, Wifi, advanced, and turn off "Network Notification (Notify whenever a public network is available)". This stops it trying to connect. This, or something similar, has worked on my previous phones too (Moto G & others).

As above, you can also manually disconnect each time it happens.

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AndyS
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Re: Shit Wi-Fi?

>Or is caused by the obsession of marketing droids to capture every activity that we make so that they can apply bad "Data Science" in order to try and sell us shit that we don't need?

My current one is wire clips. I needed some, so I went to Amazon and bought some.

Now, obviously, the data analyst wombles have discovered my nefarious plan to fill a warehouse with the things.

For all their claimed intelligence, I would have thought it would be relatively easy to work out which things are typically one-off purchases (wire clips, home router, things like that) and to say "you bought an A, so you probably don't want another," versus things like, I don't know, cabbages, which one might buy on a reasonably frequent basis.

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AndyS
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Re: free wifi that requires passwords ?

Just stop your phone from trying to connect to any open wifi network? That's what I've done. I want to connect to known networks by default, but I certainly don't want my phone surfing whatever random pay-per-use open-but-passworded flaky, unreliable connection it stumbles across, especially since, as you point out, this can break the connection it is reliably using.

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Machismo is ruining the tech industry for all of us. Equally

AndyS
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You would say that though.

I bet you wrote it on a Mac, too.

:)

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Facebook paid £4k in tax. HMRC then paid Facebook £27k – for ads

AndyS
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"Facebook is, it says, undergoing a major overhaul of its tax structure.</p"

I thought "/s" was the standard sarcasm denotation?

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Rent a denial-of-service booter for $60, wreak $720k in damage

AndyS
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Re: extrapolation.

Also, does it follow that one minute of down-time costing £X automatically means that 100 minutes costs £100*X?

Let's think of an analogy. If I'm 1 minute late to catch my train, I'm half an hour late for work. Therefore if I'm 10 minutes late I'll obviously be 5 hours late for work, right?

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Vendor rep 'Stinky Sam' told to wash and brush teeth or lose job

AndyS
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Well, that was a let down.

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BBC telly tax drops onto telly-free households. Cough up, iPlayer fans

AndyS
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We don't have a licence, as we don't have or want live TV in the house. This makes us more selective in what we watch, and prevents us leaving the telly on blaring background noise, dumbing down the kids.

However, I've always been aware the iplayer is a loophole. For the cost of it (a fraction of what the likes of Sky charge), you get an enormous amount. Not only that but the commercial channels STILL shovel adverts down your neck, even after you've directly paid them. I don't know why people put up with that.

So, we'll pay. No issues.

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Converged PC and smartphone is the future, says Canonical's Mark Shuttleworth

AndyS
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I'm actually pretty excited about this. I carry around a heck of a lot of computing power in my pocket, but spend all day sitting at another computer which can't talk to it. Then I go home, where I have a NAS which can be accessed by all sorts of things, but also a desktop and a couple of laptops, all of which have their own storage, and setting them up to talk seamlessly to each other isn't trivial.

In a few years, I can see the phone being powerful enough to do everything all the other computers I currently use can do. For consumer stuff it's already there. I'm looking for a new tablet just now, and very tempted by a Ubuntu one.

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NASA funds new supersonic airliner research

AndyS
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@Voland: flying boats

Sadly, there are fewer real benefits than you'd imagine once you try and scale up. Firstly, you still need terminal buildings, with all associated air bridges, lounges, customs, baggage handling etc. Look at a typical large airport and you've probably several miles of external walls along which aircraft dock. Every point of that needs luggage and people moved to/from it constantly.

Then there's security - how do you propose to effectively secure a large area of open ocean?

Finally, there's weather. Large aircraft need remarkably smooth landing surfaces, whether at sea or on land. Waves of any size at all would close the air.

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