* Posts by toughluck

105 posts • joined 22 Jun 2009

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Sony sees the cold light of optical archives, buys ex-Facebooker's upstart

toughluck

Quite more than a few times, in fact. That alone probably kills the idea of an optical archive. Well, that, and the fact that a lot of people had very bad experience with optical media.

There are two small high-density rackmounted libraries on the market. BDT makes one for a number of OEMs, and Oracle makes SL150.

BDT's density is 8 cartridges in 1 rack unit, and then 24 cartridges per 2 rack units in 2, 4 and 8 unit form factors (top density of 12 carts/RU).

SL150 scales from 30 cartridges in 3 rack units to 300 in 21 units (top density of 14+ carts/RU).

At LTO-6 cartridge density, this adds up to 30-35.7 TB/RU.

This Sony contraption looks like 4 rack unit height, so it's only 12.5 TB/RU. And mind you, those high density bluray disks are not cheaper than tape per byte.

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Hacker uses Starbucks INFINITE MONEY for free CHICKEN SANDWICH

toughluck

Re: Appreciation?

Because it's hard for non-tech companies to grasp certain key concepts. Thanks to Hollywood, they have very flawed analogies and terrible understanding of security exploits.

They work on a safe wall analogy. Suppose it takes two weeks to drill a hole in a safe wall. Day after day, the safecracker drills away at it, and after 14 days, he succeeds. To them, a hacker does mostly the same thing. There is an attack, security becomes weaker, and after a certain number of attacks, they're exposed. So they "harden" their systems to sustain more such attacks, much like a bank might install thicker walls, electrify them, and so on.

They also imagine that their IT security team (if they have any) actively engages hackers to mitigate such attacks (again, thank you, Hollywood).

So for them, there's no concept of "next time". They don't understand that their systems have exploits that completely circumvent every safeguard there are in place. And to them, it's completely acceptable to them that a hacker whittles away at their systems. After all (another set of flawed analogies):

- it's just one person;

- even if he succeeds, the damage will be limited;

- nobody else will be able to use his exploit.

--

I realize that hacking is not ethical. I realize there are no "victimless crimes". I can't say that I wish they are hacked over and over until they learn. I won't even say they deserve being hacked.

However, pride goes before the fall. They leave themselves completely open for exploitation. There will be people who take advantage of this. The next hacker that comes along may not be a white hat, or even an off-white hat. And the inevitable next exploit may crush the company completely.

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PHOTON SPACE SAIL successfully Kickstarted into orbit

toughluck

New El Reg standard unit for thickness?

How thick is an average trash bag? What is the minimum and maximum thickness for trash bags? I know that below a certain thickness, things labeled and sold as trash bags are not fit for purpose (unless the purpose is to bag them in trash).

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BILLION YEAR SECRETS of baking hellworld Mercury UNLOCKED by NASA probe crash

toughluck
Headmaster

Re: Yet another stunning achievement...

Old Terra can't support life anymore, I see?

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Infusion pump is hackable … but rumours of death are exaggerated

toughluck

So an exploit can be delivered over WiFi. What about a harmful agent?

Suppose a hacker gains access to the infusion pump. What can he do? Either increase the flow or stop it. Increasing the flow is impossible beyond a certain level which is probably not going to cause much but a certain discomfort. Stopping the pump completely will be quite obvious, so if a patient is told to walk around with the pump for an hour or two and the medicine is still not fully administered by then, the doctor is going to know what to do (I'm sure they deal with pump failures from time to time).

And what danger is there, anyway? All the contents of the bag were going to end up in the patient one way or another. It's not like the pump is plugged into a pipework of all the drugs available in the hospital, so it's not like an exploit is going to put arsenic or cyanide in the mix.

Until hackers figure out a way to deliver chemicals over WiFi, I think it's fair to say we're safe.

The vulnerability is certainly alarming. Not because of the potential risks, but because of the carelessness.

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NINETY PER CENT of Java black hats migrate to footling Flash

toughluck

120%?

Why does the chart y-axis scale go all the way up to 120%? Any value on that chart can only be between 0 and 100%.

On the other hand, maybe I should be thankful that they nailed the bottom down, I've seen percentage charts go from -20% to 120%...

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Business plans, good ideas, and 8 other myths about startups – by Indiegogo's CEO

toughluck

Re: #4: No Plan...

Eisenhower once remarked: In preparing for battle, I have always found that plans are useless but planning is indispensable.

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Fibre Channel's looking a bit flat. Bad news for these three firms

toughluck

Re: Eliminating tape

Disclosure: I work for Oracle Tape.

You didn't search good enough, or you'd be aware that what you actually needed is a library supporting SDLT or SDLT320 drives (assuming the user had DLTape IV, God help you if they had DLTape III or earlier, but still doable).

In case of Oracle, it would be an SL500 or L180/700 -- both are end of life, but recent enough to actually find drives for in good condition -- those first and second generation SDLT drives are usually in very good working order and assuming you're migrating the data to disk or to new media, even tens of thousands of tapes isn't a scary prospect, since DLTape IV supported at most 40 GB natively per cartridge.

I don't know which DLT generation your user had, but even if you found a DLT-based library, you'd probably have problems with finding HVD SCSI HBAs to attach to the drives. The real reason you could not find a library sporting DLT drives is because it's been end of life for so long that it's obsolete by all modern standards and 99% of customers moved on.

Even if it was a problem getting a Storagetek library for your case, I'm fairly sure Quantum would jump at this chance.

About the retention periods -- you seriously think that using disk drives is going to solve this? Suppose you put it on a MAID array today using state of the art 16 Gbps Fibre Channel, 40 Gbps Ethernet or 3rd generation SAS. Are you sure you're going to be able to access that array in 15 years?

- It's impossible to access first generation 1 Gbps Fibre Channel arrays with 8 Gbps HBAs and switches. That obsolescence came in just 12 years. It was impossible to find new disk drives to replace failing ones 7-10 years from introduction of these arrays.

- It's not possible to connect 10 Mbps Ethernet to some 1 Gbps switches, and to no 10 Gbps switches. Not to even mention coax standards. It's probably easier to find legacy consumer stuff for this and step down with switches supporting lower speeds, but if you said that's your solution for future access that array, you'd be laughed out of the data centre.

- Like Fibre Channel, SAS only supports negotiating a link down to two generations back. Next SAS generation will not negotiate a link with first generation SAS.

And now let me go over your points:

1. We still support 9840 tape drives in new tape libraries (SL8500 and SL3000), originally introduced 1998. Heck, we still support 9490 tape drives, introduced 20 years ago (although the libraries in which they are used are end of life). New T10000D drives still support reading from cartridges written by T10000A drives introduced in 2006.

2. That's completely irrelevant. How is that an issue with tape? It's exactly the same regardless of whether you use tape, disk, flash or anything else today.

3. That wasn't a problem since basically forever. With 9840, you can access over 50% of blocks on tape within 8 seconds of mount, and any block on tape within 20 seconds. If you know which file mark you're looking for, this is stored in the media information region. Same applies to all modern tape formats, which take at most 90 seconds to spool the whole tape if it turns out that the data you're looking for is at the end of media. Serpentine writing means that the data is more evenly spread across tape.

With LTFS, it's even easier, since the tape is effectively presented as a block device to the OS -- there are two partitions, one has the file layout, the other is actual data.

True, it's still impossible to read data backwards, so if the file is stored over the entire length of tape, but starts at the end of it, it will still add 90 seconds overhead to reading the file.

4. It's called Storagetek Tape Analytics and it's meant to do exactly what you say here -- mount a tape at preset intervals, read the media information region and either do a full tape read or read random bits to verify it's not degrading too much.

Re-writing will occur if the margins are getting too thin.

And there's now Xcopy to seamlessly move data from one cartridge to another without host involvement. There's a lot of exciting stuff happening that you're completely unaware of.

How about efficient physical delete on a disk drive? Oh, not possible? Again, how is that a tape problem specifically?

Efficient physical delete on tape? A few seconds in a degausser does the trick. The tape is completely blank and unreadable, including the servo tracks, making it completely impossible to read from.

And with hardware-based encryption, there's really no reason you should worry about logical deletes.

5. Again, it's not a problem specific to tape. If in your organization employee attrition, changing priorities and laziness allows anything to get out of control and ignore processes, you have much bigger issues at hand than worrying about tape obsolescence.

6. So, disk drives don't deteriorate, huh? They do, and much faster than tape since magnetic domains are much smaller. Seriously, if you only write to tape once (as should happen in a proper archive), the retention period is way more than the guaranteed 30 years.

7. Disk drives don't dedupe, either. So what? There are three approaches to deduplication on tape:

- Don't dedupe. Retain integrity in every object/file you store. That prevents any problems with being unable to read from tape in the future.

- Write raw data from your deduplicating arrays to tape. It's the most efficient method, but only if your array supports that and you're sure the manufacturer will be around when you need to restore the data. It probably makes sense for short-term backups when you don't lose track of data and would need to restore specific portions of your storage, but definitely not for long-term archives.

- If you have a lot of similar files (that dedupe well), offload them in a single compressed image to tape -- or in multiple images, where the deduped blocks are stored in line with the rest of the files. It's a compromise and it requires some capability to read the data in the future, but it could work if your archive assumes you would only ever restore most of the files from the archive or when it's done well and you don't reference more than one tape.

Anyway, deduplication is a foolish solution for a long-term archive. If you did dedupe, you'd quickly have a situation where restoring a single file from archive involved reading bits and pieces from a number of tapes ranging from one per file to one per deduped block. And if you somehow lost the unique copy of some particular block common to all files in your storage system (as happens in improperly configured deduplicating solutions), you'd lose all data.

8. Here's a news flash: disk drives are not cheap. Enterprise drives are still over 10 times more expensive than tape per byte. And for enterprise products (like Oracle's T10000D), cost of storage per byte is lower than cheapest consumer hard drives today. An 8.5 TB cartridge costs about the same as a 1 TB disk drive.

Let me rephrase what you said: In a world of very cheap tape, putting EVERYTHING on disk is just plain STUPID.

And to rephrase your last paragraph: Any IT professional that doesn't examine the virtues of every available solution should be tarred and feathered. Horses are definitely nice animals, and they shouldn't be used to execute anyone.

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Google versus the EU: Sigh. You can't exploit a contestable monopoly

toughluck

Re: Harm..

I typed:

webmail not google

guess what, the results are only for gmail. Which is obvious, since google, in their infinite wisdom, removed boolean search operators (not to mention literal search).

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toughluck

Sigh indeed...

Minerals are fungible. Services are not.

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Good news! Your job's not going to the Philippines

toughluck

Plus forgetting Russia includes Kaliningrad Oblast, Sakhalin and northern islands, and shading Portugal blue although it was not mentioned anywhere in the document (which is puzzling in and of itself).

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Flash dead end is deferred by TLC and 3D

toughluck

Re: Does Flash have to be smaller

And a write hole and performance hit when writing small blocks.

If anything, Huffman coding on a block level or mirroring (RAID 1) would make more sense -- more expensive, but more reliable. It could still be cheaper than a very reliable cell.

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Seagate's third quarter results looking lacklustre as profits tumble

toughluck

Who compares current quarter to immediately preceding quarter?

It's year-on-year, or it's useless. The previous quarter appears to have been an anomaly, so frankly, anything will look lackluster compared to it.

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Public exploit crashes Minecraft servers

toughluck

Poison pill?

Mojang knew it and didn't do anything about it? Could Mr. Persson have been too busy counting his billions to actually care?

He basically got paid for a defective product. It's a possibility that he may have willfully withheld this information from Microsoft to conclude the sale.

What now? What could Microsoft do? Sue them? Get some money back? I'm really curious, I don't think it's going to go down too well.

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ICANN urges US, Canada: Help us stop the 'predatory' monster we created ... dot-sucks!

toughluck

What's stopping registrars from creating .suck, .blows, .blow, .isapieceofshit and so on?

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Dot-com intimidation forces Indiana to undo hated anti-gay law

toughluck

Re: Old Testament

@dan1980: Apostle Paul reasserted this in Corinthians, so it's not just the Old Testament. And if you follow the New Testament, you would understand how the Old Law was reinterpreted in light of Jesus's ministry.

Note that this is about marriage. As such, Bible says marriage is limited to heterosexual couples. And sex outside marriage is a sin regardless whether homosexual or heterosexual. You can ignore this, but don't force Christians to ignore it.

Otherwise, in your pursuit of tolerance towards homosexuals, you are becoming intolerant of Christians. And nobody said they wouldn't cater to homosexuals specifically, but rather wouldn't cater a gay/lesbian/etc. wedding. This is a marked difference.

Suppose a Catholic is running a business (I don't want to meander around specific approaches to divorce in various Christian denominations). Not only should they have the right to decline catering a same-sex wedding, it goes further, including refusing to cater to a wedding of a divorced couple (if one or both were earlier a part of a Catholic marriage), because taking part in something they disagree with does make them appear as supporters of this idea.

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toughluck

@Richard 12: Doesn't it? In that case, I could set up a religion which I would be the only member of and I could claim anything I want to derail any argument that starts with "No religion does x", or "Every religion is y".

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toughluck

@Suricou: I honestly don't know how to reply to your question. However, let me ask if you know any significant religion that is opposing interracial marriage on religious grounds and decrying it as sinful?

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toughluck

Re: It's called freedom, folks

@thomas k.: you're saying that refusing to accept a particular job is not the same as refusing to provide any service to an entire class of people.

What about that "Sweet Cakes" case, where a baker from Oregon refused to provide a wedding cake for a lesbian wedding? They had no objections about serving gays or lesbians, I don't know, let's say cupcakes or coffee, but would not cater a wedding. Does that count as a particular job, or as refusing service to an entire class of people?

By the way, it wasn't the only bakery in town. That area had some 18 confectioners that the couple hasn't asked. I can understand that if all 18 refused service, the couple could claim collusion and would have solid grounds for legal action. But in this particular case? I don't think so.

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Judge greenlights class-action suit accusing AMD of securities fraud

toughluck

I also hope AMD wins this, but even though problems were well-known, GlobalFoundries was only established in March, 2009, up until when it was part of AMD. So it was their problem. Establishing GF did not solve the problems, it did not even have potential to solve the problems they were having.

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toughluck
Facepalm

Here's an idea

Once AMD loses that suit and is forced to pay damages, its stock will likely plummet again. Then investors start a new class action, accusing AMD of not informing investors of problems with its manufacturing, and as a result, losing a class-action lawsuit that resulted in its stock price plummeting.

Repeat ad infinitum, AMD has loads of cash that it can spend.

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Oracle gets ZFS filer array spun up to near-AFA speeds

toughluck

Re: IBM worst in class

This ties to Oracle, too -- who would IBM offload their tape business to? If they just up and discontinued it, it would leave Oracle as the only supplier of Enterprise tape storage, and HP as the only manufacturer of LTO drives. Quite uncomfortable for Spectra Logic which uses IBM drives in their libraries.

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It's the FALKLANDS SYNDROME! Fukushima MELTDOWN to cause '10,000 Chernobyls' in South Atlantic

toughluck

What really gave it away was this:

"The Falkland Islands will be a barely habitable wilderness, afterwards."

That would be an improvement, wouldn't it?

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Angry Austrian could turn Europe against the US - thanks to data

toughluck

Re: Whatever the outcome...

I didn't mean that. But, if he's dead, he can't influence the proceedings anymore, and the thing might fall apart.

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toughluck

Re: Whatever the outcome...

I applaud what he's doing and I really hope he succeeds, but people have been killed for less...

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toughluck

So you're saying that transferring user data to the US National Security Agency (NSA) doesn't protect EU citizens' privacy? Whoduvthunkit?

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Hear that sound? It's the Windows XP PC bubble popping

toughluck

I wish I could give you 100 downvotes, but I'm limited to just one.

"Really would your Nan really give less then Two about doing what ever it was on a PC or a Phablet?"

Yes. But she's a touch-typist. But for my great-grandma, the screen would probably go blank before she found the next letter on the on-screen keyboard. And she'd have to squint quite a lot to make out some of the letters, be it on a phablet (strange of you to even mention a phablet as a viable choice), or even a large-screen tablet. But then again, a large, 12-inch, tablet costs as much as a basic PC with a 24-inch screen attached.

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toughluck

Re: Huh?

If you have 'umpteen thousand' machines running XP and you can't afford to upgrade them to a newer OS (be it a hardware or just OS upgrade), then your organization definitely has bigger problems than those machines:

- failing;

- being broken into;

- suddenly becoming unsupported platforms for critical software.

If your organization could afford 'umpteen thousand' machines some 10 years ago and it cannot afford new ones now, you definitely have bigger problems than just IT.

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toughluck

Re: Sewing machine driver

Ok, cool, there's a use case.

- Did your PC stop working when XP support was discontinued?

- Did your software stop working when XP support was discontinued?

No? So what's the problem? Disconnect the PC from the network, or at least from the Internet and put a separate PC running a newer OS as proxy for the embroidery jobs.

Why did you want to virtualize it? How would it help your use case? If you put it in a VM on a secure OS, it doesn't suddenly become secure (if the VM is connected to any network).

Besides, even if you were virtualizing, you were probably doing it wrong. Did you use IOMMU (any sort) to virtualize the hardware that actually connects to the machine?

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DARPA: We KNOW WHO YOU ARE... by the WAY you MOVE your MOUSE

toughluck

Re: Typical

Four words: correct horse battery staple

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Death becomes it: Grim Fandango Remastered

toughluck

Just be sure not to rely on one [walkthrough] utterly, as otherwise you’ll beat the game without any of those "Eureka!" moments of satisfaction.

Funny, I don't think people had "Eureka" moments in the E.T. game (yeah, that one) when they managed to get out of the pits.

And "Eureka" moments in adventure games in the olden days usually went like: "combine this broken metal rod with that plastic bottle in order to create a thingamajig that will combine with that torn piece of clothing which you then give to the king who will give you a cart full of dirt to take to the wizard".

Not in the least logical and if you didn't buy the official guide (usually about the price of the boxed game release!), you needed to hope for your games magazine would print tips for the game you're stuck with and that they would include that specific location and not the ones you guessed.

Eureka? Fat chance. More like sheer frustration.

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I'll build a Hyperloop railgun tube-way in Texas, Elon Musk vows

toughluck

Re: It's the track stupid.

This transportation system is point-to-point, and specifically between two population centers. They won't build loops, but two tubes. The train will be switched from one to the other at each end.

Indeed, it's costly. But Musk is betting the cost will be below potential revenue, and why not? If it works, and if it turns out it's able to turn in a profit, it can be extended (to multiple tubes, and to more connections).

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Which country has 2nd largest social welfare system in the world?

toughluck

Re: yay, statistics

Are these statistics even reliable? I live in Poland, and according to the first chart, the bottom 10% of population in Britain are at a worse socioeconomic status than the bottom 10% in Poland.

How the fuck is it possible that people would want to migrate to Britain, then (or Germany, or France, for that matter)? Assuming that it is the people on the bottom of the scale who migrate looking for a job and they can only get the least paid jobs in the UK, it would mean that they are worse off than they were before they moved. However, not only are they able to support themselves in UK, they make enough to send back home and support the family. Effectively, one paycheck is able to support two households.

Anyone care to comment?

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No NAND's land: Flash will NOT take over the data centre

toughluck

"Each shrink in NAND geometry seems to require costlier manufacturing processes and more over-provisioning to keep endurance, expressed as drive writes/day for five years, up at acceptable levels."

And shingling, TDMR, HAMR cost nothing to implement?

Between 2000 and 2010, over some 10 years, mainstream hard disks went from ~40 GB to 2 TB, a 50-fold improvement without increasing the price too much (allowing for the overblown Thai flood hype). That's an average increase of nearly 50% per year. If this pace kept up, mainstream disks now would be almost 10 TB in capacity, and yet mainstream is still at 2 TB, very slowly moving towards 3 TB, never mind 4.

The recent breakthroughs that will allow more than 4 TB are ridiculously expensive and it seems that disk cannot break through this ceiling.

Going by the same chart, I see that SSDs are predicted to grow by almost 2000%, while HDDs only by 123%.

However, assuming the data for two last years and estimate for this one are accurate, this is an interesting extrapolation.

It predicts that HDD growth is expected to increase or keep at a steady rate, while SSD growth is supposed taper off, astonishingly so -- it grew by 120% in 2013, then 85% this year, and they are expecting this trend to continue and growth to decline further, while HDDs are not going to be affected at all? I call bullshit.

Oh, and they've got SSD endurance wrong. Taking a 480 GB SATA 3 drive at maximum speed (600 MB/s=52 TB/day) and 10000 writes/block, assuming you never stop and you never read this data, you get 92 days of useful life. That's still extremely high endurance. Lower this by a factor of 10, to 5.2 TB/day, and you get almost three years of useful life. However, 5 TB/day on a 480 GB drive? Who writes (and overwrites) this amount of data daily? If there's a usage pattern that fits this requirement, I suppose the user is getting paid well more than enough to cover disk replacement.

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Oracle bypasses SAS/SATA controllers in flashy new servers

toughluck

Re: Are you kidding me?

They did? Awesome. Point me to the NVMe drives and a motherboard with NVMe ports, thank you very much.

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Ten excellent FREE PC apps to brighten your Windows

toughluck

Re: Eraser + SSD

Depending on the implementation and controller, TRIM will destroy any meaningful way to restore the data from an SSD.

If the disk uses encryption and/or compression, TRIM will prevent any restore of the data since it also drops all pointers to how the data is arranged, how it is compressed or what encryption key is used.

And theoretical methods to restore data from magnetic drives are unusable on SSDs, the cells of which deteriorate/degrade much quicker than magnetic domains on a hard disk. Even if you were able to recreate the bits, you've no idea what they represent, if the data is encrypted or compressed and you have no way to rearrange it.

As for the Gutmann method, Wikipedia has an excellent article about it, and Gutmann himself says it best -- 35 passes was never needed for any drive. The first and last four passes are with random data, and there are RLL (two methods) and MFM-specific passes. MFM "needs" 18 passes at most, (1,7)RLL "needs" 26.

In case of modern PRML disks, these MFM- or RLL-specific passes do nothing special and are completely unnecessary.

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Flash data storage: Knocking TAPE off the archiving top spot

toughluck

Consider LTFS, but add -LE

When you have LTFS-LE (Library Edition), where a single translation layer presents a single hierarchy, where top-level directories are individual volumes, you can actually use tape as a drop-in solution.

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Behold our SPINNING DATA GRAVE: WD carts out 6.3TB cold storage drive

toughluck

Re: Short warranty for Archive drive?

500,000 hours? Wow, that's really a lot. It's nearly 21,000 days and almost equal to 57 years constant run time. I don't think there's any piece of IT equipment that could claim that long run time.

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toughluck

Re: Short warranty for Archive drive?

Not a neat trick. Just partial pressure. It's just that Helium has very small particles and there is so little of it in the atmosphere that for practical purposes, it's vacuum for Helium (and vice-versa, Helium-filled spaces are vacuum for all other gases).

As for neat tricks, it does have superfluid properties at extremely low temperatures, but while it's cool (pun intended), that is a frequently misunderstood phenomenon; do look up superfluidity.

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Oracle's MySQL buy a 'fiasco' says Dovecot man Mikko Linnanmäki

toughluck

So very true. By the end of the day, it's not like their data is stored in some fine mist with a cable dangling from it. The data has to be on an array somewhere, so they end up paying for the purchase, support, connection and on top of that, overhead and margin of their provider.

If you use a considerable portion of your storage, shifting to cloud makes no sense whatsoever. If somebody offers you a lower price per byte stored and transferred, they're cutting corners somewhere. The problem is, you don't know where. And finally, if they grossly underestimated costs or overestimated profits, their business model falls apart, they fold and you're left without a provider and usually without any way with which you can recover your data.

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Brit Sci-Fi author Alastair Reynolds says MS Word 'drives me to distraction'

toughluck

Re: Why use an unsuitable tool in the first place?

Did I make even the slightest hint that the work should be submitted full of errors?

1. The tool I suggested (focuswriter) has a spelling dictionary and checks on the fly or at the end.

2. Word is not better (or worse) in this regard.

The software you use is not an excuse for errors. However, let me point out that it used to be common to submit written works as typescript (or manuscript) and the writers did not have the luxury of spellcheckers or even error correction. And the quality of manuscripts and typescripts was vastly superior to some examples of today's works where the writer did not even bother to run a spellchecker on his or her text once.

However, it's Alastair Reynolds we're talking about. So your comment that the publisher would give excuses not to use your work is absurd. Mr. Reynolds has been published extensively and his publisher is definitely not going to give excuses not to use his work since it's basically printing money. Well, okay, I presume if he submitted utter rubbish, the publisher would firmly say 'no,' but otherwise, you're very unreasonable.

Your post reveals that you may have been rejected by some publishers. However, I would offer an alternative explanation. Whatever tools you use (or don't), they're not the reason you were rejected. And they were right -- they want "stuff" that's readable. Yours is not. It displays as three lines on my screen and I can say with all certainty that if I were to read through three thousand lines of such dubious quality, my eyes would bleed out of my eyesockets.

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toughluck

Why use an unsuitable tool in the first place?

To be honest, I can't understand why anyone would want to torture themselves with a full-featured word processor to write anything serious.

You're the Writer, NOT the Editor. You're there to write, not to edit or prepare for publishing. If the writer is trying to do the editor's job, and even the best writer might be a mediocre editor/publisher, the primary task will suffer and the resulting book will be form over substance.

I can understand a writer emphasizing certain passages, introducing quotations, digressions, etc., but it's the choice of the editor whether to italicize or embolden, not the writer.

What any self-respecting writer should do is to submit his or her work in plain-text or at most in light markup (such as RTF, for all its shortcomings), and the publishing house should be the party to actually decide what the final form will be.

With that in mind, either use a typewriter (with a facility to save text, of course), or software such as focuswriter (it's free) that comes with features specifically for writers.

Do note that the alternative is to let the writer do everything, including (virtual) typesetting, preparing for publishing, sending to the printer, promoting it, hey, why not pay for the whole thing while he's at it, in effect self-publishing, but where the proceeds go to a publishing house that didn't do anything worth paying for.

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Autodesk CEO: '3D printing has been way overhyped'

toughluck

Re: I think Mr Carl Bass is making the same mistake Steve Balmer did with tablets

There's one problem with this approach. Scale.

Think about it. You can go and buy a nice model aeroplane for, say, 50 quid, then put it together.

3D printing would allow you to print the same nice model aeroplane for, say, 25 quid, plus up-front cost of 5,000. That's not including energy prices, though, and if it takes days to print at several hundred watts of power, it's starting to get a little ineffective.

Worse still, you have to file off the bits sticking out, then wonder why the wings are uneven.

3D printing at a local shop will be a different matter. Let's say a plastic part failed in some appliance (say, a washing machine latch). The manufacturer will either say they don't stock spares, or they'll try to force you to buy the latch assembly, or the whole door, or at the very least, sell you the plastic bit, but charge 20% of a new washing machine.

One of the reasons is that you have to use the 3D printer regularly for the resin to not clog the nozzles. I had the rather sobering experience of using epoxy two weeks ago when it cured in the mixing nozzle within two minutes of being squeezed into it. I think 3D printers use thermal compound for this, but there are two problems with it -- if it doesn't re-plasticize after being warmed, you have to clean out the nozzle mechanically or use solvents, and either of these methods may damage the delicate nozzle. If it does re-plasticize, there's the question how you can heat all pipes that hold it and whether it will be stable in any useful application.

That might be exactly what Carl Bass implied all along -- 3D printing won't be ubiquitous at home, but local businesses will be built around it for sure.

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Oracle horns in on Red Hat's OpenStack party with own distro

toughluck

KSplice?

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Oh Sony. Have we learned NOTHING from SuperAIT?

toughluck

Sony is a media manufacturer, too

In addition to AIT and SAIT that always were niche products meant more to showcase their media manufacturing capabilities than to actually turn a huge profit. Sony OEMs a lot of LTO media and sells some under its own brand as well.

Nobody in their right mind ever suggested that Fujifilm would release a new tape format when they announced joint work on Barium Ferrite. Now they even dedicated a site to BaFe:

http://thefutureoftape.com/index.html

Sony stated that their technology would allow storing 74 more times data on a standard BaFe LTO-6 tape. Fujifilm demonstrated a 35 TB tape, Sony now claims they could manufacture tape up to 185 TB in the same format -- exactly 150 TB more.

Since Sony is a media supplier, they are naturally interested in being the chosen media provider. LTO Consortium decided to adopt BaFe for LTO-6 (and presumably LTO-7). If Sony plays this right, they can get the LTOC board to adopt this as media of choice for LTO-8 (and Oracle's T10000x, and presumably IBM's future 3592 drive) and then make money on licensing manufacturing to other media suppliers. Right now, all LTO-6 cartridges *must* be BaFe. Every cartridge sold is an extra solid profit for Fujifilm and Sony rightly wants to jump on that bandwagon.

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Bill Gates: Sell off Bing? Nah. Xbox? Maybe...

toughluck

Re: Ready market...

Wrong. If margin goes UP by a percentage and they're fine to report it, it means it was positive in the first place.

10% margin up 26% is 12.6% now. -10% margin up 26% is negative 12.6% after going up.

Note that nobody uses these statements when margin is negative and drops further down.

And what you're describing is a change that would necessarily be expressed in percentage points, not raw percentage.

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Vladimir Putin says internet is a 'CIA project'

toughluck

Re: Macumba

There is just one problem with Putin. He was a KGB colonel. Have you ever seen a colonel commanding generals?

Putin may be deranged. He may believe himself to be the Czar. However, that makes him all the easier to manipulate and I can't shake that nagging feeling there's another power behind the throne and it's not even that hard to find.

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Report: Apple flushes 12.9-inch MaxiPad plan down the drain

toughluck

Just goes to show you how little you can do with a MacBook Pro rather than the other way around. Seriously, why did you have a high performance laptop in the first place if you managed to completely replace it with a commodity appliance? For show?

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WD My Cloud EX4 four-bay NAS

toughluck

Abysmal performance

What gives with just 45 MB/s performance sequential? With RAID 0, no less. A single drive is able to feed and digest 100 MB/s sequentially, with RAID 0, this should nearly linearly increase to 400 MB/s.

Apparently this is a problem with all hardware solutions, I can see. I had a Linux soft raid solution with five 1 TB WD Green drives in a RAID 5 configuration and I was able to get up to nearly 500 MB/s from them. Now I switched to an LSI 9260-8i and the performance dropped at least 10 times, which is ridiculous, and I'm considering going back, despite the sunk costs.

I can see the NAS boxes are even worse.

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Nokia's Android? It's not for the likes of us…

toughluck

Aren't ARM SOCs going for as low as 50 cents? Let's imagine a proper dual core goes for 2 bucks, how much can they save by going lower?

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