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* Posts by toughluck

69 posts • joined 22 Jun 2009

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Flash data storage: Knocking TAPE off the archiving top spot

toughluck

Consider LTFS, but add -LE

When you have LTFS-LE (Library Edition), where a single translation layer presents a single hierarchy, where top-level directories are individual volumes, you can actually use tape as a drop-in solution.

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Behold our SPINNING DATA GRAVE: WD carts out 6.3TB cold storage drive

toughluck

Re: Short warranty for Archive drive?

500,000 hours? Wow, that's really a lot. It's nearly 21,000 days and almost equal to 57 years constant run time. I don't think there's any piece of IT equipment that could claim that long run time.

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toughluck

Re: Short warranty for Archive drive?

Not a neat trick. Just partial pressure. It's just that Helium has very small particles and there is so little of it in the atmosphere that for practical purposes, it's vacuum for Helium (and vice-versa, Helium-filled spaces are vacuum for all other gases).

As for neat tricks, it does have superfluid properties at extremely low temperatures, but while it's cool (pun intended), that is a frequently misunderstood phenomenon; do look up superfluidity.

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Oracle's MySQL buy a 'fiasco' says Dovecot man Mikko Linnanmäki

toughluck

So very true. By the end of the day, it's not like their data is stored in some fine mist with a cable dangling from it. The data has to be on an array somewhere, so they end up paying for the purchase, support, connection and on top of that, overhead and margin of their provider.

If you use a considerable portion of your storage, shifting to cloud makes no sense whatsoever. If somebody offers you a lower price per byte stored and transferred, they're cutting corners somewhere. The problem is, you don't know where. And finally, if they grossly underestimated costs or overestimated profits, their business model falls apart, they fold and you're left without a provider and usually without any way with which you can recover your data.

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Brit Sci-Fi author Alastair Reynolds says MS Word 'drives me to distraction'

toughluck

Re: Why use an unsuitable tool in the first place?

Did I make even the slightest hint that the work should be submitted full of errors?

1. The tool I suggested (focuswriter) has a spelling dictionary and checks on the fly or at the end.

2. Word is not better (or worse) in this regard.

The software you use is not an excuse for errors. However, let me point out that it used to be common to submit written works as typescript (or manuscript) and the writers did not have the luxury of spellcheckers or even error correction. And the quality of manuscripts and typescripts was vastly superior to some examples of today's works where the writer did not even bother to run a spellchecker on his or her text once.

However, it's Alastair Reynolds we're talking about. So your comment that the publisher would give excuses not to use your work is absurd. Mr. Reynolds has been published extensively and his publisher is definitely not going to give excuses not to use his work since it's basically printing money. Well, okay, I presume if he submitted utter rubbish, the publisher would firmly say 'no,' but otherwise, you're very unreasonable.

Your post reveals that you may have been rejected by some publishers. However, I would offer an alternative explanation. Whatever tools you use (or don't), they're not the reason you were rejected. And they were right -- they want "stuff" that's readable. Yours is not. It displays as three lines on my screen and I can say with all certainty that if I were to read through three thousand lines of such dubious quality, my eyes would bleed out of my eyesockets.

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toughluck

Why use an unsuitable tool in the first place?

To be honest, I can't understand why anyone would want to torture themselves with a full-featured word processor to write anything serious.

You're the Writer, NOT the Editor. You're there to write, not to edit or prepare for publishing. If the writer is trying to do the editor's job, and even the best writer might be a mediocre editor/publisher, the primary task will suffer and the resulting book will be form over substance.

I can understand a writer emphasizing certain passages, introducing quotations, digressions, etc., but it's the choice of the editor whether to italicize or embolden, not the writer.

What any self-respecting writer should do is to submit his or her work in plain-text or at most in light markup (such as RTF, for all its shortcomings), and the publishing house should be the party to actually decide what the final form will be.

With that in mind, either use a typewriter (with a facility to save text, of course), or software such as focuswriter (it's free) that comes with features specifically for writers.

Do note that the alternative is to let the writer do everything, including (virtual) typesetting, preparing for publishing, sending to the printer, promoting it, hey, why not pay for the whole thing while he's at it, in effect self-publishing, but where the proceeds go to a publishing house that didn't do anything worth paying for.

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Autodesk CEO: '3D printing has been way overhyped'

toughluck

Re: I think Mr Carl Bass is making the same mistake Steve Balmer did with tablets

There's one problem with this approach. Scale.

Think about it. You can go and buy a nice model aeroplane for, say, 50 quid, then put it together.

3D printing would allow you to print the same nice model aeroplane for, say, 25 quid, plus up-front cost of 5,000. That's not including energy prices, though, and if it takes days to print at several hundred watts of power, it's starting to get a little ineffective.

Worse still, you have to file off the bits sticking out, then wonder why the wings are uneven.

3D printing at a local shop will be a different matter. Let's say a plastic part failed in some appliance (say, a washing machine latch). The manufacturer will either say they don't stock spares, or they'll try to force you to buy the latch assembly, or the whole door, or at the very least, sell you the plastic bit, but charge 20% of a new washing machine.

One of the reasons is that you have to use the 3D printer regularly for the resin to not clog the nozzles. I had the rather sobering experience of using epoxy two weeks ago when it cured in the mixing nozzle within two minutes of being squeezed into it. I think 3D printers use thermal compound for this, but there are two problems with it -- if it doesn't re-plasticize after being warmed, you have to clean out the nozzle mechanically or use solvents, and either of these methods may damage the delicate nozzle. If it does re-plasticize, there's the question how you can heat all pipes that hold it and whether it will be stable in any useful application.

That might be exactly what Carl Bass implied all along -- 3D printing won't be ubiquitous at home, but local businesses will be built around it for sure.

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Oracle horns in on Red Hat's OpenStack party with own distro

toughluck

KSplice?

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Oh Sony. Have we learned NOTHING from SuperAIT?

toughluck

Sony is a media manufacturer, too

In addition to AIT and SAIT that always were niche products meant more to showcase their media manufacturing capabilities than to actually turn a huge profit. Sony OEMs a lot of LTO media and sells some under its own brand as well.

Nobody in their right mind ever suggested that Fujifilm would release a new tape format when they announced joint work on Barium Ferrite. Now they even dedicated a site to BaFe:

http://thefutureoftape.com/index.html

Sony stated that their technology would allow storing 74 more times data on a standard BaFe LTO-6 tape. Fujifilm demonstrated a 35 TB tape, Sony now claims they could manufacture tape up to 185 TB in the same format -- exactly 150 TB more.

Since Sony is a media supplier, they are naturally interested in being the chosen media provider. LTO Consortium decided to adopt BaFe for LTO-6 (and presumably LTO-7). If Sony plays this right, they can get the LTOC board to adopt this as media of choice for LTO-8 (and Oracle's T10000x, and presumably IBM's future 3592 drive) and then make money on licensing manufacturing to other media suppliers. Right now, all LTO-6 cartridges *must* be BaFe. Every cartridge sold is an extra solid profit for Fujifilm and Sony rightly wants to jump on that bandwagon.

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Bill Gates: Sell off Bing? Nah. Xbox? Maybe...

toughluck

Re: Ready market...

Wrong. If margin goes UP by a percentage and they're fine to report it, it means it was positive in the first place.

10% margin up 26% is 12.6% now. -10% margin up 26% is negative 12.6% after going up.

Note that nobody uses these statements when margin is negative and drops further down.

And what you're describing is a change that would necessarily be expressed in percentage points, not raw percentage.

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Vladimir Putin says internet is a 'CIA project'

toughluck

Re: Macumba

There is just one problem with Putin. He was a KGB colonel. Have you ever seen a colonel commanding generals?

Putin may be deranged. He may believe himself to be the Czar. However, that makes him all the easier to manipulate and I can't shake that nagging feeling there's another power behind the throne and it's not even that hard to find.

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Report: Apple flushes 12.9-inch MaxiPad plan down the drain

toughluck

Just goes to show you how little you can do with a MacBook Pro rather than the other way around. Seriously, why did you have a high performance laptop in the first place if you managed to completely replace it with a commodity appliance? For show?

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WD My Cloud EX4 four-bay NAS

toughluck

Abysmal performance

What gives with just 45 MB/s performance sequential? With RAID 0, no less. A single drive is able to feed and digest 100 MB/s sequentially, with RAID 0, this should nearly linearly increase to 400 MB/s.

Apparently this is a problem with all hardware solutions, I can see. I had a Linux soft raid solution with five 1 TB WD Green drives in a RAID 5 configuration and I was able to get up to nearly 500 MB/s from them. Now I switched to an LSI 9260-8i and the performance dropped at least 10 times, which is ridiculous, and I'm considering going back, despite the sunk costs.

I can see the NAS boxes are even worse.

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Nokia's Android? It's not for the likes of us…

toughluck

Aren't ARM SOCs going for as low as 50 cents? Let's imagine a proper dual core goes for 2 bucks, how much can they save by going lower?

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Has Intel side-stepped NGOs on conflict minerals in its chips?

toughluck

First, the slave drivers there will not allow him to dig the stuff.

Second, nobody would buy from him. Companies do not buy such small amounts because they are not sustainable, and because it's hugely unlikely the ore would be of a useful grade (if an ore in the first place). You really need a lot of buckets (=a lot of hands), and you need some ore preprocessing on site, hence operations are set up.

Having recently read about the proceedings in Congo myself, I am appalled by this situation. Unsurprisingly, the corrupt government is not interested in resolving this problem, since they benefit from the minerals one way or another, and probably are involved in illegal dealings themselves.

Cue someone coming there, trying to enforce some humane standards, and be labeled a warmongering world police.

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toughluck

50 MW megaphone?

Man, that could be legally classed as a weapon of mass destruction. Or maybe something Atreides would use.

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Sysadmin job ad: 'If you don’t mind really bad work-life balance, this is for you'

toughluck

Re: Good luck to you Penny Arcade

By all means apply. The problem is, they've got millions of readers and PA has a budget of several hundred thousand dollars, perhaps into millions now. The job will definitely suck hard. Of course it won't be a 160 hours per week job, they will expect you to squeeze the 160 hours into 40.

Sure, prioritization, but I seriously doubt they have a ticketing system and any SLAs. You'll likely be doing a few things at once, like trying to work out the network because there are some looming problems that might bring down the whole operation and fixing a printer because the printouts for the next month's presentation come out a bit too dark to the art director's liking. Guess who will demand you drop everything and solve his problem immediately. You'll end up fixing the network after hours, which nobody will notice since you're directly managed by people with no IT experience whatsoever.

If you are professional, if you prioritize and never take overtime, you'll have a working network, but you'll be kicked out because of ignoring the key person in the company. Hint: in a small organization, they are *all* key people and their problems come first. If they retain you, expect no raises because you're not doing your job well.

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toughluck

I wonder who will fall for that ad

I read PA regularly and I appreciate their comic strip, but this ad really shows how easily you can lose touch with reality. I'm sure Mike and Jerry are perfectly happy to work their asses off for a measly reward since they own the operation and I assume they'd be happy with it even if they only barely broke even. But working behind the scenes, however important your job is, you'll never get the accolades and you'll never be in the spotlight, while you're still expected to put all of yourself into the job. Might as well get paid for it, no?

What would be the perks? Being able to talk to the owners? Play video games with them? Seriously? If that's supposed to cover for the ridiculous salary, they're really stretching it.

Problem is, it's a McJob. Expect poor pay, worthless experience and constant patting on the back, telling you how important you are to them. The problem with experience is that it will never be appreciated properly. It will be appreciated by other small operation webcomics, who will line up to fleece you at the same job just like PA is likely to, but any serious employer might actually balk at this, fully expecting that you just goofed off at the job. Finally, for all the work you put in there, you'll be laid off if they're ever merged into something larger.

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toughluck

Re: Well, it's Penny Arcade...

Sure. A 'normal' and 'boring' job ad, outlining the actual challenges and any items specific to the job.

Once you accept a funny ad, expect your job to be funny (but of the black humor variety). Oh, and prepare to accept funny money for that, too.

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toughluck

Re: Good luck to you Penny Arcade

I can't agre enough. Especially when looking at this:

- Annual Salary: Negotiable, but you should know up front we’re not a terribly money-motivated group. We’re more likely to spend less money on salary and invest that on making your day-to-day life at work better.

Improving day-to-day life at work? That still requires money that I would spend on things like a car, a good lunch, etc. The job should be paid no less than 4 salaries minus overhead of 3 extra people, so it should be something like 200-300 thousand dollars. And frankly, the ad reads more like expecting someone to come in to work for some 20-30 thousand.

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Jolla's Android-aping Sailfish OS smartphones to land in November

toughluck

Somebody doesn't get the concept of preorders

So the mobes will hit the retail channel in November and they will only then be sent out to those who preordered and should get to them before the end of the year?

And to think they only paid €100 for the privilege...

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VMware vSAN test pilots: Don't panic but there's a chance of DATA LOSS

toughluck
Headmaster

IOPs?

What's IOP? The article uses a pluralization form of IOPs. Obviously IOPS is I/O Operations Per Second, but IOP?

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Thorium and inefficient solar power? That's good enough for me

toughluck
Alien

Re: Slightly fruity comparison

Fruit flies? Of the radioactive mutant variety?

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Facebook's request to the flash industry: 'Make the worst flash possible'

toughluck

What about tape?

Let's discuss the flash solution. It could be made in small or large modules, each would have its own advantages and drawbacks. Even though it's frugal, flash still needs power to function. The larger the basic module, the more power it will use. Then there's the matter of reliability. Larger modules would fail more frequently per module than small ones. And ultimately, they would be more expensive per byte because they would need more complex controllers. These factors would favor smaller modules. However, smaller modules would require more complex routing, switching, finally it would need very complex controllers per each brick of modules.

Would it be cheaper than current flash technologies? Sure. Would it be cheap? Not by a long stretch. Flash is still 8-10 times more expensive than spinning drives. TLC doesn't bring the cost down far enough.

It's also not a matter of density. At the same node, I suppose flash makers could make features denser, but even if they were twice as dense (which is rather unrealistic), we're looking at only four times the raw capacity -- which is still more expensive than spinning media.

Interference would become a greater problem, and it would probably cause the usable capacity to not increase as fast as raw capacity did. Durability would suffer, of course, but as the guy said, it's not a problem for them, especially since they already don't delete the content, but keep it hidden.

Nevertheless, it's still not a solution. Perhaps Facebook will be happy with the resultant module, even if it's expensive, if they think it will save power, or if it would be less complex to build and maintain, but I don't think so.

--

Which brings me to tape. There are T10000C drives that offer 5 TB per tape, and T10000D on the horizon which will offer more -- that's beyond the LTO roadmap at the moment, so I'm not talking about LTO. Tape has the nice property that when it's idle, it's not using up power and when a cartridge is needed, automation takes care of picking it up and mounting on a drive.

--

That said, I realize that if he said that waiting times for spinning up disks are too long, waiting half a minute or so to access a tape would probably be much too long for a user to wait. Caching part of the content on disk to wait until a tape is mounted would probably alleviate some of this concern. However, the service is free of charge, so Facebook pretty much has all power to set SLAs for it.

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BMW offers in-car streaming music for cross-Europe road trips

toughluck

Re: Why when Radio is already free?

What's so bad about DAB?

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Move over Radeon, GeForce – Intel has a new graphics brand: Iris

toughluck
WTF?

Re: Wow! 75 times faster than... whaaat?

@Steve.T: Reading comprehension, man. It was obviously irony. Should I have used HTML5-compliant <sarcasm> tags?

They can be used for light gaming, assuming you're happy with 1366×768 resolution at absolutely lowest settings (some games provide Intel-specific setting, which offers quality even below the basic).

Oh, and funny you should mention AMD bought ATi. Remember Intel740? Thought not. Intel bought Real3D and released their GPU in 1998 -- eight years before AMD bought ATi. They had EIGHT MORE YEARS to develop the (admittedly rubbish at the time) solution into a solid product. When AMD bought ATi, they were struggling with their lineup, slowly recovering from 2000 series debacle with notably improved 3000 series, but they weren't well entrenched until releasing the 4000 series and Evergreen. Integrated GPUs from ATi were already vastly better than Intel's at that time and it was without much prior support from AMD that the GPU was excellent. Intel's GPUs continued to lag behind AMD's, and when AMD integrated them into APUs, Intel was again outstripped.

Between 1998 and 2006, Intel had time to improve their GPUs. They failed. They had eight years of possibilities to integrate the CPU and GPU within the hardware, even when the GPU resided in NB, but they didn't care about it. Since 2006 they have slowly improved, with each generation about doubling the performance, but it was still way behind the curve. Seeing Intel's lack of initiative I have to call bullshit on this 'Iris'. Maybe Haswell is not going to bring anything new to the table in terms of graphics (aside from increased clocks) and Iris is just a way to counter the lack of performance by doubling the number of GPUs.

As for playing video streams -- Intel's CPUs DO NOT use the GPU portion for decoding the stream. The CPU has a dedicated processing unit for this. And although it is impressive in its own right, it is supposed to play high numbers of video streams without breaking a sweat.

And your last paragraph -- as long as Intel is trying to stick x86 into everyone's face, they will continue to fail. And it's funny how Intel continuously claims that their target is ahead of them. When i740 was released, high performance GPUs were their future. They failed. Then they said their goal was best integrated graphics. They failed. Then they were supposed to release Larrabee, which was supposed to introduce Intel to the enthusiast GPU market. When that failed, they said Larrabee was intended for heterogeneous computing all the time and they never intended it to be a GPU. Now you are saying their goal is best performance in tablets? Ain't gonna happen. Iris isn't going to convince anyone, either.

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toughluck
FAIL

Wow! 75 times faster than... whaaat?

Seriously, who are they kidding? Why not claim they are seventy-five HUNDRED (7500) times faster than ViRGE, the 3D decelerator? While they're at it, why not remember that their Core i7 CPUs are several hundred thousand times faster than 8088?

75×rubbish is just rubbish, but more of it. Their drivers are bad, the performance is in the basement compared to integrated GPUs from AMD. While they could be on to something with Iris, the competition would need to stand still for the last five years. Wake up call, Intel! You are NOT competing with 2006 chipset-integrated Radeon or GeForce! You're going to compete with 2014 APUs which are going to include hUMA (which for most users will mean PS4-like GDDR5 system memory). Your GPU may well be 75 times faster than in 2006, but AMD's GPUs made more improvement in the last 7 years and you are not going to fool anyone.

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Ten ancestors of the netbook

toughluck
Thumb Down

I can see nobody mentioned Bicom yet

It launched in 1993. I remember reading the review, but frankly, there's scant info on the Internet and it's hard to find the information.

Nevertheless, I did find information on it. There were two models: 240i and 260i, differing in HDD capacity (40 and 60 MB, which was a lot for a notebook back then). Specifications:

- Am286LX at 16 MHz (1.5 µm node)

- 2 MB RAM

- Dimensions: 223×161×31 mm (smaller than original EeePC!)

- Weight: 1 kg (which is less than some EeePC models, at almost 1.5 kg)

- 7.5" monochrome displays (640×400 resolution, line-doubled CGA)

- Battery life: 3-4 hours on 5 AA batteries (!), you could use rechargeables (Ni-Cd at the time).

- Price: I can't remember now, but for what it did, it was cheaper than cheapest regular notebooks, at some $300-400.

It's hard not to draw parallels between then and now. The subnotebook was based on technology that was two generations behind the mainstream (486, color displays), which is about where netbooks are in relation to notebooks.

Obviously, technology has progressed since then, but in 15 years between this and the original EeePC, what did we get in return? Frankly, not much! Larger hard drives, color displays (sometimes they are even larger), more memory. But feature bloat caused the netbooks to not perform better than their old rivals. If you used 700 mAh Ni-Cd rechargeables with the Bicom, you got 3 hours battery life. With 2700 mAh NiMH rechargeables, you would get 12 hours -- compare that to 3 hours on an EeePC with batteries rated at 5600 mAh with higher voltage. Displays obviously draw the most energy, but 15 years of progress should have brought them at least to parity. If anything, turning off backlight (or the display altogether, and running on an external monitor), should allow the netbook to work considerably longer, but it doesn't.

Is it unreasonable to expect that you should be able to get a 9-inch notebook running a shrunk CPU two generations old (hey, it would be the original Nehalem now) -- not downclocked, mind you, with an SSD, weighing in at less than 0.5 kg, with dimensions of an A5 sheet of paper and at most 5 mm thick?

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Behold: Ten storage chieftains whose products hold humanity's data

toughluck

Re: Hmmm, what about tape?

You're welcome. And no, I didn't mean absolute leadership, but some of the names and companies should have never made the list.

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toughluck
FAIL

Hmmm, what about tape?

What about Storagetek/Sun/Oracle and tape? What about IBM for that matter? You mentioned HP, which might go bankrupt and assets may disperse between various other companies, but both IBM and Oracle tape equipment right now holds more data (an order of magnitude more) on tape than is kept on disk. Tape still has the edge over flash for overall TCO, and flash vendors have to catch up with tape, not vice versa.

I understand that you may be enamored with the new technologies, but as it stands, the list is woefully inadequate. Dropbox, Facebook and Amazon? Pretty much equivalent in terms of web storage -- pick any one of the three or add many more to the list if you really believe that they matter. How about adding Rapidshare, then? Going further, I see fusion-io, which is apparently struggling, as you yourself reported:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/01/31/fio_q2_fy2013/

Is this the financial outlook of a market leader and a successful company?

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/03/25/fusion_io_marklogic/

It doesn't seem that Fusion-IO is leading in benchmarks, either. Or are you considering adding OCZ to the list as well? It certainly doesn't seem that competition has to chase Fusion-IO in anything.

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Why did your outsourced IT fall over? Cos you weren't on Twitter

toughluck
WTF?

I'm wondering

Is this a contest of who makes the presentation most devoid of content and crams as many cliparts to a page as possible?

What do the gears even represent? How the hell are two completely different domains -- sourcing and monitoring -- supposed to drive one another???

Or is it just a classroom project of one of the execs' children?

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Why mergers LOSE money, but are GOOD for the economy

toughluck

Re: The success of capitalism

I've yet to see Capitalism at work. The bailouts are precisely where the problems lie -- it's not Capitalism, it's thinly-veiled Socialism with tolerated Personal Property (unless said Personal Property needs to be taken over by the Government to support its own interests).

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Swedish boffins: An ICE AGE is coming, only CO2 can save us

toughluck

@Andy Gates

Why would it matter whether they are experts on global climate? The only conclusion of the research is the unprecedented scale of carbon sequestration in peat, and the enormous rate of growth of mires and bogs. The additional conclusion that the amount of carbon sequestrated might be high enough to offset human industrial CO2 emissions is added almost as an afterthought.

By the way, annual anthropogenic CO2 emissions are within the margin of error of estimates on amount of CO2 emissions from a medium-sized volcano eruption. How could human-made CO2 be responsible for anything? That's the thing that I've never seen climate scientists refute. It's like they're trying to explain how we can heat an ocean using a candle.

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Got no idea what Hadoop is, but think you need it? You're not alone

toughluck
Facepalm

Given that indeed.com is a global site, and contains many more jobs in other sectors than IT, it's a big deal.

Even if it is not a huge percentage within IT, it's still significant.

Compared to other IT jobs, which include programming where the basic skill is a language, then there are generic IT jobs where no skills are required, web coding where you'll find the usual fare of CSS and PHP, Hadoop will be a significant part of the remainder of critical jobs -- like mainframe or Unix administration -- it might seem archaic for some, but it brings a lot of money.

Not everyone will have to know Hadoop inside-out, but those who do, and whose skills are required, will rake in the big cash.

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SpaceX Dragon chokes at the last second

toughluck

Re: To quote Top Gear... How Hard Can It Be™

Okay, so I'm risking a reply to what may be an obvious troll, but... The Soviets were thought to have enormous apparent advantage in rocket design 50 years ago, and well, look up N1.

Soviets couldn't build a "simple rocket" to reach the Moon, it makes the American Saturn V that much more remarkable. (Some try to say it was a lucky break, but the perfect safety record says otherwise).

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Turing's rapid Nazi Enigma code-breaking secret revealed

toughluck
Pint

Re: "squeezed the juice" out of the two papers...

Unfortunately (yes, I'm Polish), not much. It's not that a lot of the theoretical foundations weren't laid by Polish mathematicians, it's that certain political decisions caused them to fall by the wayside.

However you want to twist it, siding with the French in their code-breaking efforts cost them the chance to work at Bletchley Park. Turing was a brilliant mathematician and computer scientist and he did a lot more work in breaking the code than any other man.

Cheers to that!

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Death to Office or to Windows - choose wisely, Microsoft

toughluck
Megaphone

Well, the writer lives on the assumption that Apple's market share is growing and is significant everywhere in the world.

Well, that's not the case in roughly 90% of the world. OS X requires Apple hardware, and people don't want to pay the Apple tax for an otherwise ordinary PC. Not to mention exorbitant prices for parts and limited upgradeability. Sorry, but for the price of a Mac I can get a much more capable PC and run whatever I wish on it.

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toughluck
WTF?

Re: Re: Re: huh?

Aside from being a shiny toy, what can a tablet do that a PC cannot at half the price?

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toughluck
Stop

Re: Re: "Windows is dead."

Yes, that is, assuming all those users decide to either:

1. Accept 10-12 inch screens on their tablets.

2. Accept 10-12 kg tablets with 27 inch screens.

Everybody seems to be under the impression that screen size no longer matters. And if you add in a keyboard, mouse, external screen and a power brick to an otherwise svelte slate, the sum becomes vastly more cumbersome than a desktop, vastly more expensive, and vastly less capable.

Or has everybody forgotten that tablets cost twice the amount of a more capable desktop PC?

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Apple’s Siri gets sweary with British child

toughluck
Coat

How much are they suing for?

It misses on the most important detail -- how high do they rate their moral losses and how much do they want from Tesco/Apple/world+dog?

Mine's the one with the disclaimer not to use as parachute on the tag.

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Oracle hammered as hardware sales soften

toughluck
Facepalm

Lucky then that the financial analysts covering Oracle are able to tell what SPARC is, considering those covering IBM aren't able to tell anything about one of IBM's most valuable assets.

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BOFH: We don't need no stinkin' upgrade

toughluck
WTF?

Firefox? They did 3.0, jumped to 3.5, sanity apparently hit them for a while, since they did 3.6, then jumped to 4.0, but suddenly lost it all by skipping to 5.0 in three months, 6.0 in about two, and 7.0 in just one more. If they release something in mid-November, it's going to be version 11...

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Why grill Google over web dominance? It has none

toughluck
Stop

All those searches have to pay for themselves, you know

They don't make (much) money when you search for a search engine.

Furthermore, using specialized search engines implies that you are shopping, and context ads in those engines are much better at being effective (as opposed to context ads when you are searching for whatever) -- and context ads generate the most revenue -- precisely the revenue that Google is otherwise losing.

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AMD Llano vs Intel Sandy Bridge

toughluck

It's Intel's GPU drivers, which are not up to scratch.

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HP murders webOS tablets, phones

toughluck
WTF?

@Matt Bryant

Quite frankly, the last post is an insult to intelligence. Which of the three companies would you prefer to own (assuming you were looking for longevity):

Company A, $100 bn revenue, $150 bn costs, $50 bn loss

Company B, $80 bn revenue, $60 bn costs, $20 bn profit

Company C, $50 bn revenue, $10 bn costs, $40 bn profit

Going by your logic, you would believe company A has the best outlook of the three above.

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It's official: IE users are dumb as a bag of hammers

toughluck
Facepalm

@John Dee

Yes, because as we all know, increasing debt limits and doing nothing about the spending is the right way to go wrt budgets.

5
2

AMD gets in Intel's grille with desktop Fusion rollout

toughluck

@E 2 : Ummm, no

The beta drivers were there earlier. Plus, the older drivers worked (sort of). And let's not forget that it was 6 weeks after the *announcement* was made. General availability wasn't until a few weeks after the release.

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Oracle to triple Exadata installs this year

toughluck
Facepalm

Well, how is *your* English?

"Ellison said in the Wall Street call today that Oracle has installed over 1,000 Exadata clusters (not racks, but distinct clusters) so far, and that it can triple the base to more than 3,000 machines in fiscal 2012."

In your own words:

What Oracle said is they have "installed" over 1000 Exadata servers. They made it clear it is not 1000 clusters.

To me, it's pretty clear Ellison said clusters. Care to re-read? BTW, you were replying to a post made at 9 p.m. and accused the guy of early drinking on Friday. You made your post at 9 a.m. on Saturday. What does that make you? Pot? Kettle? Black?

1
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toughluck
FAIL

Installed vs. sold

Now, correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't this more a matter of how many Exadata clusters are installed compared to sold, but not installed yet? I.e., the sales team could have closed the deal already, but put it on a three-month backorder, then it will take some time to install, lab test and put into production.

You seem to be taking the common definition of something being installed or sold, and not the one that's used by businesses.

1
1

Tilera throws gauntlet at Intel's feet

toughluck
Stop

Why doesn't Tilera compare their CPU to SPARC?

Interestingly, Tilera didn't seem to show whether there are any advantages in the merge-sort when compared to a SPARC T3 CPU. Since T3 is also made on 40 nm, the comparison would make sense in that regard, especially since both CPUs are RISC designs.

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