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* Posts by ElReg!comments!Pierre

2061 posts • joined 22 Jun 2009

Ploppr: The #VultureTRENDING App of the Now

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: "bump to dump"

Sincery hope the icon shows some kind of beverage...

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Securobods RAGE over $600k Kickstarter Tor box components

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Why all the rage? Oh I see.

It's not like you'd need custom-build hardware for a TOR router. I reckon I could build one out of my Fonera in a couple hours, probably on top of a hardened realtime-patched minimal Linux kernel, a minimal set of system utils (busybox?) and a purpose-compiled TOR stack.

I would build it on top of Gnu HURD but it'd probably take a couple years instead of hours ;-)

So, unless they're selling it for its weight of SD cards filled with iTunes-bought songs* because they custom-built it, I don't see the problem. Oh wait.

*https://what-if.xkcd.com/108/

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Life is good in the data centre – UKFast boss reports from hot tub

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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A sysadmin in a hot tub? I think not.

Here's how a sysadmin works:

http://ars.userfriendly.org/cartoons/?id=20141013

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BEND IT like YOGA: Newest Lenovo gadgets have built in PROJECTORS

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Who would want an integrated projector?

Actually a mini projector is not going to be much better than this. For anything good you have to cross the kilogram barrier. I should know, I tested everything I could get my mitts on. I finally bought a LED thing, on the light-and-small side of the large projector range. Pretty quiet too, and not overly expensive.

At first I was more interested in a mini projector because, well, neato! But I found even the rather overexpensive ones struggled at more than ~1.5 m, and that's before we even start talking contrast. This embedded one is probably not extra-good but certainly worth having for a quick improvised meeting on the go where the mini projector is going to be equally shitty with the added burden of needing an extra couple cables*, an extra device, and an extra power outlet.

*and hdmi cables are not the sturdiest things around, either. Being carried around will mess them up pretty fast.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Subwoofer?

Yeah, subyapper more like, at this size.

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WOMEN, your 'SUPERPOWER' is ... NOT asking for a RAISE: Satya Nadella

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: @ A Twig

> but it's surely a fine principle?

It certainly is, but that's where the trouble kick in regarding gender equality: for the end of the evening shift, say, starting at half past pissed, you may want to have more bartenders of the burly, hairy-chested type as opposed to the squishy curvy type, for obvious reasons (including the squishy type not wanting to actually get squished)... and you're not paying the same wages... see the problem here?

Of course there's a very valid reason to begin with, but from outside it may look like you're willingly paying women less than men. That's where you have to put in all these compensatory-this and equivalent-that which makes the calculations that much more complicated, as I was saying (although I did not have this particular problem in mind at the time, I was thinking more along the line of out-of-hours work and such).

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: @ ElReg!comments!Pierre

> having two separate pay grades for men and woman

WTF are you talking about?

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Boffin

Re: re: Not as easy-peasy as it may seem at first.

> 2 people, doing the same job, will be on the same pay-scale, at points determined by their respective experience/performance.

Yes, they are on the same payscale. It would be illegal to have separate ones. The point being argued here is, is the "fluffy factor" (experience/performance/etc recognition) evaluated and taken into account the same way. And that's where the icon is NOT sarcastic.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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> "I believe men and women should get equal pay for equal work. "

> I believe that it's insane to suggest anything else.

Sure, but in the real world how do you do that? First there's a problem with the metrics. Do you consider yearly pay, per-hour, bi-monthly, on the results (per-project)? With each method comes caveats, as not everyone works the same number of hours, results can depend on your work and abilities but also on a good serving of luck, etc. Then there's the fact that in a lot of places pay calculation depends on your overall experience and on your seniority in the place, meaning that things get hairy pretty quick if you're trying to compare pay between 2 people of different ages and/or who weren't hired at the same time. So the only way really is to make it retroactive, i.e. in the end of the, say, year, you crunch the numbers, with a lot of equivalent-this and compensatory-that (to account for holidays, number of worked hours, position in the local food chain, performance reviews etc) and you can tell if you've been paying fat black redhead women less than fit blond white men (or any other 2 categories that you may want to compare).

Then you can retroactively make adjustment "attention all blue-eyed staff, please head to your local HR office immediately for a 2% pay cut. Thank you for your cooperation" or sumfin' (OK, not really, what you would do is tweak the raises for the upcoming year I guess, and hope that things will equilibrate).

Not as easy-peasy as it may seem at first.

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Intel 'underestimates error bounds by 1.3 QUINTILLION'

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Ulp!

> I shudder to think what he would have made of the Millennium Dome

indeed!

http://cjoint.com/14oc/DJkl4hLHRQI_millennium.jpg

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: God, keep me from harm and working on FPUs

You're being a bit unfair there. He's just complaining that Intel oversold the precision. He did not seem so upset about the precision itself, but about the fact that if you rely on the doc you'll assume that your result is more accurate than it actually is, and thus rely on it instead of doing things another way.

I bet he's perfectly happy with Intel's response of fixing the doc to fit the code.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Ulp!

> you might miss Mars

If you did not have a way to correct trajectory as you get closer, true. But that would make you more vulnerable to a fly's fart on the launchpad than to this error...

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Ingredient found in TASTY BEER is GOOD for your BRAIN

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: 3,520 pints a day?

Before I'm anywhere near finishing 3,520 pints I process information twice as fast because I can see two of everything.

Fact: that's how they switched from 32-bits to 64-bits architectures.

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Linux systemd dev says open source is 'SICK', kernel community 'awful'

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Oh please...

Personally I don't understand the total dislike for it that some people have but then I am quite happy to see people build distros that use SysVinit if that's what they want. There is room for both camps.

You'd think that, but actually there isn't room for both camps when one camp is trying to push kernel commits that would break the other camps' solution.

What I dislike in systemd is not primarily what it is* but more what it wants to become: OS in place of the OS (that's the self-admitted goal of Poettering, for whom systemd is poised to become "a group of blocks from which to build an OS" -or something to that effect). It means that devs are faced with a choice: either you code against systemd, and then you let it do everything it does because redundancy is not good (and in some cases even impossible); that means removing key parts of other userland tools, and even modifying the kernel in some cases. That also means that other, simpler init methods won't work anymore. Or you let systemd alone entirely.

*although I do think that journald's binary logs and the all-encompassing, everything-but-the-kitche-sink approach to software design are imbecilic, to name only 2, but that's only my opinion.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: OSS survive on its Community

> [...] and rapidly become irrelevant. I can reference the comparitive treatment of beginners by the Python and Perl forums in the late 90s

Heh? Which of these do you reckon became irrelevant?

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: But I thought Linux was the dog's

I'd like to know why your post got a downvote.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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@ Mark #255 Re: @Duncan Macdonald Hostile leadership vs hostile software

I like Jose Rodrigues' solution better (although the version he posted seems to be missing several characters...)

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Oh please... @ phil dude

On the last part of my post I have an example: I usually try to minimize unnecessary resource hogs so I use minimal windows managers, like twm, quite a lot. twm windows don't have a "close" button: it's a widows manager, it gives the application a window to work in, that's it that's all. BUT most windows managers do have a "close" button... and although every sane developper includes one, sometimes several, in-app ways to close said app, one particular project visibly thought "windows manager have a close button anyway so why bother" and did not provide any way to cleanly close the app from within.

That -otherwise excellent- application is Rawtherapee (give it a try, it's not quite as complete as lightroom but it's stable, has everything *I* need and then some, and is open source). Much to my dismay, to close it nicely in twm you have to send it a kill -15 signal from a virtual console. It's not lazyness, as the application itself is extremely well finished, has a lot of well thought-out functionalities, and very complex ones to code, too. The app's worth it but it's annoying, and a sign of what happens when you start relying on "gadget" niceties in parts of the system that don't require them.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Oh please... @ phil dude

> not to be picky, but could you be more specific about pulseaudio?

I can answer only for myself, and perhaps it's fixed now, but until recently it kept crashing on me, repeatedly, often bringing the calling app down with it. Be it for games, online video, local video, anything a bit demanding that had sound was likely to crash within a few tens of seconds (with an error message about pulseaudio on stdout). That, or grind to a halt with distant "tt tt tt" as the sole audio output (and a whole bunch of pulseaudio error messages to stdout). That on an otherwise remarkably stable system. Pulseaudio had become synonymous of crash: whenever anything crashed or stalled, you could be sure there was a pulseaudio error message waiting for you on stdout. Switched back to a more "basic" sound system and everything magically works.

It may be because I'm always using bare-minimum hardware configurations, perhaps a few more GB of RAM would have solved the problem, but if so it's still bad code IMHO.

> One of the MASSIVE benefits of PA is that EVERY process can be given its own volume control.

You see it as a good thing, I see it as a telltale sign of crud. Typically that's not the job of the sound daemon, that's the app's job. Same as how systemd is trying to do everything at once. Not only is it bad design because it leads to unmaintainably huge codebase and some features will inevitably fall behind in terms of development, it also means to encorage app developpers to not include volume control even though their app would need it -because it's done by the sound system anyway so why bother, right?

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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or the good old sysV, which still does the job...

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Why a reinstall? I just switched back to sysvinit, no problem at all (I did have to remove a few things, mostly meta-packages with one "gadget" dependency coded against systemd, but no core thing).

I too was disturbed by Debian's switch to systemd. That's only for the i86 version but i reckon it's the most used one. Dangerous to say the least.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Oh please...

> Pulseaudio and avahi are garbage as well.

Tru dat. Perhaps I failed to throw enough resources at them, but I never could make them work reliably.

> He singlehandedly is the reason I won't have a Linux Desktop any more.

He singlehandedly is the reason why I have Linux desktops that don't have either Avahi or PulseAudio. Or systemd for that matter (tried it, reversed to sysV after a couple magistral borks on update)

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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> that is no different on windows forums, though.

It is a bit different on Windows forums for 2 reasons that Windows transfuges often don't get at first when posting on *NIX forums:

-on widows forums you usually talk to fellow users; it is customary to begin with "This app is crap and the doc is useless, please help a bro out". On Linux forums you're usually talking to the people who coded the damn thing and / or wrote the doc. You can't be a total dickhead to their face and demand that they fix your problems politely.

-in the Windows ecosystem when you talk to the official support and/or the devs they already got your money. You're a customer and thus benefit from a higher tolerance if you're being a bit of a dick. On linux forums (excluding the paid-for support like RHEL) you usually did not pay the devs you're insulting, so they don't have to be nice if you're being a jackass.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Your stuff is crap but it's free so I'll take it.

Now write me a detailed tutorial on how to do $STUFF because I can't be arsed to read the man page or search the forum/mailing list history.

Oh, and did I mention that your stuff is not quite as good as anything else on the market and the only reason I try it is because I can have it for free?

I can sort of believe it...

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Apple's iPhone 6 can REVERSE BALDNESS (and cause it, too)

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Seems to be a common belief

Nothing wrong with it if you feel you need it.

I, OTOH, own an old, second-hand Samsung S5230.

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MAC BOTNET uses REDDIT comments for directions

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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@ Mike Bell Re: Sorry, has to be said.....

> That fanboi was almost certainly correct. Strictly speaking, no virus has ever been found running on a Mac.

Since you're going for the pedant angle I thought I'd mention that there has indeed been viruses developped for the Mac; including the first virus ever to be described as such, actually. So, strictly speaking as you would say, viruses were born on a Mac.

Now please by all means do carry on flaming each other over how such or such OS is totally foolproof, I don't really care about OS wars.

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Buying memory in an iPhone 6: Like wiping your bottom with dollar bills

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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@Richard 12

> Yes it is. Mostly because it's the same chip with the same interface.

Neither the same chip nor the same interface actually. And that's part of the reason why it's not (even remotely) as fast. But again, it doesn't really matter for the expected uses of a smartphone, except perhaps way-too-high-pixel-count video shooting.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: "A little eBay shopping and you can find 128GB Micro SD cards for under a tenner"

"Is an SD card as quick as built-in memory? I assume it is, if you get a decent card?"

Not even remotely close, but a decent speed class card is usually fast enough that you won't notice the difference on a phone, unless perhaps if shooting insanely high-square-pixel video directly to card.

AFAIK as a rule of thumb the speed for such devices is internal flash>CF card~USB drive*>>SD card

The internal memory of the iPhone is compact flash, and with a high-speed interface I would expect, so it's expected to be massively faster than a SD card. By a factor 10 at the very least I would guess. Again, for most uses it probably won't be noticeable very often especially on a phone. For example my Pi can stream 720p video seamlessly from a relatively low-speed (class4) SD card.

*both USB devices and CF cards speeds vary enormously depending on the interface, the storage hardware and the iteration, so they leapfrog each other on a regular basis; they are not usually direct competitors though, so the comparison is not really relevant)

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Your chance to WIN the WORLD'S ONLY HANDHELD ZX SPECTRUM

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Can we be told ......

I assume you want these data to calculate your chances of getting your mitts on the sweet, sweet bo[ou]nty

A good rule of thumb for this kind of questions is "not a fucking chance in hell".

Didn't prevent me from entering the draw though.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Happy

Re: In order to stand a chance at winning

Admittedly it would be funnier if there was a bonus for the most entertaining combination in answers. With a short text explaining the choices of course, perhaps Fry-Style.

Still entered the expected answers (I think) because, well, DO WANT!

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Getting to the BOTTOM of the great office seating debate

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Buy a proper camera FFS

Were these snaps taken through a 18th century handcrafted wine decanter?

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Man buys iPHONE 6 and DROPS IT to SMASH on PURPOSE

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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The downside of using "good" materials

Not taking any side here, but the strong selling point of the iPhone is its luxury feel, coming from the use of materials that feel sturdy. That is exemplified time and time again when fanbois deride the competition: the first argument they use is usually "cheap plastic feel".

Thing is, when you drop a "cheap plastic" shell, its deformation will absorb and spread a lot of the shock and keep the rigid screen relatively protected. The case might also get a dent in the process, but usually not even. The (more rigid) metal back may pop off if present, but pick the thing from the ground, reassemble as needed and you're good to go.

Now when you drop a sturdy-feely rigid case it won't deform (it may dent but that doesn't dissipate nearly as much energy). So the shock is transmitted in full to the gorilla glass, which is many things but not flexible. >SCHATTARZZZ<

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Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Yup, back to normal soon methink. Although...

If Apple's PR dept blew a fuse over "snow lepperd", I don't think "fruity führer" will do their arteries any good.

But El Reg now has considerably more clout than back then; it's recognised as one of the leading tech publications in the English*-speaking world. So perhaps Apple will be willing to let a few disparaging comments slip through...

*English and related languages such as Strine or Murkin.

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I saved Bitcoin and the PERFECT DRAFT OF HISTORY, says Assange

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Book promotion...

True except for the bit about Bush. I'm pretty sure he never wrote a book. Proof: the book is not written upside down

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Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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What is this "TV" thing the guy is referring to?

TV? Stuck in the 70s? Seriously?

Nowadays almost everyone I know (bar the really old) have a huge-ass monitor stuck on the wall (or a projector) through which they, in turn, channel the output of a digital tuner (with autorecord, replay, ad skipping etc), their computer, their phone, a gaming console or 3, the content of a USB stick or the SD card with their holiday snaps to name but a few. Some are stuck with a traditional remote control for everything, which sucks -although less than the ATV one- but most also have a wireless keyboard with touchpad too (and of course the consoles' own controllers for appropriate situations).

Perhaps Cook's TV is stuck in the 70s. That's not a problem any new tat from Apple can solve.

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Hey, scammers. Google's FINE with your dodgy look-a-like apps

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Google apparently sells a lot of things too

I keep receiving all these adds from the fine chaps at ads.google.com. There must be a fierce competiton though, because the guys at Bing and at Yahoo! appear to stock approximately the same goods.

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iPhone 6: Advanced features? Pah! Nexus 4 had most of them in 2012

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Speak about your personal experience

"Speak about your personal experience and use and get downvoted. That is the ElReg way these days I'm afraid."

What the fluking flack? The post in question is not a "p ersonal experience" or anything about the device use but a direct and gratuitous attack on a competitor. It's been downvoted instead of being reported as abusive, that's already quite lenient; what are you complaining about?

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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@cambsukguy Re: Take my money! Oh, you're too busy... @h4rm0ny

Yup, works pretty well for hard-discount shops around the world. It's the Online-shop-without-delivery model.

Good value for money usually. Also, fast service. No comment.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Take my money! Oh, you're too busy...

" There's an app for that. Run up the Apple Store app, scan the barcode of the item you want to buy, fill in your Apple password, wait for confirmation and walk out of the store with it in hand."

Funny that, there's a tech store near my place that works like that (but better because they offer the same through a standard web interface, not just a silly app).

They do it to keep the costs down: it's a heavy-discount store. Glad to see Apple keeping up with the "premium" image...

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Take my money! Oh, you're too busy...

Same experience here. Both times I entered an Apple store to buy something I ended up leaving empty-handed, cursing them for the lost 45 minutes on my lunchtime, and buying the stuff in 10 minutes in a "regular" shop.

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Sun's MASSIVE solar storm belch to light up Earth's skies

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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@ Tom Re: Dear Americans,

So you'll start doing proper science when we start using improper spelling?

I can't see a problem with that... (notice how CNN says "English" units were at fault despite said units being specific to the USA? Interesting innit.)

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: theregister.co.UK

"When the ESA is monitoring these things and releasing press releases, they can (and presumably will be) Eurocentric. When JAXA does them, the maps will likely be centered on Asia. "

You'd think that, heh? Well, you'd be wrong. The "only us" mentality on that kind of subject is pretty much specific to the USA. Scientific reports on worldwide phenomena from that strange RestOfTheWorld country ALWAYS give data for the whole blue-orb-thinggie, because it's the sciencey thing to do. What's more, even NEWS REPORTS local to this strange RestOfTheWorld country almost always mentions the consequences on other RestOfTheWorld parts*. Not to mention the USA which always get prominent mentions as should be, The One Country That Matters and all that. So now, you know.

*I know, I know, it may come as a surprise for you, but RestOfTheWorldians sometimes feel different from each other. Fools the lot of them.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: theregister.co.UK

Most definitely south. Although not quite directly so.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Climate Change

> don't see or hear any actual scientists claiming that solar phenomena have anything to do with Earth's atmospheric chemistry,

There's a rather huge pile of actual scientists claiming that solar phenomena and Earth atmospheric chemistry are closely linked actually. In fact, not a single real scientist would deny that. Ask them. Where do you think ozone comes from?

On a more controversial, banned-from-BBC-airtime note, there's also ample evidence that sun flares are the single major factor influencing Earth climate (and thus, as a consequence, CO2 and methane concentration in the atmosphere).Of course it's easier to prove on a small timescale as flares are temporally well-defined phenomena, so it may be just that.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Only the US?

Is it going to be only visible in the US and only affect the US grid, or is it another case of only-US-mattersitis?

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spɹɐʍʞɔɐB writing is spammers' new mail filter avoidance trick

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: Odd...

"Plus, don't use an email program that renders HTML. That's probably the second most stupid thing you can do"

I use an email reader that renders HTML... but I do tell it to not do so. It nicely translates the bold to *bold*, the italics to /italics/ and the <span style="text-decoration:underline;"> underline </span>* to _underline_ for me and that's it. I do sometimes miss out on the "included the latest 10-page memo (relevant line in red)" type of message, and the tables directly pasted from MSExcel to MSExchange are often mangled, but it's well worth it.

*Hu? That was supposed to work... well, you get the idea

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
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Re: How long did it take the Editor to write that title?

Tech site. Pro'lly was faster to implement than to come up with.

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Apple's Watch is basically electric perfume

ElReg!comments!Pierre
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I'm sorry you ARE required to know your way around basic maintenance

CU20 Using a vehicle with defective parts or accessories

CU30 Using a vehicle with defective tyres

So I should have been more precise: you're not under any bligation to know how to change a bulb: you always have the option of parking your vehicle right away and finishing your journey on foot.

You may also want to have a look at these:

https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-maintenance-safety-security

https://www.gov.uk/rules-drivers-motorcyclists-89-to-102/vehicle-condition-89

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