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* Posts by Brian Miller 1

85 posts • joined 22 Jun 2009

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Tesla's TOP SECRET gigafactories: Lithium to power world's vehicles? Let's do the sums

Brian Miller 1

Asteroid mining

Surely as has been pointed out, at some point we will hopefully be pulling down resources from NEO's and the like. Musk is working on that concurrently.

So, while hundreds of "gigafactories" might be envisaged, not all of the resources are necessarily earthbound.

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Unions mull appetite for HP strike action over 16k job cull

Brian Miller 1

What do they think all the staff will do?

Can they not see that the huge amount of skilled staff will likely start there own IT businesses, Increasing the competition. Even if they do not collectively start their own, it is their competitors which will soak up the skilled folk.

It seems totally barmy.

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Truck-sized asteroid slips silently between Moon and Earth

Brian Miller 1

Hmmmm salt pinch

According to this impact effect calculator: http://impact.ese.ic.ac.uk/cgi-bin/crater.cgi?dist=0.1&diam=15&pdens=3000&pdens_select=8000&vel=51&theta=90&tdens=2750&tdens_select=0

It would break up into fragments and would not leave a significant crater. This is assuming that it is made of Iron, travelling as fast as a comet and impacting @ 90deg or straight through the shortest part of the atmosphere (the worst case).

Not even a megaton of energy energy in the airburst.

I don't know what the source is for this but perhaps it assumes we have no atmosphere to protect us. Not really that newsworthy if you ask me.

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Mt Gox's 'transaction malleability' claim rubbished by researchers

Brian Miller 1

check your "facts"

I fail to see any facts in your statement. Here are some of my own.

Fact: Mt. Gox was the 7th largest public exchange at the time of its troubles.

Fact: Bitcoin protocol was not the issue. Mt. Gox re-wrote the open source BTC wallet code badly, enabling this exploit.

Fact: You know very little about what you speak.

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MtGox fallout bogs down Bitcoin traders as malleability issue goes mainstream

Brian Miller 1

@asdf

What a silly thing to say. Do you not remember when the new york stock exchange ground to a halt and ceased trading. Any large exchange experiencing issues immediately affects the market. If you think about cryptocurrencies more like stocks as opposed to a spendable fiat currency you will be better set to understand what is happening.

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Judge orders probe over Samsung execs viewing secret Apple docs

Brian Miller 1

Sounds like a biased judge

If the judge has already decided that samsung is the fox and that apple is the chicken, then I would say that they will not receive a fair trial. Innocent until proven guilty and all that.

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Upgraded 3D printed rifle shoots 14 times before breaking

Brian Miller 1

Re: inevitable

The main concern I have is that with ballistics analyses you can identify and link weapons to crimes. Some guns are even traceable. If someone with nefarious intent can print a one shot weapon, use it to assassinate/murder someone and then dissolve it away in a matter of hours in a solvent, then collecting the evidence needed to convict someone becomes a lot harder.

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Police 'stumped' by car thefts using electronic skeleton key

Brian Miller 1

Re: Frequency Scanning

I disagree, if it was the code being sent then the lights would flash and you would be able to use any door. As I just mentioned I believe it is an inductive loop "charger" jury rigged with a camera "flash" capacitor to spike a current to the solenoid. This also explains why it takes a short time to trigger, the capacitor has to charge up from the battery.

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Brian Miller 1

Inductive charger jury rigged to fire door unlock solenoid?

It could be as simple as using a "wireless charger" inductive loop to produce a 12V pulse to the door solenoid.

It certainly looks as though you have to be very close to the car door to get it to unlock. These things have only just started being popular and I have seen a lot of people asking for them to make one for cars.

Unsurprisingly the manufacturers have no plans to make these for cars as the INDUCE VOLTAGES TO NEARBY WIRING, duh. The great unwashed clearly has no idea about physics.

Anyway. I bet you that is what it is. It will only unlock cars with central/power locking and only if they place it near where the solenoid is.

I don't know for sure why it would disable an alarm, but it probably would fry a good amount of IC's. I assume that there are mechanisms in place in ECU's to protect electronics from noise and power surges. Perhaps it has the benefit of tripping circuit protection.

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Hot new battery technologies need a cooling off period

Brian Miller 1
Mushroom

Releasing _Pure Oxygen when charging?

That sounds like a fire risk to me. Anyone remember the Gemini Rocket? Pure O2 is pretty dangerous.

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P2P badboys The Pirate Bay kicked out of Greenland: Took under 48 hours

Brian Miller 1
Stop

Re: Tiny?

There are only 3 countries in north america so coming last place is nothing to write about. Most Europeans consider mexico part of central america. If you are not of that opinion it is still 3rd of 4.

It is less than 1/3rd the size of australia. The ridiculous landmass you speak of is actually a product of the way we map the globe to a flat surface. If you look on google maps for example it appears as large as USA and canada combined. This is bullshit.

Anyway it is smallish. Roughly 12th in the world. Brazil and argentina both have its number. Anyway, I am sure they meant small in terms of population.

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Soot forces temperatures more than thought: AGU

Brian Miller 1
Stop

I thought soot was a cooling factor due to global dimming

Yeah a lot of research says the exact opposite of this. Check out global dimming. It was suggested that the droughts in north eastern africa were partially due to the european area suddenly changing the air pollution laws, stoppping clouds from being seeded and allowing more sunlight to reach the surface.

This was big news a way back when. Now we are told that it makes the earth warmer. Colour me unconvinced.

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Intel uncloaks 'highest performance' desktop processor

Brian Miller 1

In depth review already available

They have its speeds and feeds, benches etc at toms hardware...

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-3970x-sandy-bridge-e-benchmark,3348.html

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Inside the iPad mini: Pray you never have to open one

Brian Miller 1
Stop

Actually a two speaker system can still be mono

Having 2 speakers does not a stereo make. The channels on stereo carry seperate audio information to allow the listener to hear the sounds coming from different places. A "3d" effect for the ears so to speak.

You can simply duplicate the mono information adn send it down two channels but that is not stereo sound. It is mono over two speakers.

I do not know if the device is mono or not but your assertion that two speakers == stereo is false.

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Unconsenting Facebookers exposed by Beacon denied payouts

Brian Miller 1
Devil

Sick the lawyers on em

What we will have now is the plaintiffs sueing their own lawyers, with a whole new bunch of lawyers.

Thus the cycle continues.

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Korean boffins discover secret to quick-charge batteries

Brian Miller 1

There is a problem that is a corollary to fast charge...

It is the fast DISCHARGE of the battery. In the event of a short circuit they tend to explode rather than just catch fire. This coupled with normal protection mechanisms not working in those circumstances (too slow) can really put a downer on someones day (life).

But hey, a short circuit can't happen in a car crash.... oh wait.

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Lenovo CEO Yang doles out US$3m bonus to staff

Brian Miller 1

Honestly some people

This is equivalent to a months salary in China. It was never reported to be performance related other than for the CEO hitting targets, for the average worker I think this is a very generous and kind gesture.

I honestly can't believe the negative responses of a lot of the commenters. Keep it up Yang! I think what you did was really nice. More wealthy people should behave like this. I am sure you will reap the benefits of an encouraged and happy workforce.

BOO HISS to the negatrons.....

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So you wanna be a Wall Street techie? Or anyway, get paid a lot

Brian Miller 1
Thumb Up

I think the right answer to all of those things is...

"GOOGLE IT".

Then explain how a search engine can go about analysing the question to come up with an accurate answer or set of answers.

For example whether it means "tuning forks" or "professional piano tuners".

It can index all the businesses it has in it's databases and come to a figure that is representative of what is known. i.e. number of listings that exactly match or 98% match with added keywords present. etc.etc.

Then your interviewer knows that you can make a search function that will meet customer expectations.

Swish...

Nothing but net!

HIRE ME GOOGLE!!!!

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Gov mulls ban on wallet-draining charges for card payments

Brian Miller 1

Paypal might be screwed too

I wonder if they will increase listing fees to combat this?

It basically takes away all Paypals profits.

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German KIT v Fighting Seawolves in student cluster deathmatch

Brian Miller 1

FPGA's FTW

If it truly is a "bring anything" game having someone get heavy with FPGA's would be a treat.

I am interested in what hardware they are actually using. Anywhere we can go to see that?

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The incredible shrinking NAND: I'm MEELLLLTING

Brian Miller 1
Stop

Economy of Scale?

Hang on a minute??? Doesn't economy of scale come into it at all? It works like this you see. Making anything is limited by the resources allocated to it's production. As the whole world now actually knows, SSD's may cost more to make than spinning magneto-drives, but this is in large part to there being incumbents in the HD game with huge manufacuring facilities that have already paid for themselves and need minimal change to change to newer technologies (slowly).

And the fact that people have shown that they are willing to pay more for better storage? So driving cost to the ground isn't really the be all and end all of flash is it? Having more factories set up and taking ever increasing share of the spinning disk market is the future. The "areal density" or equivalent is already reaching parity with spinning discs (they still have room to play with for cramming more in if they go to a 3.5" form factor). It may cost more but people will still buy them and THAT is what is important to BUSINESSES.

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AMD and Nvidia extreme GPUs workout

Brian Miller 1
Stop

Re: Nice

You will find actually that the way they got so much grunt is by crippling the GPGPU compute parts for the 680 onwards.... They are gamer cards strictly and hobbled for compute.

And re: BenR ^^

These cards are also designed to allow actual gaming on tri-screen setups. It is not too much to ask for them to include triple monitor resolutions as I am certain they own 3 monitors.

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'Super-powerful' Flame worm actually boring BLOATWARE

Brian Miller 1
FAIL

Re: Kaspersky employee Aleks's blog on securelist is worth reading over

Your 2nd point is EXACTLY what my first thoughts were when the author plays down the infection rates.

If it is capable of erasing it's presence and has had at least 2 years, maybe 5 years to spread and gobble info, the fact that only 1000 concurrent infections have been verified means FA.

If the "insert large governmental institution of your choice" had 1000 people each tasked with slurping the useful stuff off a machine each day, then spreading and finding the most interesting one the next day lets do the math:

1000 * 5 (working days a week) * 48 (working weeks a year) * 5 (years) = 6 million possible machines infected at this work rate.

So that is in the same order of magnitude as conficker etc. Of course I have zero evidence to back this up, however Mr. Author, you also have zero evidence the impact was so small and benign.

And what is this about wiper? It strikes me that if you didn't want to bring in 1000 people on this you could easily have your corporate hacker team write a script to very much automate the infect, check pc for keywords/data types, spread, delete self routine and maybe hit every "connected" machine on earth in the same timescale. Maybe this script is also pretty smart and happens to go by the "Wiper" name?

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Raspberry Pi supplier coughs to ship date delay glitch

Brian Miller 1
FAIL

CE is Self-Certified

CE marking does not absolutely require any agency outside of the manufacturer to test the items for compliance.

You can self certify, basically just writing a declaration of conformance.

It is if you are challenged that you need to produce evidence of compliance (in the form of test results etc.)

For example all the powerline networking kit that are blatantly NOT EMC compliant all have CE certification (from manufacturer). Look at how they have been made to stop selling taht kit after complaints..Oh wait.

It is a useless system that does nothing to protect consumers. It is just a theatrical show.

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Braben sticks knife into secondhand games market

Brian Miller 1
FAIL

Wait WHAT?

You imply that by sharing their revenue (that with the highest profit margin) they would have somehow have had more money? How did you work that out genius?

And if you can finish a title to satisfaction in a week or less then it is a problem with the GAME, not the sales channel. Most new games are crap compared to the old classics.

To be successful you have to have great gameplay, plenty content and a hook of some kind that keeps you going back for more.

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Seagate strikes trillion bit HAMR blow

Brian Miller 1
Stop

I am of the opinion

Surely there would in fact be an improvment in IO. When spinning at similar RPM's the read head should pass 20x more data at any given location on the disk purely because the density is increased.

It happen with PMR, transfer rates went up significantly. I think that it wont scale exactly to match the increased density but there should be some improvement.

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Microsoft slashes Office 365 prices

Brian Miller 1
Windows

Aren't their refunds based on cost of package?

Haven't they just had a major outage (8 hours) recently? Don't they refund their customers based on a percentage of cost of the service?

So by lowering the cost of the service plan they can now be liable for a much lower cost for the failure to deliver the contracted uptime....

They can sell this to try to attract more into the cloudy fold too (P.T. Barnum states that they will actually do this quite successfully)

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Warp drives are PLANET KILLERS, Sydney Uni students find

Brian Miller 1
Go

Or....

Travel in lots of very short pulses such that you never build up an amount that would produce very harmful emissions.

squirt squirt squirt, each time radiating most of the build up.

It may take a little longer, but if you can make it interstellar without frying your intended hosts that would be rather more polite...

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Zuck plots carefully considered Facebook IPO

Brian Miller 1
Alert

don't forget that user base

A lot of the users might grow concerned about the pressure to increase profits/monetization when it goes public. I know I am.

I think it might lead to a general reduction of users if it is seen as needing to live up to a huge valuation. They will start pushing crap or selling more and more personal info.

I still don't know how they afford the running costs let alone pull in a profit. Is it purely through ads and games? I have never spent a penny on it and I don't plan to.

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HTC Explorer budget smartphone

Brian Miller 1
FAIL

It sounds almost the same as a galaxy europa...

But the europa costs £50 new (from 3 store)

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Oz skeptic offers prize if Rossi’s E-cat works

Brian Miller 1
FAIL

"pseudo sceptical debunkers"? What does that even mean?

A few things I would like to say.

@ Amanfromearth vs AC "peer review". - Neither of the links come from peer reviewed journals. The Purdue Uni paper is unpublished. Also it doesn't have any mathematics in it at all to back up anything that is written. The author makes bold statements without reference to the actual calculations used to predict temperatures where reaction could occur for example. The blogspot article has maths to back it up and relevant observations of misleading/misunderstood basic scientific principles from the inventor.

As per title, what the hell is a pseudo sceptic? somebody who doesn't believe, but really they do because they are faking their disbelief? And if they are a debunker that implies some form of historical success at debunking, meaning that they have already achieved their goal.

If anything it is the attitude and fanaticism of the supporters that make me think this is a hoax. When people bring emotions into physics you know that they are either clueless or fraudsters.

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Man fights felony hacking charge for accessing wife's email

Brian Miller 1

Google Permission VS. Marriage Vows

So let me get this straight... Some people think that because you click a tiny little box saying that you read the T&C's (which you didn't) that makes it ok for them to do what they want with your personal info....

But, standing in front of all of your collective friends and family and vowing to be faithful, trusting and sharing of your WHOLE LIFE, then signing a document to that effect, does not give the partner the right to look at personal info?

Wow...... They say the pen is mighter than the sword, now apparently the check box beats pen hands down.

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Boffins: Japan was hit by 'double-wave' tsunami

Brian Miller 1
Go

Well, maybe nukes have some uses then...

Perhaps changing the undersea topology would act to prevent this type of tsunami being able to be come about.

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World may be short 70 MILLION disk drives

Brian Miller 1
Mushroom

Hybrid Disks = FAIL

Title says it all. RIP spinning magneto drive... Hello FLASH (AAAAHHH aHHHH, he'll save every one of us!)

request flash gordon emoticon...

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Telcos snub UK.gov broadband cash pot

Brian Miller 1
Stop

@TheManCalledStan

Well, BT are legally required to connect a telephone line to any residence or premises in the UK. This is despite the lack of an economic case for doing so based on the usage that the line will have.

Undoubtedly this has proven beneficial in the long run, people in the countryside can phone the emergency services for example when they are required. During the war (WWII) I am sure that having telephone lines run throughout the nation saved a great number of british lives etc etc etc.

It is expected that people have sufficient access to communications technology in this day and age. You can't just leave out people because they live in rural surroundings. They after all are the people who FEED everyone. So I think the business case isn't really that relevant. The money is there to subsidise this rollout to an extent and if the terms being made by BT are blocking the utility and implementation then they should be pressured into making the terms more attractive. 'Nuff said.

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Natwest net and phone banking goes titsup

Brian Miller 1

RBS is also down

The Royal Bank of Scotland is also down at the moment with the same message. Natwest is now just a part of RBS so it makes sense that they are all down together.

Frustrating stuff, but as long as my money is still there after I am ok about it. just a few years ago we didn't even have ibanking etc. so whatever.

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Royal Navy halts Highlands GPS jamming

Brian Miller 1
Stop

Radio Jamming

I am pretty sure that "radio jamming" actually throws out LOADS of frequencies and is not just targeted at one specific band. That would be a pretty inefficient way to disrupt "enemy" comms. as they can just change band, and hey presto!

I am not at all suprised that military grade jammers knock out damn near everything. This will be why it is dangerous.

The writer is presumably unaware of this.

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Bargain-basement botnet kit – yours for just €5

Brian Miller 1
Thumb Down

Probably Leeching off of his user base

I bet he is trying to get as many people as possible out there to start infecting machines for the Seller themself to use.

Why bother doing the dirty work when you can make money by selling the kit and then backdoor into all of the machines infected by his buyers.

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Mars trips could blind astronauts

Brian Miller 1

Well, gee, they just have to simulate gravity then huh?

I would have expected NASA to construct the manned section of the vessel as a toroid or cylinderand rotate the section such that the centripital force approximates 1g.

Is it just me or wasn't this approach WIDELY publicised in 2001: A Space Odyssey?

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Three in ten Americans urge feds to read their email

Brian Miller 1
Paris Hilton

Quite a small sample size

The sample size is really very small, and it doesn't sound randomised either. It is easy to prove an outrageous conclusion in any study by carefully selecting your sample group.

But yeah, I would say that there really are too many people that have this sort of attitude. Around 50% is a figure I would debate, or at least scrutinise closely.

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US and Russia to give uranium to ANYONE

Brian Miller 1
Mushroom

I do believe that they have Uranium Mines in Iran

Two anyway. Although about a quarter of the the worlds supply is refined in close by Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan.

Why is it that there is absolutely no concerns about them I wonder? Maybe the west can't admit that Iran has had pretty harsh treatment from us in the recent past.

I think we should not be ruled by fear. If we think about the realistic probabilities that even if Iran made some nukes, and then actually used them on civilians anywhere in the world, how likely is it that the retaliation in kind from everyone would simply make Iran a "once was" country.

Yeah, same goes for North Korea. If they nuke someone, expect the whole country to win a darwin award. I think that mostly the people there are intelligent enough to see that.

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London rioters should 'loose all benefits'

Brian Miller 1
Alert

Anyone have any Ideas that don't include Genocide?

It seems to me that at least most people here are agreed that these people aren't really people, just mere scum to be flicked off of your boots.

Some great ideas:

Cancel benifits to those that choose to have children. So in other words kill the scums babies by starvation, a particularly cruel method.

Shoot them all (if only there was a way to distinguish them with 100% accuracy)

Make them get a job to repay the damage.... get a job or starve (but wouldn't repaying the damage mean that if they got a job they STILL wouldn't have money?)

Send them all to death camps! (worked out so well for Hitler and the Nazis)

I am starting to think it might just be easier to kill all the rich people to stop them complaining, there are after all a lot fewer of them and they tend to be so soft and fat and squidgy. Could maybe even temporarily put off the energy crisis. Fat Boy Biodiesel anyone?

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Will the looters 'loose' their benefits?

Brian Miller 1

From Wikipedia "french revolution"

Economic factors included hunger and malnutrition in the most destitute segments of the population, due to rising bread prices (from a normal 8 sous for a four-pound loaf to 12 sous by the end of 1789),[3] after several years of poor grain harvests. Bad harvests (caused in part by extreme weather from El Niño along with volcanic activity at Laki and Grímsvötn), rising food prices, and an inadequate transportation system that hindered the shipment of bulk foods from rural areas to large population centers contributed greatly to the destabilization of French society in the years leading up to the Revolution.

Another cause was the state's effective bankruptcy due to the enormous cost of previous wars, particularly the financial strain caused by French participation in the American Revolutionary War. The national debt amounted to some 1,000–2,000 million[citation needed] livres. The social burdens caused by war included the huge war debt, made worse by the loss of France's colonial possessions in North America and the growing commercial dominance of Great Britain. France's inefficient and antiquated financial system was unable to manage the national debt, something which was both partially caused and exacerbated by the burden of an inadequate system of taxation. To obtain new money to head off default on the government's loans, the king called an Assembly of Notables in 1787.

Meanwhile, the royal court at Versailles was seen as being isolated from, and indifferent to, the hardships of the lower classes. While in theory King Louis XVI was an absolute monarch, in practice he was often indecisive and known to back down when faced with strong opposition. While he did reduce government expenditures, opponents in the parlements successfully thwarted his attempts at enacting much needed reforms. Those who were opposed to Louis' policies further undermined royal authority by distributing pamphlets (often reporting false or exaggerated information) that criticized the government and its officials, stirring up public opinion against the monarchy.[4]

Does anyone here see some worrying similarities? Financial Crisis, Destitution, Bankruptcy from running expensive unpopular wars, Government indifference and isolation from the poor?

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DIY aerial drone monitors Wi-Fi, GSM networks

Brian Miller 1
Stop

Settle down Jimbo

It amazes me how so much managed to pass you by.

It uses a 4g command and control system, and is AUTOMATED, as in the pilot issues instructions only, not direct control of the flaps/throttle etc.

It doesn't need to operate at 22,000 feet, that is the highest it can reach if you instruct it to go as high as possible, suspiciously few wifi nodes up that high.

It as previously mentioned doesn't crack the WPA "on the fly". I just captures enough info to crack it later.

The point is that it can just fly around (anywhere with 4G reception) collecting the data needed to crack LOT's of infrastructure controlled from anywhere that is internet connected. A truly sneaky and assuredly REAL development. Disbelieve at your peril. RTFM.

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Sorry, time travelers, you’re still just fiction

Brian Miller 1
Alert

No joke

It would be very hard to disprove the hypothesis that the "wave front" isn't moving faster than light as has been mentioned that it may result in the effect hitting at exactly the same time as it moved itself very slightly backwards in time to sit exactly where it was before exceeding lightspeed.

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UK Channel insolvency rates soar to nine-year high

Brian Miller 1

"Consumers are holding onto their cash" LOLASAURUS

Or rather, the number of consumers is greatly decreased because they have no cash. The government is taking it all in taxes.

Income tax + NI= 33% (for most people) or %45 for those lucky enought to have a good job

VAT: %20

Council Tax: ~ %10 for low wage earners

TV tax: + 140 quid a year, now payable even if you only have a computer and net access

Drinking and smoking: Variable rate but not less than 15%

Fuel: 42% of purchase price

Car Tax: couple of hundred quid minimum (for a proper car)

Anyway I think you can see where I am going with this. Westminster takes the vast majority of everybody's money and pisses it all over the place on idiot contracts with there friends, paying the heads of quangos (more nepotism).

My advice, Run for fucking office and hope to god you can convince the suckers that live here that you really do deserve to take over %80 of their earnings for very poor services in return.

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Engineering student cracks major riddle of the universe

Brian Miller 1
Boffin

Ummm, having read the paper

They have not given any sort of analyses about how much mass the filaments constitute as a total of how much mass we expect there to be in the universe.

It also appears that these filaments were already "known" to exist. So its not even like they discovered them.

So please can you show me the calculations that indicate that all the "missing mass" is accounted for by these findings?

Don't get me wrong, the paper is well written and obviously significant to be published in this prestigious journal, but this story is WAY to sensational for what the paper actually states. Is she a friend of yours perhaps?

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NHS IT dino-project NPfIT should be killed off - NAO

Brian Miller 1
Grenade

Electronic care records allow better patient care

End of story. I am refering to the observations made in superfreakonomics that when doctors in ER didn't have access to a patients data in 1 place they spent 95% of their time managing information, i.e. finding test results, phoning other departments/GP practices etc. and only 5% of their time treating patients

When an IT system (now called amalgum) was installed they spent 40% of their time actually treating patients. The savings on costs and lives was massive.

So this project is expensive. I know I would like my doctor treating my ills in an emergency than on the phone checking if I am allergic to anything etc. (I am not, so just give me the F*cking DRUGS etc. etc.) Especially so when I am KO'd and about to die.

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Vote now for the best sci-fi film never made

Brian Miller 1
Thumb Up

@ Trevor3

Damn,

Bill the galactic hero is another fantastic HH book. Could be HILARIOUS

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Brian Miller 1
Welcome

perhaps we should use

The alternative voting system where we rank our top five and they get counted like the new voting system.

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