* Posts by Adrian Midgley 1

215 posts • joined 19 Jun 2009

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Linux 4.2 release 'possible' for next week, if Linus feels good

Adrian Midgley 1

I'd prefer to have it right rather than

soon, but you can have it now of course, just download the current RC.

CEOs do tend to lie about things, no?

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Windows 10 marks the end of 'pay once, use forever' software

Adrian Midgley 1

Pay never and use forever sound good?

Since 1984, GNU.

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Exploding Power Bars: EE couldn't even get the CE safety mark right

Adrian Midgley 1

fonts and such

I'm interested in the things blowing up.

I'm not interested in the font.

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Space Station 'nauts dive for cover from flying Soviet junk

Adrian Midgley 1

there isn't a one way system, but almost everything in orbit

was put there going the same way round[1].

What differs is the inclination of the orbits, up to about 90 degrees if you consider polar orbits, but mostly only a few degrees.

[1] Because the delta-V is 2000mph less if you launch with the Earth's rotation from the equator than if you launch against it.

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Privacy campaigners question credibility of NHS ‘endorsed’ apps

Adrian Midgley 1

Optimism

We've known for generations how to prevent many illnesses, and not only is this poorly applied by the people who have to apply it - the people - but they elect governments that will sell off school playing fields ...

Rapid high-tech fixes for specific conditions whether inherited or acquired are more in the arena of healthcare, or medicine, and while personal data and opinionated systems with hinting engines may well be interesting, the data doesn't need to be collected on everyone in advance to make it work.

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Police robot duo storm Colorado house, end four-day siege

Adrian Midgley 1

It isn't clear what

they wanted to grab him for.

Did they say?

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UK.gov confirms it's binned extended Windows XP support

Adrian Midgley 1

Re: What next ?

No. Although as always people who can make headings out of big bold text will believe their familiarity should lead IT policy for others...

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Malfunctioning Russian supply podule EXPLODES above Pacific

Adrian Midgley 1

You think it will come straight down?

onto the terminal below it, which has been constructed with the knowledge that a break is possible, and that that will cause severe damage?

It won't come straight down.

The cable low down is quite light.

Avoiding putting things in one direction along the plane of the cable - in an area which is likely to be mostly water - doesn't seem a major task.

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Adrian Midgley 1

Re: @Remy: There is extensive

prior work on this.

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Millions of voters are missing: It’s another #GovtDigiShambles

Adrian Midgley 1

But a (voting) poll

is also a counting of heads.

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Siri, you're fired: Microsoft Cortana's elbows into iOS, Android

Adrian Midgley 1

Bob has had

a sex change.

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ICO's data protection tentacles will penetrate NHS bodies

Adrian Midgley 1

you don't like NHS websites, and want all GPs to have them?

I don't want someone else either passing off a website as my Practices (NHS "Choices" has come rather close to that for many years actually, have you not seen it?) nor do I wish anyone to declare that I have to use a specific platform provided by someone else for my business website.

Back when GPs started adding themselves and their practices to the Web, last century, most of the Web was "amateur". The professional bit tends to be shiny twinkly bits, active code that executes on other people's computers, and links to as many paying services as can be squeezed in, with a dash of bait and switch aka search engine optimisation.

Now if you meant proper metadata, design according to user metrics and usability testing rather than marketing and graphics people, perhaps professionalism would be good.

Prescription requests come through services provided centrally by suppliers of GP software - all clsoed source stuff alas - are not email (although were you to choose to email us and ask, should we refuse on the grounds that you are not applying to yourself the level of security that we would apply to you?) and are available widely. Same for appointments, although most of our patients ring us up or walk round the corner and ask.

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Australians! Let us all rise up against data retention

Adrian Midgley 1

Re: @dan or indeed stand...

Surely other people are allowed to stand for your parliaments?

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Claim: Microsoft Alt-F4'd Chilean government open-source install bid

Adrian Midgley 1

This

week.

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Google reveals bug Microsoft says is mere gnat

Adrian Midgley 1

Organising the world's information

seems a clear mission statement.

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Adrian Midgley 1

Isn't that already standard?

better MS fix it, or if it is really of no consequence stop complaining it isn't secret.

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'LOOK into my EYES: You are feeling very worried about the climate ... SO worried'

Adrian Midgley 1

Ships. They don't have thermometers, do they

not on the engine cooling water intakes, and not dipped into buckets from the time of the Royal Society founding onward (one of the early exercises of the R. Soc was to make thermometers, and one of the early uses was to put them on HM ships, and write the readings in the logs which sit in the Admiralty.

ZThomm, were you drunk when you wrote that, or what?

If drunk, then tomorrow you may be sober and enlightened or appalled, if not drunk then is it money, or sheer appalling stupidity?

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Adrian Midgley 1

"No thermometers at both Poles."

Really? There's a ring of flags at the South Pole, and the thermometers are outside them, is that what you mean?

That the base at (where at means within actual walking distance of) the South Pole, where people stay in large numbers all summer, and small numebrs all winter doesn't have a thermometer - everyone agreed perhaps to stick a hand outside and say "we scientists don't nbeed a thermometer to tell us that is COLD, and we don't care how cold it is"?

They are actually on the Internet these days.

www.nsf.gov/geo/plr/support/southp.jsp

I'm amazed you can type.

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Adrian Midgley 1

Why do you pick 20? Although

it has, actually.

Still - facts - science- if you want to believe something else you will.

Just remember that Gandalf and the headmaster are actually us, nowadays.

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Privacy alert: Outlook for iOS does security STUPIDLY, says dev

Adrian Midgley 1

Surprise

For certain very small values of surprise.

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MI5 boss: We NEED to break securo-tech, get 'assistance' from data-slurp firms

Adrian Midgley 1

It was glaring

So not the only one.

W

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NHS refused to pull 'unfit for purpose' Care.data leaflet

Adrian Midgley 1

the minutes have been refused

to a FOI Act request on the grounds they are due for publication

Overdue I think.

The najor failing was the appearance of dishonesty and not listening to people who Di have a clue and/or entirely legitimate views.

The business of sending things - usually a bit late - for mandatory or statutory checking for publucation and at the same time publishing them is pretty standard. I suspect it correlates with a criminal mind, even if the mind involved has not actually committed any overt detectable crimes.

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Reuse the Force, Luke: SpaceX's Elon Musk reveals X-WING designs

Adrian Midgley 1

Water pistols...

Very very small drops of water, projected against the junk.

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Freedom of Info at 10: Tony Blair's WORST NIGHTMARE

Adrian Midgley 1

Probably because

you use MS Word etc and keep a horde of unconnected documents.

Building an information system or knowledge system would have been a good first step.

But MS looked to people buying things as thoguh they understood it, and Word docs look to the administrata as though they are useful pictures of documents...

The coffee machine cleaning probably isn't management information, and won't be collected never mind collating. Cleaning costs for the canteen, possibly, cleaning costs overall certainly, in whatever degree of detail the management of the hospital and their outsourced cleaner management company find useful in setting and paying bills, certainly is, and it seems likely it would be better managed if this is information kept in an organised form and thus trivially available.

Is it more or less than other hospitals? Is the result cleaner or dirtier? THat sounds like interesting tuff to know.

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Open Source's 2014: MS 'cancer' embrace, NASDAQ listings and a quiet dog

Adrian Midgley 1

You want part of it refactored in a language you know and approve of ...

you refactor it.

Nobody can stop you from doing that.

Now try that with closed soruce.

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Care.data's a good thing? Tell us WHY, thunders watchdog

Adrian Midgley 1

Given no permission

is what he means.

So if they (or even we) share some of it, we must do so under some power, or for obvious benefit to him (as doctors have from time to time done in the last few millenia) and cannot say "you have allowed us to do whatever we like" in response to a question.

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Judge spanks SCO in ancient ownership of Unix lawsuit

Adrian Midgley 1

Presumably Mr mcbride has previously

run a company doing useful things for a profit?

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Orion: To Mars, the Moon and beyond... but first, a TEST FLIGHT through Van Allen belt

Adrian Midgley 1

Flying...

So the ISS is flying?

The essence of flying is that it uses aerodynamic forces to control direction.

Hence the altitude at which spaceflight (as NASA seem to call it) supplants atmospheric flight (at that altitude the speed required to fly on aerodynamic lift exceeds the orbital speed).

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'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described

Adrian Midgley 1

is any use of this legal, by anyone

on anyone, anywhere?

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LIFE, JIM? Comet probot lander found 'ORGANICS' on far-off iceball

Adrian Midgley 1

depends

on nucleic acids, for instance.

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Adrian Midgley 1

big....

as you say.

Really big.

So unlikely things are likely to happen.

Positing instead that something impossible happened is not, Watson, an improvement.

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Adrian Midgley 1

we know it has happened

at least once.

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NASA launches new climate model at SC14

Adrian Midgley 1

from the article ...

this is the observed data, presented...

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NHS slow to react as Windows XP support nears the end

Adrian Midgley 1

Open Source in the NHS 2001

We were working on it then, but the Blair Microsoft Project intervened. Now NPfIT has mutated to CfH and ruthlessly faded out in standard fashion the work is picking up again.

And as noted, FLODS replacements for proprietary systems are happening.

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FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on

Adrian Midgley 1

yes damage

Yes crime I think in UK.

IANAL

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Antarctic ice at ALL TIME RECORD HIGH: We have more to learn, says boffin

Adrian Midgley 1

amount area depth extent...

3 are different and one is poorly defined.

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Hey, non-US websites – FBI don't have to show you any stinkin' warrant

Adrian Midgley 1

illegal abroad surely

Isn't the FBI claiming they can do abroad things which would be illegal for thrmvto do in their own country, and which are rather likely to be illegal - criminal - in the country where the server is?

Odd interpretation.

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Open source and the NHS: Two huge disorganised entities without central control

Adrian Midgley 1

unmemorable numeric string as foreign key

asked of people and typed in to recall records.

The new NHS Number is a 9 digit string + modulo 11 check digit.

It isn't very useful for quick selection from a list. Feel free to work on that.

Most of my patients can have their record called up with 2 letters of surname and 2 of forename.

The NHS number has some odd rules baked in - gender is locked for instance so have a gender change and your identity fails. Clearly this is a business rule somewhere since the number doesn't encode the gender of indeed anything else - unlike the CHI string.

Neither is even slightly useful for effective pseudonymisation.

But one of the more obvious reasons it lsaks in slowly is that these systems are not mostly new ones.

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Adrian Midgley 1

NPfIT failed for other reasons mainly

Including being not very good.

This was partly because it was run by managers who had limited understanding of IT and less of the business; and specified by clueless people from clueless firms.

Talking about medical re odd (what is one of those BTW) rather than automation is tending to be an index of being behind; and a major failure mode is seeing computers as devices with which people can be programmed.

GPs inventented this stuff, put it into operation in their Practices, in several cases actually wrote it, and have now lost control of it to the elements above.

I did play golf, once, in 1974 IIRC which by coincidence was about the time The London Hospital implemented a computer system that was useful on the wards. I have a picture somewhere of the 10 MByte hard drive being craned from its lorry into the building.

The example of the bankers may not be entirely good, but consider the idea that if you want to help someone clever, knowledgeable and hard working to do something they are good at a bit better faster or cheaper you should probably be sitting near them watching and listening, and building software in conversations which occasionally include "make this script work fast and reliably"

You'd better also reflect that much of medicine is nonlinear.

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'I think photographers get TOO MUCH copyright for their work'

Adrian Midgley 1

No it isn't...

"Copyright is a basic property right."

It isn't basic.

It isn't applied to property here, but to information, which is different.

Copyright is supported and enforced by States for benefits to the commonwealth. Where States get captured by companies the commonwealth gets a disbenefit from their extension of copyright.

This thought is CC attribute, modify, commercial.

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Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything

Adrian Midgley 1

Closed source...

Best avoided.

Quite how open source makes support more expensive eludes me.

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Oz fed police in PDF redaction SNAFU

Adrian Midgley 1

Plain Text

has something to be said for it.

What actually do PDFs usually have in them that improves on that?

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It's time for PGP to die, says ... no, not the NSA – a US crypto prof

Adrian Midgley 1

criticism of everything except PGP/GPG is it not?

All his criticisms do not seem to me to be of PGP, or the GnuPG implementation of it, they seem to be statements that email clients that incorporate it don't do it very well.

I'm not convinced that having it built into a complex other piece of software is entirely a good thing, but if someone is going to do that then it is them building it in, not PGP itself that is to be judged.

On the command line it is no more or less unfriendly than various other very precise programs, and the files or pasteable text that result are no harder to email than any other text file.

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Banning handheld phone use by drivers had NO effect on accident rate - study

Adrian Midgley 1

And for other

purposes.

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UK's emergency data slurp: IT giants panicked over 'legal uncertainty'

Adrian Midgley 1

Absence??

In the presence of the directive.

In the face of the directive.

Not in its absence.

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Google: Grab our TOOL if you want your search query quashed

Adrian Midgley 1

claiming ID

It would mean a criminal offence had probably been committed though.

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Boffins say hot air makes Antarctica COLDER

Adrian Midgley 1

models of the world are made from

the world.

Some of them suggest places to look and things to look for.

Some of those suggest ways to make the model a bit better.

Ever made a model of something?

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Up to 500 GP practices to test plans to share patient data

Adrian Midgley 1

Re: Fume cupboard?

If you see it on a screen you have downloaded it to a local machine.

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Fix capitalism with floating cities on Venus says Charles Stross

Adrian Midgley 1

Interstellar economics is the core

plot element in one of his rather good novels, actually.

I tend to the Metric fucktonne which is quite a lot.

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USA opposes 'Schengen cloud' Eurocentric routing plan

Adrian Midgley 1
Linux

SMTP Direct

anyone?

Yes, gnupg of course.

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