* Posts by Paul Shirley

1988 posts • joined 19 Jun 2009

Malware figures out it's running on VMs and refuses to execute

Paul Shirley
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ummm

More detail please.

Does it have to be Word opening them?

What if you delete the history regularly?

Which history is it checking anyway?

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Virgin Media costs balloon by MEEELLIONS in wake of Brexit

Paul Shirley
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Re: Another Illustration of the Fact...

But the affects of the vote in favour of an EU exit are being felt now; the pound has already lost around 10% of it's value against foreign currencies for instance.

Thanks to currency hedging the effects of currency fluctuations aren't being felt by most companies yet and by almost none of the public, to remain competitive companies without protection can't afford to pass on the change till their competitors are equally affected. That won't last forever, effects might even start before A50 is signed.

Most people probably aren't worrying much about the stock market reaction either, after all it panics all the time but more because they forget where their pensions are invested.

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Windows 10 backlash: Which? demands compo for forced upgrades

Paul Shirley
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Re: Two faced Which?

Helping people use a pre-installed clusterfuck OS they will be unable to avoid on new PCs is not endorsement, it's accepting the sad reality that most plebs won't (and probably shouldn't) try to replace what it shipped with. It's an OS even experienced IT folk need internet searches to make sense of and we can't all choose to dump the sorry POS.

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Let's Encrypt won its Comodo trademark battle – but now fan tools must rename

Paul Shirley
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Re: @Paul Shirley Wow

IANAL but it might give Comodo a chance to demand a licence on equivalent terms

Trademark law is explicitly discriminatory in favour of the IP holder with no way to force issue of a licence against their will unless they signed up for something like FRAND in standards licencing or other similar binding commitment. It's purpose is to prevent competitors doing what Comodo tried. Comodo would not have a cause of action to get a trial afaik. In fact they only got this far because LetsEncrypt had not been trademarked, they would have hit a stone wall right away.

Legal costs are a problem but I'd argue a suitably restrictive standard licence would be both unusable by competitors and a visible sign they were protecting the trademark for the courts.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: Wow

I wonder if they even considered licencing the trademark under non transferable terms before taking the nuclear option? Defending does not automatically mean shutting down.

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Google GPS grab felt like a feature, was actually a bug

Paul Shirley
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When even slightly contradicting the editor's obsessive ranting and raving it's probably wise to choose words carefully ;)

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Paul Shirley
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Play is the store app.

Play Services is a support framework, one job it does is mediating access to location to prevent multiple clients hammering the underlying GPS & Wi-Fi hardware. It's meant to reduce battery use. You really want a warning about disabling it.

On Android they're both apps, someone thought they should both be in the app location permission list but took the trouble to add that warning and the confusing ok option. On my phone the location settings button takes me to location settings and happily let me disable them. Be more sensible to not list it with apps perhaps.

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Songsmiths sue US antitrust over Google-friendly rules ruling

Paul Shirley
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Re: There few getting "rich".

Except... The music industry is looking robustly healthy. The artists are a mixed story. Those still participating in it are more screwed than ever, those outside it are doing better than the nothing they had before.

Andrew would do better agitating to reform the whole system instead of picking villains challenging the status quo. Too agitated to see the evil in front of his nose.

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Ad flog Plus: Adblock Plus now an advertising network, takes cash to broker web banners

Paul Shirley
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Re: Isn't this actually what we've all been asking for?

Setting up their own ad broker/server and pre-approved, locally stored content potentially makes injecting malware from compromised sites impossible. They'd need to hack the adblock server or use MITM interception downstream of it.

Acceptable ads promises are warm and fuzzy but the tangled mess of intermediates serving ads prevent it being safe or trustworthy without a system like this. An entire industry needs tearing down and rebuilding with safety as a goal. They won't do it voluntarily, if nothing else this might force their hand.

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Post-Brexit UK.gov must keep EU scientists coming, say boffins

Paul Shirley
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Re: "attracting European students and staff members to the UK was necessary"

"You'll presumably agree that we really shouldn't have given the hoi polloi the vote, when the urban liberals know what's best."

My position is we should allow an informed public to vote. Actual effort has to be made to honestly inform them. That attempts to misinform voters to influence a vote should have career ending penalties or worse. That deliberate media misinformation should have business threatening penalties (and for Europe that needed to start when BJ got his first EU reporting job decades ago).

And in an ideal world we'd also come up with a less damaging way to register protest votes and avoid issue hijacking.

But most of all I'd like sore winners to FOAD.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: why not promote science/engineer in UK Education instead?

You're talking about a different problem, getting skilled workers. What's under immediate threat is progress enabled by collaboration and cross fertilisation between researchers. Usually fairly short term arrangements, not life long commitment.

UK loses 2 ways here, it's researchers miss that contact and the new thinking it brings and UK institutions miss capturing any of the benefits. Throwing money at creating more local researchers won't magically make them more creative or intelligent and they'd still be stuck in their own isolated talent pool. A second rate solution with second rate results.

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Paul Shirley
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There's the real possibility that any brain drain is UK -> EU.

Brexit directly threatens EU -> UK immigration, from movement restrictions & the hostile sentiment here. Most countries have always been very happy greasing the wheels of immigration for higher level scientists, all the way to offering citizenship if needed. A future where UK->EU movement is still easy for the skilled is very possible and a net outflow very believable.

By the time our political scum work out how to talk down the leave vote enough to compete for talent, it will be too late.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: "attracting European students and staff members to the UK was necessary"

Oh, I think so many leave voters demanding less EU immigrants on their precious island is closer to demanding EU out than UK out.

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Brexit makes life harder for an Internet of Things startup

Paul Shirley
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Re: I wouldn't worry

"The single market and its associated custom union are highly beneficial for its members."

They are not.

Interesting. When a brexiteer has a wet dream about trade deals it's guaranteed to be great. When the EU has an actual concrete 'trade deal' it's automatically a failure?

Day 1 of brexit negotiations may end very quickly when you have no actual choice when offered 4 or 0 of the 4 freedoms as the base deal.

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Edward Snowden's 40 days in a Russian airport – by the woman who helped him escape

Paul Shirley
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Re: A fair trial?

The yanks never quite understand that patriotism is not rubber stamping whatever your country is already doing, it's making sure what you're country is doing is right and worth your support.

Sadly most of the UK has gone the same way.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: Elections

I don't think PR helps either, since the pool of parties (and hence manifestos) is still pretty small.

PR helps by reducing the chance of an absolute majority provided at least 3 parties gain seats. That makes it much harder to force through the most despicable parts of each manifesto and injects some fine grain into policy&law making. If nothing else it slows down gov and it's endless, wasteful see saw lurches left & right.

PR should improve the pool of parties as well since your vote is much more likely to be represented in parliament, even if there's no chance of government. Should...

But of course this country voted against PR so apparently the 'majority' quite like pissing money away on left-right excursions into madness.

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NHS health apps project plan: Powered by your medical records

Paul Shirley
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Re: There is no security issue

Luckily someone else has tried the competing businesses approach, we've seen it, voters don't like it.

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Nul points: PM May's post-Brexit EU immigration options

Paul Shirley
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Re: Strange logic

What you missed is the ordinary leave voters don't see any obvious direct benefit to themselves. Indirect benefits are a hard sell, especially if elites are successfully intercepting a lot of it, out of sight out of mind. If migrants stop injecting money into local economies the locals probably won't believe it's a problem, even as the effects kick in.

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Brexit? We have heard of this, says Dixons Carphone CEO

Paul Shirley
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Re: Hang on. ...

The financial markets are irrational, responding to unexpected changes in largely unpredictable ways, while nothing changes about brexit they're straight back to checking whether birds have started the winter migration when predicted and counting cracks in the pavement before tossing a coin about how they feel about it! Makes it very easy to pretend nothings wrong.

While May is still stonewalling it would be wasted effort for business to do more than contingency planning and inadvisable to go public about the details. The longer May waits though, the faster they'll be able to move later, so it's only borrowing against the future disruption.

Meanwhile the voting public haven't been affected by the fall in the pound, price rises haven't worked through yet on imports. Brexiteers are loudly shouting about exports and if you don't look hard things look great. The ones that know what's coming know they should spend now not later.

I'm left wondering what would have happened if Boris&Gove had succeeded in their cynical plan to delay signing A50 for years. Hard to believe this lull before the storm could have lasted that long.

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A nice long pub crawl is good for your health, if you stay on your feet

Paul Shirley
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Re: Inducing paranoia pulls in the grant money!

Moderation? You health nazi!

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Spinning that Brexit wheel: Regulation lotto for tech startups

Paul Shirley
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Re: What's next?

If beer is a key factor, you already know you're going to Belgium!

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Japan's Brexit warning casts shadow over Softbank ARM promises

Paul Shirley
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Re: Diplomatic goodbye

Leaving the EU can take as long as 6 to 20 years

Leaving the EU with a good deal could take that long. There are other options where the UK still spends 6-20 years disentangling itself but actually leaves nearly empty handed in no more than 2 years. Given the various UK biased 'deals' assorted soft brexiteers (and May) are talking up and the hard-brexit idiots, I'm guessing 2 years is more probable.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: Nope.

There won't be a second referendum. End. Of. I believe Theresa May has been crystal on that.

In post-truth politics what does that mean? Does it even mean anything?

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Brexit must not break the cloud, Japan tells UK and EU

Paul Shirley
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There's no guarantee the EU will want anything we can offer

There's no guarantee what they do want won't move production into the EU...

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Paul Shirley
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Re: Dear Japan

something that is good for business is not necessarily good for the wider electorate

My impression of the brexiteer ringleaders is they're strongly driven by the desire to stop EU interference in their UK business ambitions. Everything else is just whatever rouses the mob, a mob that just voted to let tories weaken worker protection!

A good question to ask is why tories in general are letting May make promises to workers they've never shown any support for ever. Maybe they're still in shock...

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Paul Shirley
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We also don't want to pay any tax and Europe gives us that opportunity

Last week's memo about attacking dodgy EU tax deals hasn't reached you. It might seem a good opportunity for the UK to undercut Europe but I seriously doubt any deal is available with the EU that allows the UK to do it.

Remember: brexit is not just an opportunity for the UK, it's also an opportunity for the EU to change it's relationship with and what it will allow the UK to get away with.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: What is that ?

Luckily brexit is happening under a remain PM who seems intent on letting the brexiteers self destruct in their own fantasy worlds of what brexit means.

Worry more that a childless PM has rather less invested in future success for the UK than 'breeds like a rabbit' Boris, insulated by a PMs pension she may not care so much about allowing bad brexit decisions ;)

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Life imitates satire: Facebook touts zlib killer just like Silicon Valley's Pied Piper

Paul Shirley
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FSE already under patent attack

Hold off on the compression until the patent situation is resolved, a bunch of (bogus) patents related to FSE are already causing trouble...

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Making us pay tax will DESTROY EUROPE, roars Apple's Tim Cook

Paul Shirley
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Pocket change yes. The domino that starts the topple?

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Paul Shirley
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The problem is simply that tax authorities worldwide have been trained to negotiate with the rich, by the rich running governments. Now we have truly independent 'well off' eurocrats doing what's right for the ordinary people instead.

It's like you could be well paid to do "the right thing". Am idea that will never catch on in this country.

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Missing Milky Way mass blown away by bingeing supermassive black hole

Paul Shirley
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Re: "a million-degree gaseous fog permeating our galaxy"

Dark matter is and stays undetectable and to all evidence does not interact via photons.

Dark matter is still just theory (ok dozens of theories) to explain why we haven't found matter we can see. If a relatively cool, dilute plasma only noticeably interacts with photons we haven't looked for, then Dark matter isn't dark, we're just blind.

Gas as the missing matter may have been prematurely discarded. Be nice if truly exotic stuff exists, more useful to notice we missed something this big though!

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Corbyn lied, Virgin Trains lied, Harambe died

Paul Shirley
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I remember BR staff trying very hard to get you to the destination whatever it took when things went wrong. I also vividly remember the first post privatisation problem trip where none of them could promise to get me further than the next companies section of my trip. We now have at least 1 less train to choose because it's not safe to rely on the last one, too much chance of being stranded without help.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: damn, they're spilling travel secrets

Better clarify, by timid I mean people that won't bother checking if a seat reservation is currently active or won't assume an empty reserved seat is empty because it's owner isn't on the train. It was not a suggestion to frighten people from grabbing their reservations!

If there's no one in a reserved seat 5min after its left the starting station, it's very unlikely the owner's coming for it. Yet those seats go empty a lot of the time.

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Paul Shirley
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damn, they're spilling travel secrets

My wife and I rely on the high number of unclaimed reserved seats, seats reservations that end before or start after your journey and the timidity of many travellers to claim them. Now everyone's been tipped off! I see travel annoyance in my future.

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Paper mountain, hidden Brexit: How'd you say immigration control would work?

Paul Shirley
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Re: contactless payments as ID Cards

In the UK paying off the police is frowned on. What other reason would they have to check your card?

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Paul Shirley
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Re: Simple is best

Any attempt to rebuild that border could work wonders for the English constructioni industry on the mainland... the rest of the EU might be less aggressive in response to any brit attempt to isolate and use Ireland as a bargaining chip. dont make that mistake.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: Propaganda by CEO's

There will be no reduction in the number of migrant workers

There might be a reduction if migrant workers voluntarily decide not to come and the loud minority brexit mobilised stands a good chance of achieving that. That could be much worse. This mornings trip to hospital would still be going on without the predominantly migrant staff I saw. Not just making up the numbers, they largely are the skilled part of the NHS.

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New UK trade deals would not compensate for loss of single market membership

Paul Shirley
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Re: Good grief.

"reasonable discussion" etc.

I used to think lying to voters in the run up to a vote was unacceptable and career ending.

Apparently I was wrong.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: Good grief.

I'm definitely going to do what's best for my country. Your country I've given up on.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: @Tom7

"we're in the EU for a minimum of 2 years"

Not strictly true. We're guaranteed at least 2 years of negotiation time but there's nothing saying we can't complete and leave faster. Unlikely but not forbidden. Likewise the 3 brexiteers could, in some parallel universe, not piss off the EU so badly they refuse an extension on those 2 years.

We have Boris in just the right place to ensure a hard 2 year limit applies, now to find some way to stop the delaying and watch the clowns panic.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: "just in time"

There was an interview with German car companies and ones in the car part supply chain around vote time. The problems even small disruptions in delivery cause in a JIT industry were detailed, along with the point that no mass production car factory can build cars without working JIT supply lines. They also seemed resigned to losing exports to the UK, including component supply.

The brexiteers favourite 'they'll be hurt more than us' overlooks that supply chain dependency. Unless they can magically negotiate much better terms for component supplies over assembled cars, those UK car factories are going to be severely disrupted as EU export losses/problems hit their production. Fixable but not necessarily before the foreign owners of those factories have moved somewhere more efficient.

That particular big stick brexiteers think they can frighten Gernam car industry with doesn't look all that frightening.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: Also, the reverse would apply

The reason Norway gave was not wanting to add a massively larger economy to a club of small nations. Whatever reasons you think any EFTA member would have for wanting the UK, not letting them in now means no need to 'take back control' some time in the future if/when the UK starts bullying the others.

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The calm before the storm: AMD's Zen bears down on Intel CPUs

Paul Shirley
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The days of excess power are 'sort of' gone if you're using an AMD APU but that's because they're low end/low(ish) performance parts more than any real efficiency improvement. Intels equivalents still suck less power. Just harder to care about a few watts.

The performance parts are a very different story. My current FX8370 under load supplies 50%+ of the winter heating in my office. Fire up the GPU and I have a heating problem ;)

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Email proves UK boffins axed from EU research in Brexit aftermath

Paul Shirley
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Facepalm

Re: Thank you Mr.Farage

Ah, the very amateur attempts at misdirection coming thick and fast.

In real life it's completely possible for Carney & the BOE to identify problems with the EU and point out leaving would be even worse than those problems, they aren't opposites and there's no U-turn on advice. Given the choice of believing professional politicians (AKA liars and opportunists), amateurs like Farage & Gove (too stupid to know if they're lying, even sleazier opportunists) or a bunch of independent of politicking economists, I'm going with the experts (even though it's more witchcraft than science).

And all those predictions of doom you claim haven't come true. There's a missing 'yet' in that because you haven't left yet, haven't even started to leave. And are carefully ignoring any sign that things are starting to unravel while everyone waits for you to grow balls and leave.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: Article 50

If England and Wales don't leave Europe the arguing will carry on for ever. It will only end when brexit is tried and the results of it known. You need to be gone and soon.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: Oh dear, how sad, never mind.

Once Brexit is executed then things may be able to go back to normal

With one little problem, it will require Britain to accept some form of free movement and it's hard to believe Europe will accept a highly diluted version. Collaborative projects don't make much sense if scientists can't freely travel and work.

...but any uk gov that does that will have some hard explaining to 52% of the population. Given the way foreigners are already being made unwelcome by the rabid minority brexit empowered we may never get back to normal, if scientists simply don't want to risk coming here.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: Is anyone surprised?

So much concentrated cluelessness. The 'unelected' are the ones asking for funding who noticed the uk fuckwits handling brexit are deliberately doing nothing to guarantee uk participation will continue. They've made the sane choice to avoid risk until the uk stops using them as a negotiating chip. FFS the uk refuses to even guarantee EU citizens in these collaborations can work in the uk, what kind of fool would sign up for that?

Brexiters would do well to remember how eager most governments are to grease the wheels of immigration for scientists. Play nice now or have your whining ignored when your scientists leave.

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Breaking 350 million: What's next for Windows 10?

Paul Shirley
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Re: Windows 10 did especially well

What's startling is how many refuse to upgrade Win8/8.1 to 10. Microsoft have built a reputation for shovelling shit strong enough people choose a known POS over risking shit-as-a-service evermore!

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Windows 10 Anniversary Update is borking boxen everywhere

Paul Shirley
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this is how they'll force us to their cloud

...by ensuring settings and registry wiping clean installs every few updates. Looks like stage 2 has kicked off, wipe other partitions to encourage use of the ms store for easier app recovery.

Mine the one taking a differential drive image every night.

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Paul Shirley
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Re: It aint just this upgrade

Used to switch to the US layout on my GB machine at random until i realised you need to change both locale and input settings. Buggy pos

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