Feeds

* Posts by deadlockvictim

484 posts • joined 19 Jun 2009

Page:

MIT boffins moot tsunami-proof floating nuke power plants

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: .. Fukishima Residents Never Allowed Home?

Of course, they have covered the country in shame for happening to live there.

0
0
deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Fukushima

What I don't really understand is why the authorities in the prefecture of Fukushima ( «blessed island» in Japanese ) didn't build some form of impressive anti-tsunami structure in the sea in front of the power plant. Gods know that Japan is a place likely to be hit by tsunamis. The word itself is Japanese.

Methinks that the Japanese had (or maybe still have) a much-bleieved ostrich-in-the-sand approach to things that will destroy them (or maybe simply to things that «smell» (kusai)).

1
5

BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Laptop! Lucky bastards

Our BOFHs have us all on VMs.

I'd rather get a new laptop and not be consulted about it rather than be on a VM.

6
1

Borked Bitcoin bunker MtGox in administration: Lawyer seizes control

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: Lawyer named Kobayashi takes charge?

Well, they *are* in Japan and Kobayashi is by no means an uncommon name there.

If he were a tricksy hobbitses, he would go by the name of Littlewood, Smallgrove or something along those lines.

0
0

Nvidia's new CUDA 6 has the 'most significant new functionality in the history of CUDA'

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: English?

Now you know what your poor parents feel like when you speak to them in computer. All the phrases like 'just clear the cache', 'it's those bloody cookies, you know' and 'you need more memory' left them simply agreeing with you while not having a bloody clue what you were on about.

And as for your daughter crying because some nasty girls at school wrote horrible things on her wall and then defriended her, well, I just give up.

1
0

Which sweaty exec dreamt up Office for iOS? Ballmer, Ballmer, Ballmer

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Explanation

So, what was the explanation for putting Clippy [2] humanely down? Because Max the SE [1] on Office Mac was cooler than Clippy? And not because Clippy was Steve Ballmer in malleable metal form on our desktop?

[1] I always thought that the SE in Office Mac was the Banana Jr from Bloom County.

[2] Obligatory YouTube clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6aXzMuYN7U

1
0

NSW to expand e-voting

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Madness

Since the revelations of the now exiled E. Snowden, I would have thought that it would be clear to all that what travels over the Internet can not be guaranteed to be untouched. Actually, it might be more proper to say that it can be guaranteed to have been «inspected» at least once. SSL has been broken.

Can guarantees can the government in NSW give that the votes cast will be the votes received? Why would big agencies stop at just deep-packet inspection when the technology to alter said packets is within their grasp. Who would know, anyway, if it were done?

Please feel free to post the XKCD link about the bug-report to God.

0
0

Tokyo to TXT warning of incoming Norks nukes

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

stampede

I would not like to see this happen in practice. Tokyo is massive. The greater Tokyo area has a population of 30-ish million people. Tokyo is an efficient machine for getting millions in and out of the city centre every day. Shinjuku station alone has a throughput of a million Japanese, not to mention foreigners and other lesser people. It works well when people are calm.

Introduce 10 million text messages politely asking people not to panic and to consider making their way to their nearest rural prefecture would be trigger a stampede. It would probably kill more people than the incoming rockets.

That being said, if Nakano Takeshi were around with a film crew leaving various sharp and lethal weapons lying around, it could be the most exciting film production since 'Apocalypse Now'.

0
0

UK.gov! frets! over! Yahoo! exodus! to! RIPA-free! Dublin!

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

A part of the English-speaking world

Reginald D. Hunter speaks Irish, well, the English that is spoken in Ireland.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2PsyAfr6lA

0
0

TEN THINGS Google believes you believe about Glassholes and wishes you didn't

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Eric and Larry in the changing room

Dear Larry and Eric

I would be happy a demo the Google Glass if you let me come train with you. I promise that I won't have Glass turned on while we are in the training room, in the showers or out running together. The 45 minute video recording limitation won't be a problem.

Is that OK?

Many thanks from a fellow pioneering spirit

1
0

Microsoft exec: I don't know HOW our market share sunk

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

innovation

To be fair to Microsoft, they have been innovating quite actively over the last 6 years. Before that, Microsoft's policy was to give people a nicer, more stable version of what had come before (with a few exceptions — Word v6 and Windows ME spring to mind). Each iteration of the software also had more features and was glossier. And their users got used to this.

Then with Office 2007 they introduced the ribbon which pissed their users off royally. The ribbon was very innovative. Being of vintage Mac stock, I quite liked it, but the loyal MS users hated it. It was a break from the past. Innovation is supposed to be change for the better, but change for the loyal users is not good. Why, with this sort of change, they could bugger off and try Mac OS or Ubuntu, like their children keep pestering them to do.

Microsoft, though, was on a roll with Office 2007. Windows 7 was more of the same and it has become beloved. 'We need to innovate', cried MS management and out came Windows 8. Although our sysadmins tell us that it is faster and more stable than Windows 7, it is very different from what went before. Why even Mac OS X is more familiar to what went before than Windows 8.

Microsoft's problem is that they have very little experience listening to the end-user. They've rarely done so in the past, why should they do so now? MS products were usually foisted upon people, not necessarily against their will, mind you. Apple is also like this but unlike Apple, MS's CEO didn't know what the people wanted. That being said, Apple's (previous) CEO has said that the people don't know what they want, but that is another story.

Microsoft need to ask themselves if they really want to be in the tablet space. Being late to the party is no bad thing. Having a very desirable product is.

2
3

Microsoft's SQL Server 2014 early code: First look

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: There's a news article on this?

In my experience, the management of most companies that have chosen SQL Server aren't likely to move to another RDBMS, unless it's to something like Oracle or DB2. DBAs in these companies don't choose SQL Server. It is chosen for them. I'm not saying that they wouldn't choose SQL Server, rather that the choice in their world doesn't exist.

There are many companies running SQL Server, and especially SQL Server 2005, which ran out of support last year. SQL Server 2008 will be running out of support next year (or soon after).

The last 3 three releases of SQL Server have not offered much to the small to medium DB (read under 500GB). They were aimed at the big boys and Big Data.

This release is, on the other hand, offers some new and worthwhile — in-memory tables with the promise of substantial speed improvements. It will require new hardware with massive amounts of memory (in comparison to what they had before). Database schemas will have to be re-written. The application code that sits on top of the DB will have to be re-written.

This release has the potential to have the biggest impact on current installations of SQL Server since the release of the SQL Server 2005.

I can't see MariaDB-DBs being migrated, but then, they aren't the target here. The management and DBAs of RDBMSs with expensive licence arrangements, like Oracle and DB2, are.

And because so many companies use SQL Server, this is why this news is important.

9
0

Facebook's Zuckerberg buttonholes Obama, rages against NSA dragnet spying

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: They are the criminals

Of which crime(s) have they been convicted?

Do tell.

0
0

SATANIC 'HELL DIAMOND' tells of sunless subterranean sea

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Life

There are bacteria that live in volcanoes. If there is a substantial body of water down in the transition zone, I wonder if there is any life down there? I wouldn't be surprised if there are and if there are, I'd be as curious in the organisms themselves as to how they got there — evolved where they were or migrated down from outside.

0
0

Five unbelievable headlines that claim Tim Berners-Lee 'INVENTED the INTERNET'

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Zuckerberg

It could be worse.

Imagine the headlines in 15 years' time if Facebook stays at its presence prominence: 'Zuckerberg talks about founding the Internet 25 years' ago'.

6
0

PM Cameron leaps aboard Internet of Thingies

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Bong

It's this sort of thing that puts Steve Bong into perspective.

1
0

Tim Cook and Israeli PM commune with the GHOST of Steve Jobs

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

SJ already has an icon

Susan Kare, the icon designer on the original mac team, has already designed an icon of Steve Jobs. It is 32x32 pixels.

The link is here (warning painful-looking tattoo): http://www.bytecellar.com/2012/09/11/susan-kares-32x32-pixels-of-steve-jobs-on-my-flesh-and-forever/

p.s. I think that this should be one of the standard El Reg icons, given that Steve Jobs appears so often as a subject in articles. There may be copyright problems with it, alas.

0
0

Show more CANADIAN-MADE PORN, insists Canadian government

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Canadian Orgies

Does anyone know to whom is attributed the saying that there aren't more orgies in Canada because it would take too long to write the thank-you notes afterwards?

11
0

Why can’t I walk past Maplin without buying stuff I don’t need?

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

eBay

... while the other half is so old and pointless that they could be sold as collectors’ items.

Thank God, there is eBay and an outlet to buy and sell said obsolescent crap.

There is still a market for, say, graphics cards that allows your monochrome compact mac to display greyscale, and in this case, a very healthy market. One might even get half the original starting price.

I empathize with the box of cables and gadgets. Mine are filled with SCSI drives, MO-disks and drives, NuBus cards as well as many other things I could never afford back in 1990.

1
0

Blimey! ANOTHER Bitcoin bleed brouhaha

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: This is why you have transactional systems.

AC» I own real physical money

Do you mean Krugerrands and Swiss Vrenelis?

0
0
deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Conspiracy Theory Time

It seems to me that bringing now down the various Bitcoin institutions is self-defeating, unless one wanted to destroy Bitcoin altogether (and who would want to do that?). It does look at the moment as if a war is being waged against Bitcoin as a whole.

Currencies survive on trust. Why would one steal something and then actively move to devalue what one has stolen? Or am I missing something fundamental, such as an inherent instability of non-governmental currencies? I am not an economist.

And, just for the record, I have no bitcoins and am merely an amused bystander.

2
1

Facebook: We want a solar sky cruiser comms net that DARPA couldn't build

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Invasive, pervasive, intrusive

Hi everyone,

We're not as pervasive as we'd like to be nor as intrusive as we could be and we want to show the NSA how Total Knowledge really works.

If the experiment works well in Africa, and let's face it, no one there is really going to complain, then we can move to Europe, Japan and the States.

with love,

MZ

2
0

MtGox to customers: Your call is important to us … NOT!

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Hontou ni gomen nasai

Said over and over and over again.

Or maybe play one of those dreadful Japanese dirges that are ever so popular in karaoke bars — the ones which feature middle-aged Japanese women in kimonos watching ships depart for Hokkaidou or some such distant place.

Actually, the CEO should go on TV and publicly cry like the fellow who oversaw the bankruptcy of an old, established insurance company back in the 1990s or so.

1
0

Microsoft chairman John Thompson: Redmond looks 'like IBM in 1990'

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Competition

Is Microsofft ready for competition, let alone be competitive?

In some fields, it's doing rather well: xbox, SQL Server, C# and .Net come to mind offhand. Bing managed to gouge 10-15% marketshare away from Google. Not superb, but not bad either.

In other fields, it's pretty much the only game in town: Windows and Office come to mind here as well. Here Microsoft seems hell-bent on irritating the fuck out of its loyal customer base. Despite themselves, they are still dominant.

And then there are fields where they've lost the plot, like SharePoint, WindowsPhone or Surface. I'm told that they are most usable, I just haven't met anyone yet who likes them to recommend it.

With xbox and bing MS must be competitive. they want the attention of us little people.

With products like Server and SQL Server, I really wonder how competitive they are. These products are sold to senior executives and MS competes well among the users of PowerPoint and Excel.

The Board decides that the company will be a Microsoft house, rather than a LAMP house or a Java-Oracle house. The majority of sysadmins I've met who run their own servers choose UNIX and Linux variants. Maybe it's the cost.

Microsoft makes and sells office software. This is their strong point (although I did like their keyboards and mice).

Google and the Cloud would have been making strong headway into this space had one E. Snowden not made some very interesting revelations. Apple has already shown that Microsoft is not always the obvious choice for the client.

1
2

Google warns Glass wearers: Quit being 'CREEPY GLASSHOLES'

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: @Ali

If it were Apple, it would be called iSpy, regardless of whether Apple named it such.

7
0

Birds Eye releases 'mashtags' social spud snacks

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Secure food

The offering from Bird's Eye is salted and hashed, well mashed.

Just as well they ddin't include a mashkey with it.

2
0

Wii got it WRONG: How do you solve a problem like Nintendo?

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

The first kana of Nintendo is

Esteemed Author» The Big N – or should that be the petite N these days?

Hiragana Ni perhaps or, better still, the relevant kanji Nin (whichever one that happens to be. There are a lot of kanji with the reading Nin).

0
0

Rand Paul launches class-action lawsuit to end NSA phone spying

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: Google worse than NSA

Unfortunately it's not illegal.

And your government is probably complicit in the capturing and sharing of personal data as well.

1
0

Rotten to the core: Apple’s 10 greatest FAILS

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: Concentrating on things

Not at all. In the mid-1990s Apple had a smaller marketshare than they could have had. When Microsoft released Windows 95, this marketshare was slashed and did terrible things to their bottom line. The success of the iMac in 1998 that saved them from financial ruin and that was, by no means, a high-end computer for the well-heeled.

Apple have now reasonably priced macs in the form of the mac mini as well as powerful workstations in the form of the dustbin.

2
0
deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: Concentrating on things

What is true now is not necessarily what was true 20-30 years ago and most of this article deals with products and events that were around then. One of my main points was that Apple should have striven for marketshare at the beginning (and with it medium-term to long-term profits) rather than short-term profit. Sales of the Apple II were healthy and the success of the Macintosh was not a make or break situation for the company at the time.

It was the route that Bill Gates steered Microsoft towards — get your software on the most machines possible. Apple has followed this strategy with the iPhone and iPad with much success..

Apple does charge what the market will bear and my point was that lower prices would have meant a bigger market. And this would have been a benefit to them.

And as for dip-shits like me, I bought (and still buy) my macs second- and thirdhand because they certainly were well built and are in rude health after 20 years. And I couldn't give a toss about the PC market. Only old macintoshes.

4
0
deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Concentrating on things

I would concentrate less on concrete things and instead include a few policy decisions:

1. Upper-Right — the decision by upper management to fleece customers for as much as possible started early on. Rather than trying to build marketshare, Apple management went for short-term profit. Andy Hertzfeld outlines this from the very beginning in his Folklore.org website. The original Macintosh was to be billed at $1500 and that became $2500 after Sculley became involved.

The likes of Jean-Louis Gassée then promoted the idea that because Macs were desirable that they should be milked for all they were worth. The apogée of this was the Mac IIfx which went for $10K in 1990. Despite the high prices, Macs had a 12% marketshare in 1992. Just think what it could have been if Macs had been more reasonably priced.

The pricing in Europe was also much, much higher than in the US and this hurt marketshare as well.

2. Lack of Direction in Models

Steve Jobs highlighted this in 1998. There were 40 or so different models marketed between 1994 and 1997, many of which were the same. The crassest example of which was the LC475 | Performa 475 | Quadra 605. Each was aimed at a different market and each was priced differently despite being the same machine. Then there was the awful Performa name.

3. Games

Games, especially 3-D shooters, became the killer app in the mid-1990s for PCs. Apple were already on the road to nowhere, did little to make the mac more gamer-friendly and game-developer friendly. I myself migrated from the mac in 1998 for this very reason. Half Life never came out on the Mac and I was not happy to wait for 6 months while other games on the PC were already available.

It is a mindset within Apple, I think, that goes way back to the early 1980s. A developer had written a lovely little game (Through the Looking Glass) for the nascent Mac and Apple were reluctant to market it because they din't want the Mac to be seen as a games machine.

4. Symmetric Multi-Processing

I often wonder why Apple didn't go down the road of SMP with the early Mac IIs. Steve Jobs had purchased 1 million 68000 processors from Motorola and it took Apple 6 years to use these up. The last mac to use one was the Classic in 1990. I would have required rewriting the System and Finder as well obliging companies like Microsoft and Adobe to rewrite their software to take advantage of it, but it would have made already powerful (for the day) computers more so. It would have given Apple a great technological advantage and more firmly established the Mac as a powerful computer. The nearest mac users got to this was the Radius Rocket form ex-Mac Developers Andy Hertzfeld and Burrell Smith

4
1

Larry Ellison: Technology has 'negatively impacted' children

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: <shrug>

That SMS has without doubt just put her on the GCHQ watchlist. Thankfully she's a teenager and will probably be excused.

2
0

Q: What's government-owned, designed to kill, and now more transparent? A: DARPA!

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Confused

Like other U.S. military agencies, they are probably evil, but it's hard not to have a soft spot for DARPA. I suspect that for many (if not most) of us, DARPA represents the dream place to work.

0
0

Fujitsu launches lappie for oldies

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Apple ADB Extended Keyboard

I still have an Apple ADB Extended Keyboard keyboard and I find it a joy to type on. I had to get a USB-ADB adapter for it. The ALPS keys on it have a lovely spring.

1
0

Why IBM's server sell-off is a lightbulb moment

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

buy out

It seems to me that IBM is selling itself to Lenovo bit by bit (pun intended).

How long before IBM simply disappears? 20 years? 30 years?

3
2

MAC TO THE FUTURE: 30 years of hindsight and smart-arsery

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: Nobody remembers Bill Gates saved Apple

No. Bill Gates was a part of their success.

The revenues from the fruity iMacs pulled them out of the financial abyss.

Bill Gates saved Apple by publicly supporting them at a low ebb [1] and, more importantly, by pledging the continuation of MS Office for the Mac for the next 5 years. I'm not sure how much Apple really needed $150m at the time.

[1] The adjective for Apple at this time was 'beleaguered'.

2
0

Tell us we're all doomed, MPs beg climate scientists

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Esteemed Author» Politicians have to be creative and accountable...

Some politicians are creative about their accounting. Will that do?

10
0

Yes, Google can afford to lose $9bn in Motorola sale. But did it really?

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: No idea

Hi Carl,

Did you ever get that diploma in telephone sanitation? There could be good news coming your way soon.

Kind regards

2
0

Snowden: Canadian spooks used free airport WiFi to track travellers

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: Awkward

Not really. You would be apprehended by persons unknown and flown to Guantanamo Bay, having first been tortured to within an inch of your life. You would be an unperson.

------------------------------------------------------------------

This message has been scanned by the «spying agency of your government» and has been determined to be 43% Terror-Free™.

12
0

Facebook's dying? HA! Get ready for another DECADE of us – Zuck

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Yahoo!

Well. Yahoo is still around after a decade of irrelevance.

I'm sure that Facebook will still be with us in 2025.

Microsoft too, for that matter, because PCs will be probably be back in fashion and people will be complaining that they don't want to give Vista II as their desktop OS.

2
1

Prof Stephen Hawking: 'There are NO black holes' – they're GREY!

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: "I know absolutely nothing about the black holes...

Jemma» The name Penrose does actually ring a bell somewhere but I'm not sure where and in what context I heard it.

Hint: He's the greatest | he's fantastic | wherever there is danger he'll be theeeere | dangermouse | de dum de dum | daaaangermouuuuse | de dum de dum de dum | daaaaaaangermouuuuuuusssse....

Oh bugger, I've just it wrong, haven't I? Oh well, my memory for early 1980's cartoons is not what it was.

6
0

Reading this headline? You and 9.47 million others

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

el Reg» el Reg has around a third as much clout as The Sun

Maybe a few more salacious pictures of motherboards and daughterboards as well as their silicon enhancements and some pin-outs to boot and we'll catch up with el Sol.

Oooh, just thinking about transistor layouts on ARM chips makes me weak at the knees.

7
0

Those NSA 'reforms' in full: El Reg translates US Prez Obama's pledges

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Esteemed Author» It's fair to say that if the British had the capabilities of the NSA today, there wouldn’t have been an American revolution and the citizens of the North American continent would be sipping warm beer and spelling color with a 'u' along with the rest of British society.

It is fair to say that George Washington et al. were terrorists and that the government of the United Kingdom of England & Scotland should have sent them to the Britsih equivalent of Guantanamo Bay (Australia maybe?) had they been able to catch them.

2
1

'Leaked' iPhone 6 pics will make cool fanbois WEEP - it's a PHABLET

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

peak apple

Every couple of months an article will mention 'peak Apple'. It rather devalues the phrase if it needs to be re-hashed so often.

It rather reminds me of a broken clock — it will be right twice a day.

Eventually you will be right with 'peak Apple' and even then, you won't know until much later afterwards.

In the meantime it's getting very tedious.

1
4

Bosch launches obligatory Internet of Things push

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Social Media

Bosch are doing it wrong. Instead of making it compulsory, Bosch should offer the ability for your drill to automatically post to Facebook et al. to say how great your drill and your drilling is — along with all of the relevant data. The Sirius Cybernetics Corporation does come to mind here.

With this new feature, people will want to use their drill all of the time.

1
0

How to kill trolls and influence Apple people: A patent solution

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Re: Proof by assertion

Steve Todd» wholesale stealing of European patents

Wholesale copying of European patents, I think you mean. Theft involves the removal of one thing from someone and depriving them of it. The Europeans were not deprived of their patents.

3
1

Bill Gates is once again the richest man on Earth

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

worth of a decent OS

Probably nothing, if the success of the various UNIX flavours is anything to go by.

8
1

US Department of Justice details Kim Dotcom evidence

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

sanctimoneous eurotrash

Sanctimoneous Eurotrash

That's a great handle.

Get it before it's gone, folks!

1
1

BEASTED: Apple fined $666k in Taiwan for iPhone price meddling

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

The size of the fine

The size of the fine, btw, was picked because Steve Wozniak liked the look of all of the 6's together.

0
0

Google: Surge in pressure from govts to DELETE CHUNKS of the web

deadlockvictim
Bronze badge

Rebelle» So this is how our government is repaying google to sell us out

Who exactly is selling us out: our government or google?

It seems to me that Google is on no-one's side but her own and her use of the data we give her (a.k.a. her product) is a part of her business model. As for the Governments, are they on our side? I doubt it. We are there to give them want they want.

The inter-governmental level seems to be like a kindergarten playground: those who can bully, do bully and take want they want; those who want protection, give up their lunch money to the bigger kids.

0
0

Page: