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* Posts by deadlockvictim

523 posts • joined 19 Jun 2009

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US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account

deadlockvictim
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sigh

title says it all really.

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There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES

deadlockvictim
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Oh dear

I gave up watching TV almost a decade ago.

I just buy boxsets when I see something that interests me.

It seems that I've missed something called Simon Cowell and Sheryl Cole and my children haven't yet realised that they are missing something called 'Peppa Pig'. A tragedy on a national scale.

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That stirring LOHAN motto: Anyone know a native Latin speaker?

deadlockvictim
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Re: Why Latin?

There are a million of so Welsh speakers, aren't there?

I'm not sure they'd be happy to have their language classified as dead.

Maybe you had Manx in mind.

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deadlockvictim
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We, who are about to fly, salute thee

I haven't done Latin for 25 years, so I open to correction on my future participles:

We, who are about to fly, salute thee!

Volaturi te salutant

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Trick-cyclists defend Facebook emoto-furtling experiment

deadlockvictim
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Power

My understanding of Facebook's actions is that they did it because they could.

And that it would make them richer than Croesus, or possibly even Apple, if they would be able to manipulate the emotions of their users as posited. It would take advertising to a new level and really, really stick it to Google.

Just think of implications in the political sphere if Facebook had a preferred candidate.

Just what is the cost of political mood?

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British and European data cops probe Facebook user-manipulation scandal

deadlockvictim
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Re: If I was a Facebook engineer...

A.C.» I'd wake up and ask myself: What am I doing with my life...???

Answer» Pulling in a handsome salary while exploiting all of the resources at my disposal, including you, if you don't stop me.

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Hey, remember the iPod Touch? Apple just did

deadlockvictim
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Re: zune killer

Dammit, you beat me to it.

Have an upvote.

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Warrantless snooping on American man was LEGAL in terrorism case, rules US judge

deadlockvictim
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Re: Only a lawyer

Wouldn't a troll icon have been better?

Or don't those accused of terrorism deserve a lawyer?

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How Microsoft's cloud aims to cover the world

deadlockvictim
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As usual security

Until Microsoft et al. can convince us that they won't drop their knickers to whatever state agency that wants them to, I won't trust them with my data in their public cloud.

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Elon Musk: Just watch me – I'll put HUMAN BOOTS on Mars by 2026

deadlockvictim
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Grammar Nazi

I have to admit that I'm not happy with the phrase 'Grammar Nazi'.

It conjures up the metaphor of someone collecting together double negatives and split infinitives and then gassing them alive until they are no more.

It reduces the horror of what the Nazis did by making the term commonplace for something relatively petty.

The word 'pedant' is defined at dictionary.com as:

1. a person who makes an excessive or inappropriate display of learning.

2. a person who overemphasizes rules or minor details.

3. a person who adheres rigidly to book knowledge without regard to common sense.

And this seems to fit the bill quite nicely.

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Women are too expensive to draw and code – Ubisoft

deadlockvictim
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Re: So women deserve higher pay

Alas, I don't have any figures offhand.

In the spirit of compromise, I was talking about the big picture, wherein women as a whole are paid less than men as whole. If that means more women in senior positions and more men in junior positions, then that is the price to be paid for the compromise. However, this won't change drastically without major social upheaval.

My guess is that in most organisations those who are less pushy get paid less than those who are more pushy. Or rather, lal start out more or less the same and the pushier or more ambitious ones get pay rises more often because they are an arse about it. And women tend to be in the less pushy category.

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deadlockvictim
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Trollface

Re: makehuman

Tom7» you can knock up women just as easily as men

Are men easily knocked up? I thought that that was a peculiarly female complaint.

Boom, tish.

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deadlockvictim
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Re: So women deserve higher pay

Zane» So consequently, women need higher pay than men.

Let us compromise and say broadly that they ought to get paid better than what they are getting at the moment.

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So, what exactly defines a 'boffin'? Speak your brains...

deadlockvictim
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Boffin

My nomination for archetypal boffin would the doc from 'Back to the Future'.

In reality, though, anyone who willingly reads academic journals that require a degree in one of the sciences or applied sciences to understand is, in my mind, a boffin. The white lab coat helps.

Ah, the happy, carefree days of 'Trends in Toxicological Sciences'...

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I am NOT a PC repair man. I will NOT get your iPad working

deadlockvictim
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Porn

Just think of the fun to be had, when women come to ask you to fix their computers.

'It's probably all of the porn that's on there', you reply, knowing full well that her husband, sons, lover have spent the last 10 years looking at sites that have not been good for the system.

'I don't look at porn!' she will reply indignantly. If she is really certain that it's clean, she'll press you to come have a look at it. If she's not, she'll probably let it drop.

If she's clever, she mutter that she's going to kill «male relative of her who also uses her computer» and ask you to come and perform an exorcism on her machine.

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The Strippers, Unicorn Computers and Martian Watches of Computex

deadlockvictim
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Re: Manga

Manga is from Japan and this event took place in Taiwan.

Are Raidmax a Japanese company perhaps?

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Happy Birthday Tetris: It's flipping 30

deadlockvictim
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The perfect game

I came across Tetris first on the Mac Plus and I became addicted. Unlike games like Civ where a full game lasts many days (or not, if you can get by without sleep), Tetris can be played for 10 minutes in the middle of some necessary but dull work (like reading academic journals).

With Tetris you can set the level of your perfection, want it faster? start at a higher level, want it to solve it in style? then only eliminate 4 rows at a time and then strive to have no more than 4 rows at any one time, want it trickier? then start with a board already incompletely filled.

It is no surprise that it finds itself installed on or available to every new iteration of hardware.

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Piketty thinks the 1% should cough up 80%. Discuss

deadlockvictim
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Simple Question

I am not an economist, which is why I pose a simple question:

What would be valid reasons not to have a very simple taxation policy based on income (and nothing else) with a tax-free base to spare those on low incomes. If say, all of one's income above the tax-free base rate was taxed at, say, 20%, would this be enough to fund government? And by income, I mean all forms of income: salary, interest, dividends, inheritance, rent, pension, corporation tax (yes, Ireland, I'm looking at you) and so on. It would mean the removal of all other taxes.

I am thinking about this theoretically. The European Union would be less than happy if a member state reduced VAT down to 0%. It might even get people spending more. Those who consume more would not be penalised for doing so. The Apples and Googles of this world would not be happy.

Those with valuable assets would be only taxed on realisation to income.

Would it hit the middle classes disportionately?

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Apple's steamy OS XXX picture leak riddle: Blurry snaps deleted

deadlockvictim
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Yosemite

Article»Partially redacted pictures of OS X 10.10, which we're calling OS XXX but Apple is calling Yosemite...

In that case, we can expect a bondi-blue and white colour scheme coupled with radically new technologies. Well that's what happened the last time they used the code name Yosemite. With any luck, they'll bring back ADB as well, although ADB may still be supported in OS X.

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Google TOO WHITE and MALE, says HR boss, looking in mirror

deadlockvictim
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Re: Japan

It is just my experience. Most of the women whom I've met so far who work in the technical end of IT have been Russian or Indian.

My guess is that in India, interest in IT is more class-based. If the family is wealthy enough and the girls interested enough, there are few barriers to young women going to college and studying computer science. I am further guessing that the best and brightest of these are more than welcome in Google India. I am open to correction on this.

My point is that societal norms play a big role, but not necessarily a dominant one, in the choice of women entering IT. If a woman in France or America wishes to become a programmer or sysadmin, there is little to stop her, assuming that she has the means to do so.

What is more of a problem to women is the fact that their husbands rarely can or will work part time and share the burden of housework and childcare, but this problem is not at all unique to women programmers.

If Google wants its share of the female cream of the IT world, they should offer creche facilities on campus. Let the parents bring their child there. If Google can make the life of the parents easier by greatly helping with creche and schooling provisioning, then they will be very desirable to employees who are parents of small children.

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deadlockvictim
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Re: Japan

You are correct. I was being lazy.

Japanese people, in my experience, have skin colour that ranges from sallow to very dark brown. I should used the term «East Asian» instead.

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deadlockvictim
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Japan

I wonder if Google Japan is mostly white and male? Probably only half of that?

And Google India probably has a much higher proportion of women in non-trivial positions in its workforce than equivalent Google branches in Western Europe or North America.

I somehow can't imagine Google as being racist. They just want the most highly qualified, clever people.

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The hoarder's dilemma: 'Why can't I throw anything away?'

deadlockvictim
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eBay

That Walkman does look valuable.

Why don't you put it onto eBay for a £100 and see if anyone bites.

It would justify your hoarding and both annoy and please the missus simultaneously.

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Watch: Kids slam Apple as 'BORING, the whole thing is BORING'

deadlockvictim
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Re: Olden stuff

IBM-Compatibles at the time were not that much more powerful and many were considerably less powerful, in both RAM and processor power (8086, 8088 and 80286, if I remember correctly).

The original macs had a large overhead to drive the GUI and that cost in both RAM and CPU cycles. Furthermore, the Motorola 68000 processor was beefy for its day (early-mid eighties) and out-performed the Intel chips that were around. Indeed, Sun Microsystems chose to use the Motorola chips for their workstations around that time.

If anything, Apple got it right the Apple ][. It was a runaway success. The Macintosh could have died a sudden death in the mid 1980s if the Mac II (with expandibility), PostScript & laser-printers and the DTP revolution hadn't started around then. The initial compact macs were not easy to expand, nor designed for expansion and this greatly limited their appeal.

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Autodesk CEO: '3D printing has been way overhyped'

deadlockvictim
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home usage

What I look forward to is the day when I can download the description file for a recently broken piece of my washing machine and print up the new part.

Or, to a lesser extent, being able to print up a new part of an old thing because it has become brittle or worn away with age.

In the same way that the acquisition of help and manuals was much more tedious before the Internet, so I hope that the replacement of little parts will be so much easier and cheaper with a 3D-printer in years to come.

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Wolfenstein: The New Order ... BLAM-BLAM! That guard did Nazi that coming

deadlockvictim
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Re: ARGHGHGHG

If I remember correctly, if the collection of initials is pronounced as a word (such as LASER then it is written as a normal word in that language, such as laser). On the other hand, if the initials in the collection of initials are pronounced separately, then they are written in capitals, such as NBC, BBC, UN and so on.

Although, that being said, I write TARDIS in capitals and pronounce it as a word, so I'm not very consistent.

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China to become world's No 1 economy. And we still can't see why

deadlockvictim
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Rising tide lifts all boats

Could it be that China is prospering for the very reasons that the United Kingdom and the U.S.A. prospered up from 250 to 50 years ago? Manufacturing affordable and high quality goods? The very same policy helped pull Japan and Germany out of the rubble and ash 65 years ago (with a little help from American money).

China has a strong and vibrant manufacturing sector, that, unlike places like Bangladesh or Malaysia, seems to be benefitting the employees and the economic wealth is rising slowly but surely..

We in the West have watched our manufacturing sector be sent to Asia in the last 30 years. Still, at least the suits got their bonuses. And that's all that is important.

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350 DBAs stare blankly when reminded super-users can pinch data

deadlockvictim
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Edward Snowden gives whistleblowers a good name

I don't like the way that Edward Snowden is used as a metaphor for wrongdoing.

He served the greater good. One can in no way suggest that he profited from his actions. If anything, he has suffered for his principles and will probably die for them.

Who here would not be happy if a DBA published evidence of gross malfeasance that lead to steps being taken to prevent such malfeasance happeing again?

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Game of Thrones written on brutal medieval word processor and OS

deadlockvictim
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Re: Whereas today...

I agree. I have a couple still at home for nostalgia purposes and my favourite is the IIfx.

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deadlockvictim
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Re: Whereas today...

Nonsense. The good author needs to witness the power and ease of use a Macintosh 128K. The 512x382 screen resolution in black and white will please him and the sturdy 400K floppies (if he can still get them) will hold many, many pages of text.

To make it even sweeter, it comes with its own writing program, MacWrite.

He's to get in contact with the charismatic young Steven P. Jobs in California. Now, there's a go-getter if ever there was one.

Once Martin has used a Macintosh, he'll never go back.

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How to catch a fraudster – using 'top cop' Benford and the power of maths

deadlockvictim
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More!

Statistics wasn't as fun or as interesting as this when I was in college.

More please!

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Quick Q: How many FLOPPIES do I need for 16 MILLION image files?

deadlockvictim
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MacFormat

Hi Alastair

Did you used to work for MacFormat? I used to love getting their magazines and CDs back when the macs had a decent interface [1]. I'm not a fan of that UNIX blow-in they have now. I still use zip disks and MOs for my IIfx. And thick chunky SCSI cables too.

I remember floppies as being big enough to hold any file (outside of serious image files) that one might create and they certainly held all of my dissertations and my thesis with space to spare. And, in case one came across a file too big for a floppy (like, say, Civilisation), then DiskDoubler was your friend,

[1] Just say no if it doesn't have Chicago (the proper one) on it.

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$3.2bn Apple deal would make hip-hop mogul Dr Dre a BEEELLLIONAIRE

deadlockvictim
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Re: Isn't Beats Audio just a funky way of saying...

P.Lee» an iscsi initiator would be far more useful.

It is ironic that Apple shouldn't have an iSCSI initiator.

Apple were one of the big proponents and every mac had it until SJ returned in 1997. Apple have also become known for their consumer products being iThings. That they don't have iSCSI is a shame.

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The ULTIMATE space geek accessory: Apollo 15's joystick up for sale

deadlockvictim
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I agree

Just think how cool that would be with an adaptor to your computer or console of choice.

Nice carpark, btw.

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PEAK APPLE: Mystery upstart to hurl iLord from its throne 'by 2020'

deadlockvictim
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Re: The only way is down...

However, if, in 2020, you are only the world's 4th biggest tech company rather than the world's biggest, then it's not really so bad.

Microsoft has taken quite a beating from Facebook, Apple and Google in the last decade, but it is still quite a decent size and very much a player.

When you are at the top, it depends on how fast you fall. Sliding very slowly is not a bad thing.

My understanding of this article is that the VC expects a 'Next Big Thing' within 5 years from a company not well known or non-existent.

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French software developers are all beautiful women

deadlockvictim
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Now that's what I call programming 16

Can anyone explain why the packaing of WinDev 919 looks like a record from the 1980s?

Perhaps WebDev comes on LaserDisc™?

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Fix capitalism with floating cities on Venus says Charles Stross

deadlockvictim
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Fuckton

I like the term 'Fuckton'. I hadn't heard it before. The result of sheltered life, no doubt.

Now that billions have become commonplace, I propose that we make this wonderful term standard in the world of money.

"Over the last 30 years Bill Gates has spent several fucktons of money developing the world's first fusion power'd interplanetary Zeppelin service. The success of Nokia after Microsoft's takeover has suprised even Gates and without the immense popularity of the smartphone Vista 8.1, this project would have been merely the dreams of economists and science fiction writers.

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Tim Cook: Apple's 'closer than it's ever been' to releasing new product range

deadlockvictim
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Re: Nothing that innovative coming, then

Come on, give credit where credit is due.

• Which computer company was successful with a WIMP system before the Macintosh?

• What product(s) did the Newton copy?

• Which companies were already very successful with laser printers when they first came out?

• Which products did the Apple II rip off?

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Bankrupt Bitcoin bunker blender begins: MtGox admin starts liquefaction

deadlockvictim
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I doubt that Russian landlords accept BitCoins. They want proper, hard currency.

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MIT boffins moot tsunami-proof floating nuke power plants

deadlockvictim
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Re: .. Fukishima Residents Never Allowed Home?

Of course, they have covered the country in shame for happening to live there.

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deadlockvictim
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Fukushima

What I don't really understand is why the authorities in the prefecture of Fukushima ( «blessed island» in Japanese ) didn't build some form of impressive anti-tsunami structure in the sea in front of the power plant. Gods know that Japan is a place likely to be hit by tsunamis. The word itself is Japanese.

Methinks that the Japanese had (or maybe still have) a much-bleieved ostrich-in-the-sand approach to things that will destroy them (or maybe simply to things that «smell» (kusai)).

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BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*

deadlockvictim
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Laptop! Lucky bastards

Our BOFHs have us all on VMs.

I'd rather get a new laptop and not be consulted about it rather than be on a VM.

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Borked Bitcoin bunker MtGox in administration: Lawyer seizes control

deadlockvictim
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Re: Lawyer named Kobayashi takes charge?

Well, they *are* in Japan and Kobayashi is by no means an uncommon name there.

If he were a tricksy hobbitses, he would go by the name of Littlewood, Smallgrove or something along those lines.

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Nvidia's new CUDA 6 has the 'most significant new functionality in the history of CUDA'

deadlockvictim
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Re: English?

Now you know what your poor parents feel like when you speak to them in computer. All the phrases like 'just clear the cache', 'it's those bloody cookies, you know' and 'you need more memory' left them simply agreeing with you while not having a bloody clue what you were on about.

And as for your daughter crying because some nasty girls at school wrote horrible things on her wall and then defriended her, well, I just give up.

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Which sweaty exec dreamt up Office for iOS? Ballmer, Ballmer, Ballmer

deadlockvictim
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Explanation

So, what was the explanation for putting Clippy [2] humanely down? Because Max the SE [1] on Office Mac was cooler than Clippy? And not because Clippy was Steve Ballmer in malleable metal form on our desktop?

[1] I always thought that the SE in Office Mac was the Banana Jr from Bloom County.

[2] Obligatory YouTube clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6aXzMuYN7U

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NSW to expand e-voting

deadlockvictim
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Madness

Since the revelations of the now exiled E. Snowden, I would have thought that it would be clear to all that what travels over the Internet can not be guaranteed to be untouched. Actually, it might be more proper to say that it can be guaranteed to have been «inspected» at least once. SSL has been broken.

Can guarantees can the government in NSW give that the votes cast will be the votes received? Why would big agencies stop at just deep-packet inspection when the technology to alter said packets is within their grasp. Who would know, anyway, if it were done?

Please feel free to post the XKCD link about the bug-report to God.

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Tokyo to TXT warning of incoming Norks nukes

deadlockvictim
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stampede

I would not like to see this happen in practice. Tokyo is massive. The greater Tokyo area has a population of 30-ish million people. Tokyo is an efficient machine for getting millions in and out of the city centre every day. Shinjuku station alone has a throughput of a million Japanese, not to mention foreigners and other lesser people. It works well when people are calm.

Introduce 10 million text messages politely asking people not to panic and to consider making their way to their nearest rural prefecture would be trigger a stampede. It would probably kill more people than the incoming rockets.

That being said, if Nakano Takeshi were around with a film crew leaving various sharp and lethal weapons lying around, it could be the most exciting film production since 'Apocalypse Now'.

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UK.gov! frets! over! Yahoo! exodus! to! RIPA-free! Dublin!

deadlockvictim
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A part of the English-speaking world

Reginald D. Hunter speaks Irish, well, the English that is spoken in Ireland.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2PsyAfr6lA

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TEN THINGS Google believes you believe about Glassholes and wishes you didn't

deadlockvictim
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Eric and Larry in the changing room

Dear Larry and Eric

I would be happy a demo the Google Glass if you let me come train with you. I promise that I won't have Glass turned on while we are in the training room, in the showers or out running together. The 45 minute video recording limitation won't be a problem.

Is that OK?

Many thanks from a fellow pioneering spirit

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Microsoft exec: I don't know HOW our market share sunk

deadlockvictim
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innovation

To be fair to Microsoft, they have been innovating quite actively over the last 6 years. Before that, Microsoft's policy was to give people a nicer, more stable version of what had come before (with a few exceptions — Word v6 and Windows ME spring to mind). Each iteration of the software also had more features and was glossier. And their users got used to this.

Then with Office 2007 they introduced the ribbon which pissed their users off royally. The ribbon was very innovative. Being of vintage Mac stock, I quite liked it, but the loyal MS users hated it. It was a break from the past. Innovation is supposed to be change for the better, but change for the loyal users is not good. Why, with this sort of change, they could bugger off and try Mac OS or Ubuntu, like their children keep pestering them to do.

Microsoft, though, was on a roll with Office 2007. Windows 7 was more of the same and it has become beloved. 'We need to innovate', cried MS management and out came Windows 8. Although our sysadmins tell us that it is faster and more stable than Windows 7, it is very different from what went before. Why even Mac OS X is more familiar to what went before than Windows 8.

Microsoft's problem is that they have very little experience listening to the end-user. They've rarely done so in the past, why should they do so now? MS products were usually foisted upon people, not necessarily against their will, mind you. Apple is also like this but unlike Apple, MS's CEO didn't know what the people wanted. That being said, Apple's (previous) CEO has said that the people don't know what they want, but that is another story.

Microsoft need to ask themselves if they really want to be in the tablet space. Being late to the party is no bad thing. Having a very desirable product is.

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