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* Posts by Matt 21

341 posts • joined 19 Jun 2009

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Google spends in three months on data centers what used to take a year

Matt 21
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@Don I have to disagree

Well, in one respect anyway. I agree that a lot of wealthy people, like the one you describe just can't stop but this isn't quite the same thing.

Look at the early days of mobile phone companies. They were (and many still are) run ridiculously badly because they were making so much money they just didn't care. All they looked for was "the next big thing". If the marketing people said we need X it didn't matter how stupid it was, that's what we did. Testing didn't matter, just get it to market.

It's only now that mobile technology is becoming a commodity that this sort of thing is stopping (well there are some projects.....).

I was suggesting that Google may be in this early phase too.

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Matt 21
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Sometimes I wonder about all of this.....

We're told that Google are really clever and process masses of data with wonderful technology and that we all ought to copy them.

Perhaps the truth is that their growth has been fuelled by easy cash which means they used whatever technique their developers thought of first and then threw money at the hardware to make it work and then more money to try and make the original idea work.... It wouldn't surprise me if it turned out that data was massively duplicated as well due to projects running independently without any consideration to any other project.

In which case we oughtn't copy them unless we're sitting on a shed load of cash we don't care about throwing away.

Still, the people behind Google are rich enough so probably don't care......

There endeth my day dreaming for the day :-)

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Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed

Matt 21
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Re: my tuppence worth

"In 1996, twin core CPU systems were a rare novelty and hugely expensive. "

Hmm, multiple CPU systems were quite common though and all the sites I worked with were on 4, or 8 CPUs with a few richer companies on more. From an RDBMS point of view there's not much difference between a core and a CPU in terms of how the RDBMS is designed and coded.

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Matt 21
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Re: I don't know where to start

@ ByeLaw101

Thanks that's a good start!

"Furthermore, in contrast to its competitors, all tables or one table at a time can be migrated."

Nope, Sybase can already do that and has been able to for seven years or so. I'm sure it is not alone.

Perhaps I was a little harsh in my first comment but it does read to me as if it has been written by someone with little experience in the DBA world.

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Matt 21
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I don't know where to start

I don't wish to appear rude but this article is so full of errors I don't know where to start...... I'm lost for words......

Oh, I give up there's so much wrong here that I'd need to publish a comment the size of the original article.

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MIT boffins moot tsunami-proof floating nuke power plants

Matt 21
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Re: MIT boffins moot tsunami-proof floating nuke power plants

They do, when they get accurate weather reports and have enough time to do so. Friend of mine worked on one and was caught in a hurricane.

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Matt 21
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Well nuclear powered subs exist, as do nuclear powered air craft carriers.......

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Fusion-io: Ah, Microsoft. I see there's in-memory in SQL Server 2014... **GERONIMO!**

Matt 21
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Re: Perhaps I'm misunderstanding what they've done...

The buffer or cache is common to all ACID compliant RDBMSs I know of. However, it's a read cache, all writes eventually find their way onto disk. Information which would be needed in case of a rollback/rollforward after a hardware failure is written at the point of commit. This, in effect, means performance is limited by the speed the disk can write this essential data (other data being written at a time convenitent to the system, to generalise a bit).

What MS SQL Server is now trying to offer is a DB which sits in memory so writes will never go to disk. As the RDBMS knows writes will never go to disk it can also ditch some of the logic around logging etc. This provides added benefits over simply using a RAM disk as people have done in the past.

MS hasn't quite got this 100% yet and there are therefore limits to the SQL you can use in such a DB. Sybase, as mentioned above, have no limits and there are even extra possibilities, like mixing and matching tables in memory, on disk, on disk but limited recovery, using a template DB with data etc.

I'm sure there are other RDBMSs which can do the same.

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Matt 21
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Re: 10 years+ later

I'd have to agree in that the MySQL offering isn't quite the same thing. This isn't just a RAM disk being put behind a DB.

On the other hand Sybase, for example, has had an in memory database without restrictions for about 7 years.

On the other, other hand each mainstream enterprise RDBMS has got features the others haven't, then the others catch up and then new features are added..........

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Microsoft's Nadella: SQL Server 2014 means we're all about data

Matt 21
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I think he's talking about in memory databases. However, SQL Server still hasn't got that fully working yet as there are a number of limitations which mean it's not usable for most people. Let's see if they can remove the limitations with the next release.

On the other hand, as you mention, you'll need to either not care about losing the data or you'll need a battery backup and a lot of faith that neither Windows, nor SQL Server, nor your hardware will ever fail.

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Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS

Matt 21
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My reading of the article suggests only 542.1 million accounts have ever sent a tweet and only 23 percent of those have tweeted in the last month. Which gives 124.7 million. If you then start to remove the ones who send less than 100 tweets and then, as you suggest, the ones who tweet about one direction etc. then it look to me that you could well be talking about less than 50 million which isn't a great deal is it? Imagine how many fewer there'd be if the BBC didn't push it all the time.

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Tesla cars can now 'do an ET' without hurting anyone's bottom line

Matt 21
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Re: FTFY

Exactly, it's a US company and the US government can make them get the data and then stop Tesla telling you. Or they can simply hack in and get it without telling anyone.

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Microsoft in 1-year Windows XP survival deal with UK govt

Matt 21
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While I agree that the money has been wasted it's a bit daft to say "If anyone had shown this level of inertia, sloth and general incompetence in the private sector they would rightly be out on their ear.". I've seen several places I've recently worked who are in the same position and they are private financial institutions and nobody is "out on their ear" for it.

Having worked most of my life in the private sector I've seen the same level of waste as the public sector and I've seen people promoted or given bonuses for it.

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Chinese company counters pollution by importing fresh air

Matt 21
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I'm curious

How does pollution become epidemic? How does it pass from one person to the other? What's an epidemic portion?

Interesting that the article mentions Paris but not the UK which has problems today and is being prosecuted for doing nothing about pollution despite 15 years of warnings.

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Vodafone brings African tech to Europe

Matt 21
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Re: Interesting to see if banks respond

Not sure how this will help the majority working abroad in the EU (specifically those from Eurzone countries).

If I'm from, say Spain and I'm working in Germany I've got access to cash machines without commission and I can transfer cash between Eurozone countries without charge. I've also probably got free Internet banking.

I think this would only appeal to those without bank accounts who are working abroad.

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Matt 21
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Re: A lot of misconceptions here..

Thanks, that answers some of my questions/points from above.

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Matt 21
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Not sure I can see this working well

1. SMS delivery is not guaranteed. I've occasionally received text messages days late.

2. While I can see that security on very basic phones might be OK I wouldn't trust my Smartphone with real money.

3. SMS isn't very secure so intercepts are quite easy.

4. How do I quickly find out if the message I've received is a genuine payment or not? Not a problem for sending cash to family but for paying for stuff it's important.

5. You'd need to be pretty careful not to mistype a number when sending money as I doubt you could get your cash back.

Perhaps I've misread the article and the text is just a confirmation of what's happened. In that case my only concern remains my smartphone which I'm convinced is insecure.

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Say WHAT? ATVOD claims 44k Brit primary school kids look at smut online each month

Matt 21
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Re: Does not add up!

Even if you do accept the figures they are out of context. How many kids in my generation looked at porn in mags? I suspect the numbers haven't changed much.

The other point is that if they already only accept payment (obviously some don't) then that means that parents are not only allowing their kids to look at porn but they're also allowing them to use their credit cards.

Of course the other possibility is that these figures are grossly exaggerated and that most kids who do look at porn are looking at free porn, which means any plans to work with payments processors are so much rubbish........

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Hot, young under-25s: Lonely slab strokers who shun TV

Matt 21
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....and similarly, just because I watch things on a TV doesn't mean I'm watching live broadcast TV. 99% of what I watch on the TV is either stuff I record and watch when it suits me (and so I can skip the ads and pause when I want) or it's downloaded.

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Matt 21
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Re: Stating the obvious ..

I haven't seen any evidence that under 30s are no longer watching TV. Sulky teenagers who don't want to watch what Mum and Dad are watching, yes they retreat to their rooms to watch things on whatever devices they have to hand. The same is true of some of those in their 20s which haven't managed to leave home.

The evidence seems to be though, that those who can afford TVs watch them. It seems to me that it's a mistake to confuse what teenagers do because they haven't got the cash/ability to do otherwise with what they will do when they grow up.

My kids will watch stuff on a PC if they don't like what I'm watching but they're back on the TV as soon as I go out.

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China's rare earth supply crimp plan ruled to be illegal

Matt 21
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Re: Oil?

..and I think that's the difference as far as this technical WTO ruling goes. OPEC control the extraction, they don't extract a load and then only sell the majority of it to their own countries while limiting the supply to the rest of us.

So, I would agree that it's not quite the same kind of "crime".

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Apple vows to add racially diverse EMOJIS after MILEY CYRUS TWITTER outrage

Matt 21
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Wait a minute there......

All the letters I've just typed have come out black. I've checked nearly all the characters on this keyboard and not a single one has come out white apart from the very long key at the bottom and that's apparently just a "space".

Something should be done!

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Our Moderately Sized Data analytics engine pooh-poohs Acer '30 second support' claims

Matt 21
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Re: Why the hatchet piece?

Depends what you mean by response. Most vendors I work with allow me to "log" the problem with almost no delay. Getting to speak to someone who can actually help or getting an engineer on site with the right component on the other hand...........

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Matt 21
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Stats

Well if they lie, oops sorry, I mean, have a rounding problem in their stats like this then it's hard to take any of their other claims very seriously, isn't it?

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Virtual reality? Two can play THAT GAME, says Sony: New headset revealed for the PS4

Matt 21
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Re: Hmmm...

Well I can certainly see the kids using it as excuse to punch and kick one another by "accident".

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Matt 21
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Re: Hmmm...

@Ketlan

Perhaps I'm taking your comment too seriously but you do realise that the sword isn't real?

So you can't really murder someone with it :-)

On the other hand your hand movements while wielding the pretend sword may result in you hitting the Mrs as she walks in front of you, or one of the kids or knocking some ornament or other on the floor.

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Microsoft's SQL Server 2014 early code: First look

Matt 21
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Re: There's a news article on this?

MS SQL Server is very widely used and while MainDB has many good features it's not something I'd use when I wanted something to go quickly or if I needed the richer features of an enterprise DBMS like MS SQL Server.

It's a shame the new in memory DB features are still a bit behind others like Sybase ASE but otherwise this seems like a nice small step forward.

BTW @foxyshadis I've never had any problems with Sybase admin tools. They're not perfect but then neither are MS SQL server's. Each has something the other lacks.

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Target IGNORED hacker alarms as crooks took 40m credit cards – claim

Matt 21
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Perhaps this was a head in the sand moment

On the other hand if the security software was chucking out millions of false alerts it's not surprising if the one correct one was ignored.

An employee raising concerns which were apparently ignored sounds bad but if the employee in question was always spouting off about one thing or another or if they were in a blame culture which meant that people always "expressed concerns over security" in order to cover their backsides then I can see how it would be ignored.

Of course it could just be that they screwed up :-)

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Bill Gates-backed SOLAR POO RAYGUN COMMODE unveiled

Matt 21
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Re: One slight niggle

On the plus side this could also help in countries where they've got water but chop down a lot of tress for fuel.

On the negative side I can't quite see how this works. If you have a dump some of it goes down the sides and doesn't neatly collect in a nice box at the bottom.

A flushing toilet copes with this by using water to wash down most of the "remains" but how does that work in a dry lav? I seem to be always cleaning up after the kids, even with a flushing bowl......

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The browser's resized future in a fragmented www world

Matt 21
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Re: Er what?

I tend to agree with you. Most people seem to get a Smart-phone, download loads of programs and then gradually stop using them as the novelty wears off. True enough, some keep getting used but I don't think it's quite as bigger use as certain groups would have us believe.

Perhaps another threat to the open Web is Facebook. Some Facebook nutters hardly look at the rest of the Web at all and I've seen that some shops only advertise their Facebook page. It reminds me of Compuserve from years ago.

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NZ bloke's drunken poker bet ends in 99-letter name

Matt 21
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Hmmmm

What about the pseudo oriental Noe-Kon-Dom ?

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Universal Music mulls 'all you can eat' buffet of song downloads

Matt 21
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Re: It could work

Speaking of the "singles chart", did you see the BBC documentary about it? I'd always guessed that the charts were gamed but I didn't realise the scale of it.

I can certainly sympathise with those who feel that downloading music via TPB etc. is OK after years of abuse by the music industry

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Triple-headed NHS privacy scare after hospital data reach marketers, Google

Matt 21
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Re: What has it got on its serverses?

It's also a stupid mis-use of technology. Uploading the data into a local SQL server should always be quicker than sending the same data over the internet, unless you are particularity stupid.

1TB isn't a lot of data these days and while I'm not a big fan of MS SQL server, queries should easily run in an acceptable time on a 1TB data set. It sounds to me like the person doing the work didn't know what they were doing with SQL server but had a friend at Google. I wouldn't be too fussed if it wasn't for the privacy concerns.

There are loads of Data Warehouse products out there, like Sybase IQ which can run these types of queries in seconds and don't require you to send your data to some dodgy location like Google.

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UK man Lauri Love accused of hacking US Federal Reserve

Matt 21
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Re: Not like McKinnon

I agree that the case isn't the same but I still think he should be tried in the UK. What he's allegedly done is illegal in the UK and he was in the UK when he allegedly did it.

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Frenchman eyes ocean domination with floating, mobile Bond villain lair

Matt 21
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Re: VIP deck?

...or perhaps a mirror with hidden Chinese spies filming his adventures from the other side of the mirror?

....or a walk-in wardrobe so Goodnight can hide in it awaiting her "turn"..............

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MEPs demand answers from EU antitrust chief about planned Google search biz deal

Matt 21
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Re: "Get back here and explain your actions to us"

To be fair part of the problem with Cyprus was about not wanting to bail out the Russian mafia :-) Perhaps more seriously they were also not keen on bailing out financial institutions which had been offering stupidly high interest rates but perhaps that's more a call for better regulation.

While I think you've got a point I think you'll see the same issues in any large "group". Look at the terrible way the US treated the areas hit by hurricane Katrina. Or on a smaller scale a lot of people feel that England is too London-centric. Yet, despite this, these groups continue.

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Matt 21
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Re: "Get back here and explain your actions to us"

I don't think you can say that the lack of bailouts was due to anything other than the level of banking integration and banking legal frameworks. While I've seen reluctance to bail out countries where some argue it's throwing good money after bad I'd say that the EU has held together remarkably well during the global economic crisis. Having travelled extensively over Europe in recent years I've heard surprisingly little grumbling from the people I meet and work with.

You are however right that our government gave up some of its veto rights. However that kind of thing is going to happen with any international treaty. You sign it and it's difficult to go back on, otherwise no-one will trust you.

The Lisbon treaty doesn't come into effect until later in the year and I believe any member state can force a return to the Nice treaty way of voting on a particular issue. The Nice treaty uses a population weighted method so Luxembourg (which has a population of 450000 BTW) has a smaller say than the UK.

In practice votes are usually unanimous, to quote Wiki:

"Voting practice

In practice, the Council targeted unanimous decisions, and qualified majority voting was often simply used as a means to pressure compromises for consensus. For example in 2008, 128 out of 147 Council decisions were unanimous. Within the remaining decisions, there was a total of 32 abstentions and 8 votes against the respective decision. These opposing votes were cast twice by Luxembourg and once by each of Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Spain, Netherlands, and Portugal.[21]"

I don't wish to bore people but there is a list of areas where action can be taken by majority and a list where any decision has to be unanimous. Plus any legislative change has to go before the parliament.

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Matt 21
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Re: "Get back here and explain your actions to us"

By and large I agree with what you're saying but...... Our government agreed to the reduction in veto powers and, as you say the whole commission can be removed if needs be so this or anything else can be stopped. The commission are only there to carry out the will of the parliament (and Council of Ministers). Of course in practice the commission is unlikely to be dismissed for one questionable action like this.

I read somewhere that this changes after the commissioners are re-appointed this year and that individual commissioners will be individually diminishable.

On the other hand we could argue that the Commission are just following the rules voted for by the Parliament so if MEPs feel they're not correctly interpreting those rules then, as you say, they could go to the European court.

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Your CIO is now a venture capitalist and you work at their startup

Matt 21
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...and you in your turn were copying something we were doing in the early 90s and I doubt we were the first either!

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HP: We're so down wid da kidz! Look at... er, Smithers, what DO yoof look at these days?

Matt 21
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Re: Sad state of affairs

..and may have raised an eyebrow at the article's use of "a child-like error in an job ad" :-)

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Big Data is like TEENAGE SEX

Matt 21
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Re: A word with that sub, please

Of course you would say that :-)

Coming back to "confirmation bias", it sounds to me that the' trying to say "it doesn't matter how stupid the data you get out the other end seems, you have to believe it without question".

As for the "you don"t know what to look for", I think he's trying to say "just because you didn't find anything doesn't mean Big Data is no good, it just means you're not looking in the right place.", or "only really smart people can see the emperor's new clothes".

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Facebook adds 50+ gender options: Stalking your 'Friends' just got more LGBT-friendly

Matt 21
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I know you posted AC but you've got to be "amanfrommars", who else could you be?

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SCRAP the TELLY TAX? Ancient BBC Time Lords mull Beeb's future

Matt 21
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While I agree with your point I would suggest that keeping the BBC funded in the way it is gives it the ability (under the right management) to go back up-market.

In effect it acts as a counterfoil to commercial television and prevent commercial television from degrading to the level seen in countries like the US. In other words ITV, for example, can't follow the US model too far as people would stop watching because the BBC provides an alternative.

Obviously we need to stop the BBC distorting the market too much and we need the BBC to up it's game (less celeb cooking shows and removing sections of the Winter Olympics coverage which seem to have been pitched at the worst of 11 year old school girl level).

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Minecraft developer kills Kickstarted Minecraft movie

Matt 21
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Re: Rule zero of movies - Get the rights *first*

I don't think that's true.

I can make a film about anything I like and no-one can stop me as long as I don't pretend it is authorised or use copyrighted material without permission. So the film could concentrate on the game writers early life and his existential angst as a teenager (should he have had one) but it can't show large sections of Minecraft game play.

...not that I really care that this particular film will never be made......

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New Delhi accuses Huawei of nobbling ZTE kit at state-owned telco

Matt 21
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Assuming the Indians working on this have similar skill sets to the ones we get for outsourcing I'd say the perceived attack had nothing to do with anything outside the company and that blaming a Chinese company is just a convenient excuse.

They are hoping enough dirt can be thrown that, while there'll never be any proof, people will accept that this was an attack and not a cock-up.

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Twitter offers boffins a free sip of its data firehose

Matt 21
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Re: Swelling and Swollen mound of Data from Twitter's Tw...

It does seem like a case of "Please look at us, we're really important, please don't just forget us and move on to the next big thing".

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Snowden leak: GCHQ DDoSed Anonymous & LulzSec's chatrooms

Matt 21
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Re: DDOS

....and GCHQ are not the police and DDOS doesn't seem an appropriate response. If this was really an attack on a target proven to be criminal why not just take down the target and have their access removed? They could have also blocked access to the target from the UK if the target was outside their jurisdiction.

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Life support's ABOUT to be switched off, but XP's suddenly COOL again

Matt 21
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Re: Yes, manufacturers should replace unsafe cars

You can still get parts and servicing for a '99 Fiesta. Ford haven't cut you off.

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Matt 21
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I'll say it again

..as the hype machine tries to pick up speed.

Most of the large sites I've worked on recently are running XP with security patches which are several years old. Instead they rely on security software to do the job for them. Now, some people may not think this is a good solution but on the other hand none of them have had any security problems.

So, for companies like this, there's no hurry to upgrade which is probably why lots of them aren't doing it.

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UK IT supplier placed on ASA naughty step over 'misleading' HDD ad

Matt 21
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Re: Blowhard

Perhaps he was unaware of the case until he was questioned about it. The questioner then said "there's this bloke saying...." thus giving him the info he could use in the response.

It might not be that way but it could be........

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