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* Posts by scrubber

177 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

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Climate: 'An excuse for tax hikes', scientists 'don't know what they're talking about'

scrubber
Boffin

Re: Maybe we could get a consensus

Scientist: Extreme weather is caused by global warming.

Skeptic: There has been little/no warming for 15 years.

Scientist: Don't you see? That proves it. All the energy that should have gone to heating is being used up in making more energetic storms and weather.

Skeptic: But that's not what you said...

Scientist: I have adapted the model to allow for the data not matching my previous model.

Skeptic: And tomorrow you'll adapt it again when new data arrives?

Scientist: That's [climate] science.

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Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network

scrubber
Black Helicopters

Re: On the contrary, it's up to the police to prove it WAS you, if the shit hits the fan.

It's up to the CPS to do the proving. However, the cops do the investigation and charging and leaking to the press which means you have the inconvenience of having your IT equipment taken away to be forensically investigated, the hassle of going to court, getting a lawyer, being banged up for a few hours, lots of questioning and then named in the paper as an internet kid-flik watcher - before being proven innocent in court.

And all that's before they bang you up for the bit of your hard disk with the old TrueCrypt area that you did when trying out TrueCrypt originally and have long ago forgotten the password for. Let alone that ancient USB key that's password protected but you never used more than once because it's more hassle than it's worth. Plus they want the passwords of all your online accounts because, well, children.

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Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them

scrubber

sensible laws

Won't someone think of the cartoon children?

Ban all manga now.

And burn all copies of lolita.

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Carlos: Slim your working week to just three days of toil

scrubber

Re: Double yer pleasure, double yer pain

Methinks you don't understand how expensive pension liabilities are...

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You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary

scrubber

Re: Eek!

Game of Thrones?

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Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash

scrubber

Re: Perpetual money machine

Step 4 is unreachable as any decent compiler will tell you

1-3 is an infinite loop.

Goddam code review on el reg comments. Should be getting paid for this shit.

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UN to Five Eyes nations: Your mass surveillance is breaking the law

scrubber

Re: Big deal

There is no moral authority if we do bad shit at home. It becomes do as I say, not as I do, which invalidates every sentiment we send out. Human rights are cajoled on other nations through embarrassment more than anything else and if we're 1984 what the heck place do we have telling anyone else anything. Plus the US executes minors and the mentally incompetent, so, ya know...

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Programming languages in economics: Cool research, bro, but what about, er, economics?

scrubber

Economists

I got out of economics when I realised that when an economist tests their model against the real world, it isn't their model they think has the problem.

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scrubber

crazed models of how macroeconomists think the real world works

models of how crazed macroeconomists think the real world works

FTFY

No word on optimisations, multithreading, support, maintainability, interoperability, ease of modification, ability to strap it to a pretty GUI or anything else that in the real world should determine which code should be used to do models that could, push come to shove, be done with a frigging glassblower having a coughing fit in the 40's.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MONIAC_Computer

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May: UK data slurp law is fine, but I still need EMERGENCY powers

scrubber

I am spartacus

I am not The fucking Truman Show! Mind your own fucking business.

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The Windows 8 dilemma: Win 8 or wait for 9?

scrubber

Re: Time for some truly revolutionary GUIs?

Not B.O.B. from B.A.T.?

http://www.mobygames.com/game/bat

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Dotcom crypto keys not for the FBI: NZ High Court

scrubber

Re: Getting desperate?

Don't understand how one can go to jail for (what should be) a civil offence.

Seems the lawmakers have been bought by big business to do their dirty work for them when they should be trying to sue each individual copyright breach(er) themselves. Making the taxpayer pick up the tab AND impose much harsher penalties seems a bit cheeky.

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Today's get-rich-quick scheme: Build your own bank

scrubber
Pint

Re: Im in.

Absolute doddle. People have two accounts, one safer than houses deposits, the other available to be used for credit for other account holders.

People wishing to use short term, small credit facilities, can do so under similar conditions to Wonga (better because they've built up a history with us) and only the funds depositors wish to put at risk are ever used to give credit.

This is much easier than people realise. Have a beer.

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Snowden's Big Brother isn't as Orwellian as you'd think

scrubber

Re: "Orwellian" isn't an absolute

Rights are taken, not given.

This is why civil rights disputes end up in civil war or civil violence, usually perpetrated by those in possession of those rights who don't want to see others granted them.

It is also why the might of state has to be fought at every turn because even when they claim new powers/rights in order to help us they will always, eventually, turn that round against us.

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Mobe-orists, beware: Stroking while driving could land you a £4k fine

scrubber
Pint

Re: For some definition of "use"

Speaking on a phone, or having a conversation with a passenger, takes your attention away from the road quite significantly - we do not multi-task well - and is more of a risk, statistically speaking, than having a few beers before driving.

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Google's driverless car: It'll just block our roads. It's the WORST

scrubber
Devil

Re: Middle Laners Anyone?

You indicate, the group recognise the car outside wants to cut in, the group splits leaving a gap and off you go.

Of course this could lead to people breaking up platoons just for a laugh by flashing their indicators next to a convoy.

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Tesla's TOP SECRET gigafactories: Lithium to power world's vehicles? Let's do the sums

scrubber

Re: Why bother?

Avoiding this:

http://earthfirstjournal.org/newswire/2013/10/21/china-smog-emergency-shuts-down-city-of-11-million-people/

Or this: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2158574/Diesel-engine-exhaust-fumes-major-cancer-risk.html

You still have to generate the electricity to power transport but doing it away from people seems sensible.

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You know all those resources we're about to run out of? No, we aren't

scrubber

Re: Ahem. @ BlueGreen @Squander Two

Starting at the end:

That's NOT what Moore's Law is (and it's not a law in any scientific sense anyway.) Moore's Law is about the density of transistors and it's still ticking along, albeit maybe doubling every 2 years now. And in terms of MHz, we went multi-core rather than single core high speed, so it could be argued processing power is still increasing at an exponential rate even if baseline speeds aren't. Seems to me like the magic IS continuing.

> we still have no policy for dealing with nuke waste (something I know about) etc.

Sure we do - use the radioactive waste to create more energy. We just opt not to do it because the by-products get more and more nasty and more and more dangerous if they were ever released into the wild/taken by bad people.

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How Google's Android Silver could become 'Wintel for phones'

scrubber

M9 on Amazon?

They could opt for the Amazon fork and all Amazon would require in return was that they put the Amazon store on rather than Google Play. They might even gain access to LoveFilm which might be a nice little bonus.

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scrubber

Wintel

No mention that what Intel did was highly illegal and has led to little to no competition in the x86 market since Core since AMD was illegally stopped from gaining market share and R&D funds for its superior Athlon processor over Intel's Netburst idiocy? Or that Microsoft was repeatedly referred to the competition authorities for anti-competitive practices and fined quite heavily?

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Grad student creates world's thinnest wires – just three atoms wide

scrubber

Re: Not easy

It was in a scouse accent in my head.

Scouse calm == regular folks' cam

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scrubber

Re: Not easy

You're right, would that I could do that comment over again.

Would. Found one.

Wood = Would (wʊd)

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scrubber

Re: Not easy

"There are no silent L's in the English language that do not modify the pronunciation/sound in any way."

Calm down, you're half way to a heart attack. Take some soothing balm and maybe eat a bit of salmon.

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UK.gov data sell-off row: HMRC denies claims it'll flog YOUR private info

scrubber

Re: Welcome to our country

I didn't vote for this! Mainly because I don't vote.

I don't vote for someone to represent me when they actually are controlled by party whips. I don't vote for parties who claim to stand for what the people believe in but actually put forth policies strongly influenced by their donors. I don't vote in an election where more than 60% of those who actually vote don't vote for the party which claims a landslide victory and a mandate from the people to implement policies which most people didn't vote for. I don't vote in a country which has an un-elected upper chamber with bishops sitting. I don't vote in an election in a country that claims to be a democracy but has an un-elected head of state who can veto any law passed by the houses of parliament.

In short - you can't blame me.

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Anatomy of OpenSSL's Heartbleed: Just four bytes trigger horror bug

scrubber

Why is heartbeat a variable length?

Why not have a fixed length test to check server is up and running? Surely a 4 or 8 byte fixed length message is enough to prove that it responds with what you sent and then there is no need for the length parameter.

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That's it, we're all really OLD: Google's Gmail is 10 ALREADY

scrubber

Re: Shame about scanning emails to target advertising though

The point isn't that the free service scans your mail, it's that Google made the legal argument that it wasn't 'reading' your emails since it was an automated scanning system that went through them. Which allowed the NSA to store and scan every American's emails without a warrant as they're "not reading them, even Google says so" and present that to various secretive courts.

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'Arrogant' Snowden putting lives at risk, says NSA's deputy spyboss

scrubber

Dear NSA,

If you're doing nothing wrong you have nothing to fear.

Cunts, cunts, cunts.

Regards,

Scrubber.

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Elon Musk slams New Jersey governor over Tesla direct sales ban

scrubber

land of the free

Home of the brave.

Capitalist country my ass. Corporate reacharounds are de rigeur.

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'No, I CAN'T write code myself,' admits woman in charge of teaching our kids to code

scrubber

Which language? Single or multi-threaded?

Writing a page of HTML is to code as painting my wall is to the Mona Lisa.

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Bitcoin value plunges as Mt.Gox halts withdrawals and Russia says 'nyet'

scrubber

Re: Run on the bank? - read the wiki page

"But they have far more than £100 in deposits to cover it."

No! That is the whole frigging point, When the financial wizardry stops they have EXACTLY £100 in cash. And a nominal £900 in loans and a nominal £1000 in deposits. But there is only £100 in existence (in this closed system).

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scrubber

Re: Run on the bank? - not quite there yet...

Let's consider two actors, me and the bank.

I deposit 100k, they lend me 90k, which I deposit, they lend me 81k, which I deposit etc. etc.

There ever only was 100k, but the bank reports 1m in assets and 1m in liabilities. I report 1m in assets and 900k in liabilities.

something has gone wrong somewhere and "the same chocolate biscuit" just doesn't cut it. Not least because the bank and myself have access to much higher degrees of finance because of our 1m assets rather than my actual 100k assets. The bank is doing this with hundreds of thousands od customers.

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scrubber

Re: Run on the bank? - read the wiki page

I ain't Spartacus, you miss the part where the magic sauce is applied:

I store £100 at the bank, they are forced to keep, say, £10 on hand so they lend out £90. At some point in the scheme of things that £90 becomes a deposit again for someone else (not necessarily at that bank, but let's have a single bank to simplify things).

That £90 deposit (which is the loan from my original saving) then allows the bank to lend out another £81. The £81 becomes a deposit too which allows the bank to lend another £73 etc. etc.

Based on the £100 initial deposit the bank can lend, through just 3 iterations, £244 (and, when all is said and done, about £900 total). This is known as the money multiplier. Like I said, they lend out a multiple of the original deposit.

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scrubber

Run on the bank?

You can't have a run on the bank in Bitcoin, or you shouldn't, as the bank simply stores the money, unlike regular banks which not only lend out your deposits to others but engage in fractional reserve banking where they actually lend out multiples of your savings in spite of not actually having funds to cover it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractional_reserve_banking

Which one sounds more like a shell game or ponzi scheme?

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Gmail falls offline, rest of Google struggles on: NO! Not error code 93!

scrubber

Re: Gmail

They took the label off - although there was something in Labs that allowed you to put it back on, but I think that's gone now.

http://googleblog.blogspot.co.uk/2009/07/google-apps-is-out-of-beta-yes-really.html

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scrubber

Gmail

Back into beta?

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Vile Twitter trolls thrown in the cooler for rape abuse tweet spree

scrubber

Not always an aggravating factor

"one of the statutory aggravating factors for sentencing for most offences (might be all offences - I'm a little rusty) is that the offence was carried out under the influence of alcohol."

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2070562/Muslim-girl-gang-kicked-Rhea-Page-head-yelling-kill-white-slag-FREED.html

"A gang of Muslim women who attacked a passer-by in a city centre walked free from court after a judge heard they were ‘not used to being drunk’ because of their religion"

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Ex-NSA guru builds $4m encrypted email biz - but its nemesis right now is control-C, control-V

scrubber

Is this a case of...

Poacher turned Gamekeeper?

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Scientists discover supervolcano trigger that could herald humanity's doom

scrubber

Re: Balloon

Yes, you cover it with tape first to prevent catastrophic destruction.

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scrubber
Paris Hilton

Terrible stats from the author

@Retiredgerald

Have an upvote for getting there before me.

One thing though, why limit it to one, why not have a few pop their corks at once (geologically speaking)? Could be an extinction event for us if a few went.

Paris, as statistically speaking I should be shagging her next week.

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HOLD THE PHONE, NSA! Judge bans 'Orwellian' US cellphone records slurp

scrubber

Re: I like the part where he rejects the governments arguments about plaintiffs' standing

"a good read for someone like myself who believes in civil liberties"

Perhaps a book about Santa would be more appropriate this time of year. He's about as likely to show up in the US as civil liberties.

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BT network-level STOCKINGs-n-suspenders KILLER arrives in time for Xmas

scrubber

Get the big boys involved

If everyone complains that there is pr0n on google and bing then the filters will have to be removed sharpish - or the law will look like exactly what it is, capricious, ill thought out, unworkable, and pandering.

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Oh no, RBS has gone titsup again... but is it JUST BAD LUCK?

scrubber

Banks?

You ceased to be banks years ago, you are now IT centres. The sooner you realise this and invest appropriately, and promote and listen to IT people, the sooner you will overtake your competitors and enhance profitability.

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Coroner suggests cars should block mobile phones

scrubber

Who cares about brake lights?

You don't need a red glow to tell you you're getting closer to the muppet in front. Lorry driver 100% at fault here.

Hint: It's called a stopping distance for a reason.

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Why Bletchley Park could never happen today

scrubber

Fuck all you

Can I vote for a party that accepts up to, say, 7,000 deaths per annum as acceptable collateral damage to be the freest and most liberal (classical sense) country in the world where my government looks after big stuff and has a priority of protecting my freedom rather than my life?

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Deploying Turing to see if we have free will

scrubber

Basic failures

In an article that has such pretentions then one cannot skim over such a basic assumptions as:

"I" exist as a meaningful entity for a period of time great enough for "me" to make a decision. This is basically untrue as the very decision making process the system (commonly known as you) undertakes changes in subtle ways that very system and so "I" change as "I" cogitate, consciously or otherwise, about any options.

"Do I make my decisions using recursive reasoning?" Yes, but is the I referred to here the conscious mind, or the complex, unseen, committee of brain parts that generally have a big neurological shouting match before your conscious self is even aware of it, by which point the decision has generally already been made and all your conscious mind can do is to rationalise the decision and/or punish/reward that decision to encourage less/more decisions to be made of that ilk.

"Can I model and simulate – at least partially – my own behavior and that of other deciders?" Yes, but not very accurately. Unless one simulates the brain (and hormones and electrolytes and neurological pathways in the gut and blood sugar and ... etc.), in which case computing power could allow all your decisions to, potentially, be either perfectly predicted or statistically predicted (depending on whether QM uncertainty plays any part in the biochemical-neurological processes). If a computer can predict your decisions before you make them, then in what sense do you have 'free will'? Even if you cannot know what you will do as that feeds into an infinitely regressing feedback loop (which isn't necessarily true) then the fact outside observers can know in advance your precise actions and reactions (and potentially set up scenarios to push you to certain, known outcomes) means you are not free.

Just because I can't see the predictions of my own behaviour beforehand does not make me free any more than my inability to see my opponents cards at poker makes them random.

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Baldness fix from foreskin follicles

scrubber

"donor samples"

In both legal and medical terminology a donor* must voluntarily give whatever thing is being donated. I would strongly suggest that none of the foreskins used here were voluntarily surrendered by their owners.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/donor:

2. (Medicine) Med any person who voluntarily gives blood, skin, a kidney etc., for use in the treatment of another person

3. (Law) Law

a. a person who makes a gift of property

b. a person who bestows upon another a power of appointment over property

*Okay, in organ donation the next of kin gets to make the legal decision as the donor is not legally able to make that decision.

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NSA boss Alexander and deputy to take a hike next year

scrubber

Snowden for NSA chief

The problem is none of the politicians will come out and say that a few Boston bombings are a cheap price to pay for the freedom and prosperity that the US (pre-9/11) enjoyed. Even a 9/11 per year is a cheap price to pay - although placing locks on the cockpit doors would stop terrorists using planes as fuel-laden guided missiles. But apparently fear, paranoia, xenophobia and claims of "making America safe" play better in the polls than freedom.

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Apple's Steve Jobs was a SEX-crazed World War II fighter pilot, says ex

scrubber
WTF?

"his premature death"

What does that even mean?

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Why a Robin Hood tax on filthy rich City types is the very LAST thing needed

scrubber

Re: What does automated trading add?

Automated trading allows, among other things, people to buy or sell large amounts of shares at the most efficient prices by spreading trades throughout the day and placing most of them when the volume would be least noticed. It also allows shares to be bought as soon as a pre-chosen price is hit maximising the number bought/sold at that price.

Basically, if I have an automated trading tool it allows me to hide my knowledge about demand/supply of a share from the market as a whole. This is generally beneficial because it allows the share price to reflect the fundamentals of the underlying assets and dividend streams rather than knowledge about what some person is doing. c.f. Gordon Brown (economic genius) informing the markets that he would be selling billions of dollars worth of gold a day before he actually did it, artificially depressing the market price and costing the UK billions of pounds.

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IPCC: Yes, humans are definitely behind all this global warming we aren't having

scrubber

Your models repeatedly fail to predict climate, your models about what will happen to countries 'in danger' have proven to be flawed, there is no serious prospect of redistributing any carbon-esque taxes to those who actually suffer from changes to the climate so... yeah, let's retool our entire economy, starve millions, and cost countless future economic benefits so that governments can impact consumer behaviour and further snoop into our lives.

Let scientists do science, let economists tell the politicians likely economic impacts and then, and only then, let the politicians decide which of the available options are most palatable to the populous.

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