* Posts by Oliver 7

196 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

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Jim Beam me up, Scotty! WHISKY from SPAAACE returns to Earth

Oliver 7

Re: Shame it's Ardbeg

Peated whisky can be an acquired taste but, believe me, it can be acquired. Traditionally the sweet sherry-casked whisky of Speyside was touted to American and Japanese markets for its easy-drinking qualities but, increasingly, whisky aficionados seek out the smokiest expressions such as Laphroaig and Ardbeg from the tiny island of Islay. The island has eight distilleries and the peat there has a unique 'medicinal' character.

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Oliver 7
IT Angle

It's just a PR Stunt

http://www.scotchmaltwhisky.co.uk/ardbegsupernova2014.htm

Although none of this whisky has been to space, it comes with a price tag of £124.99, which is a circa £50 mark-up on their last 'committee release'. Lumsden is a very knowledgeable distiller but a shameless marketer.

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EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass

Oliver 7

Re: Decline of the High Street ...

"33% of retail space is empty."

You'll probably find most of the closed outlets are owned by lawyers working on behalf of Tesco. When the footfall becomes low enough, in they come as a knight in shining armour with a redevelopment plan...

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Ab phab: Apple is Britain's coolest brand YET AGAIN

Oliver 7

Double plus good

Remember those 80s ads? Hardly the choice of the non-conformist these days.

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eBay, Facebook, Tumblr ALL go TITSUP in me-too MULTI-FAIL

Oliver 7

I still don't exist

My account completely vanished some time between 7pm and 8pm last night and has yet to reappear. Looking at Twitter it would seem I'm not the only one.

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Déjà vu: Virgin Media jacks up broadband prices

Oliver 7

Re: Might go back to BT

Yeah, I was with them when it was BlueYonder all the way up to a couple of years ago. In those days dial-up and ADSL services were about as expensive and complete pants. The annoying thing was they knew to price the bundles only just higher than the cost of dropping the landline (and why would they need a landline network when they have fibre cable right?), really cynical!

Anyway, I moved to the sticks a couple of years ago and I'm getting 10Mbs-15Mbs with a TalkTalk bundle for half the price! It's amazing how far ADSL has come, always worth a look if you haven't checked for a while.

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UK's pirate-nagging VCAP scheme WON'T have penalties – report

Oliver 7

Stop!

Reminds me of Robin Williams stand-up sketch about UK policemen. "'Stop!', or I'll say 'Stop!' again!".

That aside, this may actually have some effect. Some people may be spooked enough that they stop file-sharing. However, after more than a decade of wrangles, inaction and a total failure on the part of content providers to provide reasonably priced, comprehensive and legal alternatives, file-sharing is now an entrenched part of our culture. We all know that everyone from housewives to policemen to politicians are now au fait with the techniques and the lack of consequences. And their children surely don't even give it a second thought.

The reality is that copyright legislation and enforcement in its current form is designed for a pre-digital age and is effectively dead in the water. And the fact that the film companies keep making record profits and the major labels haven't folded suggests that the moral panic around piracy has little foundation. Yet we are still left with the execrable DEA on the statute books thanks to Mssrs Mandelson and Geffen:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Economy_Act_2010#Industry_lobbying

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Say WHAT? ATVOD claims 44k Brit primary school kids look at smut online each month

Oliver 7

Re: 44k Brit kids look at smut online each month

If you have ergot, you should give it a good wipe-down with an anti-fungal cleaner!

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Instagram: You'll LOVE our 'enjoyable' new feature. Yes, it's adverts

Oliver 7

Put down of the day for me, thanks! :-D

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Profit healthy, sales up, 4,000 staff face axe. Cisco CEO, here's your pay doubled to $21m

Oliver 7

Re: to Johan

"I wish there was a treatment for me so that I could become one of them."

As good as it may sound, by the time you were one of them you'd be barely human. There is more to life...

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Steve Jobs AIRBRUSHED from history by APPLE months before his death

Oliver 7

Re: "bling blong! Expensive"

I agree, it is truly disgusting! I still don't understand what exactly they were granted a patent for though. Revolving doors have been around a long time now!

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RBS Mainframe Meltdown: A year on, the fallout is still coming

Oliver 7

Is the editor off this week?

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Culture Sec: You - Google. Where's the off switch for all this filth?

Oliver 7

Re: Harmful... harmful to whom?

Thanks for the J.S. Mill quote! His work is fast being forgotten and the principles he stood for and which have informed much debate on statute down the years are fast being eroded, from minimum pricing on alcohol to freedom of thought.

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Oliver 7

Complexity

The minister added:

"the complexity of dealing with harmful online content is not an acceptable reason for the current situation to persist."

These people just do not 'get it'. They are fascists in all but name. I can't even form the words to express my repugnance at this way of thinking!

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Cisco gobbles UK mobe mast maker - you know where this is going

Oliver 7

Re: Femtocell

Yup. Sounds like a brand of female condoms to me.

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Ten serious sci-fi films for the sentient fan

Oliver 7

Re: Strange Days

Strange Days started brilliantly with a great concept but it's trawling the depths by the end with the most ridiculous conspiracy theory dénouement.

Gattaca is a great shout. You could have mentioned Forbidden Planet had the first entirely electronic soundtrack (which wasn't released as 'music') and, what's more, was composed by a woman, Bebe Barron.

Dark Star, Silent Running (flawed), Dune (seriously, but again flawed) and Alien might have been candidates for me. I think Alien in particular, although being as much horror as SF, raises some serious themes (genetic adaptation/dystopian future/corporate exploitation/human flaws/woman as heroine) and spectacular plot twists/shocks (chest burst scene/Ash as a robot) that were so new and influential at the time that they have coloured everything since and detracted from its radicalism today.

Guilty pleasures - Them, Rollerball, Robocop.

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Congratulations, freetards: You are THE FIVE PER CENT

Oliver 7

It's amazing that only 5% of us are at it! In fact I don't really believe that, if we all paid for what we consume we'd be impoverished, e.g. you'd have to be a millionaire to fill an iPod. And the 'legitimate' income streams denied to the distributors isn't somehow wasted, it all goes back into the economy in other ways, not many paytards seem to acknowledge this (OK, some might go on recreational drugs). Hopefully it will stay this way and the intransigence at Westminster will continue. I reckon most of their disinterest is down to them not having the first fucking clue about how the Interwebs work, their ignorance is certainly apparent when they have to discuss it (cf. DEB). That and the fact the PM's wife isn't a performing artist (to whom could I be alluding?).

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Health pros: Alcohol is EVIL – raise its price, ban its ads

Oliver 7

Tyrrany

If we are to be mothered, mother must know best. . . . In every age the men who want us under their thumb, if they have any sense, will put forward the particular pretension which the hopes and fears of that age render most potent. They ‘cash in.’ It has been magic, it has been Christianity. Now it will certainly be science. . . . Let us not be deceived by phrases about ‘Man taking charge of his own destiny.’ All that can really happen is that some men will take charge of the destiny of others. . . . The more completely we are planned the more powerful they will be.

. . . .

Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. They may be more likely to go to Heaven yet at the same time likelier to make a Hell of earth. Their very kindness stings with intolerable insult. To be ‘cured’ against one’s will and cured of states which we may not regard as disease is to be put on a level of those who have not yet reached the age of reason or those who never will; to be classed with infants, imbeciles, and domestic animals.

—C. S. Lewis, God in the Dock

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North Korea's satellite a dud, say US astroboffins

Oliver 7

I'm not a fan of American foreign policy but North Korea really is a wacky place. I don't understand why we provide them with food aid, whilst they pursue ballistics and nuclear research. If we stopped providing aid and the country eventually fell apart is this scenario really scarier than the present regime? Surely China would step in anyway?

As far as Iran goes I entirely understand their perception that they need nuclear weapons, most of their borders are with countries either under direct occupation by the US, with a US presence or under the influence of the US. The US have also armed their mortal enemies in the region and Syria is no longer a powerful ally to them. However at least they can feed their own people and afford a space programme at the same time!

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Samsung states sales date for Galaxy S III Mini

Oliver 7
FAIL

A 5MP camera? Are you shitting me? At next renewal I would like a phone with a 3.7in-4in screen but a good spec, is it too much to ask? Apparently so.

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UK's Intellectual Property Obliteration office attacked by Parliament

Oliver 7
Thumb Down

It's in the first line

"With the British economy now increasingly dependent on "intangibles" - brands, designs, patents and copyright"

Instead of, er, making stuff? Thatcher ripped the soul out of this nation, Blair violated the open wounds, now we're all busy trying to sell branded coffee to each other (with all proceeds going straight to the Caymans). Technology has devastated the ability of monopolists to create artificial scarcity in media markets. That's a genie that's not about to go back in the bottle any time soon, perhaps the IPO simply realise this.

Have a nice day now!

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Affected by ebook price-fixing? Amazon has a few shiny pennies for you

Oliver 7
FAIL

Re: Pricing Blows

Agreed, out and out greed. The move to digital publishing should have been smoother than that of digital music but it seems no one learned anything, if anything it's been worse with format wars and next-gen DRM. Again and again we hear of examples of corporations showing their true colours, i.e. they're out to gouge you wherever they can. Digital publishing offered certain 'opportunities' and they just couldn't help themselves. It must also be said charging VAT on eBooks is a major, major fail.

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Windows 8 pricing details announced as preorders begin

Oliver 7

Re: Back to the future

Is that the view from the TARDIS' window as you are transported to the relevant marketing era?

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Six months under water and iPhone 4 STILL WORKS

Oliver 7

Re: "Immersion, lake and palm 'er" Oh God. You ought to be shot for that one Caleb!

Beat me to it, candidate for Worst Subtitle 2012?

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Sony Vaio T13 Ultrabook review

Oliver 7
FAIL

"After all the scare stories about hugely expensive ultrabooks, it’s good to see a premium-brand, latest-tech model set at a mid-range price.

Suggested Price: £779"

For shizzle?

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UK.gov's minimum booze price dream demolished

Oliver 7

Tyranny of the do-gooders

"Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. They may be more likely to go to Heaven yet at the same time likelier to make a Hell of earth. Their very kindness stings with intolerable insult. To be ‘cured' against one's will and cured of states which we may not regard as disease is to be put on a level of those who have not yet reached the age of reason or those who never will; to be classed with infants, imbeciles, and domestic animals."

[C.S. Lewis]

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Oliver 7

Re: A lot of indignation here...

One could argue that the reduction in tobacco consumption is as much or more to do with a change in attitudes and awareness of the health dangers than the pricing. Besides there is a roaring and ever-increasing black market in tobacco now. That complicates health studies, deprives the treasury of income and funds other smuggling activities (some you may approve of but these are not nice people ultimately!).

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Oliver 7

I'm sure I remember someone telling me that in Turkey committing a crime whilst drunk is an aggravating factor. Here, drunkenness is sometimes offered as an excuse (at least for a lack of recall) and may be a mitigating factor in crimes, in Turkey the logic is that being drunk makes the crime even more irresponsible and the sentence will be even more severe. Even if I was being led up the garden path, this logic makes sense to me. It's fine to drink but drink responsibly, it's even fine to be completely bladdered, just do it quietly. If you look at other countries it's clear to see that most of our problems with alcohol are not with the alcohol per se but are social and relate to our attitudes to and expectations of alcohol, it's our culture that needs to change.

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Oliver 7

Finally, Andrew, we agree on something...

For a paytard, you do at least acknowledge the lessons of history. And as far as taxation on alcohol goes I am with you, and John Stuart Mill who condemned the prohibitionist doctrine as:

"A theory of "social rights," the like of which probably never before found its way into distinct language: being nothing short of this—that it is the absolute social right of every individual, that every other individual shall act in every respect exactly as he ought; that whosoever fails thereof in the smallest particular, violates my social right, and entitles me to demand from the legislature the removal of the grievance. So monstrous a principle is far more dangerous than any single interference with liberty; there is no violation of liberty which it would not justify; it acknowledges no right to any freedom whatever"

In Scotland the otherwise populist SNP are pushing forward with minimum pricing, I only hope they founder in the European courts (the Scotch Whisky Assoc. has already moved to challenge it). The SNP point to the infamous Sheffield University study for the touted social benefits but, as we know, that is based on pseudo-science and the original findings have now been reined back. Minimum pricing will simply provide the stimulus to black market booze that we have seen with tobacco market and will end with people simply turning to illicit sources and/or other drugs. I shouldn't care, I like expensive ales and whiskies, but I'm a libertarian and I do.

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News Ltd's Australian chief demands copyright overhaul

Oliver 7

Re: Tell him to go fuck himself.

"Our very economies rely on the notion of being able to own stuff we can't see or touch."

Well that's fine for those people who say that this ephemeral 'stuff' that they assert a claim to has a value defined by them and that everyone should pony up for it on a piecemeal basis. It's also fine for them as long as they can assert control over the reproduction and distribution of said stuff. In your world everyone just needs to play along nice!

In reality copyright law is (in some contexts) justifiable and workable in a world of physical products and distribution networks. In your quote however you unwittingly touch upon the game changer. Electronic products are by their very nature capable of being infinitely reproduced and distributed for a cost that tends towards zero. You, and the banger in the article, need a reality check as everything has changed and the genie is not going back into the bottle. The social and economic costs of enforcing old school copyright law in this Brave New World simply isn't worth it. Instead of asking for copyright laws to be applied to the information age, this guy should be exploring alternative ways of exploiting the biggest opportunity since the industrial revolution.

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SCO keeps dying, and dying, and dying

Oliver 7
Mushroom

SCO is dead?

Let me reach into my little bag of care...

...oh dear, it appears to be empty.

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God-botherers burst onto IPTV Freeview: The End is Nigh

Oliver 7

Re: Firewall?

On holiday in Greece once with a satellite service, I laughed for hours watching the religious channels, evangelist preachers with their non sequitur logic, imam call-ins with worried punters asking if they were allowed tassles on their prayer mat, etc. If you ever think you're taking life too seriously it's just the tonic!

That's not to say wall to wall channels of utter pish is what we want, but!

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How to fix the broken internet economy: START HERE

Oliver 7

Re: I'd like them to stop region control

Did you even read the article? Media companies can't stop people looking into other people's gardens any more and stuff like staggered releases and region control merely pisses off potentially legitimate customers.

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Watch out, Apple: HTC ruling could hurt your patent income

Oliver 7
Thumb Up

The USPO can lick the sweat from my balls!

You can't take obvious affordances, albeit in a new medium, and patent them. It's as ridiculous as saying that, in the early days of radio equipment, buttons and sliders could be patented. They can't (or shouldn't be) because they are the only obvious solutions to the technical problems they address. The US patent system is becoming as laughable as the copyright regime and is in dire need of reform.

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UK websites: No one bothers with cookie law, why should we?

Oliver 7

IANAL but I believe it actually isn't illegal to park your car on the pavement. I think it's illegal to 'drive' your car on the pavement but, if it's just parked there, that's fine. The police will only move your car if it is causing an obstruction. Of course, if there are double yellows on the road you are still liable to be ticketed, but it can be useful where there are no lines and some idiot at the council has built out a bit of pavement purely as a nuisance (I'm sure we can all testify to this phenomenon).

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HTC slips One X, Evo 4G past Apple US patent ban

Oliver 7

Patents system is...

...fucked up!

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Olympic Wenlock plod cops condemnation from Amazon wags

Oliver 7
Devil

An unwitting physical manifestation...

of our surveillance culture! Iconic!

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Creatives spin copyright licence that sticks to web

Oliver 7

Re: So what's the solution?

"very few people have any credible solutions for what should be done to fix things"

Your request for a solution pre-supposes that there is a problem. Until music could be recorded there was no problem, musicians earned a living by performing. Until movies came along actors made money in the theatre. Until TVs were common film studios made money through cinema distribution and still do. At each stage, in each form of media, there were business opportunities created by the ability to disseminate content through reproduction and distribution models that could be controlled. These conditions were created organically, just as the Internet has created a situation where the reproduction and distribution costs are tending toward zero and it has become (almost?) impossible to "protect" a viable economic model based on these models. I would ask why we should lament that? There are plenty of other industries that went to the wall because their business model didn't stack up any more - coal mining, steel etc. If you want to preserve the creative "industries" why don't we copy the EU Common Agricultural Policy and have a Common Creative Policy, where we all pay our taxes to subsidise a bunch of self-entitled, loss-making creative types? Of course I'm being facetious but, after all, agriculture is a broken business model too isn't it? We only protect it to avoid dependence on imports and prevent third world countries developing lucrative commodity markets.

Copyright is actually a grant of a monopoly on distribution, its there to protect the distribution model, not primarily the artist or creator (though Thoreau's amendment allowed certain controls on reproduction). That is why this article pays scant regard to the actual artists and creators. However creating art in its truest sense is more of a human instinct or compulsion, rather than a productive capitalist activity. I have faith that whatever economic conditions prevail, whatever the viability of creative activities, real artists will create, regardless!

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Oliver 7

DRM

...by any other name.

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Mp3Tunes files for bankruptcy

Oliver 7

"But a copy is a copy, and without a licence to make a copy (outside of a few special cases), courts don't have much choice other than to treat it as infringement."

One day we will look back and laugh, or despair if it all escalates out of control!

http://c4sif.org/2011/08/death-penalty-for-pirating-fabric-designs-in-france/

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Kelvin MacKenzie blasts 'footie rights warehouse' BSkyB

Oliver 7
Gimp

These days there is an opt-out

"Can't even watch the game or the Sugar Ray fight"

Grandmaster Flash - The Message (1982)

If you're that disgusted why not just take it for free? There are plenty of streams available. Personally I think sport is the most monopolised and over-priced form of content available, more than films, music, games, etc. There's no accounting for (or competing with) the fanaticism of some fans and their willingness to spend half their income on event/season tickets, PPVs, Sky subscriptions or £45 for a nylon t-shirt. It's close to (an evangelist) religion for many. People with a love of sport but who also have some worldly perspective simply won't subject themselves to this extortion.

The real shame of Sky et. al. is that these sports become detached from, and neglect their grass roots, particularly football, which was a working man's game. The growth of value in the game is a story of disenfranchisement for everyone except a handful of people at the top of the game (FA, FIFA, players, agents) and Sky shareholders of course. We saw recently with the Karen Murphy case how viciously determined these people are to keep milking their monopoly.

Gimp for Sky subscribers.

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Virgin Media site goes titsup in Pirate Bay payback attack

Oliver 7

Re: dammed if you do

Agreed, it's harsh, but who cares if the BPI Web site is taken off line?

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Canada failing to sufficiently protect IP rights – US report

Oliver 7
Gimp

GATT, TPP, ACTA and all that

The US relentlessly and ruthlessly pursues its commercial and foreign policy objectives and it doesn't give a shit about the collateral damage or anybody else's interests, their hypocrisy is without equal. The watchlist mentioned in the article derives from the Advisory Committee on Trade Negotiations (ACTN), which sparked into life in the early 80s, mainly in response to America's decline as a competitive manufacturing nation (and the rise of Toyota, it's always the cars that get to them!). By renegotiating international trade treaties and threatening 'trading partners' with 'sanctions', the US uses its economic might and foreign policy objectives to redefine the value of it's own IP on it's own terms thus applying a patina of legitimisation to its activities, whilst arriving at lopsided outcomes. It's a virtual rerun of the actual gunboat diplomacy it used to use, e.g. against Japan where in 1853 the US Navy 'Black ships' steamed into Uraga harbour and demanded Japan open up to trade. Well hell, they're trying to run an empire here!

Gimp because we've been taking it in the ass from Uncle Sam since Suez.

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Blackpool ICT boss: BYOD doesn't save money

Oliver 7

This is where the cloud comes in?

My workplace is developing a series of apps for iOS and Android so that we can use our smartphones to access corporate services. There is also a Citrix-style thin client tool for accessing VDI sessions from your home PC. However they don't support the user devices, they just provide secure access to the network. Over time, combined with hotdesking and home working, there must surely be savings? Essentially they're pushing the point-of-access infrastructure support costs onto their employees, though of course they don't pitch it like that ;-)

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Jeremy Hunt clings on as SpAd quits over News Corp emails

Oliver 7
Holmes

Quite! The implications also point to NI support for the Tories and a smear campaign against Gordon Brown being sewn up prior to the election with the quid pro quo being the docking of Ofcom's and the BBC's tails and the ushering through of the BSkyB deal.

Of course, this is all hearsay and the trails so far stop one layer short of Hunt and Cameron, but the timings of certain emails, meetings and announcements are almost ridiculously conspicuous. We all know this is the Realpolitik but we are as close as we have ever been to having it all laid bare before us.

I almost wonder if Murdoch's comments are a shot across the government's bows?

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So what's the worst movie NEVER made?

Oliver 7

Re: Have none of you ever been here : http://www.badmovies.org/

Blind Fury anyone?

A blind Vietnam vet (Rutger Hauer), trained as a swordfighter, comes to America and helps to rescue the son of a fellow soldier.

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Oliver 7

Re: Not the absolute worst

Thought I should add that another film well worth watching is Tim Burton's eponymous biopic of Ed Wood, starring Johnny Depp of course but, for once, wonderfully cast for the ham he is! I loved the scene where, dressed in a frock and wig, he bumps into Orson Welles - hilarious!

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ISPs torch UK.gov's smut-blocking master plan

Oliver 7
Facepalm

I don't need no steenking title!

Did anyone see Daybreak this morning? I can't remember the specifics but they wielded a red top headline claiming our kids are all accessing adult content online and trotted out some interest group saddo (Mum's Against Filth or something like that?) who *actually* brought with her a teddy bear. She said she had brought the bear specifically to evoke in our minds the image of a 10 year old's bedroom with pile of teddys on the bed (awww!) - while at the same time the inquisitive Herbert is busy accessing filth on their PC. It was a classic 'think of the children' moment!

I wouldn't even know where to start, but suffice to say no 10 year old should be getting unfettered and unsupervised access to an Internet-connected PC in their room! What world do these people live in? And why should I have to pay (via ISP fees) to prevent this scenario occurring? The mind boggles!

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Sony 2011 losses are TWICE as bad as expected

Oliver 7

When tech was more about mechanics and electrical engineering Sony was a player. Now that software is more important, Sony's UIs lack usability and their hardware is less differentiated and more relatively expensive.

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Android store spotted in China ... selling iPhones

Oliver 7

Provenance

I once saw a documentary about Chinese counterfeiting, it made my jaw drop. Whole shopping malls selling ripped DVDs and fake designer goods and the police turned a blind eye.

Burberry was used as an example of what can happen. They closed their Welsh factory and moved production to China where the 'official' factory was effectively cloned and an entire black market operation was set up, based on the Burberry blueprints and flooding eBay with fake products. On the one had I had no sympathy for Burberry, their mark-ups don't justify such greedy cost-cutting and I felt sorry for the Welsh workers. On the other hand the programme went on to look at the fake trade in cosmetics, medicines and contraceptives to East Africa and that was just scary!!!

They even found a workshop where some guy was knocking out fake eggs! No shit! They used some kind of chemical process and claimed it was cheaper than keeping chickens. Thing is, would you eat one? Would you want to live somewhere where you could eat a fake egg and not know it? At the end of the day, for some products, provenance is everything!

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