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* Posts by No, I will not fix your computer

661 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

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Gay marriage foes outraged at Mozilla CEO flap, call for boycott

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Should have told protesters where to go

>>As a private citizen he made a modest donation to a campaign for reasons he did not make public and presumably had no intention of disclosing except for donation laws.

So imposing his bigotry is fine if you keep it a secret?

Lobbying for slavery to be re-introduced is OK, if you don't tell anyone?

Remember, this is not merely a "view" he tried to get the law changed.

>>And none of which has anything to do with making a web browser. He should have told the protesters to go bother someone else.

Yep, his views have nothing to do with a browser, but why is his view relevant to gay people either? unless he's actually gay why is his view relevant to the world?, nobody is forcing him to marry a man.

His protest and the activists protests follow the same form.

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No, I will not fix your computer
Happy

Fresh Milk?

Fundamentally, we have free speech, we can also (to some extent) vote with our money and consumer feet.

Brendan Eich, paid money in to lobby so that a sector of society shouldn't have certain rights, I support his right to do this 100%, but free speech doesn't come with a "- and can't be criticised for it" suffix, I can't force him to think differently, that's his choice, and his choice to attempt to impose his view on others.

The protesters against Brendan Eich, were doing exactly the same, instead of paying to have a sector of society denied rights, they boycotted (and encouraged others to boycott) a product he was subsequently associated with, I support this action 100% too.

Neither action or protest was illegal, but was one protest disproportionate to the other? lets compare them; a man lost a job (and may find it difficult to get another in the same salary range), that's a bit shitty, he attempted to prevent an entire sector of society from getting legal recognition of love, and (some may say) more importantly legal protection, pension sharing, next of kin etc. if it was disproportionate, perhaps he lost a little as a result of attempting to take away a lot from others?

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Amazon carefully stitches up Heartbleed OpenSSL hole

No, I will not fix your computer
Boffin

Re: Could heartbleed be in any way related to the windigo botnet?

>>SSH != SSL

OpenSSH (which comes as standard with many vendor supplied OS's) uses part of OpenSSL (specifically libcrypto) however, OpenSSH doesn't use TLS for it's sessions (unlike HTTPS, which TLS is one option and within that TLS heartbeat is optional).

So while some versions of SSH can use bits of crypto from OpenSSL, the actual transport itself (the vulnerable bit) is pure OpenSSL TLS heartbeat.

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No, I will not fix your computer
Boffin

Re: This didn't occur to me immediately

>>but it only affects the client if you connect to a compromised server.

Not exactly, and you may not even be able to detect if a server had been "compromised" - say for example the private keys had been copied off, it probably hasn't left any footprint.

Also, if someone had captured the traffic between a client and a server and then retrieves the private key the entire conversation is open to subsequent disclosure (which would probably include authentication details).

If you have a network capture then get the keys you have the content, if you get the keys then have access to (or create/redirect to) a transparent proxy (which is far easier than you may expect) then you have the content.

So, the safest option is to immediately shut down, reset all your authentication details, upgrade, generate new certificates, restart, note, don't make the same mistake as many and just generate new certificates from the old keys, generate new keys as well (i.e. don't use the same CSR).

The thing is with this one is that millions of servers could have been harvested for keys for months/years, with those keys they could have been snooping at the contents (such as passwords) for months/years, how often do you change your (supposedly secure) credentials? securing the sites won't change the fact they have your credentials - I'd suggest changing Amazon etc. passwords ASAP.

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Why won't you DIE? IBM's S/360 and its legacy at 50

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Excel enables the next Holocaust!

>>So how did Stalin and Mao do better without the devil punch card machines?

Stalin was "killing" from 1927 - 1953 (26 years) as opposed to WW2 which was broadly 6 years.

The majority of Stalin's targeted killing was regional (people on specific land) and very easy to identify.

Mao was a similar story, there was no specific "target", just people on land.

I'm not sure whether you intended it or not, but you're emphasising my point of the post, the machines IBM supplied enabled accurate targeting and filtering of people integrated into an existing community with specific traits - unlike Mao and Stalin, if you honestly don't see the difference between the implementation of targeting sectors of society using technology and states that treated all their people as animals then you have no appreciation for history.

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Too early for a Godwin?

@Robert Long 1

You seem to be conflating using "an aircraft" with "machines specifically designed to enable the final solution".

Don't get me wrong, I do understand what you're saying, load of people traded with the Nazis before, during, between and after the wars (The Bush family made their fortune from trading war bonds and other financial instruments, the presidential race may not have been possible without it), but there's a huge difference (or possibly a fine line, depending how you look at it) between war profiteering and explicitly supplying a ground breaking technology specifically designed to enable extermination of sectors of society.

Put another way, if this technology (on which IBM is founded) was used for constructive social issues, say a national insurance or healthcare system, don't you think that IBM would have held it up as a pioneering tech? I'm not even talking about the relative right or wrongs of the system, merely the fact it's not discussed, because technologically, it was an achievement, on which IBM is founded, it's not just the money they made, it's the central database, standard interfaces, correlated data, centralised de-duping, automatic data processing, all those properties that define a mainframe.

I've got absolutely no axe to grind with respect to the American involvement in war, I just find it interesting that the subject is avoided, and given the impact of IBM the concepts on which mainframes are based, It seems to me relevant history.

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No, I will not fix your computer

Too early for a Godwin?

I wonder why it is that many articles and discussions about the history of IBM (and mainframes) avoid the subject of their part in the holocaust?

While it's true they deny an awareness of the use of their counting machines, it's a matter of record that they did supply the punch card census machines (mainly through Dehomag, the IBM subsidiary in German, and Watson Business Machines in the US).

There's the financial impact to IBM, they made a lot of money from Nazi Germany before and during WW2, then there's the technological importance of drawing all information to a central place for processing (which is in essence "mainframe" technology).

Surely you can discuss these two crucially important historical milestones without implicitly approving of it, or is it really that insignificant? or is the subject avoided purely because of a "ooh.. we better not discuss that mentality?"

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ICANN boss: 'Russia and China will NOT take over interwebs'

No, I will not fix your computer
Joke

"the US government’s withdrawal could leave a dangerous vacuum"

After withdrawal, there was no danger, just an odd farting sound.

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No, I will not fix your computer
Joke

"the US government’s withdrawal could leave a dangerous vacuum"

I had one of those once, turned out to be a loose wire in the plug.

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New IPCC report: 8 ways climate change will throw world INTO PERIL

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: It's the words: stupid.

>>Therein lies the success of the propagandists denying AGW.

I don't think it's even that complex, we see it now, the politicians are clearly saying "what is the cost of avoiding this, compared to letting it happen", what is emotionally "right" (or even morally "right") is no longer relevant, it's whether it's financially "right", and that's why they want numbers.

If climate change is affected by man (and the consensus is that it is), then at some point it will either be too late, or it will be very costly to change.

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: ..everyone can identify with slower maturation of wine grapes as an issue worth tackling! ..

While the point you make has some validity, if (and I repeat, if) Western Australia's late harvest is good, imagine how a later harvest could change it, perhaps it will cease being good, perhaps it will destroy the harvest, perhaps they will cease to be able to produce "delicious and refreshing tipples".

The changing seasonal demographics may make areas previously suitable for wine of a particular taste change, typical customers will change, companies without the flexibility to change could go under, perhaps at the expense of other companies that do well.

Change is generally a good thing, gently shifting climates are fine, people are adaptable, however, a change from predictability to chaos isn't so good.

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Tesla firms hot bottoms: TITANIUM armor now bolted to Model S e-cars

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Should

>>But before you hop on the Pinto wagon (Ha!) do a bit of the same research

You're missing the Pinto point, it's not the number killed, it's the fact that the engineers pointed out the issue in production, and it was totally avoidable, 27 deaths may not mean anything to you, and statistically it's trivial, it's the fact that the explicit decision was explicitly make to leave it knowingly unsafe - even to the point of calculating the cost of recall vs the cost of lawsuit.

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No, I will not fix your computer
Headmaster

Re: Historical

>>Up to 18,000 times a minute: A piston has both an up and a down stroke for each revolution of the crankshaft.

A single reciprocation includes both an up stroke and a down stroke which means 9,000 - (rather than 18,000 strokes).

You could (or course) claim that an "up", "down" followed by another "up" is an initial stroke followed by two reciprocations, however that would mean the "down" belongs to two different reciprocations which doesn't sit right with me, so I would say 9,000 is 9,000 reciprocations, rather than a single starting stroke followed by 17,999 shared reciprocations.

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Homeopathic remedies contaminated with REAL medicine get recalled

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: What do we do for those for whom it works?

>>To me it's simple. I'll start to believe modern science, when they perform alternative medicine research, using subjects for whom all other medical treatments have been exhausted.

Sometimes, things (what we say in the industry) "get better on their own", the body is an amazing thing, we also use (slightly annoying) phrases like "grow out of it", unfortunately we don't know all the triggers for things, psoriatic arthritis for example - you don't "have" it in the same way as you "have" a broken leg, symptoms can come and go, flareups with exposure to certain triggers are possible (although there appears to be a genetic factor, which may explain your condition), in other words it's perfect for the woo of homoeopathy, the condition doesn't get better with X so you try Y and it gets better, therefore (the pattern forming animal) says Y fixed it, it's irrelevant (to you) if it "just went away", or you body learnt how to cope with certain triggers, or the triggers ceased being there (and this is of course before we get into the realm of placebo effect).

If for example (as another poster says) Y always fixes "psoriatic arthritis", consistently don't you think that it would be trivial to do a study? This is the problem with homoeopathy - the effect is not consistent, and, at best no better than placebo, in fact the best independent meta study (Cochrane) finds this exact result - in other words, the thing you're asking for has been done.

All that said, I'm in two minds, the NHS funds a homoeopathic hospital in London, actually that isn't true, "The Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine" as it has been renamed attempts to align "complementary" medicine with "traditional" medicine and homoeopathy is one of the "complements", my personal view is that it's a costly (but sometime effective) placebo for hypochondriacs, but as they say YMMV, if it makes you happy to throw spilt salt over your shoulder you do it, hell, I won't even get all bent out of shape just because some of my tax money is paying for it there's worse things in this world than someone who needs a placebo to get by (although I was a bit disappointed by "Loud like love", "Meds" was so much better - see what I did there?)

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China's CERT blames US for a THIRD of all attacks on Middle Kingdom PCs

No, I will not fix your computer

While it's true.....

China is the source of lots of hacking / botnet / intrusion, per capita it's actually not as bad as the US (per capita), probably due to the rather split demographic in China, pretty much 50/50 with those who have access to IT and those that don't.

To be fair, China is also one of the best sources for open proxies... apparently, which would definitely skew the "original source", not that I'd know obviously, after all I can't imagine what use a proxy in another country would be.... ahem.

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ISPs' pirate-choking blocking measures ARE effective – music body

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Quality

Don't blame me for the downvote but, I suspect whoever downvoted you should have gone on to say there's a couple of important points you seem to be missing;

#1 mp3 comes in many levels of quality, most people wouldn't be able to tell the difference between 320kbps CBR and a CD, most people would be able to tell the difference between 128kbps and a CD, depending on you (and the type of song) you can get away with as much (or as little) compression as you like (and 256kbps VBR is a good compromise between size and quality).

#1.5 "mp3" often is used to refer to "compressed music" but AAC 256kbit VBR is probably as good as 320kbps mp3 (at least I can't tell the difference).

#2 A car is a really bad environment for audiophiles, not only will the speakers be positioned less than optimally for your ears, there's odd shapes/sound reflections, engine noises etc., you might have isolators to stop the electrics for interfering (you might not), and if the CD player is old, then I guess the speakers are too?

I've played 96kbps vbr from an iPod mini (using a wireless adapter) in a car and it's perfectly acceptable, I've also built and installed a touchscreen PC playing FLAC encoded CD tracks, one thing for sure is that a shit song is a shit song, no matter the quality, and a great song (like my old Pet Sounds mono recording) is a great song even with fuzz and crackles.

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This changes everything: Microsoft slips WinXP holdouts $100 to buy new Windows 8 PCs

No, I will not fix your computer
Windows

Re: Windows 8.1?

>>XP is what drove me to try Linux in 2002. It was a huge pile of doggie dos until SP2 came out

Which of course is *exactly* what happened with Vista/Win 7, Vista came out, a POS, SP1 was a huge fire-fight, SP2 actually pretty good (but by then the damage was done), SP3 was "renamed" Windows 7, it's the same code base (even called Windows 6.1 internally, mind you 8 is 6.2 so that probably doesn't mean much now).

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MtGox finds 200,000 Bitcoin in old wallets

No, I will not fix your computer

Or perhaps, when there's blood on the streets....

Hide 200,000 bitcoins in the old wallet format, and if no-one notices after the dust settles it can "disappear" again.

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QUIDOCALYPSE: Blighty braces for £100 MILLION cost of new £1 coin

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Coin recognition

I suspect the £500 figure includes ISIS detection, which is a whole different bundle of electronic, that said you don't HAVE to use ISIS, you can do it old school.

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MH370 airliner MYSTERY: The El Reg Pub/Dinner-party Guide

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Accident or Malicious?

>>With regard to hijack, they would require a runway of c1.5km to land a 777, presumably there can't be many of those around that are not under the control of a government?

A full weight, full speed landing with maximum brakes can be done comfortably in less than 1.2Km, a slow, full brake, full flap "light" landing with no float can be done in a shade over 300m on a 777, but they are the kind of landings you'd need to practice (specifically, to stop the float, you need to get the wheels down asap), a zero altitude stall (spot landing) isn't really appropriate for such a large aircraft, but some of the same techniques could be used, typically longer distances are used because tyres are very expensive and a long landing protects them (at $40k a set this is important, but not so much for hijackers).

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Eight hour cleansing to get all the 'faggots' and 'bitches' OUT of Github

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: This

>>Completely unrelated topic I know, but still. Also, from reading the brief description of ovo lacto vegetarian. Isn't that just like... regular vegetarian? I mean if you remove eggs and milk that's the general shift from vegetarian to vegan right? Or am I missing something here.

It's just specific hypocrisy, he says "I avoid the whole question of the morality of meat-eating much as, say, a celibate person doesn't have to worry about the ethics of polygamous relationships" yea, because battery chickens and continued impregnation of cows and having their calves taken and eaten has no moral aspect, don't get me wrong, I'm a omnivore, at least I don't pretend there's no moral issues.

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This record-smashing robot solves a Rubik's Cube in 3.253 seconds

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: solving?

It's actually two groups (corners and sides) merging the two groups gives a maximum move solution of 20 moves, so (theoretically) the slowest "fast" solution is how long it takes to make 20 moves, and leaves the possibility of less than 20 moves if the random mix was advantageous (and opposite side moves in counter-rotation could be done at the same time), could even optimise the initial moves with partial information before the initial scan is complete.

Sub 3 seconds should be possible, although not by me, being an armchair geek, I never actually do anything, I just comment one stuff I'm to stupid or lazy to do myself, well done guys!

Best I managed was 57 seconds, and 4.33 for the revenge (but I did solve the revenge before there was any official world record recorded)

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GitHub probes worker's claims of hostile, sexist office culture

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Awful lot of misogynists here

If somebody is accused of harassment (sexual or otherwise) then the "correct" procedure (or at least usual) is to be separated (often by leave), this doesn't mean that there was wrongdoing, just enough evidence that it's possible, also now allowing the Founders wife at work is just usual practice (how many partners can come and go at the other persons workplace?).

GitHub, I suspect has taken legal advice, and they have have been told to post a carefully crafted statement to avoid vicarious liability, i.e. it's the individuals not "the company" if you want to sue someone, sue them not us (there's very little mileage suing individuals, but companies have money)

I've seen the same thing before (first hand), and I've seen similar conversations between management and their legal advisor's.

The engineer will be hung out to dry (unless he claims it was "cultural", again vicarious responsibility, he better get a solicitor quick and don't assume that the company will support him in any way) - perhaps he deserves if he was a dick, the Founder will probably take one for the team short-term, but be back in a few months as if nothing happened.

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They ACCUSED him of inventing Bitcoin. Now, Nakamoto hires lawyer to CLEAR his name

This post has been deleted by a moderator

UK's CASH POINTS to MISS Windows XP withdrawal date

No, I will not fix your computer
FAIL

Re: Hmm

To be honest, the OS X quote and Linux jokes were quite funny, but when I read;

>>The only choice was, and remains, Windows for ANY device that has to be used by the non-techy general public.

I realised that you were not joking, just look at the number of Android phones out there and you can see that this is untrue. Open sources and command-lines are available, but you don't have to use them, it's a bit like the gay marriage argument, you can support it without actually having to marry someone of the same sex.

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Space-junk RAYGUN wins Australian government funding

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Orbital Mechanics- what goes up must come down

Nahh... the gap between LEO (minimum 160Km) and the highest levels of atmosphere (mesopause ~80Km) is a minimum of 80Km, so you'd need a really eccentric orbit, so not only would you create a rapidly accelerating object, you'd have it going up and down through many different orbits, creating a much more dangerous object.

Deorbiting using an eccentric orbit is a really bad idea (even it if were possible).

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Fee fie Firefox: Mozilla's lawyers probe Dell over browser install charge

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Are they blond?

I suspect that Mozilla take exception on this bit;

The Mozilla product must be without cost and its distribution (whether by download or other media) may not be subject to a fee, or tied to subscribing to or purchasing a service, or the collection of personal information.

I guess they don't like the obtaining of Firefox tied to the installation service?

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Apple Mac Pro: It's a death star, not a nappy bin, OK?

No, I will not fix your computer
Holmes

No, no, no, no. no

>>Glad it's not just me who's offended by Abrams' continued rape of classic Star Trek. I am also, however, slightly offended by your misuse of the apostrophe.

I'm offended by your misuse of the word "rape", but also it seems like some people don't understand this was never a remake, the new story was the story of the first meeting of Khan, whereas "The Wrath of Khan" was the story of the second meeting of Khan, the new film was also twisted slightly because old Spock (who experienced the second meeting) was there to warn people about Khan, which could result in him not being left on the planet, preventing the second meeting.

Sherlock (for obvious reasons)

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Clink! Terrorist jailed for refusing to tell police his encryption password

No, I will not fix your computer

Not "complying" is the crime, not the results of complying.

It's the same as "failure to provide a breath test specimen", and I'm sure it's not coinicdence that the punishment happens to be the same as drink driving.

>>That's all this is really, a law that says "if you don't give us evidence against you, it means you are guilty".

Nope, the way the law is, is means "if you don't give us the means to easily gather evidence, it means you are guilty of not allowing us to easily gather evidence".

Personally, I suspect that they wanted to firstly convict him of something easily provable (not supplying the key) which gives them time to build a subsequent case around what they have already found, this buys them lots of time.

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Sensation: Chinese Jade Rabbit FOUND ON MOON

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Wow

>>You should not forget that there have been several controlled martian landings of highly successful autonomous and remotely controlled rovers in your lifetime

Technically a "controlled landing" means landing something in a controlled manner, chute/balloons are not controlled, but retarded, and curiosity was a hybryd, a controlled payload drop with a "crashed" landing stage, although I do agree "Dismissing them out of hand would be a bit unfair", and curiosity was definitely a bit special, however, a controlled landing is far more relevant when it comes to it's applicability for human space travel, after all, you'd hope it's not a one way trip, and soft landing a return module is critical for that.

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Most

>>To be fair, technology from the Germans was a prize of war.

The hardware, to some extent yes - although the land race between the Russians and the Americans could mean it was "stolen from underneath the Russians"

The people, no, that was definitely stolen, instead of the (known) war criminals being punished for their part in the suffering (such as the camp at Dora) the Americans doctored false histories and work permits for the ex Nazis to be allowed to (il)legally work for the US. This was in stark contrast to the Russians who never let any captured Germans to work directly on their missile programs, and had either repatriated or charged all their detainees by 1951.

>>Losing your technology developments and expertise are some of the downsides of losing a war.

Not for those who ended up safe from trial in the US, even Arthur Rudolph was allowed to escape back to Germany after the statute of limitations for his crimes had expired (leaving him drawing a pension from the US). As usual, the "downsides" of war were not suffered by those instigating and manufacturing the war, but the every day people who died in the camps and under the bombs.

>>That's the way it has always worked. Had things gone differently, Germans would claim leadership in radar, encryption, space exploration, aviation and vodka.

Actually, I think you'll find that Russia was ahead in most of these areas, Germany was financially "all in" with no possibility of going back because their economy was already ruined, the only option was to attempt to win whilst already being overdrawn (kind of like the US is now).

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Oh no, RBS has gone titsup again... but is it JUST BAD LUCK?

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: So many posts so much silliness

The best analogy is that IT is like a "shop front", you might be able to get away with no glass, or you might decide you want huge realestate, it's a cost which directly affects income, maybe a regularly maintained display to keep people interested, but if it's just a costly inconvienience you don't understand what it is.

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'Best known female architect' angrily defends gigantic vagina

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Personally ...

If only David Seaman was still playing......

Seaman has come on the pitch....

Seaman is in the box.....

Seaman is all over him....

Seaman is on the ball....

etc.

A man before his time.... (he obviously came too early)

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Boffins baffled after Sun fails to fry satellites

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Scientists! Repeat after me: We don't know

Scientific papers almost always describe correlations within frames of confidence, and without scientific training we expect the media to take this and draw a conclusion, unfortunately there is a reason that the papers have a certain level of detail and that a simple one-liner or paragraph isn't able to give you the full story.

The reason why we have had health scares over things like MMR is because the media didn't translate the papers findings correctly, the same is true for climate change, and even meta studies struggle to draw a simple conclusion.

You're wrong to call this hubris, you're wrong to call this "so-called science", if you look at the source data, there's no hubris, and there's a lot of science, what gets related in the Fail is a different matter, El Reg tends to bare quite well, good referencing, related stories, an expectation of audience awareness, and often a humorous description of compounding and confounding factors - it we never ever be as popular as The Sun or The Mail, and if it ever is, I hope that's because the quality of the general audience has improved, not because it goes down the same route of sensationalist journalism.

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Dry, cold and volatile: How to survive Mars, and your fellow crew

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: winds estimated to be upwards of 90kmph

>>sounds like a sensationalist nonsense,

Sounds like a factual statement

>>if i'm not mistaken because of WAY thinner atmosphere and lower pressure, effect of wind at this speed is comparable to a light breeze on earth.

Wind, yes (perhaps) but when there's Martian dust, which is very fine (and microscopically "sharp") means it's only comparable by it's difference - it's not air, and don't forget the inverse square, rovers tend to be small, exposing a small surface (of mostly hard-wearing materials), habitats with joints (for doors), large surface areas, the fine dust will (individually) carry a lot of energy - like a small metal fragment of space junk in orbit carries a lot of energy if it's travelling faster (and that's without taking into account of any corrosive effects of the dust).

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Habitats

>>I think the problem would be that robots wouldnt be able, even with cameras and controllers back on earth, to make habitats without people being there to ensure saftey and sustainablity.

Why not?

The electronics could test a stable pressure, a balanced N+O2 air environment

>>There is only so much info you can get from a TV screen.

And being there when you discover that the Nitrogen/Oxygen ratio was round the wrong way or that the habitat has no roof due to a meteorite smashing into it has what advantages? at the end of the day, sensors will tell you everything, whether you're there or not, when Apollo 13 sprung an O2 leak, they could see venting from a viewport, this only confirmed that the sensors were right, they got back alive because a massive amount of hands on work, which was only required because they were there, and was only possible because of the dry runs and testing on earth, the crew of Apollo 13 achieved a massive victory against fate because of their skill and because they exactly followed a plan designed on earth from sensor readings.

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No, I will not fix your computer
Thumb Up

Re: I honestly don't see the point

The point is purely because (we think) we can.

For survival, space stations are quite limited because of the complete lack of any resource available.

The moon is a far more logical step, the very limited gravity has the disadvantage of not being long-term healthy for humans evolved for stronger gravity, but has the massive advantage of being able to leave the surface with a relatively light fuel requirement.

Mars has a few advantages, the stronger gravity means the effects of things like osteoporosis (while still significant) are reduced, it looks like there's more water, and even a few big chunks of metal laying around (although processing meteorites is far from trivial).

For me, Mars feels like trying to run before we can walk, the Moon just seems so much more sensible, we could have been shipping automatically assembled living quarters there since the 1960's or even just lightweight structural materials for later assembly when the robotic technology catches up.

It's quite a soft landing on the Moon compared with Mars - anyone who watched the animations of how the latest rover got to the surface of Mars will understand that the gravity coupled with almost no atmosphere means getting delicate things like rovers and people on the surface isn't easy.

I see two parallel programs;

#1 Get "stuff" to Mars, oxygen/water harvesters, automate resource collection, investigate metals processing, habitat creation, get it full automatic and stable, iron out the bugs before it's life and death, have plenty of multiple redundancy systems in place.

#2 Get "stuff" to the Moon, this will be far more "escapable" so redundancy is less critical, a return pod is possible, orbiting resources that can be staged to the Moon or Mars, trial run the stuff that will be used at Mars, the Moon is a perfect test bed (OK, not identical, but it really is so good I can't see the reason not go go there first .

My guess, while the western world is sending corpses to Mars, the eastern world will create moon bases and colonies that naturally populate the less trendy places like the Moon and Europa.

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Bitcoin mining rig firm claims $3m revenue in just FOUR DAYS

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: 2nd Generation ASIC Miners

>>The newer ones which can theoretically perform 2.2 Ghash/sec are now shipping

Your probably mean theoretically perform 2.2 Thash/sec, and 2.2 Thash/s, is probably not the maximum being touted, I've heard of a UK bunch doing 2.4Thash/s units

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LG’s G2: The phondleslab that wants you to TOUCH ITS BEHIND

No, I will not fix your computer
Meh

I'm not wondering....

>>Using the rear controls becomes second nature very, very quickly - I'm talking about 20-odd minutes of use. After which time you wonder why the heck nobody has thought of doing this before.

How about the Sony TH55, OK, a PDA, not a smartphone, but their Jog Dial™ is exactly this sort of thing (Google images if you're interested)

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RETRO-GASM: The Fuze electronics kit for the Raspberry Pi

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: from the makers....

@TeamFUZE

I was literally on the verge of ordering a basic setup (with additional breadboard), as I have a Pi, but I was also going to add a small open frame PSU, small fan, kettle plug, and 7 port hub (the parts are about £10), this would have left me with a rather messy backplate which I can live with - a completely blank backplate (with some standoffs) might be a good addition to your shop for people who want to customise?

Seriously consider extra USB, while 7 is obviously excessive (I had it spare) 2 could cut it a little fine - do you mean 2 extra (i.e. a total of three out the back), some unpowered USB drives need two ports, they can go really quickly.

Great product BTW, just so tidy, having a bare board is sometimes a little too much of a leap for people, vaguely reminiscent of when I got my ZX81, I got one of the first of the prebuilt ones, when I was 12, my soldering skills looked like welding, having a box you can just turn on and go is great - it's all about getting on the learning curve, perhaps you could consider trying to getting the OS/BASIC added into NOOBS?

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Funds flung at 9-inch fan-built Raspberry Pi monitor

No, I will not fix your computer

Really cool, but.....

You can get a 9" tablet (to be fair, only 800x480) with an A8 (1.5Ghz) with 8Gb ram and 5 point capacitive for a smidge over £50 it seems like there's some tricks to be missed here, there could be one that appears with "video in" and it will run off USB, maybe drive the mouse as well?

Think I'll have a play.

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The Colosseum, Hagia Sophia, Tower of London... and, er, Steve Jobs' GARAGE

No, I will not fix your computer

Meanwhile in the UK.....

Bletchley Park one of the most important (all due respect to Steve, but actually important) sites in the 20th century, left to rot for years, treated indifferently at best, only one block (Block C) finally getting grade 2 status (last year), no funds from the government, all charity.

Sigh.

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SR-71 Blackbird follow-up: A new TERRIFYING Mach 6 spy-drone bomber

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: As an intellectual and technological excercise...

It's a valid point, but at 8 billion people, losing 150 million over 100 years isn't that much impacting to population, it's more of a problem that the people we lost were those who would make the biggest (positive) contributions, those in the prime of their working lives (unlike the old and young).

Notwithstanding, all that wasted money, infrastructure etc. we did get the NHS out of it I suppose, I guess where we can all agree is that it would have been better to have development without death, if only there was some way of making that happen!

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: As an intellectual and technological excercise...

@itzman

While it's absolutely true that much funding has come from military, it's logical to assume if we didn't spend money on the military, we'd spend it on something else, or conversely, because the military was funding it you didn't need to fund it elsewhere.

However, look look at your specific points;

RADAR Christian Hulsmeyer first used radio waves to detect ships (collision avoidance) - Not military

Spread spectrum radio - the link between this and CDMA (etc.) is tenuous at best, it is similar technology but with decades between them it's hard to credit this development with what is used today.

GPS - pretty much a military funded invention, pretty sure it wouldn't have happened (at least as soon) without this funding (I'll give you that one) doesn't mean it wouldn't have been invented of course.

The Integrated Circuit - not sure why you think this is a military invention, Werner Jacobi first suggested (and patented) this idea (simple amplifier) and proposed it's use in hearing aids, the first people to use IC's was the USAF, but it's hard to call it a military invention per se.

The Internet - merely a network of networks, often attributed to the military because of it's "redundancy during attack, ARPANET" this is untrue and a popular myth, notwithstanding, even if this was the case I think it's pretty obvious that universities were going to connect their networks regardless of the military aspect (and proposals for networks such as Merit preceded it, X25 etc.)

Nuclear power - This is an odd one, primarily because the first looks into nuclear power were non military, then the use was militarised (for weapons), and only after WW2 was nuclear power used for (usable) engery creation, there is an argument that the use in war stunted development for power as the government regulated and controlled it's use (with explicit classification).

Robotics? seriously?

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: As an intellectual and technological excercise...

>>Many more technological marvels of the 20th century were the result of non-military research. The counterfactual is: if the money had been left in the economy, what would people have come up with, quite probably more efficiently?

There's truth and there's truth, WW1/WW2 gave us huge medical advances, as you get really good at stitching people up when you have a lot of people to work on (and since 1900, around 150 million died because of war) - the question is, if we didn't have war (and therefore didn't have such an intense knowledge) would we be worse off, the same or better off, and there's arguments for all three, what's true is that we made the best of a bad job.

What about technological advancements? I guess it's a similar thing is true, would we have achieved more without broken infrastructure (like schools and universities) the loss of (typically) young men when they would otherwise be contributing/graduating intellectually makes me think that while necessity is obviously one of the parents to invention, perhaps we could have done more with a few more children.

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Mars defends: HUMANS to SEND UFO to Red Planet by 2016

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Re: Of course they have to say that...

>>I wonder what the locals said when people said they were going to sail to the other side of the world

Something along the lines of "These ships work really well, if you've gone through half your resources without finding anything, come back"?

>>I think even if it's a scam, it's putting hopes and ideas into peoples minds, and it's actually getting people to realize that people can talk freely about the idea without ridicule.

Nope, it's a ridiculous leap of faith, when you can't keep the ISS in LEO without 18 hours of maintenance a day, you *know* the tech isn't up to it yet, perhaps better (more) space stations, something outside of LEO (Lagrange perhaps?), a moonbase that you can actually leave and come back from?

>>Every single word and conversation about this gets us one step closer, think about it and you'll understand one day.

Absolutely! but sometimes that conversation has to be "This is a shit idea, lets do some walking before we can run", at some point when we're quite good at walking then running will be on the menu.

>>It's not like we spend our money on anything important other than consuming resources or selfishly indulging ourselves to our deaths.

Well, we in the privileged west might, and we have money to spunk on stupid things, if we put all our money into a manned mission to Mars we'd currently have a bunch of dead astronauts and no rovers.

The Chinese plan to go to the Moon, is great, *nobody* has the tech to get a human on the moon yet/anymore and they are planning a base, imagine what they're going to learn, and imagine how applicable that is going to be to a Mars mission.

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RM CEO: We didn't even try to sell PC biz before killing it

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Re: Good News

What!!!! you mean RM are in business to make money?????

Heathen, next you'll say they are pulling out so they don't lose money (like they said).

*any* time you ask a company to supply something, they want a profit, and selling off government departments that existed to purely supply governments with goods for *no* profit will guarantee that the government end up paying more.

I do not feel any need to criticise RM, they are a company, one that only exists to make money (it's not a charity, and lots of them are suspect), if you want to poke someone with a shitty stick, poke the government that sold off the departments that existed for the benefit of the people.

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Number-crunching quant cooks up gambling machine, promises untold RICHES

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Re: hhhmmmm

Winning 70% of the straight up (non points spread) bet is actually quite easy, bet on the favourite, but the odds will be shit - and you'll lose overall.

What would be more interesting would be to win 70% of the time on a straight up, non favourite, the odds would be significantly better (ranging between 6:5 and 4:1).

I smell BS too, as it's either useless (70% favourite) or they want to give money away (70% non favourite). It is possible of course that there's some smarter logic in there, and to be fair, why not? there's lots of clever people out there, but what certain is that it's not free money, and systems that do work (laying bets to cover all odds against multiple bookies/doubling etc.) have severe limitations (like a need for unlimited funds) or even just implementing rules "no doubling past 5 allowed".

I'm not saying that this system is fake, but if I wanted to create a system, I'd have some logic which won most of the time (regardless of odds), and if the punter won using my system, I get 5% of the win, if they lose I get nothing, that way I'd just sit back and yum up all those 5%'s - then it doesn't matter if the punters lose overall, I'd still get the 5% when they won (with absolutely no risk to me) - and I can keep saying "they win most of the time".

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I am a recovering Superwoman wannabee

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Re: Relax!

The *only* difference between working men and working women is the acceptability (to some) of compromise for success, I know mums who don't make any effort at work, and become "full time mums" (whatever that is) I know mums who do "pin money" part time jobs while husbands pay the bills, I know women who are CEO's of successful companies and take off two weeks to have a baby (twice, I may add).

Dads can pretty much do whatever they like without fear that they'll be criticised for being a bad parent, making time for the kids seems over and above (by being a "good dad").

What's wrong with this picture? same thing that's wrong with the article, an assumption that men and women are different, Phoummala strives and then caves in, failing to be a "superwoman" is merely failing to be super successful, but accepting that it's OK to be "normal", if this story was about a man, it would just end up with him saying "I couldn't be arsed, but at least I got to spend some extra time with the kids".

The article is hilarious, complaining about stereotypes - and then becomes one.

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TUPPERWARE FOUND ON MOON of Saturn

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Re: Terrist prejudice

A towel has immense psychological value. For some reason, if a strag (strag: nonhitchhiker) discovers that a hitchhiker has his towel with him, he will automatically assume that he is also in possession of a toothbrush, washcloth, soap, tin of biscuits, flask, compass, map, ball of string, gnat spray, wet-weather gear, space suit etc., etc. Furthermore, the strag will then happily lend the hitchhiker any of these or a dozen other items that the hitchhiker might accidentally have "lost". What the strag will think is that any man who can hitch the length and breadth of the galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through, and still knows where his towel is, is clearly a man to be reckoned with.

- Douglas Adams

So, yes, remember your towel when you travel the galaxy!

As a side note, perhaps the polypropylene being detected is from all the refills in the biros?

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