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* Posts by No, I will not fix your computer

684 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

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Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Logic fail

>>As i understand it, he _can't_ be given a custodial sentence for his alleged crime. _He has already voluntarily locked his silly Ass(tm) up for two years for an offence for which he couldn't be locked up_. Yes, he's really that scared of the Feds.

I'm pretty sure that you _can_ be locked up for rape in Sweden.

My view is simple, he should face the interview and (potential) charges in Sweden, the alleged victims deserve that much.

The whole extradition thing is a separate issue, I suspect that the US (and if the alleged leaked "pending" extradition is true), then perhaps Assange will have an opportunity to validate the actions of people like Maning and Snowdon, imagine the outcry against the US if there is some conspiracy, imagine the US trying to cover it up, FOI would reveal all kinds of wrong doing.

I guess what I'm saying is that if the US government is playing a game, Assange should have the courage of his convictions and play it, if they are not, then perhaps he should turn himself in anyway.

Easy for me to say? absolutely! but then I've never asked anyone to take all the risk and act against their government (even if it's for the greater good).

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London cops cuff 20-year-old man for unblocking blocked websites

No, I will not fix your computer

My guess....

I suspect he was actually providing a proxy service, providing access to copywrite material is significantly different to merely using a proxy.

This is why Google don't provide links to (some) torrents, but it's still in the fine line between holding material you didn't pay for and giving access to the same said material, with a vaguely competent lawyer he should be fine, for a start they would have to prove loss or damage, you can't be guilty of speeding merely by having a car capable of speeding.

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: even if he did...

>>On the other hand, in the UK your rights are not specifically codified anywhere, so if bad actors want to pretend those rights don't exist there's nothing for you to point to to say they do in fact exist.

hahahahahahaha!!!!

The US constitution is built upon British documents, Magna Carta for a start, and it's no coincidence that the first ten amendments are called the "Bill of Rights", they are called that because they are based on the British "Bill of Rights" from the 1600's, you're just a bunch of copycats from an upstart British colony.

Besides, how valid is your constitution when you have sedation acts which means the government can do whatever they like to you if you act against them?

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: even if he did...

>>In principle, maybe. However, the USA has a written constitution. The UK has nothing to protect against governments making it up as they go along(*), and the hereditary principle in no way improves that situation.

Ummm... the UK has a massive constitution, from Magna Carta onwards, it's extremely developed, mature and enshrined for centuries, Bill of Rights, Claim of Rights, all the numerous provisions, statutes and acts, which by the way the US constitution (or "Constitution for Dummies" as it's known as) is based upon.

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Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE

No, I will not fix your computer
Boffin

Re: aware of the benefits of 4K

>>Just because you can't see the individual pixels doesn't mean they have no benefit. If you are too far away to see an individual pixel on a screen or dot in a print, you end up perceiving the average result of those pixels/dots. A higher resolution results in an average that is more accurate to the original source.

Yes, and no, the interpolation/antialias effect you're describing is very real, however, for this implied averaging to be relevant you must be able to achieve an effect not possible on their own, as pixel size itself is no longer relevant (as discussed above) then it's only colour and intensity, with a 24bit (True Colour) palate it's about 16 million colours, given normal humans can "only" identify approximately 10 million colours it's actually irrelevant if the screen is more accurate - normal humans can't tell the difference between 24bit (true colour) and anything higher (i.e. deep colour).

I say "normal humans" because people (women and other people with two X chromosomes) who have an extra cone (tetrachromia) can see more colours (yellow-orange as I recall), but that's quite rare, and given that it's an extra cone (not just better fidelity) it wouldn't be an even colourspace so interpolating for a tetrachromat wouldn't be the same i.e. the normal 24 bit (8x8x8) couldn't simply be boosted to 27bit (9x9x9) as you're simply boosting fidelity on the traditional cones, you'd actually need to add a channel for the extra cone (8x8x8x8), which means you'd need to film in four colours and have that extra channel on the pixel.

So, yes, absolutely - an increase in pixels to make up for for low bit depth can be useful, but not really relevant for 24bit displays.

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: aware of the benefits of 4K

@Badvok

>>Ah, yes the old, "can't see the pixels argument"

Hmmm... maybe I should have explained more simply, let me summarise, then feel free to go back and re-read the technical bits;

As soon as you can't make out the individual pixels, any further increase in resolution has no benefit;

For 20/20 vision (good vision) looking at a 1080p/2K screen at any distance over 2x the height of the screen you can't identify individual pixels, so if you're any further away from the screen than twice the height of the screen it is physically impossible to tell if it's a 2k or 4k screen.

So, for a PC monitor where the distances are closer, a 4K screen might be practical, for a home TV, unless you're really close, or it's really big, 4K could be pointless, note - Sony (who produce a lot of digital cinema equipment) have done several studies on this in relation to digital cinema, but the principles are the same (and with very big screens viewed at significant distances it's a little easier to understand).

@El Reg - why not do an article on this? with pictures and everything? 4k is a bit Emperors new clothes for home video (bragging rights aside).

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No, I will not fix your computer
Boffin

Re: aware of the benefits of 4K

@Badvok

You're almost definitely wrong, and let me explain why, as this is simple physics/biology.

What is normal range? lets say "good vision" is 20/20 (some people have better, say 20/10), but lets run with "good" - 20/20 vision is a visual acuity of about 60 pixels per degree of vision this means that at a distance of 1.5x the height your total view is 37 degrees, on a 2k (1080p) screen that's 30 pixels - ie. even below average eyesight can see the pixels, on a 4k screen that's 45 pixels per degree and unless you have "good" (above average) eyesight you probably won't be able to pick out the pixels.

So..... if you look at a 1080p (2k) screen from a distance of twice the height you end up with about 60 pixels per degree, in other words 20/20 vision cannot pick out the pixels. for a 4k screen that's 90 pixels per degree - even 20/10 vision would in reality struggle to identify a difference as it's on the limit for 20/10 vision (the best vision ever measured is around 20/8).

60 pixels per degree is a theoretical maximum for 20/20 vision, more correctly that is if each pixel is a contrast i.e. could you identify a line of one pixel; but films don't consist of one pixel lines, it's more likely to be "moving pictures", so the ability it identify a static pixel doesn't really mean much in practicality.

Both physics and I agree that you're wrong, either that or you have the vision of a hawk (20/2).

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Google pulls Gaza games from Play store

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Religion... and the rest

>>People will ALWAYS find an excuse to kill each other, whether it is religion, politics, culture, tribalism, football etc. etc.

>>Take one away and something else will fill the void.

While that might be true on some level, wouldn't it be nice not not to have this appeal to authority, or this division of people, for example if you couldn't say "God gave us this land, simply believing in this flavour of God means this is mine" or "My god is better than your god".

Could something fill the excuse void as well as gods do?

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Home-grown Xiaomi crushes Samsung in world's biggest market

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Stop deluding yourself with silly propaganda

>>They (being general) will do just as they are told no matter how stupid the requirement is. They won't question the clear stupidity of their superiors simply because their society does not work that way

While this is true to a great extent (from personal experience) - this cultural difference doesn't change the fact that there's lots of smart independent thinkers, put it another way, there's more elite graduates (passing with firsts, plus multiple degrees etc.) every year in India than there are graduates (of any type) in the US.

This is just a numbers game, its a big country, you're more likely to meet the average Indian graduate than an elite one, but often the elite graduates aren't staying in low-level engineering jobs long, and many do stay in India where its lucrative for an above average achiever.

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Brit amateur payload set to complete full circle around PLANET EARTH

No, I will not fix your computer

Ahhh... the old "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea" misunderstanding, just in the sky instead of under the water.

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Cave pits, ideal for human bases, FOUND ON MOON

No, I will not fix your computer

Has nobody seen Pitch Black?

I ain't going in there.......

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Running the Gauntlet: Atari's classic ... now and then

No, I will not fix your computer

@I ain't Spartacus

>>I want to play it again. I'm amazed no-one's released it for iOS / Android, or just as a Flash game online.

One word.... MAME

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Drone's drug airdrop mission ends in failure for Irish prisoners

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Define "drone"

Drone is rather a generic term (but quite accurate in it's use as a generic term), if you're looking for something more specific there's two (overlapping) categories;

UAV - Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (the umbrella drone term)

RPV - Remotely Piloted Aircraft (closer to the control you mean)

But of course neither of these terms are fully satisfactory in answering your question, because within these there's;

MITL - Man in the loop (piloting)

MOTL - Man on the loop (destination waypoint with viewing, simple drop, return to base functions)

FA - Fully Automated (considered as issue orders and return, but may include abort functionality)

But these terms could be a bit fuzzy depending on the system in place, and even cover multiple definitions, it sounds like in this case it was a MITL/RPV drone.

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Russians turn Raspberry Pi into fully-fledged autopilot

No, I will not fix your computer

This looks cool

At the moment I have a Pi with GPS/magnetometer/Sonar so it knows where it is, and I'm getting a servo board which will feed into my dedicated flight controller (KK), but a single board that does all this will be cool.

If this board is going to be an all-in-one solution (flight control and location/direction) it will be great, but depends on how much work the Pi is going to do (and how much IO is still available), I hope the board is going to do all the flight control (specifically stabilisation, level, altitude hold etc.) and leave all the CPU to do the actual navigation, operate a camera etc. (and with Rx input it should be fantastically controllable for manual override).

Price is going to be the biggie, a KK flight controller is £20, servo board £20, GPS £25, magnetometer £2, sonar £2 so $145 for an integrated bit of kit is good, not bite your hand off good, but probably the best bit of "all-in-one" for the price.

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You'll never believe it: Apple stock is going for CHEAP

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: I see this as a baaaaaad sign.

There's good and bad in this, and I suspect it's more psychological than practical.

Cheaper buy-in you might not want to spend $700 on one share but $350 for 5 feels better, % fluctuations don't appear as bad; a $70 drop on a $700 share is bad, but a $7 drop on a $70 share feels better (even if it means the same).

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You know what today's movies need? MORE DRONES

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: I don't understand this

Before, the early ones were expensive bits of kit costing several thousand, but over the last years they have dropped substantially, my DIY quad with GoPro was less than £500 all in and is much better than those first quads, now you can pick up a quad with camera for barely £45 (my cheapest quad was less than £20 and massive fun).

It's like cars, when only a few had them, licences were not considered, once available to the masses it was deemed required.

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ET hunter: We will find SPACE ALIENS in 20 years

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: I've heard that before...

@GrumpyMiddleAgedGuy

Totally agree with everything you said, except "We are alone. Any civilisation even slightly more advanced than us could populate the galaxy in 10,000,000 years" even the slowest SciFi fuelled craft requires close to light speeds to get anywhere.

"Space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space."

- Douglas Adams

So imagine there is another civilisation, imagine it exists in a similar time-frame to us, imagine it built spacecraft several factors faster than anything we have ever created, imagine it even happened to point it at our solar system, imagine the craft survived decades of space travel, would we even know? with 100,000,000,000 galaxies each with 100,000,000,000 stars I wouldn't be surprised if some could have life, and further not surprised if some actually could/had/will have life, some of that life could even be massively intelligent, and having a whale of a time in it's own bit of the universe, hell, I get lost in Tescos (and have a particular problem finding the Bovril), just because we may never find it, doesn't mean we are alone.

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Recommendations for NAS-based home media set-up

No, I will not fix your computer

My setup...

My circumstances are different to yours so, whether is is a recommendation or not is debatable.

Second hand 2U Case - £20 + £15 delivery

(Came with six 3.5" SATA bays, a pair of dual core 280 Opterons, 2Gb RAM, GigE)

16Gb RAM £25 (delivered)

RAID card £20

2Gb flash card and IDE adaptor (has this already but <£10)

6x 2Tb drives (the expensive bit!) - always buy NAS disks new £330

Total <£450

Using NAS4Free and ZFS/Raid-Z gives me ~10Tb of protected storage, I'm not using the hardware RAID from the card because it doesn't support such large volumes, and if fact 2Tb is the largest drive it supports. I could lie and tell you it was simple to put together, but I had a real mare with the advanced format drives (they were quite new at the time, I suspect that NAS4Free has better awareness of them now).

Then for the media centres, I use Sumvision MKV (simple SMB browsing), which works fine, plays on iPad (using VLC), and various PC's, I use a powerline adaptor for the projector in the shed when I do "drive in movie BBq" nights.

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Australia to build 35,000-core supercomputer on Xeon-E5-2600 v3

No, I will not fix your computer

The clue is in the article

>>Come on - what about telling us about the sort of work loads this beast will deal with.

"Magnus spends most of its time on radio astronomy and geoscience problems"

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The amazing .uk domain: Less .co and loads more whalesong

No, I will not fix your computer

.uk vs .gb

@Steve Graham

Do you mean Northern Ireland? I don't believe it has a TLD, so if there was a .gb then I assume a TLD would have to be created for it, .uk makes sense so at leats it has an address, unless of course you use .ie, which kind of makes sense unless you start talking about offices in NI which relate to the UK, like the Northern Ireland office , which sits under a .gov.uk, where .gov.gb wouldn't make sense (apart from the physical inconsistency, where's the governmental responsibility implied?).

So, given a choice between .gb and .uk, .uk makes more sense, that said, no reason why there couldn't have been a .gb and a new .te TLD

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FCC seeks $48K fine from mobile phone-jamming driver

No, I will not fix your computer

The assumption that he could save lives is faulty

Mobile phones used while driving undoubtedly cause deaths indirectly by distracting people (and they are well documented to do so).

#1 How many lives are saved by mobile phones? did he disrupt someone driving to hospital? cut off someone calling emergency services by the side of the road during a heart attack?

#2 If someone is using a phone while driving and gets cut off by a jammer, are they more likely to be even more distracted (looking at their phone, attempting to redial etc.)

#3 If they attempt to use it but it's unusable will they spend more time, be more distracted attempting do dial or switching it off an on etc.

While I see what he was trying to do, the legal issues mean nothing to me, but I'm not convinced that it was actually constructive and it seems to me that it was potentially more destructive and dangerous, causing more distractions that he was preventing.

I'd fully support someone using a jammer in the cinema/library/museum/prison etc. - the random beeps and bright white texting is really annoying in the cinema (let alone actually taking a call), but I also think people should be made aware their phones won't work so it doesn't confuse them (and in case they have a critical call to take, in which case they can choose not to watch/disturb my film)

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Chap builds mobe based on Raspberry Pi

No, I will not fix your computer

@Daniel Palmer

Judging by the upvote/downvote ratio, you don't "get it", I think it's been explained, but I'll summarise;

This is a Pi project, not arduno - regardless of the competition in the "small processor board" (such as the excellent arduno/beagle etc.) the Pi has managed to be a full computer, with excellent general purpose connectivity (SD/HDMI/USB) which you can just boot up into a Linux desktop, this allows the most novice of users to get their toes wet. The thing that separates it from (say) a nano iTX or other small PC is that it's also got well thought out GPIO, which is astoundingly easy to use, loads of easy to read python. But the icing on the cake is the $25 pricetag (although we all know it's a bit more than that).

The excitement that Pi brings isn't because of what it's capable of (individual projects can do the same) it's the fact that Pi is "mainstream" - ordinary people know what it is, this article isn't an instructive article for bit twiddlers (like you), it's another "look what else Pi does", it's here on the register not to instruct geeks (like the majority of ElReg readers are), but to show the geekdom world how we are going mainstream

The whole point of Pi is that kids pick it up and we generate excited kids, and enthuse a new generation of computer literate people - the 80's and 90's were fertile with teenagers cutting code, Amiga copper and blitter programmers having fun, who then went on to various techie/IT jobs, but the generation after didn't have the same exposure, just check the CV's of UK IT people, the majority are 30's through to late 40's.

Give someone a fish, and they will eat for a day, teach them to fish and they will eat for a lifetime.

Give someone a PS3 and they will shoot drug dealers for hours after school, give them a Pi they might well get excited about technology end up with an IT job which improves the industry and gets them a good income.

(not quite as snappy, but you get the idea)

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: re:"*If you want contributions to the hacking of electronics;"

>>What colour box do you think it's contained in then?

Please tell me this was a reference to the HHGTTG.

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Gay marriage foes outraged at Mozilla CEO flap, call for boycott

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Should have told protesters where to go

>>As a private citizen he made a modest donation to a campaign for reasons he did not make public and presumably had no intention of disclosing except for donation laws.

So imposing his bigotry is fine if you keep it a secret?

Lobbying for slavery to be re-introduced is OK, if you don't tell anyone?

Remember, this is not merely a "view" he tried to get the law changed.

>>And none of which has anything to do with making a web browser. He should have told the protesters to go bother someone else.

Yep, his views have nothing to do with a browser, but why is his view relevant to gay people either? unless he's actually gay why is his view relevant to the world?, nobody is forcing him to marry a man.

His protest and the activists protests follow the same form.

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No, I will not fix your computer
Happy

Fresh Milk?

Fundamentally, we have free speech, we can also (to some extent) vote with our money and consumer feet.

Brendan Eich, paid money in to lobby so that a sector of society shouldn't have certain rights, I support his right to do this 100%, but free speech doesn't come with a "- and can't be criticised for it" suffix, I can't force him to think differently, that's his choice, and his choice to attempt to impose his view on others.

The protesters against Brendan Eich, were doing exactly the same, instead of paying to have a sector of society denied rights, they boycotted (and encouraged others to boycott) a product he was subsequently associated with, I support this action 100% too.

Neither action or protest was illegal, but was one protest disproportionate to the other? lets compare them; a man lost a job (and may find it difficult to get another in the same salary range), that's a bit shitty, he attempted to prevent an entire sector of society from getting legal recognition of love, and (some may say) more importantly legal protection, pension sharing, next of kin etc. if it was disproportionate, perhaps he lost a little as a result of attempting to take away a lot from others?

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Amazon carefully stitches up Heartbleed OpenSSL hole

No, I will not fix your computer
Boffin

Re: Could heartbleed be in any way related to the windigo botnet?

>>SSH != SSL

OpenSSH (which comes as standard with many vendor supplied OS's) uses part of OpenSSL (specifically libcrypto) however, OpenSSH doesn't use TLS for it's sessions (unlike HTTPS, which TLS is one option and within that TLS heartbeat is optional).

So while some versions of SSH can use bits of crypto from OpenSSL, the actual transport itself (the vulnerable bit) is pure OpenSSL TLS heartbeat.

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No, I will not fix your computer
Boffin

Re: This didn't occur to me immediately

>>but it only affects the client if you connect to a compromised server.

Not exactly, and you may not even be able to detect if a server had been "compromised" - say for example the private keys had been copied off, it probably hasn't left any footprint.

Also, if someone had captured the traffic between a client and a server and then retrieves the private key the entire conversation is open to subsequent disclosure (which would probably include authentication details).

If you have a network capture then get the keys you have the content, if you get the keys then have access to (or create/redirect to) a transparent proxy (which is far easier than you may expect) then you have the content.

So, the safest option is to immediately shut down, reset all your authentication details, upgrade, generate new certificates, restart, note, don't make the same mistake as many and just generate new certificates from the old keys, generate new keys as well (i.e. don't use the same CSR).

The thing is with this one is that millions of servers could have been harvested for keys for months/years, with those keys they could have been snooping at the contents (such as passwords) for months/years, how often do you change your (supposedly secure) credentials? securing the sites won't change the fact they have your credentials - I'd suggest changing Amazon etc. passwords ASAP.

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Why won't you DIE? IBM's S/360 and its legacy at 50

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Excel enables the next Holocaust!

>>So how did Stalin and Mao do better without the devil punch card machines?

Stalin was "killing" from 1927 - 1953 (26 years) as opposed to WW2 which was broadly 6 years.

The majority of Stalin's targeted killing was regional (people on specific land) and very easy to identify.

Mao was a similar story, there was no specific "target", just people on land.

I'm not sure whether you intended it or not, but you're emphasising my point of the post, the machines IBM supplied enabled accurate targeting and filtering of people integrated into an existing community with specific traits - unlike Mao and Stalin, if you honestly don't see the difference between the implementation of targeting sectors of society using technology and states that treated all their people as animals then you have no appreciation for history.

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Too early for a Godwin?

@Robert Long 1

You seem to be conflating using "an aircraft" with "machines specifically designed to enable the final solution".

Don't get me wrong, I do understand what you're saying, load of people traded with the Nazis before, during, between and after the wars (The Bush family made their fortune from trading war bonds and other financial instruments, the presidential race may not have been possible without it), but there's a huge difference (or possibly a fine line, depending how you look at it) between war profiteering and explicitly supplying a ground breaking technology specifically designed to enable extermination of sectors of society.

Put another way, if this technology (on which IBM is founded) was used for constructive social issues, say a national insurance or healthcare system, don't you think that IBM would have held it up as a pioneering tech? I'm not even talking about the relative right or wrongs of the system, merely the fact it's not discussed, because technologically, it was an achievement, on which IBM is founded, it's not just the money they made, it's the central database, standard interfaces, correlated data, centralised de-duping, automatic data processing, all those properties that define a mainframe.

I've got absolutely no axe to grind with respect to the American involvement in war, I just find it interesting that the subject is avoided, and given the impact of IBM the concepts on which mainframes are based, It seems to me relevant history.

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No, I will not fix your computer

Too early for a Godwin?

I wonder why it is that many articles and discussions about the history of IBM (and mainframes) avoid the subject of their part in the holocaust?

While it's true they deny an awareness of the use of their counting machines, it's a matter of record that they did supply the punch card census machines (mainly through Dehomag, the IBM subsidiary in German, and Watson Business Machines in the US).

There's the financial impact to IBM, they made a lot of money from Nazi Germany before and during WW2, then there's the technological importance of drawing all information to a central place for processing (which is in essence "mainframe" technology).

Surely you can discuss these two crucially important historical milestones without implicitly approving of it, or is it really that insignificant? or is the subject avoided purely because of a "ooh.. we better not discuss that mentality?"

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ICANN boss: 'Russia and China will NOT take over interwebs'

No, I will not fix your computer
Joke

"the US government’s withdrawal could leave a dangerous vacuum"

After withdrawal, there was no danger, just an odd farting sound.

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No, I will not fix your computer
Joke

"the US government’s withdrawal could leave a dangerous vacuum"

I had one of those once, turned out to be a loose wire in the plug.

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New IPCC report: 8 ways climate change will throw world INTO PERIL

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: It's the words: stupid.

>>Therein lies the success of the propagandists denying AGW.

I don't think it's even that complex, we see it now, the politicians are clearly saying "what is the cost of avoiding this, compared to letting it happen", what is emotionally "right" (or even morally "right") is no longer relevant, it's whether it's financially "right", and that's why they want numbers.

If climate change is affected by man (and the consensus is that it is), then at some point it will either be too late, or it will be very costly to change.

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No, I will not fix your computer

Re: ..everyone can identify with slower maturation of wine grapes as an issue worth tackling! ..

While the point you make has some validity, if (and I repeat, if) Western Australia's late harvest is good, imagine how a later harvest could change it, perhaps it will cease being good, perhaps it will destroy the harvest, perhaps they will cease to be able to produce "delicious and refreshing tipples".

The changing seasonal demographics may make areas previously suitable for wine of a particular taste change, typical customers will change, companies without the flexibility to change could go under, perhaps at the expense of other companies that do well.

Change is generally a good thing, gently shifting climates are fine, people are adaptable, however, a change from predictability to chaos isn't so good.

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Tesla firms hot bottoms: TITANIUM armor now bolted to Model S e-cars

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Should

>>But before you hop on the Pinto wagon (Ha!) do a bit of the same research

You're missing the Pinto point, it's not the number killed, it's the fact that the engineers pointed out the issue in production, and it was totally avoidable, 27 deaths may not mean anything to you, and statistically it's trivial, it's the fact that the explicit decision was explicitly make to leave it knowingly unsafe - even to the point of calculating the cost of recall vs the cost of lawsuit.

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No, I will not fix your computer
Headmaster

Re: Historical

>>Up to 18,000 times a minute: A piston has both an up and a down stroke for each revolution of the crankshaft.

A single reciprocation includes both an up stroke and a down stroke which means 9,000 - (rather than 18,000 strokes).

You could (or course) claim that an "up", "down" followed by another "up" is an initial stroke followed by two reciprocations, however that would mean the "down" belongs to two different reciprocations which doesn't sit right with me, so I would say 9,000 is 9,000 reciprocations, rather than a single starting stroke followed by 17,999 shared reciprocations.

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Homeopathic remedies contaminated with REAL medicine get recalled

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: What do we do for those for whom it works?

>>To me it's simple. I'll start to believe modern science, when they perform alternative medicine research, using subjects for whom all other medical treatments have been exhausted.

Sometimes, things (what we say in the industry) "get better on their own", the body is an amazing thing, we also use (slightly annoying) phrases like "grow out of it", unfortunately we don't know all the triggers for things, psoriatic arthritis for example - you don't "have" it in the same way as you "have" a broken leg, symptoms can come and go, flareups with exposure to certain triggers are possible (although there appears to be a genetic factor, which may explain your condition), in other words it's perfect for the woo of homoeopathy, the condition doesn't get better with X so you try Y and it gets better, therefore (the pattern forming animal) says Y fixed it, it's irrelevant (to you) if it "just went away", or you body learnt how to cope with certain triggers, or the triggers ceased being there (and this is of course before we get into the realm of placebo effect).

If for example (as another poster says) Y always fixes "psoriatic arthritis", consistently don't you think that it would be trivial to do a study? This is the problem with homoeopathy - the effect is not consistent, and, at best no better than placebo, in fact the best independent meta study (Cochrane) finds this exact result - in other words, the thing you're asking for has been done.

All that said, I'm in two minds, the NHS funds a homoeopathic hospital in London, actually that isn't true, "The Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine" as it has been renamed attempts to align "complementary" medicine with "traditional" medicine and homoeopathy is one of the "complements", my personal view is that it's a costly (but sometime effective) placebo for hypochondriacs, but as they say YMMV, if it makes you happy to throw spilt salt over your shoulder you do it, hell, I won't even get all bent out of shape just because some of my tax money is paying for it there's worse things in this world than someone who needs a placebo to get by (although I was a bit disappointed by "Loud like love", "Meds" was so much better - see what I did there?)

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China's CERT blames US for a THIRD of all attacks on Middle Kingdom PCs

No, I will not fix your computer

While it's true.....

China is the source of lots of hacking / botnet / intrusion, per capita it's actually not as bad as the US (per capita), probably due to the rather split demographic in China, pretty much 50/50 with those who have access to IT and those that don't.

To be fair, China is also one of the best sources for open proxies... apparently, which would definitely skew the "original source", not that I'd know obviously, after all I can't imagine what use a proxy in another country would be.... ahem.

5
1

ISPs' pirate-choking blocking measures ARE effective – music body

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Quality

Don't blame me for the downvote but, I suspect whoever downvoted you should have gone on to say there's a couple of important points you seem to be missing;

#1 mp3 comes in many levels of quality, most people wouldn't be able to tell the difference between 320kbps CBR and a CD, most people would be able to tell the difference between 128kbps and a CD, depending on you (and the type of song) you can get away with as much (or as little) compression as you like (and 256kbps VBR is a good compromise between size and quality).

#1.5 "mp3" often is used to refer to "compressed music" but AAC 256kbit VBR is probably as good as 320kbps mp3 (at least I can't tell the difference).

#2 A car is a really bad environment for audiophiles, not only will the speakers be positioned less than optimally for your ears, there's odd shapes/sound reflections, engine noises etc., you might have isolators to stop the electrics for interfering (you might not), and if the CD player is old, then I guess the speakers are too?

I've played 96kbps vbr from an iPod mini (using a wireless adapter) in a car and it's perfectly acceptable, I've also built and installed a touchscreen PC playing FLAC encoded CD tracks, one thing for sure is that a shit song is a shit song, no matter the quality, and a great song (like my old Pet Sounds mono recording) is a great song even with fuzz and crackles.

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This changes everything: Microsoft slips WinXP holdouts $100 to buy new Windows 8 PCs

No, I will not fix your computer
Windows

Re: Windows 8.1?

>>XP is what drove me to try Linux in 2002. It was a huge pile of doggie dos until SP2 came out

Which of course is *exactly* what happened with Vista/Win 7, Vista came out, a POS, SP1 was a huge fire-fight, SP2 actually pretty good (but by then the damage was done), SP3 was "renamed" Windows 7, it's the same code base (even called Windows 6.1 internally, mind you 8 is 6.2 so that probably doesn't mean much now).

3
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MtGox finds 200,000 Bitcoin in old wallets

No, I will not fix your computer

Or perhaps, when there's blood on the streets....

Hide 200,000 bitcoins in the old wallet format, and if no-one notices after the dust settles it can "disappear" again.

2
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QUIDOCALYPSE: Blighty braces for £100 MILLION cost of new £1 coin

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Coin recognition

I suspect the £500 figure includes ISIS detection, which is a whole different bundle of electronic, that said you don't HAVE to use ISIS, you can do it old school.

0
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MH370 airliner MYSTERY: The El Reg Pub/Dinner-party Guide

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Accident or Malicious?

>>With regard to hijack, they would require a runway of c1.5km to land a 777, presumably there can't be many of those around that are not under the control of a government?

A full weight, full speed landing with maximum brakes can be done comfortably in less than 1.2Km, a slow, full brake, full flap "light" landing with no float can be done in a shade over 300m on a 777, but they are the kind of landings you'd need to practice (specifically, to stop the float, you need to get the wheels down asap), a zero altitude stall (spot landing) isn't really appropriate for such a large aircraft, but some of the same techniques could be used, typically longer distances are used because tyres are very expensive and a long landing protects them (at $40k a set this is important, but not so much for hijackers).

0
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Eight hour cleansing to get all the 'faggots' and 'bitches' OUT of Github

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: This

>>Completely unrelated topic I know, but still. Also, from reading the brief description of ovo lacto vegetarian. Isn't that just like... regular vegetarian? I mean if you remove eggs and milk that's the general shift from vegetarian to vegan right? Or am I missing something here.

It's just specific hypocrisy, he says "I avoid the whole question of the morality of meat-eating much as, say, a celibate person doesn't have to worry about the ethics of polygamous relationships" yea, because battery chickens and continued impregnation of cows and having their calves taken and eaten has no moral aspect, don't get me wrong, I'm a omnivore, at least I don't pretend there's no moral issues.

1
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This record-smashing robot solves a Rubik's Cube in 3.253 seconds

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: solving?

It's actually two groups (corners and sides) merging the two groups gives a maximum move solution of 20 moves, so (theoretically) the slowest "fast" solution is how long it takes to make 20 moves, and leaves the possibility of less than 20 moves if the random mix was advantageous (and opposite side moves in counter-rotation could be done at the same time), could even optimise the initial moves with partial information before the initial scan is complete.

Sub 3 seconds should be possible, although not by me, being an armchair geek, I never actually do anything, I just comment one stuff I'm to stupid or lazy to do myself, well done guys!

Best I managed was 57 seconds, and 4.33 for the revenge (but I did solve the revenge before there was any official world record recorded)

1
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GitHub probes worker's claims of hostile, sexist office culture

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Awful lot of misogynists here

If somebody is accused of harassment (sexual or otherwise) then the "correct" procedure (or at least usual) is to be separated (often by leave), this doesn't mean that there was wrongdoing, just enough evidence that it's possible, also now allowing the Founders wife at work is just usual practice (how many partners can come and go at the other persons workplace?).

GitHub, I suspect has taken legal advice, and they have have been told to post a carefully crafted statement to avoid vicarious liability, i.e. it's the individuals not "the company" if you want to sue someone, sue them not us (there's very little mileage suing individuals, but companies have money)

I've seen the same thing before (first hand), and I've seen similar conversations between management and their legal advisor's.

The engineer will be hung out to dry (unless he claims it was "cultural", again vicarious responsibility, he better get a solicitor quick and don't assume that the company will support him in any way) - perhaps he deserves if he was a dick, the Founder will probably take one for the team short-term, but be back in a few months as if nothing happened.

0
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They ACCUSED him of inventing Bitcoin. Now, Nakamoto hires lawyer to CLEAR his name

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UK's CASH POINTS to MISS Windows XP withdrawal date

No, I will not fix your computer
FAIL

Re: Hmm

To be honest, the OS X quote and Linux jokes were quite funny, but when I read;

>>The only choice was, and remains, Windows for ANY device that has to be used by the non-techy general public.

I realised that you were not joking, just look at the number of Android phones out there and you can see that this is untrue. Open sources and command-lines are available, but you don't have to use them, it's a bit like the gay marriage argument, you can support it without actually having to marry someone of the same sex.

2
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Space-junk RAYGUN wins Australian government funding

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Orbital Mechanics- what goes up must come down

Nahh... the gap between LEO (minimum 160Km) and the highest levels of atmosphere (mesopause ~80Km) is a minimum of 80Km, so you'd need a really eccentric orbit, so not only would you create a rapidly accelerating object, you'd have it going up and down through many different orbits, creating a much more dangerous object.

Deorbiting using an eccentric orbit is a really bad idea (even it if were possible).

0
0

Fee fie Firefox: Mozilla's lawyers probe Dell over browser install charge

No, I will not fix your computer

Re: Are they blond?

I suspect that Mozilla take exception on this bit;

The Mozilla product must be without cost and its distribution (whether by download or other media) may not be subject to a fee, or tied to subscribing to or purchasing a service, or the collection of personal information.

I guess they don't like the obtaining of Firefox tied to the installation service?

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