* Posts by Adam 52

72 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

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Legal eagles accuse Labour of data law breach over party purge

Adam 52

Meanwhile the Tories are still hoovering up your medical records ...

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Security fears arise over body-worn plodcam footage

Adam 52

Re: It's funny...

The usual response to turning on a body worn camera is that the opinionated member of the public finds somewhere else to be...

Camera on all the time? Like when you're taking the intimate sample from the rape victim or searching recently deceased granddad? You sure about that, people deserve some dignity in death and when they're the victim.

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Microsoft will explain only 'significant' Windows 10 updates

Adam 52

Re: loophole....

IANAL of course, but I don't think the EULA can be a bullet proof get out, no more than "she consented" is a get out for performing unnecessary medical surgery.

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Adam 52

I don't understand how this can be legal. Up until now they've had the justification that a computer owner has consented to the code running on their PC. If they don't explain the updates that consent can't be given.

This was Microsoft's own argument when the Computer Misuse Act was being drafted. I know not all of the provisions have been enacted, maybe there's a loophole.

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Anti-privacy unkillable super-cookies spreading around the world – study

Adam 52

Re: Spain?

Read beyond the first paragraph!

https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-pecr/cookies-and-similar-technologies

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Adam 52

Re: Spain?

No. The EU rules are about storing data on the user's computer. They aren't about cookies, cookies are just one mechanism by which data can be stored. As I understand it this system doesn't store anything locally.

There may be other privacy regulations this violates though. DPA is the obvious one (if the token is PII, which it would seem to be).

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You CAN'T jail online pirates for 10 years, legal eagles tell UK govt

Adam 52

Re: Of course it will work...

Prosecuting home downloaders isn't rare, it's non existent. That's because home downloading isn't a crime.

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Care.data is a complete omnishambles, says study into hated scheme

Adam 52

Re: Good medical practice

As far as I can tell from reading the evidence to the commons select committee no data is being extracted. Is that not the case? [I've asked my gp and hospital, both are dodging the question]

I'm also curious as to what makes people think that DPA no longer applies. There's no mention of relaxing DPA rules anywhere in the legislation so is there some legal principle I don't understand?

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Adam 52

Re: Change in the law

Sorry the change is in Care Act 2014:

"Information Centre may do so only if it considers that disseminating the information would be for the purposes of—

(a)the provision of health care or adult social care, or

(b)the promotion of health.”

Not exactly a cast- iron safeguard is it!

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Adam 52

Re: Change in the law

Health and Social Care Act 2012

but that allows the data to be collated, it doesn't somehow retrospectively grant permission from patients or override decades of common law. Or at least it shouldn't, but most of the judges who would have defended common law have retired.

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Thirty five Flash Player holes plugged (and there's one quick fix)

Adam 52

Have you managed to make YouTube work?

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Download Fest goers were human guinea pigs in spy tech experiment, admit police

Adam 52

There is a reason for that. You see there are some people who, for whatever reason, aren't very friendly towards constables and engage in activities ranging from smearing their cars in faeces to kidnapping their children. For that reason a lot of police don't want their photos on Facebook.

Plus after the 7th drunk idiot asking for a photo it gets a bit tedious.

Not excusing mass surveillance, but two wrongs don't make a right.

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Windows 10: THE ULTIMATE GUIDE to Microsoft's long apology for Windows 8

Adam 52

Re: Not persuaded

I think your 32 bit licence covers 64 bit too. There are tutorials out there explaining how to back up the licence and reinstate into a 64 bit install. I did it when my new 8gb laptop came preinstalled with 32 bit Windows.

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Adam 52

Apart from the occasional "we're stealing even more of your personal information" emails I don't recall getting any spam from Google to my Android account.

Microsoft, on the other hand, are deluging the account I attached to Windows 8 with marketing email. So I'm back to a plain old username.

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Assange™ celebrates third year in Ecuadorian embassy broom closet

Adam 52

Trying to work this out. A constable's pay is roughly £30,000 with London allowance. So you can get 366 constable-years for his £11 million, or more if you outsource to Group 4 (watching a door hardly needs a fully attested constable).

Methinks there may be some creative accounting going on.

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Skype hauled into court after refusing to hand call records to cops

Adam 52

Re: Good for them

Police and Criminal Evidence Act for one. There are many others. I believe there was an entire book of reasons published in the early 90s.

Anyone arrested can have their home searched and Home Office interpretation is that desire to search means the necessity criteria for arrest is met.

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Adam 52

Re: Good for them

I'm not sure where you live but certainly in the UK the Police can, may and will come to your house and search your drawers without getting the ok from a judge first.

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Welsh police force fined £160,000 after losing sensitive video interview

Adam 52

Re: Victim Compensation

Police officers have to view video footage and they can't do that if it's locked in an evidence room. Witnesses and victims have a habit of being uncooperative and hard to find, scientific evidence is slow to arrive. Booking evidence in and out takes a long time and huge amounts of paperwork (all done longhand on paper forms with exhibit nunbers that make UUIDs look like friendly names). On top of that state of Police IT (see here passim) means it is by no means easy to find a PC capable of viewing the footage. The officer will be running this case and many others as well as responding to the pub fight, Wayne and Brittney's domestic and Mrs Jones upset about someone parking on "her" street (you think CID do initial interviews for rape, not a chance, dream on).

So it's easy for a DVD to get put in a drawer waiting for a witness, the case eventually goes nowhere and the DVD forgotten. It's the price you pay for cutting a service to the bone and expecting 5 people to police 200,000.

Let the down voting begin!

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UK safety app keeping lorries on the right side of cyclists

Adam 52

Re: 100M£

The construction and use regs say  "Every motor vehicle shall be so designed and constructed that the driver thereof while controlling the vehicle can at all times have a full view of the road and traffic ahead of the motor vehicle."

so if the driver can't see the cycles in front then they shouldn't be driving. I believe there have been some failed prosecutions.

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Is this what Windows XP's death throes look like?

Adam 52

Re: I see desktop OS's similar to TV dinners...

At the risk of upsetting, that's not my experience. Ubuntu - one of the plug and play Linuxes - has failed on both of the machines I've tried it. First time because the display resolution wasn't supported and it went into a 1980 film version of a PC crash (fixed by modding the x config) and second because the installer couldn't cope with installing to an encrypted partition that it itself had created.

Both I got working eventually but the experience was in no way as seamless as you'd hope or as people are suggesting here.

I'm a small sample of course so I may be an exception.

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Google throws a 180 on its plans for Dart language

Adam 52

Debugging

How do they solve the debugging problem? Instrument the JavaScript somehow and call back to the IDE?

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Kaspersky Lab hits back at Bloomberg's Russian spy link hit piece

Adam 52

Re: Were the accusations true...

It's a sad state of affairs that the default assumption is that of law enforcement "causing you problems". You could rewrite your argument using "protection" instead and come to the opposite conclusion but we don't trust our governments.

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Gamers! Ransomware will scramble your save files unless you cough up $1,000

Adam 52

Re: Meh

I have absolutely no idea where most of the software I run stores its state. My docs are backed up but short of a clone I couldn't guarantee that everything else is. I suspect I'm not alone.

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The BBC wants to slap a TAX on EVERYONE in BLIGHTY

Adam 52

He's talking about data because it's been phenomenally successful for Channel 4. Up until now the broadcasters have had noidea, beyond a few surveys, who watches what. If they can find who watches what then it helps build pprogrammes people want, even real-time schedule updates for trending topics - and audience figures are what they're chasing. Of course it's also a nice profile to sell to advertisers, depends how much you trust the BBC.

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Police radios will be KILLED soon – yet no one dares say 'Huawei'

Adam 52

Have you any idea how much paperwork PC Pleb has to do? And then transcribe onto a PC at the office. And then print and fax to the CPS?

PC Pleb could really use a nice, reliable ruggedised laptop and data stick. Would save hours per day. And a car GPS linked to the command and control system like Ambo and Fire have would take minutes off response times.

But don't take away the reliable radio. The last thing your 4ft9 single crew copper needs as the 6ft6 20 stone mental patient kicks off is a radio that needs more than one finger or is slow.

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Space Commanders lock missiles on Elite's Frontier Devs

Adam 52

I backed on Kickstarter. I still haven't played it because the online activation doesn't work. There's been a support ticket in sice November which Frontier can't be bothered to answer.

On offline mode - I played Elite as a kid. Then I had enough time to make it to Elite. I'm now grown up. I've got a job, a commute and a family. I'm lucky to get a spare hour to play. I don't want dynamic pricing, I don't want to load up with cargo and come back a week later to find it's worthless.

This sort of realism is why Braben's other Elite projects failed. When I backed the kickstarter I'd hope he'd learnt.

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ASA slaps Ebuyer AGAIN - this time for ignoring regulator

Adam 52

Re: What's the next level below Toothless Tiger?

The ASA is a mechanism to resolve disputes more cheaply than a fraud trial (because misleading advertising is fraud). If eBuyer are ignoring the ASA then they're abandoning their safety net against the directors being prosectuted.

Next move trading standards or Yorkshire constabulary (fat chance!)

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Device fingerprinting tech: It's not a cookie, but 'cookie' rules apply

Adam 52

Re: oh great!

Not this one again. Please actually read the legislation. It's not about cookies. It's about unauthorised storage on your machine. Just because you know how to delete cookies doesn't mean you know how to delete the data stored by my new plugin that I just invented and haven't told you about.

You'd have thought IT people would understand the concept of abstraction.

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Lords take revenge on REVENGE PORN publishers

Adam 52

Re: Not about revenge porn

Or maybe you're not looking hard enough?

(1)     A person is guilty of an offence if, knowingly and without

reasonable cause, he uses a means of identification of another

person or a fictitious person.

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Adam 52

Not about revenge porn

What none of the journalism on this issue seems to mention is if you actually read the text, the ammendment doesn't actually ban revenge porn. It bans any "private sexual" image that might offend the model. So all those glamour models and celebrities (and politicians) who posed for dodgey shots or have been caught with their pants down can now call for the publisher to be prosecuted.

And on the subject of names - check out the other ammendments banning pseudonyns.

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Police mistake reveals plan for Assange's Embassy capture

Adam 52

Re: @ Adam 52

Let me try to put this in geek terms. There are five of you running a helpdesk for 200,000 users. You are getting aroubd 200 calls per hour. One user's copy of Word has crashed but they won't use the document recovery feature, they insist on you coming down in person to clone their hard drive (which won't help restore the file).

Meanwhile one of the net connections has died, and whilst you do have a backup it's overloaded and thousands of users are getting partial network access.

Do you come in on your day off to help the first user?

To address the points raised:

1. You don't know the priorities. It only takes one vulnerable 90 year old to go missing to divert an entire shift. Vulnerable people go missng a lot (think about your grandparents if you're old enough) and if out overnight they almost invariably die. That's just one example.

Your friend was safe, he'd escaped. He is no longer a priority. Catching criminals is lower priority than preventing deaths or injury.

2. Assault is not a particularly serious crime. It usually isn't even prosecuted, so why waste time. You can argue the government, CPS and court priorities are wrong, but that's not a police issue.

3. CCTV, other than very expensive town centre style operator controlled CCTV is usually next to useless at identifying criminals. And it *has* to be backed up with a statement or it is useless in court. If you want to prosecute you need evidence.

4. Unfortunately social workers work 10 to 4, and don't do potentially violent situations or confrontation; taking a child into care is confrontational.

5. Society doesn't accept closed roads for long periods of time. It also doesn't like decomposing body parts scattered around.

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Adam 52

Even if your CCTV was useful, which in all probablility it wasn't, it needs to be written to DVD and backed up with a statement by the CCTV operator to be usable as evidence.

As for the 3 days, it's possible that the officer, or her boss, felt that one of the 50 other cases on her books was more deserving of her time (maybe they were trying to explain to the 8 year old why she was being taken into care and would never see her parents or siblings again, or maybe picking up pieces of the motorbiker scattered along the local roads). Or even that she may have been on leave or on a night shift - you know police officers do have to take time off occasionally and some even have to sleep. I note you didn't care enough to prevent it being wiped.

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No, iPhone location tracking isn't harmless and here's why

Adam 52

Disclosure

That's not really fair on the police/CPS. Yes, there is a tendency to looks for evidence to convict the accused, but any evidence that is found during the investigation is disclosed. Usually.

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Minister hints that libel reform will create privacy law

Adam 52

Not libel

Max didn't sue for libel - although many thought he could have. He sued for breach of privacy, and won.

He also did the court case relatively cheaply using a small firm of lawyers and yet the costs were still way out of reach of the average person.

In the next issue after the decision, the NoTW ran an similar article about a friend of mine that destroyed their career. The current law is clearly no deterrent.

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UK.gov's phone and net snooping hits record high

Adam 52

title

Last time I checked, caller ID didn't give an address.

The red-tape you mention is about 5 keystrokes - flash call log to control rooms Inspector - and a quick note. That's why RIPA allows an Inspector to authorise.

Don't underestimate the number of calls a 999 operator will get from people who aren't thinking clearly. If my experience is typical, I reckon at least 80% will fit this category.

I suspect the next biggest is a scan of the local drug dealer's confiscated mobile phones.

You need to look a long way beyond the headline figure to get to anything controversial.

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Adam 52

Not intercepts

I say this every time this report comes out. These are not intercepts, they're data requests.

If the 999 operator gets a call that suddenly goes quiet before they've got an address you'll get a hit here, because someone has to go and find out if the call was a genuine emergency.

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TalkTalk-Tiscali merger proves fraught

Adam 52

@Michael Jennings

Good luck if you do decide to leave. Then you'll find out why everyone hates Tiscali so much - it's six months since I left and despite three complaints to the ISPA and a win at arbitration they're still sending round the bully-boy debt collectors.

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Scotland Yard criticised over raid on Parliament

Adam 52

@Peter 45, @AC

If it isn't true, it is a very widely held belief amongst constables.

Similarly because PACE allows a search of the home of someone arrested, constables believe that the desire for of a search satisfies the necessity criteria for an arrest.

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West Midlands cops to roll out Mitsubishi EVs

Adam 52

Ever seen a police station car park?

Good luck anyone trying to get this to the charging point.

Other than that, eminently sensible idea. Most police work consists of running about in a limited area ferrying forms to different locations.

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Panicky Plod apologises to Innocent Terror Techie

Adam 52

@Defence?

Yes, you may resist unlawful arrest. However you'll discover that the Met can *and will* bring more force to bear than you can. The advice from the Courts is, therefore, to sue.

You'll also find that the Met nearly always wins the cases that go to court, even the ones that look hopeless. If you do the analysis you'll note that there is one particular judge that takes almost all of the cases involving the Met., and he always finds in their favour (although sometime overturned on appeal).

I suspect if David had gone to court then he would have lost.

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Baroness Scotland fined for failing to follow own law

Adam 52

@Unfortunately

You're spot on. She's managed to do a deal with the border agency to avoid being prosecuted.

In other words she's committed a crime (one she herself created) and she's bought her way out of a prosecution. A bargain for her really because a criminal conviction, which she should have, would have ruined her career.

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Arms biz: Your taxes mainly go on our fat salaries! Ha ha!

Adam 52

Pay comparison

Some research has put (possibly outdated) numbers against those army benefits.

A private with no qualifications on minimum salary gets £1390/month [source: The Telegraph]. Housing subsidy worth £300/month [source:BBC]. PHI/life insurance worth £100/month [what I pay]. Pension contribution worth £350/month [source: army.mod.uk + Scottish Widows]. Whilst on tour add £300/month [source: The Telegraph].

Works out to an equivalent salary of £27,500 assuming 6 month tour, ignoring specialist pay, retention bonus etc.

By contrast starting pay (post-training) for a constable is £25,000 [source: policeoracle.com]

Starting pay for an arms worker £24000 + pension + healthcare [source: BAE systems]

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Adam 52

@Fixing aaaaall the misconceptions

1. Armed forces staff get houses at substantially below the market rate. It might not be free, but it's worth about £300/month.

2. A constable is also a 24/7 position, the duty is absolute even when not "on duty". They also face mandatory retirement, and have to contribute much more pay into their own pension scheme, death in service insurance, legal cover etc. They also don't get a pay rise for every training course attended.

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US music publishers sue online lyrics sites

Adam 52

Hope this gets defended properly

Think of the consequences if the record companies with this. Newspapers won't be allowed to quote anyone for a start.

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US women protest for the right to bare

Adam 52

@david 63

Don't believe everything Ian Flemming tells you.

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No more Eurofighters for RAF, despite 232-jet pact

Adam 52

air-to-air fighter, but such combat is very rare

I'm not convinced by that. I suspect the QRA aircraft see a fair bit of action at the moment.

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Scientists unlock DIY DNA

Adam 52

previous article

Hasn't The Register published a piece before on fabricating the indicators that a DNA profile is based on? I can't find it by searching, maybe I'm remembering incorrectly.

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GM Volt to deliver three-figure fuel economy

Adam 52

Not mpg

It's not really an mpg figure, US or UK, it's a fudge based around a notional value for each kWh of electricity.

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Increase in comms snooping? You ain't seen nothing yet

Adam 52

@Inside Track

You seem to be misinformed. As an example, o2 do not provide subscriber details except in response to a RIPA request. http://www.o2.com/cr/resource2006/call_monitoring.asp

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Adam 52

More detail

He does break it down a little more in the report, he estimates over 80% of the headline number is just a request for subscriber data. There's nothing sinister in that, happens regularly when a 999 caller can't/won't give their details (as I've posted before). I suspect you'll also find that in that 80%, there are only about a thousand actual people being targeted - the serial 999 fake callers - plus the mobile left in a pocket and a few genuine emergencies.

I think a breakdown would be useful, it'd help inform debate and stop scaremongering headlines like the Lib Dems are generating.

Report available at http://www.statewatch.org/news/2009/aug/uk-interception-of-communications-2008.pdf

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