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* Posts by I ain't Spartacus

3446 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

Russia: SEXY LIZARDS which landed FROM SPACE are all DEAD

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Devil

Re: That's a first..

This is Olga. She is beautiful 19 year-old Russian Olympic gold medalist and she will be your space companion this trip. She is shot-putting champion. Have nice month in orbit...

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Ninja Pirate Zombie Vampires versus Chuck Norris and the Space Marines

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Re: No Commander Shepard / mixed bag of aliens on the winning side?

The Knnn have got to be good. And whatever the aliens are called in 'Hunter of Worlds'. Plus we have the Kif and the Mri for hand-to-hand (plus teeth) nastiness.

But the most dangerous of the lot has surely got to be the nighthorses. If they ever hear that bacon is available throughout the universe, I'm sure they'll soon 'persuade' some pilots to get them into space...

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Devil

Re: R2-D2 etc ARE combat robots by design.

Only in the sense that non-lethal weapons are combat equipment because they include irritants. C3-PO, R2-D2 and Johny-5 are all more likely to provoke violence by virtue of being really annoying.

But that would make JarJar Binks the most powerful and deadly force in the universe!

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I ain't Spartacus
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Re: Morris Dancers.

The collective noun you are looking for is 'a morris side'. Although 'a pissed of Moris men' may also be appropriate...

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I ain't Spartacus
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Surely the out comment for colonial marines should be, "because we know what happens to them every time they come up against aliens. They end up as lunch."

Clearly the Aliens will get representation. But perhaps there should also be a place for Ripley. She's pretty damned hard to kill, and not too shabby on the slaughtering her enemies front either.

I guess the rude answer about jarheads is probably because the article is written by an ex-swabbie.

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NASA to reformat Opportunity rover's memory from 125 million miles away

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Re: Even though they're highly skilled at that...

Martian research scientists will spend years trying to work out which is the 'any' key, then give up and assume that humans are irretrevable stupid and not worth contacting. Or worse, easy to defeat, and so launch their invasion.

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GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine

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Devil

Re: Fed the scum?

Are you sure he didn't mean that you should marinade the alsatians in pepper spray, then cook them over the burning braziers?

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Siri: Helpful personal assistant or SERIAL APP KILLER?

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Re: No...

Most people still have better comprehension from reading data than from hearing it. So assistants are fine for simple yes/no questions, but once things get complicated, you're better off seeing a table/map/diagram/text.

My train and bus companies have perfectly servicable we sites. But on my phone, I use the app, becuase it concentrates the stuff I want when mobile into a smaller screen space. Gives me instant links to things like the live train/bus departure boards. And can use my location too, if I choose to allow it.

Some apps also allow you to download data, for when you're offline. A problem that will reduce, but I can't see going away for many decades.

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I ain't Spartacus
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That's a useful one to try, for a chronic over-sleeper who often gets an alarm while he's halfway through showering, because I set it to wake me if I'd gone back to sleep.

It's great for cooking too. Where you've got one hand that's dirty, wet or holding something. The other can set a timer.

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Re: Maybe... but only if it gets localised

I've found Accuweather to be OK. The Met Office don't seem to be much better at predicting rain, so I used to stick to my Accuweather based app, because I liked the pretty pictures.

But then Winter came. And I noticed that Accuweather predicted snow almost every day when the temperature was below about 2°C. I remember hearing an interview with a BBC weather forecaster talking about this, and how hard it is to predict snow in the UK - particularly the South. As it doesn't tend to drop much below zero, so you've got conditions that could give snow, sleet or rain, and it's often impossible to predict which. The Met Office were way better, so I've got into the habit of using them. I wonder if it's because the Met Office have a model tuned to the UK, and Accuweather's is set to US mode?

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I ain't Spartacus
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Facepalm

Siri, how do I use Siri?

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I ain't Spartacus
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Re: Typing in Cortana

I guess not, as Cortana is going to be able to operate various functions on the phone, which a search can't. Of course, if you're typing anyway, why not just go to the app?

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BOFH: The current value of our IT ASSets? Minus eleventy-seven...

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Re: You know inventory day is approaching ...

I remember an interview with someone at London Zoo. Apparently all zoos in Europe do their stocktake on 1st January. Can't remember if it's EU rules,or a global thing, so they can keep tabs on all the breeding programs. Easy to count elephants. But with stick insects they had to have someone sit and watch the tanks for a couple of hours and guesstimate...

The stock-take at Erfert Zoo in 2007 revealed that the keepers had been killing the animals and selling them to locals for barbecues. Mostly it seemed to be petting zoo type stuff, like goats, deer, antelopes etc. But someone apparently got to try anteater.

I have eaten zebra once. I wonder if I ought to have checked up on the source? It tastes like minty horse...

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Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE

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Devil

It's the other 1% that makes them worth having.

Roj Blake,

It's no wonder you were sent to a prison planet for sexual deviancy...

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Happy

Re: hmmm

As I've said here before I'm not even an economist, I just play one on the web.

Tim,

Oooh, do you have a costume? I'll be really disappointed in you if you don't...

Faster than runaway inflation, more powerful than a blast of QE, able to leap to conclusions in a single bound. It's Supereconomist!

Quick! To the VAT-cave! There's a crisis in Gotham City. GATT-Woman is threating global trade. If her dastardly plot succeeds Mayor Ricardo will be powerless to save the economy. Commissioner Gordon Brown said he'd saved the world, but he needs your help.

...Hmmm. I'd better stop now. I wonder if I should have had those mushrooms for lunch...

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I ain't Spartacus
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Devil

Tim Worstall is an idiot!

No one uses the internet for sex! There is no sexual material on the internet at all. It's a realm of purity, scholorship, communication and enlightenment.

As I said to my wife the other day, when she noticed that I'd been spending so much time on www.rubenesques.com. Some people just have dirty minds...

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I ain't Spartacus
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We can ignore a 'post-scarcity' economy in economics. Because we currently have no way to achieve it. So economics (and politics) is still all about how best to divide and ration scarce resources.

It may be true that there aren't many uses for the washing machine, but itself it's a development of many different technologies. And it's still being innovated upon. It's taken other inventions, pumps, electric motors, chemicals, computers (to achieve power and water efficiencies), ball-bearings. And is still changing. They now use under half the water they did 10 years ago, thus fewer chemicals, and less energy. You can now get them with variable speed motors, cutting down on noise, vibration and power use - as well as prolonging the life of the unit. This is possible because the pump industry (and others) have pushed down the cost of inverter-driven motors.

Or you could take a similar dead-end invention with no further uses, the dishwasher. And yet some American chap has published a book, called dishwasher cookery. Now you see the benefits of capitalism! Communism would never have given us that... Oh dear, have I just destroyed capitalism with a single argument? Ooops.

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Happy

Re: As I always say

Pepper sir? Would sir like some grated mouse on his pasta?

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My big reveal as macro-economics analyst: It's a load of COBBLERS

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Re: When history is written

Do you have any evidence for that claim about Gordon Brown?

My recollection of events was that Barclays were after buying out Lehman Brothers globally, but wanted some quite large treasury guarantees. Which UK government refused. Perfectly understandably, as no-one had a clue what the risk was. So in the end Barclays bought Lehman's US arm afterwards instead - taking much less of the risk.

The US had already decided to let Lehman go bust, as a salutary lesson. A large mistake as it turned out. I'd imagine that the UK government position was why should we bail out a US bank if they're not going to?

I remember reading subsequently about this, and noting that the US guys they interviewed were rather bitter about the Barclays deal not going through. And so blamed the Treasury. But I'm not sure if that isn't revisionism - because as I understand it the Barclays deal only came about because the US had already decided not to bail Lehman out.

Also the crisis would still have been very serious anyway. See the Eurozone for why. The banks were totally fucked, in various ways. They'd been out of control for too long. They'd taken on too much risk, they'd been committing various frauds, the UK interest-rate swaps and PPI misselling bill is going to come to something like £20-£25 billion! Even without Lehmans, the interbank market had frozen up, because all the banks knew all the others were loaded with toxic debt. Because none of them would admit the amounts, none of them could trust each other. The Eurozone was a house of cards, waiting for a recession to destroy it, the Eurozone banking system was also fucked, although for different reasons. They'd taken on some of our and the US's crap assets, but mostly what's destroyed their banking system is cross-border lending into property markets they didn't understand, political interference with local banks (Landesbanks and Cajas in particular) and all the toxic government debt.

Banking recessions are always going to be awful, because so many companies get finance from banks, so when they're shrinking their balance sheets it's almost impossible to kick-start recovery. Lehmans was the trigger which brought the crisis on, but in the end the banking sectors in the US, UK and Europe were teetering on the edge of collapse, and couldn't be saved without huge infusions of government cash. That meant they'd have to de-leverage, and that meant a massive recession. The rest was just timing.

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I ain't Spartacus
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Re: Phlogiston quote

That's probably unfairly harsh. Sure there's politics and belief involved in people's economic theories. But they are mostly attempts to explain a very complex interplay of events, with no means for experimentation, and absolutely shockingly bad data.

Germany had a recession last year. Did you know about this? Nope? That's OK, neither did Germany. They had something like -0.1% GDP growth in Oct-Dec 2012 and -0.3% growth in Jan-Mar 2013. But they only worked those figures out in last week's GDP figures. That's over 18 months late to effect government policy.

The UK have been trying to puzzle out what bit of our huge government deficit is structural and what part is cyclical. So what do we need to cut in order to balance the books at the middle of the economic cycle (say around 2018)? Once the temporary effects of the recession have stopped lowering tax receipts and causing us to spend on extra out-of-work / low pay benefits. To know this, we need to know how deep the recession was (which was adjusted to be -0.5% of GDP worse only 4 months ago). We also need to know if the recession has had an adverse effect on productivity, so the Bank of England can try to predict inflation and wage growth, so they can set interest rates. Productivity has dropped, but is that because companies chose not to sack so many people this time, or because the recession has fundamentally changed the economy, neither r both?

That's policy, which needs accurate figures. But to form theories, you can look at older data. Except each country measure everything slightly differently. And has a different type of economy, legal system, government, culture. So absolutely nothing is properly comparable. This makes economics hard.

However, if economics didn't exist, we'd have to invent it. Politicians need a guide on how to run the economy. They've got a limited set of tools at their disposal, crap data that's always months out of date, and some very shaky theories to work with. One rule of thumb is to be very careful about the fundamentalists. People who have faith in one theory tend to ignore the good bits of the other theories. But I think we're a bit better at explaining what things correlate with other things, even if we're a hell of a lot shakier on what the actual causation is.

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I ain't Spartacus
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Because the ECB gave those LTRO loans on a two year basis. They've mostly been repaid, and are all due to be called in around February. Also, the ECB were demanding collateral. This meant that there was a shortage of assets for banks to borrow against or use. Which is why the interbank lending and repo markets are still so crap. That and the breakdown of trust between the banks.

The ECB efforts are already mostly reversed, which is one reason why Eurozone money supply has been collapsing for the last two years. The problem with the Eurozone response to the crisis, is that not only can they not agree on solutions, but when they eventually do agree a policy, it's always short term and badly compromised. Which is why the Euro was such a rubbish idea. There is no way to achieve consensus, because there is no single dominant political institution. Nor is there an electorate back that up, and force a resolution. Nor is there a single economy, for policy to work on.

Although funnily enough, interest rates always seem to be about right for Germany, even when that caused serious inflation in Spain and Ireland 10 years ago. And then partly caused depression in Spain and Ireland five years ago.

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Reg man looks through a Glass, darkly: Google's toy ploy or killer tech specs?

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Re: Eye choice

Apple's alternative is of course called the iPatch...

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Re: Couple of questions

Thanks for that. It's a lot bigger than I was expecting then.

One thing I liked the idea of using it for was for reading signs. Hopefully the camera can magnify live images (I assume it acts as a viewfinder). Otherwise take snap of train departure board, then magnify and read. Although you can often go online and get stuff so that you don't have to read signs now - most train apps tell you the platform. That probably doesn't work in airports though, where a monocular comes in handy, and Google Glass could be rather useful. These places do like to put vital information on signs 20 foot up in the air. Which guarantees you can never get close enough to read them.

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I ain't Spartacus
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Couple of questions

Alun,

Did you have a problem where all the info was going to one eye, so all that one-eyed reading gave you a headache? Or were you not using it much at any one time? It was what I first thougth of when you mentioned using it to watch video.

On that photo you took when driving, with sat-nav displayed, is that the real apparent size of the text in your visual field? Or have Google made that little insert bigger in the photos than it looks in real life? I think Glass could be a brilliant tool, mainly for travelling. I'm not interested in checking my emails while walking down the street, but to be able to use sat-nav and look up info on public transport while wandering London would be very useful. As well as seeing texts from whoever I'm meeting. But my eyesight is rubbish, so I'm interested in how big the text is. I can just about read subtitles on a 50" telly at 6-8 feet (no chance on a 26"). But then subtitles may be a smaller font size than the equivalent Google use on Glass. I hope.

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I ain't Spartacus
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Happy

Re: Re unbending legs

Surely they're arms? After all, you fold your arms, not even yoga masters can fold their legs flat...

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Re: Eye choice

I'm sure I read that Google do a left eye version. After all, pirates might want to be usin' Glass. Sat-nav be so much easier for findin' yer buried dubloons. You needs it when yer parrot has pecked out yer starboard eye, aye.

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Groupon sales reps' overtime pay suit not eligible for class action

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Devil

Re: Still around?

Don't forget them. They're in a race. Which will go bust first? Groupon or Zynga? Place bets now!

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Whither the post-pub Deathmatch?

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Whither the post-pub Deathmatch?

Don't think I've seen one of these in a while. Would be perfect for your weekend edition.

I was reminded seeing Lester's name in lights on your latest rocketry madness. Perhaps he should do something TexMex in honour of the upcoming trip to the US? I find the breakfast burrito to be an excellent snack. Bacon, salsa, scrambled egg and a bit of grated cheese wrapped in a soft tortilla. Sausages are an alternative to the bacon. There are always tortillas left over when you use them, which gives me the perfect excuse - and I like to make up big batches of salsa.

Perhaps El Reg should organise some sort of deathmatch event sometime? Could even raise funds for heart disease charities. Although that is sort of like holding a drinkathon for AA...

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Nearly there! LOHAN Kickstarter pot o'gold breaks £29,000

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Devil

Re: Why are there no STARS in space?

Why are there no STARS in space?

Because they're picky and difficult to please. And parties in space just have no atmosphere darling...

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Galileo! Galileo. Galileo! Galileo frigged-LEO: Easy come, easy go. Little high, little low

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Re: They are not insured, for a good reason

Isn't this the second and third satellited they've lost, out of the first 6 launched? I believe one of the earlier ones didn't work, although it's possible these two can be salvaged. But it's a bit sad to have lost half of the reserve of 6, in the first year of the program. On the other hand, out of 15 launches you'd expect to lose at least one, no-one's got a perfect record. It's almost as if rocket science was hard...

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China building SUPERSONIC SUBMARINE that travels in a BUBBLE

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Re: Pointless idea

Nuking carrier groups has been a part of military planning since at least the 1960s. Tactical nukes were designed for relatively small, high-value targets. Whether they be Warsaw Pact bridgeheads over German rivers, NATO carrier groups, airbases or rail junctions.

Admittedly nuking a significant target and destroying $100bn worth of enemy shiny-shiny, along with killing say 10,000 of their personnel, is not likely to end well. Particularly if that nation is equipped with strategic nuclear weapons, not to mention tactical ones of its own.

Then again, by the 70s, most NATO planning for the Central European front pretty much admitted that it was either lose, or resort to nuking the Soviet spearheads within just a few days of the war starting. So part of the plan was that you act as if you'd go nuclear in your normal battle-planning, thus the other side knew that even starting a purely conventional war was a big step in nuclear escalation.

This may be China's tactic with the US? We might admit that our navy and airforce can't defeat yours, but we think this conflict is so important that we'll simply ensure we win it by going tactical nuclear, and inflict unacceptable casualties on you. Then your choice will be nuclear escalation or humiliating surrender. As neither of those are appealing, you'd better either develop a counter to getting your carrier groups nuked, or keep your nose out.

As with Russia, it's hard to know what the Chinese think their own national interest is. They're involved in as many border disputes as Russia, but the Russian ones are mostly about nationalism and ex-Soviet Russian populations abroad. Whereas the Chinese ones seem to mostly be about off-shore oil and gas. I don't think they're interested in their various land-border disputes, like they were last century. Obviously the exception here is Taiwan. On the other hand, both countries' economies are massively reliant on global markets and international trade, so even creating international tension costs them money and the economic stablity that they require to keep their populations happy and avoid potentially getting chucked out of power.

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Devil

Re: Whales

They will be shredded in this thing's wake.

The next area for research is how to fit sufficient pancakes and hoisin sauce in the submarine, in order to deal with the shredded whale problem...

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Judge nixes HP deal for director amnesty after $8.8bn Autonomy snafu

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Re: Sorry HP, there are two sides to every purchase

That would work, except Meg Whitman was on the board at the time of the deal. You can't make $10bn purchases without board approval. The board are financially and legally responsible for oversight of the business and its executives, on behalf of the shareholders. If it wasn't a good deal, she still signed it.

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TV transport tech, part 2: From sofa to server at the touch of a button

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Unhappy

I thought the Virgin box was slow and annoying too. But then I stayed at my Mum's house for a week, and she's got Talk Talk [cue sinister music]. I don't know what they've done to their Youview boxes, but it's probably criminal...

They're not slow, snails are slow. What are ice ages? They must have known this, because they've even added something to the programming, so that after you've waited for five minutes, a little message pops up to tell you 'just finishing'. About 10 minutes later, something usually happens. I wonder if they found a job lot of old 286s? Maybe Z80s?

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Best shot: Coffee - how do you brew?

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Happy

I like good coffee as much as the next man. But I found that having to blow up my house every few months, in order to get rid of my coffee pot's makers, was just too much hassle. So I've gone back to using a french press...

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ISIS terror fanatics invade Diaspora after Twitter blockade

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Devil

The very next day...

In shock news the US and UK governments have surrendered to ISIS, after it threatened to replace the entire internet with non-stop, non-interuptable songs from Justin Bieber and 1Direction.

In a statement today David Cameron said, "I shall grow my beard forthwith. I am sorry for having destroyed Western civilsation with one careless action. I did not realise the power of sonic warfare until this moment. The British government have been ordered by our ISIS overlords to declare holy war on Radio 1. The death penalty has been introduced today for all boy-bands, girl-bands, and solo pop artists. N Dubz will be executed live on News at Ten tonight. We hope to capture Girls Aloud before they can do any more harm.

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Re: But Diaspora is Haram*!

The headlines today. An SAS mission to delivered 1Direction and Justin Bieber to ISIS has succeeded.

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BAT-GOBBLING urban SPIDER QUEENS swell to ENORMOUS SIZE

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Happy

Re: children then people

When do children become people?

I'm not exactly sure. I'd say at about age 25? Once they've learned to wash regularly, mostly got a decent haircut and turned their music down.

And got off my lawn, obviously.

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Re: Not just Oz.. happening in the UK aswell

Lionel Baden,

The hoover doesn't cut the mustard. There's an escalating scale, according to a friend of mine who's terrified of them. Really small ones, she can bear to approach, and gets with the insect spray. Or if she doesn't like the look of it, she's been known to throw the can at them. Bigger ones get the hoover. But the hoover then has to be placed outside, for some friendly person to come and decontaminate. Only in the case of really huge ones does she now run screaming from the room.

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Re: *whimper*

To repurpose an old joke:

"The artifact's in Australia. I hate snakes!"

"Nah worries Indy mate. The spiders killed all the snakes."

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I ain't Spartacus
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Devil

Insects? Pah! It's obvious the city slickers are gorging themselves on McDonalds and kebabs. Once they've worked themselves up a bit more, they'll move on to cats and small dogs. Then it'll be children, and finally people.

It's quite clear that the only way we can stop this is to evacuate Australia, before the animals learn how to consume us puny humans, and then take over the world. Or maybe it's even too late for that, and we'll just have to nuke the place. But that's got to be a last-ditch solution, as the risk of giant, radioactive mega-spiders is just too high. Plus, imagine how huge the drop bears would get...

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Is it an iPad? Is it a MacBook Air? No, it's a Surface Pro 3

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Re: want a pen

The Samsung pen software isn't as good as the Microsoft stuff. Disclaimer, I'm out of date. My last major use of an MS tablet was with Vista and a rotating hinge HP laptop. Mostly it was a dodgy compromise, though at £600 I was very happy with it. But the handwriting recognition and palm rejection was excellent. And I'm sure it's improved or stayed the same since.

Neither recognition, nor palm rejection were as good on the Note II. And Samsung's software was a touch more confusing as well. Not to mention the fact that the Note came with 2 different pieces of Sammie software to do the same job, which they then changed to 3 with an update, but disabled access to the best one from the photo app. I am however a huge fan of the Note II, and Samsung for seemingly being the only people who recognised that a stylus is crap and annoying for navigating round the software, now we've got decent capacatitive screens. But that a stylus is second-to-none for text input on a mobile device. Shame they charge double for their Note tablets, over the normal ones though.

If I could have an iPad with a proper stylus for writing and drawing, I'd be a happy camper. My next tablet may not be Apple because of their irrational hatred of the stylus.

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LOHAN packs bags for SPACEPORT AMERICA!

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Re: Cowboy Playmanaught

No, no no! You've got this wrong. Only an idiot would program their autopilot to avoid trees. If you tell the aircraft that their are trees, it will find them! This is a cast-iron law of aviation. You simply whistle quietly to yourself, muttering, "Trees? Trees? No, none of those round here." Then hope it doesn't notice.

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Gigantic toothless 'DRAGONS' dominated Earth's early skies

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Re: I still dont get the asteroid thingy and why its got so much traction

sandman,

I have to dispute your statement here. Many dinosaurs survived the Late Maastrichtian period.

Obviously the Majorsaurus died out quite quickly, along with the Portillodon. But the Redwoodopteris, BillCashasaurus, Whittingdaledactyl are still very much with us. Not to mentin the IainDuncanSmithasaurus Rex...

I'd probably best get my coat.

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Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy

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The European Arrest Warrant was not designed for "serious criminals and terrorists". It's part of the EU delusion of statehood. As well as being quite a sensible response to having a single immigration and working area covering a large chunk of a continent, so that police can operate across borders (as criminals do). I don't approve of the loss of sovereignty myself, and think extradition is the appropriate tool, but if the EU really does break down the barriers to the free movement of people (so it's as easy to move house and job within the EU as the US), then there's a perfectly fine argument for it.

I'm no expert on Swedish law, but I'd imagine an arrest warrant is exactly what it is. Arrest before charging is normal. In the UK system, you usually arrest someone before an interview if you think that there is a serious chance of charging them. If someone has buggered-off (in Assange's case out of the country) after being called to that interview, you might issue an arrest warrant, to ask other police to go out and get him for you.

There's no media exaggeration. Most stories I've seen have used the term sexual offences, rather than rape. Although rape is an accurate reflection of the charge according to the UK's Supreme Court. What there actually is, is a campaign of trivialisation of serious allegations by Assange, his legal team and his supporters.

He gets the benefit of the doubt, innocent until proven guily is important. But by fleeing justice, and lying about how serious the allegations are, as well as lying about leaving Sweden with permission, when his lawyer had already been told he was wanted for questioning again, I am a lot less inclined to assume his innocence than I'd otherwise be.

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Re: Logic fail

DiViDeD,

Just to clear this up yet again, he's accused of rape. I haven't seen the sex by surprise crap defence trotted out by his supporters in a while now...

Go and look up the Supreme Court judgement: at this link here.

The court sat on the legality of the European Arrest Warrant system. I think this was the test case for it. And accepted it. That was the only legitimate matter under discussion, since the system as set up does not allow for political or judicial interference in the process. So long as a police force / prosecutor can get the right paperwork in their own country, the other country's police and courts are simply supposed to shut up and hand their citizen over. This is the reason I personally oppose the EAW system, and prefer extradition, even though it's more expensive and time-consuming.

However, the court then went on to consider Julian Assange's other legal arguments. Despite the fact that they were totally irrelevant to the UK courts, and were therefore made for PR purposes only. As I (and the court) said, the EAW doesn't give discretion to this country, we've simply handed some of our sovereignty over to the Swedish prosecutor's office.

The court decided that there was prima facie evidence for 2 counts of rape. It might have been 3, I can't remember if ripping the condom is even still on the charge sheet, or be bothered to check. The first is that he's alleged to have held the first victim down, with his weight rather than by violence, and tried to force himselve on her. She'd said no sex without condom. That is rape in anyone's book (if true). He's then supposed to have stopped that, put his condom on like a good boy, and is alleged to have deliberately damaged it while she wasn't looking.

The other accusation was that he waited until woman number two was asleep, she'd also said no sex without condom, and then had sex with her without one anyway. The Supreme Court ruled that this was also rape under UK law, as it's sex without consent. He'd have had consent with a condom, but none without and someone who's asleep, unconscious or drunk can't give consent.

As Ken Clark got in trouble for saying, some rapes are more serious than others. Assange didn't force himself on some random stranger at knife-point. But what's accused of is a hell of a lot more serious than some 'bedroom hijinks'. And his supporters, and he, do their case a lot of damage by trying to pretend that these charges aren't very serious.

Given it's their word against his, I'd have thought he's quite likely to get found not guilty whatever the truth is.

Finally I don't think you can apply for an EAW unless the alleged crime carries a possible custodial sentence.

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I ain't Spartacus
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Re: Please

Speaking as a member of the unwashed masses (an ironic comment given that Assange seems to be a bit of a soap-dodger, by the accounts of journalists he's worked with), I feel I have every right to make unfavourable comment about Julian Assange. Which I would be perfectly happy to say to his face, were the occasion to arise.

You see he's come to my country and abused its freedoms. At quite considerably cost to us poor, put-upon, unwashed tax-payers. And incdientally a few of the more credulous celebrities who chose to support him and/or his cause. He's bitched and moaned about the rather excellent due process which we allowed him. Then abused the fact that he was granted bail to fuck off to a foreign embassy to hide for a couple of years, avoiding the consequences of the mess he got himself into in another country.

I don't believe in pre-judging the outcome of trials. However he's not exactly acting like someone who's innocent. Now admittedly his suddenly developed fear of US extradition could be his well-documented paranoid tendencies showing through. But it's funny how he was willing to ask for residence in Sweden before the accusation was brought against him, and when he fled Sweden it was to the UK. Both of us have extradition treaties with the US - and that only seemed to start bothering him after he was wanted for questioning on 2 rape cases.

As you say though, he's not very good at handling PR. Or people in general, I rather suspect. And he does seem to be a rather mixed-up guy. But I find a lot to disapprove of in both his personal and professional actions. And the fact that he's so obsessive about protecting his personal details, while happy to leak others' - along with his cavalier attitude to what Wikileaks published and what its money got spent on (i.e. himself) - I'd be grateful if he'd stop ponficiting on how unfair life is on poor old Julian.

he is being used as a distraction from some serious issues that certain people need accounting for

Careful, your tinfoil hat is slipping here... Used? Used by who? If he's a distraction from the causes he supports, then that's because he continues to act like an egotistical arsehole. Getting himself mixed-up in not one, but two, rape allegations doesn't exactly help. I do feel sorry for him, as I suspect it isn't much fun to be Julian Assange. But he has a choice about what actions he takes. And he does seem to leave a trail of betrayed friends and colleagues. Which doesn't speak well for his character.

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Happy

Re: Practical Interim Cost-saving measure

Hmmm. Placebo police.

The placebo police dismisseth us.

Howsabout: Policebo? Plodcebo? Pneumati-pig / pneumati-plod? Blowbobby?

This idea has potential. Inflatable police cars in turnings near accident black-spots. Everyone slows down. We could have inflatable anti-terrorist policemen at Glasgow airport, after all they've got the hardest baggage handlers in the land (John Smeaton), so we can save the expense...

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Cargo truck crammed with garbage explodes IN SPAAAAACE

I ain't Spartacus
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Re: The real question

Nope. They just chuck everything into the big blue bin provided.

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