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* Posts by I ain't Spartacus

2785 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

T-Mobile UK punters break for freedom in inflation-busting bill row

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Time for someone else to put out an offer.

Two of my brothers were neither-satisfied-nor-dissatisfied Virgin Media customers up until January. Both ex heavy Sky spenders. I think one had had 3 Super-Hubs, so was a bit more grumpy.

Not only did Virgin do the putting up prices on a fixed term contract thing. But at the same time, Sky had an offer to old customers of 75% off. I wonder if the two were related? If so, excellent work from Sky marketing. Both took the chance to jump ship. So I wonder how many customers that decision cost Virgin? They both heard about the offer separately.

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Re: It appears they are trying to lie their way out of it...

It shouldn't matter anyway. They can't sell you a 2 year fixed-price contract and hide a clause in the small print that allows them to increase the price. Particularly as it's unbalanced. i.e. if they had an inflation clause in there, and it said if it goes down the customer gets a discount, if it goes up, then we get more goodies. Then they could argue it's reasonable. But because it's a fixed price contract they'd have to have a bit about inflation in the big print, not the small print. Or tell you about it at point of sale. Of course that requires a court case if they continually and pig-headedly refuse to back down - and because it's small claims court territory no precedent is set by any case they lose. So it's not really worth the fight, as on year two of a £50 a month contract that's only £18, and the court fee starts at £20.

I don't know how the rules work out for contract disputes and credit ratings. I imagine they can screw up your credit rating even if you're in dispute, although they'd struggle to get a county court judgement, so it wouldn't be too bad.

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Science of the lambs: Boffins grow GLOW-IN-THE-DARK sheep

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Coat

You don't need your sheep to glow, in order to identify them. You just read the baaa code.

Shamefacedly wanders off to get coat...

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Next Xbox to be called ‘Xbox Infinity’... er... ‘Xbox’

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They could call it the neXtBox, but I suppose they'd get sued...

Otherwise it'll be Infinity this time, and back to boring 4 next time. Or they could do an Apple, and just call it the New XBox or even just XBox.

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iPhone 5 totters at the top as Samsung thrusts up UK mobe chart

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Re: HTC One Black - no stock

I don't understand what's happened to HTC.

Sure they've been overtaken by Samsung, who make their own components and have a nice marketing budget. But HTC still seem to put out some nice handsets, and they do metal ones with rubber coating to Sammy's preferred plastic - so should have some shiny factor. I can understand them not making profits, as the competition has certainly hotted-up in the last few years, but I'm surprised by how few sales they seem to make.

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Move space junk with laser shots

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Re: Lasers, check.

Why do the sharks need lasers? Surely they can just eat the debris. They'll eat anything. Just put them in orbit and job's a good'un.

Why do people have to make things so complicated...

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Pirate Party wins seats in Icelandic election

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Re: It's still better than Iceland's back up political model

EVE appears to have been what they based their banking industry on. Which didn't turn out too well...

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Re: Iceland not wanting to join EU

Given what's happened to UK fish-stocks - and what's happening to the Euro - they'd be mad to join the EU.

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Re: What exactly do they think they are going to change?

Well I wouldn't quite describe it like that. it's rather more complicated. I seem to recall the anti-terror legislation was used (or abused - depending on point of view) to stop cash being transferred out of the UK subsidiaries and back to Iceland. Which sort of made sense given that the Icelandic government broke its own loan guarantees on the banks regulated in Iceland to foreigners, but not to locals. Some banks operated here, but under Icelandic government guarantees, others were UK institutions owned by Icelandic parent companies, and thus regulated here and using the UK deposit protection scheme.

Iceland refused to pay the UK and Dutch government. Which is fair enough as they'd chosen to default. But the UK and Dutch can still ask for it. We could veto them joining the EU.

As happens, they'd be mad to join the EU, and get forced into the Euro. See Cyprus for details. Given the Troika deliberately decided to destroy the Cypriot economy - that bail-out was designed to fail even under its own terms - and didn't even last a month before unravelling. The correct thing for Cyprus to do to save it's economy is the same, default on all foreign debt and devalue the currency. Unfortunately they're in the Euro, so can't.

Iceland may be a 'financial basket case', but its economy is growing again, and unemployment and inflation have peaked, even though they've lost their banking industry. Cyprus on the other hand have also lost their banking system, but unemployment is set to rise for years to come, and they'll almost certainly get deflation. Meanwhile no-one knows how much their economy will collapse by, or how long it will last. But their next-door-neighbours Greece are 25% down on their economy and still going, with no end in sight.

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CURSE you, EINSTEIN! Humanity still chained in relativistic PRISON

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Re: The more you know, the less you're sure...

I'm certain you're wrong about that...

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Reg hack to starve on £1 a day for science

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Re: ultra cheap homebrew

Mmmmm.

[cue music and over orgasmic voiceover]: This isn't just any just about drinkable light dry white wine. This is Marks & Spencer's just about drinkable light dry white wine. At only £22 a bottle...

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Re: Short term doesn't count

Khaptain,

There's no reason we need to get poorer in order for the rest of the world to get richer. So long as we don't run out of natural resources anyway. So obviously we're going to need some better energy sources. If they get richer, then they'll buy more stuff, as well as selling us more stuff. That expansion of the world economy should allow everyone to do OK.

One of the reasons for the current problem is the speed of the growth of China. And that they held their currency down. Doing this allows them to avoid inflation and keep their workers pay lower. So it was probably more about out-competing India and Vietnam as us. But even this may not work, so that they'll still have got richer, but won't get to keep all the extra gains this gave them. That's because the money has to go somewhere. And about $4 trillion of it went into Western stock markets and government debt. Helping to inflate a massive bubble for the last 15 years that went pop. There was a similar amount from the big oil exporters and a bunch from other Asian exporters. Well now, we're going to either default on some of that debt, or inflate it away. That should hopefully allow Chinese workers to afford more stuff, and if their economy can take off then the next candidates can get going, without being out-competed by China.

Obviously though we currently have limits on resources to solve. But nuclear fission then fusion and maybe capturing a few asteroids could help with that. It's been a break-neck pace of developments since the Industrial revolution started in the 18th Century (economic historians debate the start date by over 100 years). Maybe that's unsustainable. But the pace of change seems to be getting quicker at the moment. So if we can avoid resource bottle-necks maybe the whole world can keep getting richer. Populations with more cash grow less quickly as mortality and birth rates drop. So in some ways it's environmentally sustainable to globalise as well. We may put more strain on oil supply and C02 levels, but probably take the strain off marginal agricultural land.

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Re: Short term doesn't count

Khaptain,

Well I certainly agree that being more informed about the world around us is a good thing. And so listening to people from the poorer bits of the world would be a great idea.

But most people who live under the £1 a day line don't deal in a cash economy. So that figure of £1 a day is misleading. A lot of them won't be paying for services in the same way, or buying all the food that they eat. The lack of money really shows up when it comes to things like healthcare, because then cash is important and something they don't have.

It's pretty hard to get people to vote, or follow the news so they can make an informed decision when they do so. And that's for elections that directly affect them. So it's going to be even harder to get people to listen to voices from other countries. Therefore a bit of harmless publicity in the form of getting people to eat less food seems like a good thing. And perhaps puts into perspective that whole debate in the UK last week about living on £53 (which ignored housing benefit anyway). I do agree you can't pretend to be poor.

It would also be interesting to see whether we could get a debate going as to solutions. Getting the EU (and the US) to stop subsidising our farmers quite so much for example, or at least doing so in a different way. That alone would probably help more people in Africa out of poverty than any amount of aid we could plausibly give. This might also be a time to sing the praises of globalisation. Something that's not got a good press with the current economic crisis. But there's a lot of people in Asia who're a lot better off because of it. Even if it's made 'the West' a bit poorer, partly because finance and politics hasn't adjusted fast enough for the economic changes. But it's probably still a huge net gain to world happiness/wealthiness/less-dead-poor-people-iness.

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Re: Short term doesn't count

It's an awareness exercise - which is a perfectly valid kind of stunt. If taken seriously then you'd have to look at purchasing power parity. People who live on £1 a day, but also live on farm land and don't have jobs, are going to spend some of their time growing stuff to eat, and their £1 is going to go a lot further than it does in Spain or the UK. Not that I recommend subsistence farming as a lifestyle, but it's not the same as trying to live in an industrial society on the same kind of money because you're in a different kind of society with barter and cooperation.

If you look at the industrial revolution you'll find an awful lot of nostalgia for the 'good old days' pre-enclosure where villages were very inefficient at growing crops and most people were still basically subsistence farmers, supporting a few specialist trades. It was a much more cooperative society, as it had to be. The village would share tools, labour, and expertise. As well as some big parties. All things that in a modern industrial society you might need to use money for. So they'd be massively financially poorer, but that wouldn't capture their actual standard of living.

The idea is that it's supposed to make you think. The world is complicated, and people are busy so this is a perfectly fine idea.

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Master Beats: Why doesn't audio quality matter these days?

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Re: It's in the ears of the beholder

My parents bought one of those Amstrad hi-fi things in the 80s. Sure it wasn't brilliant, but I'm pretty sure it was better than anything they could afford before that.

Similarly I remember when I bought my first CD player. It was pretty rubbish. I know that now. But the jump from tape to CD (live VHS to DVD) was so amazingly huge that I thought it was the bees knees. It was only when I could afford something a bit better, that I realised quite how poor it really was. I've never felt the need to spend on serious audio goodies, but have used professional gear, I don't think the leap in quality is quite worth the money.

I'm no audiophile, but I've mixed quite a bit of live music. And I'm therefore fully aware of how much less most people pick up.

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Review: Nokia Lumia 520

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Carphone Warehouse don't lock their PAYG phones, so they are effectively SIM free. Although you do have to buy a £10 top-up, which you'll probably end up wasting.

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Re: Android Android Android

Well Android is the rival at this price point. And dominates the market. So it's what this phone's got to be measured against. If you're going to do a review, then the big question is 'do I buy this phone'. And to decide that - you have to refer to the alternatives.

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Re: Now, this is more like it...

I've gone the other way. Cheap Nokia Lumia 710 (on WP7) to iPhone 5. This is for the work phone, and I bought the Nokia myself because the Android on the contract was too annoying. I like the OS, but the lag was pissing me off. I definitely think that the really cheap 'Droids are to be avoided. If you need a cheaper one, buy last year's (or 2 years ago) top of the range. Although if Android security starts to be a real problem, you could end up a bit sad and lonely with less likelihood of security patches. Lots of the mid-price 'Droids look pretty good, but I've not seen a £100 that I liked.

The biggest downside of Win Pho is the apps. Unless that's massively improved in the last 6 months. There weren't very many, and lots of them were poor quality. That also helps with the modest hardware. The OS seems to be pretty light on that, whereas I've seen lag just navigating round the home screen on cheap 'Droids. But if you care less about apps then you'll be less worried about low processor/RAM as you won't be doing much multi-tasking.

In my opinion the built-in email and contacts management are better on Win Pho than iOS or Android. Though with Android you can just install better ones. If you mostly use your phone for email and calls, then a cheaper one is a good plan and for that Nokia looks pretty good to me.

One big note of caution though. The lack of Gorilla Glass. I'd wonder about going up to the 720, if it's not too expensive, just for that. Although a decent case also solves that problem.

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Apple loses again in Chinese App Store copyright case

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Re: It's getting to be very apparent that ...

That only works so long as China get the balance right. If they decide to kick the big US corporates too much, or the Japanese for a particular example, then their economy might become a lot less shiny suddenly.

The reason big companies have power isn't because they're evil, greedy or politicians are stupid or corrupt. Though all of those things may or may not be true... The reason is that they have something that governments want. They create value, jobs and shinies that people want.

Russia has a powerful and rich government. But its economy is still massively biased towards mining and petrochemicals because the government have fleeced (or allowed to be fleeced) a few too many Western (and local) corporations - who now are wary of investing into their economy. It's an example China need to be wary of. There's nothing wrong with beating up on companies for breaking the law, as long as it's broadly done to foreign and domestic firms alike, and isn't too arbitrary.

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Outsourced space trucks battle for US middleweight lifting title

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Re: "New" Wallops? Not.

You're right. It's so old that Chas 'n' Dave even wrote a song about it...

Yeurrchaaa!

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App reads The Indie's dead-tree pages - so you don't have to

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Re: Playing with new toys...

It could be an app for Google Glass I suppose. You're wearing them anyway, so it would naturally overlay extra content onto what you're seeing, and is in position to photograph it as well.

Not that I see this being anything other than a cumbersome idea. If you want this at breakfast, read your paper on a tablet.

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It's just a fad I tell thee.

The Indy's PR strapline for the Blippar launch is "wouldn't it be great if your paper could update in real-time?" El Reg feels duty bound to point out that we've been doing exactly that since the 1990s, on this wonderful thing called The internet.

Don't be silly El Reg. That there internet thing will never catch on.

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Hacked AP tweet claiming White House explosion causes Dow dip

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Re: "Provides liquidity"

No. Say I bought £100m of BP stock a year ago. I'm now happy with my dividends and profit and want to sell on to invest in something else. Or just to spend the money on beer and hookers...

So I could put those shares up on the market and wait for other people who want to invest in them to buy them, a bit at a time. But that means my money is tied up, and I've seen a short term opportunity in shares in Acme Badger Culling Ltd. If I don't buy that now, the shares might rise before I can buy them - when other people realise the profits to be made.

So the market maker comes along. He knows that loads of people will want BP shares in the future. So he buys the lot off me, at a bit under market price. That's his profit. I get all my cash straight away and can invest it in what I want. I've made a tiny bit less profit, but that's made up for not having to wait to get my cash.

Other people will pick up the shares off our market maker, and so he gets rid of his stock at a slower pace. This is less of an issue with big companies, with stock that's frequently traded. But if you've got a smaller company it's very important, as you might wait weeks to shift a decent number of shares.

HFT does the same thing. It will buy up blocks of shares to sell off at tiny profits. The difference is, they probably won't trade in the unpopular stocks, because they're interested in constantly recycling trades at tiny profits. So one risk is they'll take the easy BP type money away from the market makers, who might not then be able to afford to hold stock in less frequently traded companies.

Another risk is that HFT programs will start interacting with each other in feedback loops, and break the market. Or if one trader's HFT model has a weakness and analysts for another see it, they can possibly use their HFT pooter to start siphoning money straight off the first companies by exploiting it.

Then you've got the flash crash. And that screw-up at Knight Capital to worry about... But anyway, by making it easier to trade quickly in stocks you're increasing liquidity in a market. Even while taking a small profit out of it. You are making the traded assets more liquid, i.e. easier to sell quickly.

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Re: How dumb those Wall Street guys can be...

to swallow a tweet and wet their pants because of that ? It is sad to see such a bunch of idiot muppets being given the reins of the world finance!

It's not so much that. I think what happens is something odd happens, so the high frequency traders turn their boxes off. Don't use the complex computer program when you don't understand what's happening. They also make other errors, which is another issue.

The problem with this is that the HFT programs are providing a lot of the liquidity in the market. So I go to sell a share, and normally some HFT box would happily come along to snap it up to sell in a few minutes for a tiny profit. I don't mind this, as I wanted to sell for other reasons (I've already made my bigger profit from this stock over a year, and I want my money now). So everyone wins.

This is what market makers do. They don't take a position in particular shares, they just buy anything you have to sell with the plan that someone else will want it in the next few days. They make their profit from a small mark-up on each trade. By doing this I can sell my shares now, and get the money instantly to wander off and do my next trade. I don't have to hold the shares until I can find a buyer, or sell them slowly over a week. The market maker does that. One worry is that if HFE does this, but less reliably, then markets will be less liquid. If you can't reliably sell an asset then you'll have to be more cautious about buying it.

Remember that if all trade in Apple in the market stops and I sell a few Apple share at $100, the price of Apple stock has dropped from $400 - $100. Wiping out a few hundred billion. But this isn't really true if everyone else holding Apple stock sells theirs for $400 for the rest of the day. So you could argue that hundreds of billions have been wiped off the market for that few minutes, or just that I foolishly lost a few thousand, and everything carried on as normal. The same's true for the whole market. If prices drop for a few minutes then bounce back, the only people who lose are the ones that sold at that lower price. And they're matched by winners, who bought low.

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Turn off the mic: Nokia gets injunction on 'key' HTC One component

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Re: Ironic?

It's like rain on your wedding day apparently...

Or possibly like goldy, silvery and bronzy. Talking of which can we have an El Reg irony badge please?

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Re: Maybe HTC could focus on

RyokuMas,

It would be worth many hours of my life of pointless blathering if I could see a whelk playing the trombone.

There's also the story from Greek myth to consider. The thief who promises he'll teach the king's horse to sing in a year, in order to avoid the death penalty. When challenged on the impossibility of this he say, well I get to live a year longer, and who knows, maybe the horse will learn to sing.

I suppose the other proverb is that you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him think.

Anyway, as soon as I'm convinced (yet again) that Eadon is a 16 year-old troll in the stereotypical mother's basement, he posts something sensible - or gets into an intelligent discussion. Maybe he's amanfrommars AI's emergency backup personality (now I want you wrap up nice and warm, and no playing with any naughty bug-eyed monsters), or a Microsoft shill with a better grasp of psychology than most people in marketing - who knows? We can but try.

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Re: Maybe HTC could focus on

Eadon,

I believe Nokia have got $10bn in their cash-pile. Or perhaps, given where they're from, hoard would be be the word... So they've got enough cash to dump MS and go the Android route, if they fancy a last throw of the dice.

One of their problems is that it's not just smartphones where they're failing. From the figures I saw a while back they only made half their phone profits from smarties, and the other half from the larger number of cheap dumb-phones. That's before Elop joined. The Chinese had finally caught up with their brilliant supply-chain and started beating them on price a few years ago, and I'd guess one of the reasons they went with Elop and Windows may have been that they wanted some higher profit smarphones to counter the loss of the dumb-phone market share, and they saw MS as the better chance to achieve that than Android or fixing Symbian / Meego.

As for their hardware being a generation behind, I think that's utter bollocks. They may be using lesser chips than the top 'Droids and iPhones, but most of that stuff is bought in anyway. They can always put in better ones and faster RAM if required. But Win Pho doesn't seem to need the top hardware, MS may actually have written some decently efficient code. Although it may equally be that there aren't enough demanding apps to make the multi-tasking in WP8 break sweat. I've not played much with WP8, so I've no idea how it handles heavy loads of simultaneous running apps.

Also, they've got some excellent camera hardware/software. Possibly some of the best amongst the mobile lot. That may even be a reason they dump Windows. If MS don't make OS changes that allow them to do their full Pureview goodness, I'd have though Android would be a more flexible option.

The phone is killing off the mp3 player, I don't see any reason why it shouldn't kill the cheap compact camera market as well, in a few years. Obviously if you want a big lens, then it's bridge cameras of SLRs you need - but if you can have a 3x zoom fold out lens on a tiny camera, why not on a phone? Or if the Pureview thing means you can get almost as good results without, then so much the better.

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Thumbs down and Comments

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Re: @TeeCee (was: This is a new one for us.)

jake,

I've noticed a lack of downvotes on some of your recent posts. Has your stalker finally abandoned you? Do you not feel all lonesome and sad, now that some nerd-in-a-basement no longer feels a compulsion to anonymously disapprove your every post?

I really hope they had a script to do that. It would be truly tragic if they were doing it by hand.

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Re: This is a new one for us.

That's impressive TeeCee. I think El Reg ought to have a special badge for it. The vomit-green vulture of 'I've managed to wind some loser up to such a frenzy of frustrated nerd-rage that they've felt the need to laboriously manually downvote all my posts' badge. You'd need quite broad shoulders if you wanted to sew it onto your shirt though...

I thought you were the lovely, fluffy one with an 8:1 upvote to downvote ratio as well. I keep being realistic about Julian Assange and Android, so the commentardiat have a lower opinion of me. Not helped by being nice about Windows Phone 7 and Margaret Thatcher either... The Fandroids really seem to take it personally when you're nice about WinPho.

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How long will it take Facebook Home to hit 1bn downloads? 76 years

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Hmmmm. Apple got a bunch of people to shift from slide-to-unlock due to lawyers, I believe one of the routes gone down was that you had a 'ball' on your lock screen that you dropped into a hole for the app you wanted the phone to launch into. With goatse as the lock image, I'd hate to think what gets launched when you drop it there...

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BadNews, fandroids: MILLIONS of Google Play downloads riddled with malware

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Re: Android permissions design

Aoyagi Aichou,

Unless Android has changed recently, then it and WinPho are very similar. Both list the permissions required at the bottom of the app's description page on Play Store or Marketplace. You then install them. Unless you root Android you don't get to pick and mix with permissions either.

iOS allows a bit less leeway for apps. But leaves the user a lot more in the dark as to what's going on.

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Re: Android permissions design

Windows Phone lets you set permissions. The app store has a little blurb on each app saying what permissions it wants (next to a link to an explanation of what those permissions are). They're no more granular than Android ones from memory.

Apps then have to ask for permission to do certain stuff when you launch them, like phone home with data or use location services.

As I recall iOS only has pop-ups for allowing access to your addressbook and location services. Although it may also have the same for accessing the phone function, I don't recall ever using an app that required this.

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More and more likely that double CO2 means <2°C: New study

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Re: IPCC?

Well you see, the global climate was just helping us with our enquiries, when it accidentally fell down 2 flights of concrete stairs... What do you mean our police station only has one storey?

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British bookworms deem Amazon 'evil'

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Re: What sort of cretin buys a Amazon Swindle anyway?

I can't help thinking that the majority of people who buy into a [closed / walled garden / DRM-saturated hell] type device will be perfectly happy with it. It's only us techies who expect to root our devices who might be unhappy, or those who are miss-sold devices on a false basis who will be unhappy.

I have to agree with this. I recommended a Kindle to some very non-techies a while back. Just because I'd heard such awful things about Adobe's DRM. So my suggestion was that Amazon lock-in, and paying for books, was better than the alternative of wrestling Adobes Digital Editions into submission sufficiently to be able to take advantage of free library books.

I turned out to be correct. Since they ignored me, and took someone else's advice at Christmas they have read zero library books. And given the hassle it took me to get one downloaded for them to show them how, I am entirely unsurprised.

Adobe Digital Editions is an enormous pile of shit by the way. I enjoy incomprehensible user interfaces as much as the next man, but that was just silly. Also, I could find no way to authorise the actual device you're running it on, and its built-in reading interface is also shit, especially if you're trying to get large print for someone who's visually impaired. But it doesn't want any other (competently written) reader program on said laptop to be allowed a look-in.

I personally want only DRM free media. And I'm willing to jump through the hoops, and perform the required backups to support my choice. To anyone who isn't, there's iTunes or Amazon. Haven't looked at Google Play recently, but that's obviously got the same potential. This allows you to buy a device that links everything up, and makes it all easy. Sure you're locked in, and your media is at risk. But if you buy your own and don't back it up, it's probably worse. And there's nothing wrong with paying a bit extra for convenience.

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Re: What sort of cretin buys a Amazon Swindle anyway?

"and because he is the wifes family i cant tell him to stop being a moron..."

Yeah, you can.

The Soviets could have nuked American during the Cold War. It was an option that was entirely possible, at the push of a button in fact, and totally within their capabilities.

However, the retaliation would have been too awful to contemplate. With appalling long term consequences. I put it to you that the same situation would apply in this case...

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More Brits ditch Apple tablets for Amazon, Google, Samsung kit

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Re: Grossly misleading chart

I haven't looked in detail at the figures, or legends on the tables to see what they're measuring. I don't really care enough, as I don't take other people's tablet choices personally... Although your link was a bit short on details.

But Even if Android have 50% of current sales, some of the iPads sold when they had most of the market are still in use. Also you have to be careful about sales figures, as Android could have 50% of sales into the channel, but Apple still a majority of sales to consumers. Also different organisations measure sales differently, so they never quite agree. YouGuv do a lot through online surveys - they have a panel of regulars they survey, I don't know if they top that up with on street or phone interviews. Apparently 8m Brits have never gone online though.

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Re: cost

Im sure I will be heavily down voted, but other than games, internet, social sites and watching movies I see no real benefit in an ipad... or tablet for that matter.

but apart from better sanitation and medicine and education and irrigation and public health and roads, and a freshwater system and baths and public order ... What have the Romans ever done for us?

You are right, it's a luxury. I really wouldn't want to live without a computer, and access to the internet and all the entertainment and practical goodies which all that brings. And I could perfectly happily live without my iPad. Although since getting it, my PC at home only gets used 2 or 3 times a week now, and I can read stuff on t'internet while sitting in a comfy armchair. Plus I can listen to the BBC iPlayer (radio mostly), without having to have my PC in my sitting room. And use the thing as a remote controller to drive music and podcasts through my speakers. Plus play the odd game, look at any of my photos, check my diary when I'm on the phone, take the odd note in meetings, read or play games on the train... It's a long list. All of it can be done with a laptop, but not as conveniently or comfortably.

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The Reg puts Vulture inside the Large Hadron Collider

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Boffin

Re: 42

What do you get if you multiply six by nine?

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Another quarter, another $14bn in revenue for Google

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Just what do they want with Motorola? I know there's tax profits to be had from all the losses it made before they bought it, and patents to hit people over the head with. But it's still making them an ongoing loss of $1billion per year, and cost $10bn to start with. You'd have thought if they were just going to take the bits they wanted, they'd have sold it on by now, but they've had it long enough that some sort of plan might ought to be emerging by now.

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Google Glass will SELF-DESTRUCT if flogged on eBay

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Re: Am I the only one that thinks this is good?

Let me guess, You work for Google?

Why? It's a perfectly valid comment. It's what I assumed, that the $1,500 prototypes are supposed to be for developers, and they want feedback and apps written. Remember people were actually selling invites to Google+ on eBay, when it was invite only. Bizarre, but apparently true. Sorry, I should say offering. I hope no-one was mad enough to pay.

This is common with tech now. Scalpers make cash on getting iPhones into China, before Apple release them there. The same happened with the original Raspberry Pi's. Google would like to try to stop it, which is fair enough.

Obviously I'll have to eat my words if this is Google long-term policy. But as it's almost certainly illegal, I rather doubt that. This being a developer program, I'd imagine consumer law doesn't apply.

Oh, and downvoted for being childish and accusing someone of being a shill. Which is my pet hate.

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PEAK APPLE: Fondleslab giant no longer world's biggest biz

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Devil

Re: Let it go.

I like fondleslab. And they should bring back lappy too. Which I believe was got rid of by user vote. Curse them for their democratic ways!

My favourite is pay-by-bonk. This may say rather more about me than I'd like to let on...

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Re: Bubble bursts

That's the problem. It's not that Apple have got worse, they still make more money from iPhones and iPads than they ever have. They're gradually losing iPad market share, but in a still growing market, so actual sales are still rising.

The problem was that the markets priced them as if they'd got new, growing, markets to enter still, and so could continue with their massive growth of the past. Which isn't currently the case. It's not a problem with lack of innovation, or a fault from Apple, it's that Wall Street got the price wrong.

A successful Apple TV would struggle to compete with iPhone/iPad type growth, because TVs are a mature market with lower turnover than personal, mobile gadgets. There just ain't that many markets growing at over 100% a year with yearly or 2-yearly replacement cycles in the consumer sector.

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TomTom brandishes new strap-on in Amsterdam: The wristnav

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Re: Combine the two?

My Dad cycled the Tour de France. In his gym... His exercise bike remembered his progress along the route, and gave him a cheery, you have now cycled 5% of the course. Which took several months. Obviously he wasn't doing 100km a day, like they do.

So you could set up treadmill satnav to do the London Marathon course, and it could tell you, you're now turning onto Westminster Bridge, now onto Embankment etc. Could even give you pretty pictures.

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Apple branded porno-peddling perverts by Chinese Pravda

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Happy

Re: Dear 'The Register'

Can't do that. HTC are now Facebook Bitches, due to their Facebook Home phone. And Bitch is Zuckerberg's word. So you'll have to come up with a different term for Google.

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Re: Pathetic

The Chinese aren't bailing us out! They're one of the major reasons for the current crisis.

By artificially holding the value of their currency down, when they're the 2nd largest economy and largest exporter in the world. This has caused massive global financial imbalance, and is one of the reasons for the huge bubble that got inflated over the last 10-15 years. This was partly done to keep them competitive against foreign competition, but also to hold real wages down for their own workers which both keeps them competitive and holds back the development of a middle class (who tend to be trouble makers and demand rights).

For an example of this in microcosm, see the effect of sharing a single currency with Germany on other members of the Euro. Exchange rate fluctuation puts a flex in the system that allows an economic system to move towards equilibrium.

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Antares aborted after launchpad mishap

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Re: I hate it when it falls out 12 minutes early....

Hmmm. How about:

Electric Connection in Premature Ejection from Giant Erection Causes Ejaculation of Dejection by PR from NASA's 2nd COTS Selection.

I don't think I'm cut out to be a subbie...

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Google erects tech specs tech specs, APIs hit the decks

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Re: I solemnly promise

Isn't the law in Japan that all phones have to make a loud 'shutter noise', to alert women of upskirt photos? I've no idea if they have a similar warning noise for video though.

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Re: Might be useful ...

Only if she can have a pair that overlay an image of Jason over you...

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Move over, Mythbusters: Was Archimedes an ancient STEVE JOBS?

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Re: Oh dear...

Supposedly Socrates had a sudden interestingly philosophical thought in the middle of a battle, and stopped to think about it for the rest of the afternoon. Which, surprisingly, didn't get him killed. Can't remember where I saw that now, but I think it must have been Thucydides. If he had been killed, it might have saved me from having to read all that Plato at school.

Once Hannibal had got his elephants over the Alps, he said, "I love it when a plan comes together."

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Re: a thief?

Newton and Hooke. Now there were a pair of cheerful, co-operative chaps with cool tempers...

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