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* Posts by I ain't Spartacus

3094 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

iPhone rises, Android slips in US, UK

I ain't Spartacus
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Re: I really liked my last Samsung

I agree, their UI was pretty rubbish. Although my one allowed you to select the most common functions and link to the 4-way navigation thingy, so I didn't often have to brave the menu. But then Nokia's original elegant simplicity was pretty crap by then. I had a work Nokia (in about 2008?), and by that point their menus were just as filled up and confusing as my old Motorola Razr, which also had crap software but a lovely form-factor.

I've got a good memory and some IT skills, so unintuitive software is bearable but annoying. Except trying to set my Mum's Mini up with Bluetooth, which is almost impossible (particularly as the instruction manual appeared to be wrong and I had to guess).

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Re: WP in the UK

I really liked my last Samsung, a £40 slider about 4 phones back now. My last non-smartphone. I abandoned Nokia when they refused to make slidey/clamshells. Sadly Motorola stopped making nice RAZRs too. Although I did go back to Nokia for a Lumia 710 which was excellent at £130. All other smarties have been work ones, except my Sony Ericsson P800 back in 2003.

There's certainly an opportunity at the low-end though. Neither the phone shop salespeople, or the customers, seem to give a crap about what they sell/buy - so people end up with all sorts of inappropriate or just downright rubbish kit.

I had a go at my friend about this the other day. Admitting you know nothing about phones/computers is fine. Laudable in fact. Admitting that you can't be arsed to learn, but still complain when they don't do what you want isn't quite so clever though...

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As I recall a good chunk of the growth has been in sales of iPhones 4 & 4S. Which is likely to be less release-time-sensitive than sales of the latest model. Although I don't think Apple break down the figures, so it's all analyst guesswork.

My suspicion is that quite a few customers who buy a cheapo Android as their first smartphone will have been a tad disappointed. My experience with sub-£200 'Droids has been pretty rubbish. Even a lot of the midrange ones haven't been that great, it's usually better to buy previous year's top-end ones on their way down the price list. Which might suggest people going cheaper iPhone as their second smartphone. Or it's the teens abandoning Blackberry?

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Give us a break: Next Android version to be called 'KitKat'

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Re: Hershey giveaways

That can't be right though. As the Romans brought edible dormice and garum (which is a 'sauce' made from leaving fish guts to ferment in the sun) - and yet their empire lasted for hundreds of years, so everyone must have loved them.

Even worse, they apparently had a popular desert of pears poached in wine with custard. Yummy, but sadly it was fish sauce custard. For which the inventor should be burning in a very special hell.

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Furious Frenchies tell Apple to bubble off: Bling iPhone isn't 'champagne'

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Ross K,

Cheers for the correction. I know the US didn't recognise champagne back in the day, and didn't think that had changed. I guess the WTO have been beavering away on all this sort of stuff in the meantime.

I still notice Americans saying champagne when they mean sparkling wine, whereas people in Blighty are less likely to do the same, so the Frenchies may already have lost that cultural battle.

It'll probably turn out that Apple don't even have a plan to bring out a more blingy-goldy iPhone. And it's just more rumourgasm...

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No, it's just poncy interior designer talk for gold-ish.

Like all those other made-up colours you come across if you talk to designers (or women), such as ecru and mushroom and teal. If we know anything about Apple, it's that they're fully stocked with poncy designy types.

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I'm not sure about international agreements. The protected status works inside the EU, but as I understand it the US refused to recognise the protected status of the term, and so any old Californian fizzy white will say Champagne on the label. No Cava for Cook, even if the Frenchies all refused to sell him any of their stuff.

I don't know about the status of champagne in the rest of the world though. But I'd imagine champagne was a 'generic' term long before most countries had trademark systems up and running.

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China, India the key to Micr-okia's fate says IDC

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Re: Lumia already run on "low-end" hardware - and how many apps one needs?

I barely use any apps on my phone, so before work gave me an iPhone 5, I was a very happy Win Pho 7 user. But even I was annoyed by some obvious missing stuff. For example, I tried every single free torch app that didn't have horrifically broad user-permission (about half wanted access to address book for example) - and none of them were much good - a good number were horrifically crap. I suppose £1.00 is a small price to pay to get a better one, assuming they were any better of course, but for something as simple as a torch app I really resent paying.

Another app I wanted, as Android have it, was something to adjust the screen brightness without having to trawl to the second page of the settings menu. This is because when you're out in bright sun, and the screen is too dim to read, you can't see the menu to find the control. But you can peck at the button you've placed on screen. Simple stuff like this, little widgets, should either be baked into the OS or easily available. Win Pho lets you pin some commands to the home screen, but for some weird reason not others.

Anyway I digress. My point is that many people want apps, and will pick their platform for them. Even total non-techies like my Mum have an iPad with 50-odd apps on - and if she wanted a smartphone it would be the same.

Apparently many people even use a Facebook app for Windows Phone. Despite that being built into the excellent People hub - and Facebook being horrible. But you need things like BBC iPlayer/Sky/catch-up telly, I guess the major newspaper apps, Twitter, Dropbox, Skype etc.

MS could take something like $50m out of the marketing budget and put it into app development. That would get them a lot of widgets, and quite a bit of work from people like the BBC as well - and fill their app store up nicely. Things may of course have improved in the last year - but even I was disappointed with the options, and I bought the phone knowing I didn't want many apps.

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South Carolina couple cop cuffing for shed shag

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Re: A bit hard.

Indeed. They weren't hutting anyone, or causing any bothy. So I would lean-to the side of doing nothing. After all, people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones, and a criminal record is hard to shed. Whereas now they're in the doghouse, all because they got over-excited with a wood erection.

Hmmmm. Smiley face or coat? On balance I think the bad puns have it... Byeeee.

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Science fiction titan Frederik Pohl dies, aged 93

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Re: Thanks for your visions.

Yes. Nighthorses are what bacon was invented for! And I must say, she probably could have been a horror writer if she'd wanted to. Telepathic beasties getting you to help them eat you is an excellent idea for a setting. Definitely a book to read in a small log cabin in the middle of nowhere...

She's obviously got a thing for horses, I believe she's done quite a bit of riding (or she's a brilliant researcher and bluffer) - and doing ancient military history will have helped. Her fantasy's worth a look, if you haven't already. Finisterre is I guess a bit of both. Fortress in the Eye of Time is much better than the (still good) sequels - and also has lots of horses, but I think her most interesting fantasy is the Celtic based stuff. Although I'm sure other people have done it, that was the first time I'd come across someone using the Celtic myths in that way. Plus she's just re-written her 3 Russian ones and sells them ebook only (www.closed-circle.net), as apparently they got buggered up in publishing production. I've read the first one, and it doesn't seem a whole lot different to what I remember from 10-15 years ago. But I think it was the other 2 that were less successful, and I've not got on to them yet.

But I'm mostly a fan of the science fiction, and so would like to get back to that. And it would be nice to know what those lovely gents of the ex-Company Fleet are up to nowadays. Or even something about what they were up to in the war, or which she's only written the beginning and end.

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Re: Thanks for your visions.

Sadly Cherryh's gone on a bit of a Foreigner series treadmill though, presumably because the publisher keeps asking for more. I keep hoping for something new and different to come along. Maybe she can sell enough ebooks to be able to completely please herself and self-publish? Still my favourite author of any genre though.

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Microsoft's Nokia plan: WHACK APPLE AND GOOGLE

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Re: Why now, why so sudden, and why for so little?

Ballmer has just announced he's leaving. The share price immediately went up. Clearly this has offended him. So he's bought half of Nokia, in order to give his successor a massive headache as soon as he joins the company... Trying to integrate 30,000 new staff from a totally different business culture should keep the bugger busy!

That way Ballmer's legacy is saved, and he can hope not to go down in history as Microsoft's worst CEO.

Alternatively MS are so pissed off with their hardware partners that they're going to turn themselves into Apple. Soon they'll buy a middling PC hardware company - or maybe just contract it all out, and they'll make PCs, laptops, tablets and phones. I guess Nokia can do the tablets, given that a tablet is just a bigger phone anyway. I'm sure they'll still license Windows, and they'll not bother with the corporate desktop and server markets, but having a consumer market from all-in-one home PCs, via tablets and XBoxes, to phones makes sense. However as they've got a corporate culture as innovation-stifling as Nokia at its worst, I can't see them managing to turn themselves into a nimble consumer brand.

Third option, the MS board have written a random policy generator. Possibly computerised, possibly with the use of post-it notes and a dart board. This, Metro and the purchase of Skype are the results.

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ICANN destroys Google's dotless domain dream

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Even better, there's no cash back if they chose to reject your domain - so tough luck if it only lasts a few days into the process. Also, where multiple companies have applied for the same one (say .book), they all had to pay ICANN. And for the potential winners, it's like Highlander, there can be only one. I wonder if ICANN will force them to settle disputes at sword-point? Then charge massive pay-per-view fees perhaps?

Finally, for extra yummyness - and this is in no way a conflict of interest or anything (honest!) - even if you didn't enter the process, you have to pay ICANN in order to raise an objection. So if you're an innocent bystander and someone tries to take over a generic word that also happens to be your company or industry name, then you'll have to fork out to ICANN to be allowed to complain. The only concession here, is that the governments are on the advisory board, so for example I think Brazil got to object to .amazon for free.

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'Kim Jong-un executes nork-baring ex and pals for love polygon skin flick'

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Re: Propaganda @Bumpy Cat

I'm struggling to think of one useful intervention in a war since World War 2. Perhaps you can tell me otherwise?

Dr?,

Well let's see, off the top of my head I can think of:

Korea, for starters. Didn't help the North, and was a bloody war, but the people of the South are probably extremely glad not to be starving at the moment. Given that the North lost an estimated 3-5 million in the 90s famine, that cancels out the war dead. Ignoring the ongoing deaths from famine and gulag.

In Africa recently we have Sierra Leone (started by our general on the ground without Blair's permission). He decided he could win the war on his own with not much more than 2 battalions, when he was only there to evacuate foreigners. And did. Shows how little force you sometimes need. Recently we also have Mali. It may not be all over, but the rebels are in disarray and no longer threatening to take over the country. Libya is a bit more contentious I know, but if Ghadaffi had stormed Bengazi it would have been a bloodbath. To be honest, I'm not sure if his army was up to it, as it was a piss poor show compared with say the Syrians. Egypt had a decently trained army, and they ended up kicking their dictator our and taking over from him, so Ghadaffi wasn't risking that. But Libya had decent equipment, and so probably could have managed it. Libya isn't now perfect, but it was much less perfect before, and was also destabilising the whole region.

On to the British empire. We have the Falklands. Killed just over 1,000 troops on both sides, from memory, about half the number of the population at the time. However it was undoubtedly moral to defend their freedom. And Argentina also benefited in the long run, in that the Junta collapsed. The Malaya emergency was a relatively low casualty campaign - although you might call it a colonial war rather than an intervention.

The military intervention in Yugoslavia worked pretty well. And would have saved more lives if done earlier. Serbia were acting relatively rationally, so force, or a convincing threat of it, got them to negotiate. While the peace is by no means perfect, it's far better than the alternative.

The no-fly zones in Iraq in the 90s saved (tens of?) thousands of lives, Kurds and Marsh Arabs. There's even a pretty good argument that the Iraq war cost fewer lives than Saddam would have if he was ruling. And when he died, or his sons took power and fucked everything up, there was going to be some kind of civil war anyway. Something that no Western intervention could stop. Rather like Syria. People talk about maintaining stability, as if these dictatorships are stable. Well in the short to medium term yes, but they do tend to build up massive tension in the system, which often leads to orgies of violence when the regimes inevitably collapse.

Is that enough of a list for you? Obviously we have many unsuccessful examples too. But then there are also many appalling examples of what doing nothing can result in. See Rwanda, maybe Syria, Yugoslavia, Congo. There's a good argument that the Rwanda situation started the Congolese civil war too, so that's nearly a million dead in Rwanda, plus 5 or 6 in Congo - and counting.

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Re: Nork Porn

I believe cheap DVD players make their way across the border from China. Having something like an unauthorised satellite receiver is liable to get you dead - or shipped off with your family to the gulags - which amounts to pretty much the same thing. But a DVD player can be used to watch imported Chinese films. Which is probably acceptable. I doubt anyone cares about porn, unless they're already after you for something.

However there are also supposed to be news DVDs doing the rounds. It's obviously going to be a bit on the slow side, and I'd imagine more likely to be Chinese news than BBC (though who knows?). Which are very illegal, and again likely to get you shot or sent for re-education. I read a story a while back about the police turning off the power to areas, then searching house to house - and checking what DVDs had got stuck in peoples' players that they now couldn't remove. Don't know if that's true or not, and surely a bent bit of wire will get your DVD out if the power goes anyway.

As Don Jefe says though, some people will get access to porn whatever the circumstances.

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Re: Propaganda

North Korea do however have an enormous army (even if it is mostly crap) and an unfeasibly large number of artillery pieces and rockets aimed at Seoul. And may well be willing to kick off the big one if poked. Hence deterring North Korea from doing bad things is an interesting balancing act. Given that they may be bonkers enough to go off the deep end after minor provocation, even if that dooms their own regime.

South Korea don't fancy their capital getting flattened. Which North Korea can do better with conventional weapons than their rubbishy nukes anyway.

Whereas Assad is assumed to be rather more rational, and so a quick attack on his command and control stuff may persuade him that chemical weapons aren't worth the risk.

It's a case of trying to apply the correct solutions, to difficult problems, in varying cases. So we didn't launch an attack on the Soviet Union, even though they were committing massive human rights abuses, because World War III didn't seem terribly appealing. Hence the Cold War, which was deemed to be the safest policy, stop Soviet military expansion and wait to see what happens.

Unfortunately we also did nothing about Rwanda. And it took quite a long time to decide to bother to do anything about the break up of Yugoslavia. I'm not sure what force, and what casualty levels would have been required to deal with Rwanda, but in the case of Yugoslavia it was simply a case of relatively low casualty air-strikes and a large follow-on commitment of peace-keeping troops. So there was no good excuse for failing to save tens of thousands of lives by going in years earlier.

in the case of Syria we seem to have made similar mistakes. Although I'm not sure the solution would have been so simple. Threatening to arm the rebels and targetted air-strikes to force Assad to negotiate might have worked in the early days, but there was no appetite to put peace-keeping troops on the ground, the rebels weren't organised like the Bosnians (who were able to form a working state), plus there were Al Qaeda leftovers in Syria that the government had allowed in to destabilise Iraq after the invasion (which Assad may feel was a mistake at this point), and Hizbollah right next door to cause more trouble. So with Russia taking the UN out of the picture I'd say there was little plausible solution available to the Syria crisis for the West - but a bit of applied military force might be quite persuasive to the regime to lock up the chemical weapons again.

If the government collapses someone's going to have to go in and seize/destroy those - which won't be fun.

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Behind the candelabra: Power cut sends Britain’s boxes back to the '70s

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Re: What goes around..

My friend's older Sky box needs a good 2 minutes to warm up, before it will speak to him. My Mum's starts instantly, and works perfectly. Mine starts instantly but refuses to give me program details for about 10% of channels until it's got its breath back. For some bizarre reason it won't allow viewing of Dave ja vu for 10 minutes from boot, which affects no other channel. Not even Dave. Mostly it does BBC and sport, so no matter.

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I ain't Spartacus
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Re: RE. Re. Indeed...

Oh bugger! On moving into my new flat, I didn't realise my smoke alarms were wired into the mains until after cooking bacon sandwiches for many. Removing the batteries failed to stop the infernal beeping. Aargh! I've not had a power cut yet, so now I've got the smoke alarm waking me up to look forward to on power restoration. Oh joy! It's already beeped once every 10 minutes for a day until I was able to source a 9v battery (even though it's got mains power). The 2 are linked as well, so even closing the kitchen door and removing batteries from the kitchen one doesn't save you from bacon smoke.

At least my microwave was bought without a clock. Also true for the dishwasher and washing machine. I've forgotten how I set the oven one up, but all the separate panel heaters in each room have their own clocks - and the timer on the one in my bedroom is actually different to all the others - to add to the fun.

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Re: @Lee D

I'm currently staying at my Mum's house, looking after her doggies while she lives it up in the sunshine on holiday. Most unfair.

She has got the most user-unfriendly alarm clock that I've ever had the misfortune to try and use. The clock-radio has got 4 rows of 3 or 4 buttons, yet the same buttons that set the alarm time (eventually) are also used for the radio station pre-sets. And when you set an alarm, the light comes on at the front to tell you you've done it, and stays on for a perfectly brilliant 10 seconds, to fool you into thinking you've done it right. Then goes off. All it was doing was to tell you the time was set. Then you have to press and hold another of the radio pre-set buttons, while holding down the first one to get it to actually make a noise. And in turning on alarm one, it always turns off alarm 2, or vice-versa, unless you turn them both on within ten seconds of each other. It's one of the worst designed bits of electronics I've ever had the misfortune to use.

I've never seen a central heating system timer manage to survive a power cut either. And those buggers also have some of the worst UIs in Christendom.

One of these days, I'm going to equip myself with a baseball bat with a nail in the end (nice simple UI there) and fly around the various consumer electronics companies, and I'm going to run a compulsory re-education course for their designers, called UI design for dummies.

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Re: What's the point of a microwave clock?

To quote from an old 'Cabin Pressure' episode I was just listening to, "In theory we have two altimeters in case one goes wrong. But as Chinese proverb say, man with one altimeter always know height. Man with two, is never sure..."

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Nasty Flash advert

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Broken Flash advert?

You seem to have a malfunctioning Flash banner advert on the site. It's for O2 and Nokia and it's either crashing my version of Firefox (23.0.1 on 32 bit Vista) or turning it into tortoise mode. Site works as normal any time I don't have that ad at the top of the page - so I'm pretty sure it's that.

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Dopey dope-growing dope smoked out by own dope dope-growing vid

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They truly are. I've read how gardening is dangerous in the Daily Mail.

People are always getting decked. Farmers make a fortune out of rape, not to mention all the bedding, forking and ho's.

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NASA's nuclear Mars tank REBELS against human control

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Re: It's too young to drive itself

OK, so it'll be wearing a cardigan and smoking a pipe then...

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Boffins lay bare exotic Lara Croft meteorite element ununpentium

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Why?

Why can't it be called Playmonautium - in honour of our drowned hero.

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BALLMER TO RETIRE FROM MICROSOFT

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Re: Phone Call

Is the definition of a 'donor facing position' that they're planning to harvest his organs?

Or did you mean something else, and I've just got a disturbed mind?

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No "Reply" button

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Re: No "Reply" button - this looks like a bug

Hmmm. I noticed the upvote issue this morning, but didn't do anything about it, as I didn't see it in any other article. It seems to have gone from the Fukushima one now as well. So I guess techies make problem go bye-bye.

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Re: No "Reply" button - this looks like a bug

Drew,

I can see reply buttons. On both my office PC (Vista and Firefox) and my iPad. However when I upvoted a comment, instead of the little link under their post on the upvote page taking me back to the forum, it was a link back to the article. Don't know if that's unrelated, irrelevant, or some other sign of a problem/bug with how that article got posted.

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Oh noes! New 'CRISIS DISASTER' at Fukushima! Oh wait, it's nothing. Again

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Re: "They always have a back-up"

There was a train taken out in the Boxing Day tsunami. In Sri Lanka I think.

A quick search and very lazy link to Wikiwoowah later shows I was probably right. Wiki has a death toll of 1,700.

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Reg hack battles Margaret Thatcher's ghost to bring broadband to the Highlands

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Re: I can hardly wait...

Place your bets on the next IT news stories, say in a year or two. Is it:

A. In a philanthropic move to rival Google, The Register has launched it's first broadband service.

or

B. In a developtment that has shocked privacy activists The Register has been accused of passing all its users' emails to GCHQ and the NSA. An El Reg spokesdroid whined that 'it was the victim of secret court orders forcing it to do so'.

Or take an outside bet on:

C. Princess Diana working as Elvis Impersonator in nightclub on moon!

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Re: No....

I would certainly be willing to help in this community effort. If there's a ton of Glenmorangie in the way, blocking righteous radio signals, then it must be dealt with at once! As an Englishman with perfect broadband, I see it as my civic duty to give something back for those less fortunate than myself*. Therefore I am willing to drink as much of the offending liquid as is necessary to enable radio signals to pass freely, as nature intended.

*I leave it as an exercise for you, dear reader, to decide which is a worse disadvantage. Having no broadband, or being Scottish...

Congratulations are in order to our heroic correspondent for his efforts in spreading the light of civilisation - or at least cat videos. I guess, particularly after that last comment, I'd best get my coat.

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Bradley Manning sentenced to 35 years in prison

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Re: Poor guy

Once they're dead, people become meat.

chr0mAt1c,

About that invitation you sent me for dinner tonight, I'm afraid I'm busy...

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Assange's WikiLeaks Party running-mate departs in blaze of glory

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Re: Poor Julian

Steve Knox,

Obviously there are bigger problems if a democratic decision is come to, and then gets ignored. And that suggests something more underhanded than normal, 'honest', politics.

But I'm not sure I can agree with you on the idea that all decisions should be come to at open meetings. If you had infinite time for the meetings to happen, if everyone was equally intelligent and well informed, if everyone was of roughly equal ability as speakers, and if the options are reasonably limited - only then will you get reasonable democratic results that way. However you're more likely to end up with either paralysis, or rule by the most persuasive speakers. See Athenian democracy for an example.

There needs to be a reasonable balance between transparency and effectiveness. Someone's got to sit down and do the research and policy leg-work. Also if you've got a party of a few hundred people, with a few hundred different opinions you're never going to get anywhere. Which is why all parties become coalitions of groups.

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Poor Julian

Matthews complains of disinterest by Assange: "National Council meetings have been held at least weekly for several months. Until last Friday, Julian had attended precisely one meeting."

Surely this is a bit unfair. If Julian Assange has made the effort to attend even one of the meetings in Australia in the last few months - then he's clearly made serious, even herculean, efforts to attend. It must have taken him a while to dig the required tunnel...

I wonder how he dealt with it being all hot at the centre of the earth, or if he used the tunnel they must have built for the remake of 'Total Recall'?

Seriously, it seems a bit odd to complain about building power groups within parties. Surely phoning activists up to try and persuade them to vote with you at meetings is standard practise, rather than a subversion of internal democracy? So long as you have debate and votes at meetings, and then carry out the agreed policy. Unless you're not really taking your party all that seriously, and are just having fun playing at grown-up politics.

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Boffin blends benevolent beer

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Pint

as opposed to that koala urine Fosters

I think you're being terribly unfair here.

Koala urine is pleasantly menthol scented, due to all that eucalyptus they eat. Fosters on the other hand...

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This explains everything!

The prof is obviously an evil Pom saboteur sent to Australia by SIS - it's good to see our intelligence services can still do good work. It explains the recent poor performance of most Australian sports teams. Their bad showing at the Olympics was obviously due to trying out these new electrolyte drinks, there's the rugby of course, and we now know why the Aussies can't bat - it's because they're not sure which of the 2 balls they can see to try and hit. Hooray for Science!

To quote W G Grace, "Australia rhymes with failure!"*

* Well OK, only on those Channel 4 adverts. However, he does say in his manual on batting, that one should always take one's pipe out of one's mouth before going in to bat. Excellent advice, I'm sure we can all agree.

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Green German gov battles to keep fossil powerplants running

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Re: green hypocrites

That's OK. They can have their cake and eat it. Nice green power in Germany, even if it doesn't work. Then get Poland to build lots of coal fired stations, and buy the leccy off them, when the wind don't blow. And have nuclear leccy from France as well. While still being 'greener-than-thou'. Perfect!

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British spooks seize tech from Snowden journo's boyfriend at airport

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Re: Poisoning the well

That could be a new Olympic endurance test. How many hours of badgers can you take, before the madness kicks in...

There's millions of badgers, all under one roof,

It's called Badger Land, Badger Land, Badger Land!

Obviously the winner would get a black and white stripey medal. I'm going to use the Penguin icon, due to El Reg's lack of foresight in providing a badger one. Goodness knows how they could have made such a basic error.

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Re: Obama still not strong-arming, then, I see

I find it pleasingly ironic that his name is Miranda, given this is a story about police arrest powers and due process.

I'm never quite sure about terrorism powers being quoted like this though. As lots of crappy laws got passed because of anti-terrorism, but didn't always state that they could only be used in terrorism cases.

Hence the local councils using the RIPA powers to spy on people who weren't putting their recycling out, even though those powers were supposedly brought in to fight the terrorist menace. Now admittedly recycling plastics rather than burying them probably does have more of an effect on everyday life than Al Qaeda can manage, but even so a few successful terrorist attacks on planes can soon get the death toll into the thousands - so it probably counts as a touch more serious...

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Re: No need for a third runway at Heathrow

Easy: swim the Channel

That's all very well for you, but I'm not sure your laptop and phone will be too happy. It's likely to find life considerably more comfortable in the clutches of the boys in blue, than in those of the deep blue...

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Blighty street has hottest Wi-Fi hotspot hottie in Europe: We reveal where

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one bar owner said no we can't offer it because we are too near to the Empire State Building.

Isn't it obvious? King Kong comes from a remote tropical island. He's going to want to call home, now he's in a new place - so he's going to need free WiFi to access Skype. After all, he's unlikely to have had a chance to get a US SIM, what with all the hassle the army are giving him.

So you'd be a fool to be the closest free WiFi hotspot and attract all that chaos and destruction.

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Badges for Commentards

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Re: Badge?

I can already see your shiny silveritude gleaming at me from my screen, so as far as I can see you are a correctly embadgened commentard...

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They don't recognise us as HUMAN: Disability groups want CAPTCHAs killed

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FAIL

Re: a joke?

Oops! Sorry!

Still hate link-shorteners though... And too paranoid to click on them.

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Oracle Team USA sailors admit breaking America's Cup rules

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Happy

Nevada doesn't cut it. You need to insist on the race being held on Titan.

That should get the costs up a bit, to a level that should satisfy even the most spendthrift billionaire...

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New Forum Wishlist - but read roadmap first

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Re: Reasons for reporting abuse

Drew,

Only a couple of posts reported a day. That's impressively high quality moderation! Given how few dodgy posts I've spotted, I think I've only ever reported about 5, I'm very impressed.

I know you let a lot go that some other sites wouldn't (and long may that continue), but even so there's always a good number of problem posters who need dealing with. So I guess your pre-moderation for trouble makers is very effective.

And/or you have the most amazingly lovely commentards in the whole of internet-land...

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Asus will bung 'Nexus 7 2' fondle-droids on Blighty's shelves this month

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Re: Specs make the iPad Mini look REALLY crap.

Perhaps iPad users run things other than benchmarking software and as a result are blisfully unaware that their device is "slow".

I don't believe anyone has accused the iPad, mini or otherwise, of being slow. They're not. Well my iPad 1 never recovered from the update to iOS 5, which slowed it to a crawl sometimes...

Anyway, the problem with the iPad Mini is that it's got a pretty low resolution screen by modern standards. Lower res than the much smaller iPhone. And it's very expensive in comparison to Android tablets at nearly half the price, which have better screens (the most important bit of any tablet).

Personally I'm starting to think disloyal thoughts. I'm not planning to upgrade my iPad 3 this year, maybe I'll get tempted next. But I'm rather tempted by a Samsung Galaxy Note of some description. Sadly they seem to be marketing them as premium - and matching iPad prices. But I think the pen is mightier than the (bluetooth) keyboard. I find handwriting recognition is so much nicer than an onscreen keyboad.

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ULTIMATE cuppa contenders prepare to go mug-to-mug

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Re: You just don't get...

MrT,

Now you've gone and done it! You've woken up the Hobnob Taleban! The most vicious combatants in the biscuit world...

I'm not sure I even dare to say that I find Hobnobs to be mediocre. If I had to dunk in tea, it would be a ginger or chocolate coated digestive, but I tend to find the biccie spoils the tea.

My actual favourite biscuit is the Jaffa cake - and that's not even a biscuit. So what do I know?

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US federal judge: Yes, Bitcoin IS MONEY

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Re: "It can be used to purchase goods and services"

Is that why the supermarkets introduced self-service counters?

I'm always finding unexpected items in my bagging area...

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E-reader barons file FCC plea to opt out of disabled-friendly regs

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Re: Everything should be as accessible as possible.

Should Ballet dancers wear lead weights, ear plugs and distorting dark glasses?

Yes! It would make them far more accessible. At the moment, they keep out-running me...

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British ankle-biters handed first mobe at the age of SEVEN - Ofcom

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Joke

20 other kids following you around the playground every day begging for a mere minute of donkey kong action!

You can get put in prison for that you know!

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Re: Mine aren't getting phones yet

Or being shown the stout metal 'money-box' for your savings, on the wall in the cupboard under the stairs with the slowly rotating numbers on the front...

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