* Posts by I ain't Spartacus

4345 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

Orion: To Mars, the Moon and beyond... but first, a TEST FLIGHT through Van Allen belt

I ain't Spartacus
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Re: Project Orion

Though maybe using conventional launchers for its parts and lighting the blue touch paper in LEO would be more acceptable.

Isn't that the wrong way round? Wasn't one idea for Orion that you could get some really stonkingly heavy stuff into orbit as a one-off, or at least not-too-often exercise. So you could launch space-factories, space-mining rigs or habitats as huge launches, and then do everything else with normal rockets.

Obviously it's also a faster way round the solar system. But I'd have thought it would be too heavy to lift by normal means. After all, you need a really thick baseplate and some serious shock absorbers.

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Re: Competing with Soyuz...

MacroRodent,

That's interesting, I'd not read about that as a radiation shielding option. I'd imagine that still puts our ship in the range of 10-20 launches (including, consumables, flight and assembly crews) - so the Earth-to-orbit costs alone are going to be somewhere between $5bn and $20bn.

Although hopefully this will be a re-usable asset.

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Re: Competing with Soyuz...

Tom 13,

I don't think your solution works. We simply don't have the technology to build anything in space. And we're not even close. The ISS was assembled, but mostly that was just bolting big stuff together. Plus a bit of plumbing. So everything on the main ship that drives to Mars is going to be built in modules on Earth, then lifted to orbit. So in order to have heavy shielding we're going to have use an absurdly large number of launches to get it up there, and then huge amounts of time doing the final assembly in orbit.

I agree that some sort of electric plasma engine is probably the way to go, and it would seem sensible to spend money on our big ship, as it can be continually refurbished and reused. Even if you had to launch another engine module from Earth every time it came back here, rather than trying to refurb the old one.

However, one of the arguments from the article is to use the Orion capsule as a lifeboat. If it can cope with high velocities for landing, then you might have a viable emergency return home option. If something horrible goes wrong with the main ship on the way to Mars, or even the way back, nothing is likely to be able to carry the fuel to decelerate you to Earch orbital speed so you can rendevouz with a landing craft. But being less massive than the main ship, you might be able to get within a sane speed to survive aeorbraking. Now it's possible that a Dragon 3 could do this as well, but I believe Dragon 2 is only designed for orbital re-entry speeds. Although Dragon ought to be a better bet for landing on Mars, as it's designed to land on dry land on its jets.

I think my idea would be to have several multi-purpose craft for all the landings, then a ship to do the long-haul bit that carries them and their fuel between planets. So a bigger Dragon, with better radiation shielding, and better heat shields. That way you've got more options if things go wrong. But it might make more sense to have separate Mars landers.

However I'm not sure Mars is the right question. It seems to me we need fuel and consumables. So capturing an asteroid seems a far better long term plan. That also saves a lot of the difficulties of landing on Mars. Although if we could use Mars as an excuse to build a ship to get us around the solar system, then I guess it would be a good first step.

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Re: Project Orion

OK. But only if they launch it from your back garden. And no cheating and going out when they launch either...

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Re: Why a heat shield?

JohnB,

What it seems to amount to is that this is the only way down, while we're launching stuff into space from Earth. One of the best reasons to go grab an asteroid and mine it, would be to get consumables like water/amonia/whatever. In orbit you've got virtually free electricity from your solar panels, so if you've got chemicals then you can get oxygen to breathe, water to drink (and grow plants) and nitrogen for atmosphere and fertilizer. If you've got water and electricity you've also got hydrogen and oxygen - i.e. rocket fuel.

If we could just get that sort of bulky stuff in space, rather than boosting it up from earth, then all sorts of things in space become much more feasible. As well as a lot less expensive, and a bit less dangerous. At that point we could have re-usable spaceplanes that refuel in orbit and can then slow down from orbital speeds before entering the atmosphere. Some horrific percentage of the shuttle's weight was heat-shield, and an even more horrific percentage was fuel.

We have these fundamental design problems that dog everything that we do. All the weight you carry up from earth must be accelerated to orbital speeds (17,500 mph ish). And the more you carry, the more fuel you need to launch it, and the more fuel you carry, the more fuel you need to lift that fuel. Which is why we mostly throw away bits of our rockets on the way up. And of course, to come back down, you have to lose that 17,500 mph somehow. Currently that's by aerobraking.

Now you could do like aeroplanes, and use lift to help get you up to a good height, before heading for space, but even then you need rockets for once you run out of atmosphere. And then you have to carry these, plus your jets, plus fuel for both, and a heat shield, as you can't carry enough fuel to slow down.

So Virgin's (Scaled Composite's really) design is to use well understood jet technology to carry their space plane to 50,000 feet. That saves loads of weight, and hassle. Then the spaceplane does the rest. Currently they're just after sub-orbital joyrides - but I presume they can also carry a smaller rocket to boost a satellite, instead of passengers with another design. I don't know if you can make a big enough carrier plane to carry a space vehicle with the weight of fuel and shielding to get a useful payload to orbit. But I'd be surprised if that's not possible.

Option 2 is what SpaceX are doing. Make rockets cheaper. No-one's seriously done re-designs on this stuff since the 60s/70s. So they dumped horrible chemicals or hard to handle liquid hydrogen. Instead they're using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Nice money saving. Then they're planning to land the first stage of their rockets instead of dumping them. So you carry a little more fuel, then land them and re-use.

Third is Reaction Engines. They're the old HOTOL lot, still going, but now Skylon. Use a SABRE engine that works like a jet at low speeds, then gets up to supersonic RAMJET speeds, and then will have to use stored oxygen once the atmosphere's too thin.

Oh, and there's an XKCD for everything apparently: linky

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Re: Once its been through Van Allens belt..

Not forgetting Van Halen's jockstrap and Lily Allen's ...radio interference LOS...

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Re: The reason Orion was nearly scrapped ...

Flocke Kroes,

The ISS is a perfectly reasonable thing for a space program to fund. It may be bloody expensive, particularly compared with what $100 bn-odd would buy in robot missions over 30 years, but if we want to have a permanent manned space habitat in future then we need to do this stuff. There's still loads of research to do on space medicine and life support. Also we've gained, and are still gaining, useful experience in orbital construction (another vital area). After all, I believe nobody had even come close to drowning in space before last year...

The ISS is doing several very useful things. Fostering international space cooperation, and building a larger group of experienced space-trained people is pretty important for enabling a private space industry. ISS has given us SpaceX (maybe it would have happened without that seed money, but not this quickly), and SpaceX are in my opinion the single most important thing to happen in the space industry so far this century. They give a real hope that space won't remain a hobby for major governments. If we want stuff to happen in space, including cheaper research, it'll only happen when it becomes more accessible, and that will only come when it's cheaper. Also Improving our ability to assemble stuff in space, as well as keep people alive long-term (as above).

That's not to mention another vital job the ISS did, and probably one of the reasons it got funding out of Congress at all. Which was keeping the Russian space program going after the Soviet Union collapsed, which had two purposes. One was to try to build a more friendly relationship with Russia. The other was to stop their missile/rocket scientists from going onto the freelance market, and turning up in inconvenient places like Iran and North Korea.

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Re: Wow.

Oddly enough it's considered more sporting to send up all manned capsules empty on their first run nowadays. It's this pesky health'n'safety thing you see.

Also any probe you send outside the van Allen belts to test what the shielding on a modern capsule is good for pretty much might as well be a capsule. Particularly as this is a double test, in that you want the eccentric orbit to get extra speed to test the heat shield anyway. So while you're outside the protection of the magnetic field anyway, you may as well do a little testing.

Anyway how long will the Russians be willing to share Soyuz? Or even be able to fund it? The contract is only to 2018 (from memory). Relations are not good, and look to be worsening.

Apparently Roscosmos are now unable to set a budget, as with sanctions and recession, plus the massive drop in both the oil price and the Rouble, the Russian budget has all gone to crap. As I recall it, something like 35% of the government income is based on oil/gas revenues. So when the oil price drops by 40% in a few months, and they can only borrow at 10% (worse than Greece), something will have to give in their budget. linky

That article seenms a bit over the top, would be interesting to see what it said in the original Izvestia one. Also the ISS partners pay in dollars for their trips, so Roscosmos will actually make more money on those as the Rouble falls.

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Sinclair is back with the Spectrum Vega ... just as rubbish as the ZX

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Re: Nah

goldcd,

Oi! I resemble that remark! I had a CPC464 with colour screen and tape deck.

10 PRINT "goldcd SMELLS OF POO!"

20 GOTO 10

RUN

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Re: calendar check....

If it's a true clone, it'll start shipping in July at the earliest.

Which year would that be?

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Apple patents NEVERSMASH iPHONE for fumbling fondlers

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Re: Physics.

Why not use harpoons? It worked for Philae. After all that bounced so high, it took 2 hours to come down again...

Oh, hang on. I think I've got that wrong. OK, how about it harpoons your leg, and avoids bounceage that way. I'm sure none of us would mind a small leg wound, in order to save our precious mobiles.

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Sick of the 'criminal' lies about pie? Lobby the government HERE

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Re: @ I ain't Spartacus (let the flamewar begin)

It's a bit like sausages - buy them from a good butcher and they are a world apart from the vile factory produced rubbish sold in supermarkets even under their "best of" brands, that appear to be solely made from udder, rectum, ears, lips, eyeballs, cartilage and sinew, dyed pink and injected into a twisted garden hose.

I'd heard sausages were made out of that too. But personally, I think it's just bollocks...

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Re: Hilarious maybe

I saw one of them telly chefs do that. I think it was Raymond Blanc (who otherwise seems to be a sensible chap), putting best steak into a kate & sidney pudding. Given it's going to get seared, then steamed for over 3 hours - I really don't know why he was wasting his time doing that. Plus you want something with a bit of fat in it, to make a nicer gravy.

I'm inspired to have a go now. Since I've started making bread, I'm hoping that my (long neglected) pastry skills will have improved. So I think I should have another go.

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Re: Hilarious maybe

Ledswinger,

There's nothing wrong with not serving the best meat in pies. And actually a reasonable gravy content is important, as you need some nice liquid to go with the pastry. Although you don't want gristle or the nasty bits of kidneys hiding in there. Even if it is a right bugger when you have to trim it off - something I have to do regularly as a frequent maker of the superior steak and kidney pudding.

However poor quality of meat is a sign that you shouldn't be going back to a place. Because their product is crap. Whereas non-pie-ness is an all too common problem which the market does not appear to be able to solve. Hence we need government regulation to force compliance with reasonable standards.

A proper pie is a lovely thing to eat. But also a bit of a hassle to make. Therefore it's the sort of thing that we invented restaurants for. So they can do the buggering about, greasing, rolling, shaping, blind baking, filling, sealing etc. I always end up squashing my pastry flat, and turning it into biscuits. Which is why I've resorted to the more forgiving steamed pudding.

I suppose we need to add another exception for cobblers, or whatever you call it when you stretch dough across the top of a casserole and bake it. Actually I think they might be two different (delicious) things. They're really nice, and easy to eat, as you rip off some bread and dip it in the gravy Not like those awful puff pastry hats, that so many places foist on us.

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Re: Originally, the pastry wasn't even edible

Surely that depends on the pie? I know that the cornish pasty had what was effectively an inedible pastry handle to hold it by with dirty hands. That was the bit you left - but the rest of the pastry was supposed to be eaten. I'd imagine similar things being true elsewhere. When you're trying to feed people who're taking their meal to work, then you need something to keep it in. But if you're cooking for home, you'd not want to be wasting any ingredients. It's not like flour and fat was lying around just to be thrown away!

Edible plates were the thing, back in the day. So you might serve stew on a trencher of bread, which you eat to mop up the gravy. I'd be amazed if a pie was much different.

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FOUR, count 'em, FOUR big rockets launching in next seven days

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Re: Hayabusa bombing the asteroid

Don't worry, El Reg got the details wrong. The probe won't be landing, but staying at a safe distance. It will launch its nuke small charge - then drop mobile infantry, who'll go down to kill all the bugs take samples, then (any survivors) return to the craft, and come back to earth. There's absolutely nothing to worry about.

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Star Wars: Episode VII trailer lands. You call that a lightsaber? THIS is a lightsaber

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Re: Seems they're re-using stuff again...

Sod a new Elite (although I'm interested in that too), I want a modern version of Tie Fighter!

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By the Rivers of Babylon, where the Antikythera Mechanism laid down

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Re: Lost in translation?

There was no paper instruction manual, due to the excessive costs of copying manuscripts.

Instead a slave was provided with each device, who'd memorised instructions on how to use it. This was called the Portable Didact Format. Unfortunately due to lack of security designed into this system, they all got infected with viruses and became unusuable...

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Festive streamers caught in Vulture's claws: Gadget-ogle for audiophiles, video geeks

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Re: It's all too complicated

Good point. I could never remember which was which, both had big red signs with white lettering. And were equally crap. Also Curry's seems to have disappeared into PC World anyway. Presumably as the less toxic of the 3 brands (Dixons being the first to go). As I recall our Curry's and Comet went within a few months of each other, the Curry's being folded into the PC World a few hundred yards down the main road.

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I ain't Spartacus
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Re: It's all too complicated

Andy Davies,

This is pretty much the definition of a 'first world problem'. But I don't like having to get up to pick a new song, so having the device wired to the sound system is annoying. It's OK when you put on an album to play in the background, but if you feel like listening to lots of different stuff, it's nice to have the controller by your chair.

Obviously I could be organised, and have playlists, or be less lazy and get up off my fat backside. But on the other hand it's nice to sit there with a drink, and chat to friends while passing round the iPad and letting people pick some tunes.

It's not worth £100 though. Which is why I currently have to get up. Although my player allows me to use the remote control to skip tracks within the album/artist/playlist the device is playing, for iOS and Android.

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I ain't Spartacus
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Re: It's all too complicated

I just saw an ad for an Asus 7" tablet for £79. Why not just leave one of those there? I'm actually quite tempted to buy one, or maybe a cheap Android phone, as a replacement for my iPod. It can do podcasts when I'm out-and-about, without killing the work phone battery. The work phone is an iPhone, and only has a pathetic 8GB of storage anyway. A 'Droid with an SD card slot solves that problem, for my 25GB of audio + podcasts. Then when at home, it can be the remote for BBC iPlayer, podcasts and music. As well as a Chromecast. Should I bother to get a NAS, (or leave the computer running as a media server), it can control that as well. Or Tesco's Hudl, which is dirt cheap if you use Clubcard points, and not bad if you don't.

Then you just need a Bluetooth connector for music. Or USB.

Android tablets are now so cheap that they're going to beat almost any decently specc'ed dedicated controller made in low volumes. Then you just write an app. Or even don't bother selling and locking down dedicated hardware, just do apps.

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I ain't Spartacus
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It's all too complicated

I've just never felt the desire to sit down and do all the required research to get it right, as there are so many incompatible options. So I've tended to go with what works and add to it, or go for standalone gear. I keep thinking that a fanless living room PC is the answer, but when I had the budget I didn't have the time, and now I'm mortgaged I haven't the time or the budget...

Such a shame, as the technology has been around for ages. But the bloody manufacturers just cannot get their act together.

I guess my first foray was a Bluetooth speaker/iPod dock I picked up when Curry's bit the dust. That's now relegated to the bedroom. Not great for music, but wonderful for iPlayer Radio and podcasts. iPad speakers aren't loud enough to drown out the sounds of cooking (when I mostly want to listen). Also good for the iPod. Don't know how long that's got to live though, as Apple killed the iPod Classic.

I had a brief excursion into Sky. The Sky+ box is great, and not too shabby for things like iPlayer. But NFL online didn't work, without plugging a PC directly into the telly.

Then I allowed myself the expense of a decent CD player again. So the CDs came back out of their boxes, now there's too many of the buggers for my old tower (aaargghh!). That plugs into the telly, and solves the crap flatscreen speakers issue. It also has a USB socket, so talks to phones/tablets, for iPlayer, podcasts or music. A Chromecast rounds this out for iPlayer telly and if I decide to join Netflix or go Sky online for a few months to watch the Summer's cricket. Even NFL online worked via the PC, despite the promised Chromecast app still not being available. I've been mostly impressed with Chromecast, and at £30 I was less worried by not having researched it fully. I was tempted by Apple TV, but that doesn't seem to do much more.

If I wanted surround sound, this would all break down. But I'm happy with stereo, and my speakers have plenty of base.

My friend has an Onkyo box/amp with millions of inputs, and a PS3 - and he can do more-or-less anything with those and his PC. But he also has millions of remove controls and spaghetti junction behind his telly. Even he sometimes gets confused by the setup. Oh and the media interface on the PS3 is horrible. It does many things, but that menu system is tiny, and fiddly, and nasty. I am jealous of his bluetooth receiver though - so much easier than my wired USB.

Maybe I should have tried a smart TV. But I don't trust the manufacturers to make it useable. And if my £30 Chromecast is obsolete in 2 years, I won't be complaining. When it's an £800 smart telly, I damned well would have been.

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Go festive this year with Christmas carols, baby Jesus and CLITORAL STIMULATORS

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Re: A bit rich...

TeeCee,

One of the teasmades on Amazon (when I bought mine) came with a little stainless steel thermos jug for the milk. Or you can buy those nasty pods of UHT stuff (or even just a little glass bottle of UHT), if you're not too choosy.

This was the reason I didn't buy a teasmade years ago. But I've been taking my tea black for a couple of years now.

The other, surprisingly nice, option is to go for fruit teas. The objection to these is that they smell far nicer than they actually taste. Which is even before someone has questioned your manhood. It's actaully really nice to wake up to the whole bedroom smelling of raspberries. And I rather like the refreshing first mug of fruit tea, as a nice palette cleanser, giving me the required fortitude to face getting up and schlepping to the kitchen to make a pot of the real thing.

Twinings fruit teas are disappointingly tasteless. You have to leave the bag in for about ten minutes, then they start to become harsh, before they've even developed much of a flavour. Whereas Sainsbury's fruit teas are cheaper, and much fruitier. You can take the bag out after a couple of minutes, and they've achieved a nice strong fruity taste. I haven't got round to trying any others yet.

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I ain't Spartacus
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Re: A bit rich...

How dare you criticise! I have a teasmade, and it is the finest device known to man! It awakens me with life-giving tea. Usually after I've slept through the other alarm. Although it can be a bit of a shock to the system to hear what sounds like a jet engine switching on mere inches from my ear, as I try to eke the last few precious seconds of slumber out of the morning.

I will suffer no criticism of this wonderful and humanitarian invention. At least until I'm rich enough to employ a butler to bring me tea in the morning. Well, if I can afford a butler, let's make that afternoon...

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Masala omelette

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Re: Or...

It's the bacon that's missing.

I love a plain omelette. But never want to do any work for that, so it's eggs done in a pan with some butter, plus salt and pepper. Just on the hob, and you can get it pretty fluffy if you run the spatula through the setting egg a few times, on a medium heat. You basically push the sheets of just setting egg on the bottom of the pan, from the outside to the middle, then let new egg start to set, then repeat a few times. This fluffs it a bit like scrambled, but keeps it together. As soon as there's some definition, fold in half, then turn off the heat. Turn over after a minute or so - then serve just as the middle bit has set. Or before if you like it still a bit runny in the middle (which is how they always came in Brussels).

Once you're chopping onions and faffing around with turning on the grill, you may as well do things properly. And properly means bacon or ham. Then whatever you've got. Hopefully some bits of boiled/roast potato, bit of sweetcorn, definitely cheese, tomato, peppers, onion, asparagus, whatever.

Never tried putting chilli in it, but I suppose it would work fine. I like a bit of nutmeg with eggy-bread - but I'm not sure that cumin would be all that nice. To be honest, I don't really fancy the curried omelette that much at all.

If I want chilli with my brekkie, I tend to go for a bit of tex-mex and have breakfast burritos. Nice bit of spicy tomato salsa spread on a soft tortilla, with a couple of rashers of bacon (or some sausage), plus a sprinkling of mature cheddar and a dollop of scrambled eggs. Makes a lovely brunch with fruit juice to use up leftovers if you've been doing tortillas the night before. I wonder if they'd work with guacamole, but that would have gone brown by the next morning, even if any of it ever did survive long enough to go back in the fridge.

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Androids in celluloid – which machine deserves the ULTIMATE MOVIE ROBOT title?

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Megaphone

Citizen. Please put ED209 into this list.

You have twenty seconds to comply!

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Questionable ads

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Stop

Kill it with Fire!

I've just had that crappy McAfee ad as well. I don't care who Marcus is, I just want him to shut up! Not only is the ad obnoxious for starting automatically with sound, it's also obnoxious as it seems to be on a permanent fucking loop! Just to add insult to injury.

Any company who push their crap onto people's computers because they forgot to untick a box on installing another product is malware. Which used to include Chrome and Safari, but Apple and Google stopped being sleazy, whereas Crappy McAfee (it rhymes, I like it) still are. Which I wouldn't have said if McAfee hadn't decided to invade my peace and quiet.

Please fix this advert. And also please implement a proper report ads button.

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Rosetta science team thinks Philae might come to life in the spring

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Re: Ambient Sleep Sound Made From the Comet's EM Emissions

Well done for passing on the alien mind control sound to even more people! Now they'll all be infec...

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I serve the Might Space Duck!

All Hail the Mighty Space Duck!

Praise to his harpoon defying power and his holy bounciness!

We must march on Darmstadt and kill the trespassers on Holy ground!

Hail Duck!

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Ten excellent FREE PC apps to brighten your Windows

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Re: MalwareBytes & VLC

I've noticed a drop-off in people looking for desktop and laptop repairs in the last few years...

True. I think it's partly because Windows has got better, and I almost never come across a computer that isn't running up-to-date anti-virus nowadays. 5 years ago people didn't know about the free options like AVG until I told them. Now they've probably at least got MSE/Windows Defender.

But I take the case of my Mum, who's not at all unique. Last time I had to fix her desktop was June. When I checked, it hadn't been booted since late April. She checks her email daily, but has an iPad. Even for online shopping, she needn't leave the sofa to go the other room and turn on the PC. So she doesn't anymore. It got used so infrequently she's given it away, and got a secondhand Macbook Air.

I hate using my iPad for anything serious. I like the ability to have multiple tabs, more screen space, and easily cut & paste stuff into lists. And a proper keyboard, so I can type at proper speeds. It might take me a couple of minutes to go to the spare room and fire it up, but it's so much more efficient when I get there.

However I suspect many people were never efficient on their PCs. Were never comfortable with the interface, and can't touch-type. So the iPad is just as good, maybe even easier, and they can be sat on the sofa.

Oh and a big thumbs up to Malwarebytes. I run multiple checks on PCs infected with nasties - often using a linux boot disc. So far Malwarebytes has been my first tool used, and none of the other scans have picked anything else. Except for once, when my brother decided not to pay Sky for the boxing, and went to some truly horrible site instead.

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Leaked Syrian log files reveal attempts to starve rebels of information

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Re: Not blocking xvideos.com?

They also seem to have blocked access to Zynga. So as you say, they must still have a remaining spark of humanity in their black hearts...

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Blade Runner sequel might actually be good. Harrison Ford is in it

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Re: "....Ms.Young's current appearance...."

According to the documentary on Bladerunner, Ridley Scott said he was working on Dune, when he decided to drop it, and do Bladerunner instead. I wonder what he'd have made of it? He'd have struggled to do worse...

I'm sure someone could make a much better stab at it now, with modern technology. Still a very hard film to do though. So much of the plot is going on in Paul's head.

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Re: "think of the god-awful Indianna Jones 4."

Shrimpling,

Good point. Now it's coming up to Christmas, do you think they'll ever make a sequel to Die Hard?

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Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU

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What the fuck does Free+ mean?

It should mean, not only is this free, it's also brilliant. What it actually means in many cases is free to download but not free to actually play. Even in newspeak + is supposed to be a good thing.

Perhaps Apple should have gone for Free!!

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Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned

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Re: Re:He fled the country when he got the second summons.

Seriously, the original accounts are easy enough to find. What's with the communal memory loss?

DiViDed,

They certainly are. Which is why I'm tempted to conclude that Assange's supporters are lying deliberately, rather than suffering a 'lapse of collective memory'.

So it's a matter of fact that Assange's lawyer was told that Assange was wanted for questioning the day before he left Sweden. The lawyer denied this in one of the original hearings. Only to then be forced to admit to the judge that he was wrong, as the evidence was on his own phone. Weirdly they seem to have sent him a text (seems a tad informal for these purposes to me), don't know if there was a supporting phonecall as well.

Next he is wanted for something. This was the only legitimate part of Assange's appeals. There's not supposed to be any grounds for appeal over the EAW, as it's supposed to work like we're one happy family in the EU. A system I don't approve of myself, but that's the law. So as the UK has a different legal system I believe an EAW has to be signed off by a judge, whereas in Sweden (or anyone else using the inquisitorial system) it's going to come from the prosecutor (or equivalent).

He's had his questioning and investigating, and was invited for his final "we might charge you after this" type of interview that the Swedish system apparently requires. The UK Supreme Court got to rule on this, that it's compatible with UK law that these foreign legal systems are allowed to issue European Arrest Warrants at the appropriate stage of their legal process. It is, after all, a European Arrest Warrant. Not extradition. That was the whole (wong-headed) point of the system.

Finally we come to your above allegation about the minor nature of the charges. Again, this is in the judgement of the UK Supreme Court. Freely avaiblable online, and mentioned many times here, and elsewhere. The 2 charges the Swedish ticked as rape, would be rape under UK law as well.

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Useless 'computer engineer' Barbie FIRED in three-way fsck row

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Devil

Re: Not the right way to promote IT among girls... but realistic, after all

Realistic?

I hate to break it to you, but Dilbert is not a documentary.

Martin,

Yes, I used to believe that too. I hate to break it to you though, but that all changed once I got a job at a large multi-national.

Next you'll be trying to tell me that Chris Morris's 'The Day Today' is supposed to be comedy. When it's actually training material used by most media organisations.

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MYSTERY Russian satellite: ORBITAL WEAPON? Sat GOBBLER? What?

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Happy

Re: take a look

Ah, but what's stopping the Americans from putting up a fake X37B to have a look-see at this new Russian toy?

Small inflatable microsatellite with camera perhaps?

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Devil

Re: sattelite spying sattelite?

Have you tried doing the environmental impact assesment for hollowing out a volcano?

I tend to find that after I've shot a few people with sandals and clipboards, the environmental impact statements say exactly what I want them to...

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Re: sattelite spying sattelite?

Spying on it is boring. Why not send up a bigger satellite that can drive up behind it, swallow it whole, then bring it back down to earth for examination?

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Re: or...

Stealth paint isn't magic. It's the shape that makes stealth planes hard for radar to detect. Not having any large flat surfaces for the radar to give a simple return off, but to be all angular, so it reflects off in different directions. That's going to make solar panels particularly problematic, as they have to be folded for launching, and then unfold into exactly the large, flat surfaces you're trying to avoid. I guess that's where you consider using a nice RTG power source instead. I'm sure the Russians have got the odd spare bit of plutonium lying about they could use.

Another problem is moving around. If you fire your thrusters, you're easier to spot. Although I guess that depends on whether you're expecting to move far or not.

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The Nokia ENIGMA THING and its SECRET, TERRIBLE purpose

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Devil

Re: I no what it is

.I think it's a WiFi biscuit tin that Tweets a reminder when you're about to run out of chocolate bourbons.

When you run out of bourbons it then plays the Hallelujah Chorus. It also tracks down the credit card and store that were used to purchase them, so that it can find out who bought horrible, cardboard, fake-chocolate tasting, yucky bourbons, and despatches a Reaper drone to their current location, so they can be terminated with extreme prejudice. Then orders you some decent biscuits.

I'm aware that I may have upset the bourbon taliban with my post. But I can take them on! I will not be silenced! Chocolate Covered Gingers FOR EVVVEEEERRRRRR!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: The MIGHTY Scotch egg

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Is it too easy?

One of my favourite post-pub delicacies is the fish finger sandwich. However I don't know if this is too simple for this. On the other hand, at least it's easy to cook when alcoholically advantaged.

They seem to be much nicer fried, but in the oven is less effort. And then it's just the choice of condiment. Ketchup, salad cream, tartare sauce perhaps?

Another, even easier, post-pub snack is cheese and biscuits. So long as you have large doses of port available, all other ingredients are optional. but I usually have nice cheese, savoury biscuits and fruit to hand. Did I mention the port?

I'm either unimaginative or lazy, I'm afraid.

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Re: Better hot

My brother makes them, although I believe his recipe involves bacon, then places in an insulated thingy. Apparently they're still warm and make the perfect breakfast after an hour's journey to Lords for a day of cricket and drinking with his mates.

He also claims they're much better warm.

This is one of their cricket watching traditions, along with ludicrously huge picnics, and finding a way to sneak giant gin and tonics into the ground.

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'Yes, yes... YES!' Philae lands on COMET 67P

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Next those evil Canadians will want to muscle in on the Eurovision Song Contest...

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EU Ryanair 'screen-scraping' case could affect biz models

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solo,

The internet is not for sharing. Or stopping competitors...

The Internet is for Porn

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TalkTalk's 'unbeatable signal strength' and 'fastest Wi-Fi tech' FIBS silenced by ad watchdog

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Whereas my rival ISP, with out 5,432 complaints in the last 90 days will run a big banner advert saying, "The ISP with the service so good they won't let you know about it".

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I ain't Spartacus
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Re: Dear ISPs

But... But... But... BT sent me an email the other day, saying their Home Hub had the best range of any WiFi router. And BT wouldn't lie to me. No! I won't believe it! BT are my friends. They send me emails and everything.

Next you be telling me that anti-ageing creams don't work. And they've been tested by the British Skin Foundation and everything!

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Most convincing PHISHING pages hoodwink nearly half of you – Google

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Re: Hardly surprising

Havin_it,

I couldn't be arsed. I know there's noscript, ghostery, adblock and all the rest. I installed a couple of them a few years ago. There was too much faffing around. You have to whitelist sites you want to get ads from, and sites where you want cookies (to show which articles you've already read), and I seem to remember you could download various whitelists and blacklists. So I played around with it all for half an hour, and ran it for a few days, and decided it was more effort than I could be bothered with.

A periodic cleanout of cookies, care about what sites I go to, and the fact that I use several different computers and devices every day, and log onto different services on each, keeps my data trail a bit messed up. In the end I decided it's more trouble than it's worth to do more.

I do run Flash Block sometimes, as that's nice and simple, and easy to allow stuff, as you just click on it.

If I used Facebook regularly, which I don't, I'd accept their ads. As that's the funding model these sites use, and it's my rule to cooperate, unless there's a reason not to.

Anyway I have ad-blocking software built into my brain. I don't notice them unless I choose to. Or obviously some annoying mis-behaving one zooms in to take over the screen or blares out loud noises.

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I ain't Spartacus
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Re: Hardly surprising

NatWest are still pretty good. The last email I got about one of my accounts had a button on it, which took you to info about some changes they're making, but it was on a natwest.com domain - and didn't have any links to log into you account.

However Facebook have an interesting idea of security. I don't use it very often, and I always log out. So they've started quite heavily spamming me with emails, presumably in order to get me to use the damned site, and view lots of crappy adverts. I have relatives who post a lot, so there's always something to link to in an email. I know these aren't phishing because they have partial messages from people I know - and the links lead to FB. But when I click on the button, it logs me in to Facebook. Oddly if I then log out, and click on another mail (they often seem to send two or three at once) that time, I'm taken to the proper log in page. That is some particularly pisspoor security from Facebook.

I keep meaning to go and change my email preferences to none. But I probably log-in unprompted about once every 6 weeks.

I don't know why Facebook bother though. The quality of the ads they show me is shocking. It's spam and scam stuff. I know I've filled in virtually no personal info, but they can surely do better than ads for foreign brides, dodgy looking dating sites and 'competitions' to win free iPads/iPhones. I'm amazed any legitimate companies advertise with them. Occasionally I'll see a mainstream retailer - but it's mostly the sort of stuff you see on banner ads in the dodgier areas of the internet. I guess at least I've never seen an ad on FB for one of those "you have a virus use our free online scanners", so at least they have some standards and haven't completely plumbed the depths yet. That'll be for next year...

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Italian appeal court clears seismologists of manslaughter

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Re: They predicted there WOULDN'T be an earthquake

As I understand it, their prediction was that there was no more risk of an eathquake than normal. Despite the fact that there had been some recent tremors. In an area where there are always tremors.

So if you live in an earhquake zone, that's the risk you accept. If you don't like it, either move, or live in a nice soft tent, where you don't care if it falls on you. Those are the choices. Or to stay in your homes, schools and offices, and live your life as normal. Accepting the extra risk every day.

When we have a method of predicting earthquakes, we can revisit this.

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ICANN creates 'UN Security Council for the internet', installs itself as a permanent member

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Re: "anchor seats".

Perhaps it's a cunning ploy? It's a plan to improve the breeding stock of the human race, by removing a whole pointless layer of useless global bureaucrats (B Ark style).

First create a completely insane committee. Then get some of the most useless chair-sitters on God's green Earth appointed. Then sit them on their chairs. Now tie giant anchors to them, chuck the anchors in the deepest part of the ocean, and watch them slide away to the bottom of the deeps.

It's either that or ICANN have made so much money from selling gTLDs, that their bank account is full. Perhaps it's run out of noughts? Anyway, they've all given themselves pay rises, and massive bonuses. But now their bank accounts are full. The cash is still pouring in, so they need to find a way to get rid of more of it, sharpish...

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