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* Posts by Glen 1

84 posts • joined 17 Jun 2009

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Final LOHAN test flights codenamed 'Punch' and 'Judy'

Glen 1
Pint

Re: says

I think you mean Othar Tryggvassen Gentleman Adventurer

Have a pint

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MANIC MINERS: Ten Bitcoin generating machines

Glen 1

@DougS RE:@Andy Kay

>"How much is your electricity cost to power those GPUs that would otherwise be idle?"

"... £100/month after electricity is not to be scoffed at..."

emphasis added

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Valve gives Oculus Rift a whirl with SteamVR mode

Glen 1
Gimp

Re: HL3 Confirmed?

Now *THAT* on the OR would be quite the launch title for steam boxen...

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DOOMSDAY still just MINUTES AWAY: As it has been since 1947

Glen 1
Mushroom

Re: god would'nt let them be in charge

"because the leaders are right and have the blessings of their religion behind them, after all if they did'nt have the blessings then their god would'nt let them be in charge."

In the old days, we called that "The divine right of Kings"

but in those days we went to school up hill both ways etc...

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Guardian lets UK spooks trash 'Snowden files' PCs to make them feel better

Glen 1

I realise this thread is old now...

but I find it really fucking dumb that the partner of the jurno would try to get through the major airport of crony-in-chief with the files about his person.

That's just bad tradecraft.

All it would take is an Iranian/Chinese/Yemeni 'mugger' to have his way for peoples lives to be put at risk. Middle class bloke with a laptop bag? Easy pickings. Rubber hose cryptography anyone?

The same people who are too paranoid to use TOR trust to not have their stuff confiscated at airports?

*facepalm*

The journalists are now soft targets in possession of the crown jewels.

It is in the UK/US interests to protect them...

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Manning's max sentence cut, may only spend up to 90 years in the cooler

Glen 1
Holmes

I believe the phrase is...

I might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb.

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Outsourcing your own job much more common than first thought

Glen 1
Holmes

Re: Google

The problems start when you are trying to do something that hasn't been done yet anywhere in the world.

That's when you post a question on stackoverflow... at the very least, you'll get pointed in the right direction.

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Slideshow: A History of Intel x86 in 20 CPUs

Glen 1
Boffin

Id be interested to see...

the pictures compared to each other at the same scale...

or scale at which the processes are the same size

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UK kids' charity lobbies hard for 'opt-in' web smut access

Glen 1
Megaphone

Re: Down to the parents....

Folks, remember to add your voices to combat the whitewash of a consultation.

Although keep in mind the original questionnaire had such travesties as (paraphrased) "Do you think everyone's connection should be censored, or just those of the people who live with children? Tick the box of which one below."

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How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love IPv6

Glen 1
Paris Hilton

NAT vs stateful ACLs

The thing about ACLs is(are?) that they are not likely to appear on any consumer grade kit (out of the box) any time soon.

Add to the mix wide open windows/SMB shares, and the usual disable-every-security-feature-to-get-it-to-work-itus, and im a bit worried. Many home networks security consists of "if you've got the wifi password, you can access everything. What do you mean its your address/surname?". Unless the belkin (et al) routers are going to be a drop-in replacement, with the ACL features there is going to be quite interesting times ahead.

Im not exactly comfortable with the idea that my potentially buggy code will be addressable from anywhere on the internet. If i was confident it was secure, i wouldn't call it a test server. While i might be able to cobble something together myself, its not something im going to be proficient at, because its something have never had to do before. (and my first hello world was decades ago :s)

Sorry to ramble, but there is a lot of FUD about IPv6, and that needs to be rectified before the article (however good) starts to hit a little too close to home...

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BIG BOOBS banished from Linux kernel

Glen 1
Joke

Re: Are you kidding me?

NaN NaN NaN NaN NaN NaN NaN NaN NaN Batmaaaaan!

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Oiling the big wheels that keep the Paralympics moving

Glen 1
Gimp

re: Funds

Imagine if we had the same attention/budget to spend on our office chairs?

Physio included?

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Android Jelly Bean won't get Flash Player

Glen 1
Holmes

Re: Bah!

It is *Adobe* that wont be supporting flash on mobile. If it's the user interface you're worried about, take a look at Adobe's HTML5 editor - Edge

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Glen 1
Gimp

Re: Open Source

that will mean flash takes longer to die.

Converging on one set of standard that can be supported directly the the browser makers is a Good Thing.

Open sourcing flash will mean those flash devs spend longer developing for a platform that will become increasingly non-default (users having download plugin, or it is flat out not supported) and see their marketable skills dwindle instead of biting the bullet and moving on. Indeed, perhaps the addition of former flash devs to the standards clamour will improve HTML/javascript/SVG. However, that would require feature requests/alterations to have a better reason than "because flash did it that way"

The real trick is the move from adobe flash professional to either EDGE or something like Aptana

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El Reg official units of measurement: Linguine, Jubs, Hiltons and all

Glen 1
Alien

Re: A Big Thank You...

does that mean the milky way has stayed the same size as well?

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Did dicky power supply silence climate-change probe Envisat?

Glen 1
Alien

Re: recycle

the owner of said blue box might not be best pleased either...

Alien because the Doctor is one.

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Cameron's F-35 U-turn: BAE Systems still calls the shots at No 10

Glen 1
Facepalm

Re: give a stupid quote

Couldn't we just give that bit of the job to someone else?

If the yanks recon they can do it cheaper, let them. Its not like we will be spending *less* money with BAE either way.

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Carmageddon coder seeks gamers' cash for revamp

Glen 1
Joke

do the google cars get the cunning stunt bonus?

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Lesser-spotted Raspberry Pi FINALLY dished up

Glen 1
Boffin

Re: Where are the interfaces?

To elaborate:

The Gert board is/will be similar to the arduino shield system, bringing out the GPIO pins.

Videos of it in action:

http://www.geek.com/articles/chips/raspberry-pis-gertboard-expansion-board-already-works-video-2012019/

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Iran preps Internet cutoff

Glen 1
Trollface

Re: RE: "that first paragraph was meant to be irony."

It's like goldy and bronzy, only it's made of iron

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Los Alamos fires BLOODY BIG MAGNET

Glen 1
Thumb Up

Just goes to show...

Given that this is 'only' 3-4 times stronger than an MRI, it just goes to show the engineering that goes into MRIs... while joe blogs takes them for granted.

(assuming its not a log/quadratic scale)

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Hardware hacker rigs up VR for Skyrim

Glen 1
Holmes

i refer you to the gadget show:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eg8Bh5iI2WY

10:15 for 1st playtest

14:49 for Andy McNabb (sp?) giving it a whirl

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Xeroxiraptor: Boffins to print 3D robot dinosaur

Glen 1
Joke

Re: "...adding that a six-inch model of a bone can be printed in a few hours."

if they try to make a load more, they might be 65 million years in the making....

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LOHAN's flying truss: One orb or two?

Glen 1
Paris Hilton

my two penneth worth

single balloon

tether to nearer the end of the truss

tether in a triangular fashion as above, but with the truss extended farther out one side of the triangle

Add counter weight to keep things balanced.

Card fins on the truss to keep things stable

(well, as stable as the wind... which should be marginally better than the payload pirouetting in said wind)

Paris, because I'm not a qualified engineer either.

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CRACK made by quakes FOUND ON MOON

Glen 1
Terminator

unicron transforming veeerrrryyyy sslloooooowwlllyyyy

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Two UK airports scrap IRIS eye-scanners

Glen 1
Holmes

Re: Border control has become a wasteful farce

i believe the phrase is "security theater"

A lot of hand waving and attempts to suspend the public's disbelief.

It hasn't gone well.

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Fondle my slab, baby: Inside the tactile world of Apple-fan iDating

Glen 1
Holmes

yes, many

If you see it in someones forum signature it counts

the spec of their gaming rig, to the hi-fi system, car's spec and/or history

thats just of the top of my head

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Apple's secret outsource: 'Even more software to be made in India'

Glen 1
Black Helicopters

'our' corporations....

whose?

These companies are sufficiently large that they can (and often do) up sticks to where the tax situation is most favorable.

I think you will find that many of 'our' corporations are Irish, or based in Luxemburg, or do business out of grand cayman etc...

Ultimately, any increase in tax will be passed on to the consumer.

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Mickey Mouse Whois ban threat sparks privacy fears

Glen 1
Happy

@ jonathanb

i didn't know that.... It isn't an option on the Dyn dashboard.

I logged into nic.uk directly and sorted it from there.

Thanks. :)

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Glen 1
FAIL

my registrar didnt suck (well, only slightly)

nominet, ie the people in charge of the TLD *already* forbid proxy registrars. Which Dyn was trying to be.

Which is quite relevant.

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Glen 1
Facepalm

I registered for dyn's secret registration service...

and had my co.uk domain 'expired' by nominet because the whois record didnt contain what they saw as valid info...

After too-ing and fro-ing with dyn, they refunded me, and said i can re-register, but not to select the secret registration option.

Strangely, last i checked, dyn still offers the secret registration service with .uk domains....

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Google finally admits it wants to OWN YOU

Glen 1
Thumb Up

re: plugin

would this userscript be of use to you?

http://userscripts.org/scripts/show/57679

its not the one i use, just did a quick google for the link...

i am aware of the irony.

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OCZ refunds punter for dud drive shortly after El Reg steps in

Glen 1
Joke

Re: Timestamps

Epoc Fail :P

(sorry for double (triple?) post)

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Glen 1
Paris Hilton

Re: shirtless bimbos

The eeePc girl hast college tuition to pay for.

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Android-powered goggles bring virtual reality closer

Glen 1
Black Helicopters

this is going to sound realy random, but bare with me...

in the milenium edition of pcgamer (or was it pc zone, i forget), they did a futuretech speculation article set up as a mock news report. One of the articles was how a gadget such as this erased homeless people from the users vision, optionally replacing them with cartoon characters.

Those of you familiar with dennou coil can see it's awesome future just a little bit closer...

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Tempt tech talent without Googlesque mega perks

Glen 1
Holmes

you hit the nail on the head.

the key issue is training.

Grads leave uni not knowing about much of the technology that they will be using later in their careers. Companies wanting to hire someone fresh out of uni who is an expert in X, only get their wish is they have influence on the syllabus.

A company that is prepared to invest in its staff will have a constantly improving workforce, none (less) of this 'do the minimum or you're sacked'. As long as they don't get over-skilled and search for pastures new... and that's the danger.

Companies don't want to spend money improving in house staff when they can hire for a specific skill. That way, they don't have to pay to have the staff member not doing productive work while they are being trained, only to have to give them a raise.

Then they whinge about a skills shortage, and want cheap imported labour to fill the 'skills gap' instead of plugging the 'wages gap' or the 'training gap'

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Jedi light-sabre beats Taser in Oregon parking-lot fracas

Glen 1
Trollface

re: babling incoherently

maybe he was saying things like "we need to find an alternative to fossil fuels"

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Windows 8 fondleslabs: Microsoft tip-toes through PC-makers' disaster

Glen 1

re: fisher-price toy

people used to say that about xp...

i believe it was nicknamed the 'telly-tubby' interface

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What's that sound? It's PC sales plummeting into abyss

Glen 1
Thumb Up

indeed.

even if an upgrade is deemed necessary, spending the money on a new graphics card and/or extra ram will probably have a bigger impact...

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Valve says credit card data taken

Glen 1

indeed,

but to reveal the exact method used would *greatly* help the people who now have that data, and would be really stupid.

they can throw all the horsepower they like computing MD5 collisions, but that would be pointless if valve used SHA-2. Giving hints would be a *bad idea*

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NASA tells Voyager 2 to save its strength

Glen 1
Mushroom

mdk2 reference:

atomic toaster + bread = atomic toast :)

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Is your old hardware made of gold, or just DIRT?

Glen 1

@AC

economics is rarely concerned with sustainability (look at how we got into the credit crunch)

While I agree that a sustainable approach would be preferable, until any such approach can compete on cost, it will only succeed with subsidies (such as FiTs). Anywhere such subsidies aren't available will continue with the unsustainable model.

You ask about cost in terms of stealing from our children. To even guess, would require us to predict the next 30/60/100 odd years of the metals/energy markets. Other than 'probably more expensive' any attempt at quantifying this (as you ask), would simply be guessing, and not in the scope of the original article.

>Having to revert to a lower standard of living

Indeed, but that is a relative term. The 4x4 stealing resources across time that you mention, *is a part* of some peoples standard of living, which they will have to forego to achieve this utopian sustainable future, or pay an ever increasing premium (as they already do), or move to electricity. (which could come from whatever the energy source of the day is).

Yes, energy will be more expensive. To the point where if you buy an petrol tanker and park it somewhere safe, you will probably get a better return in a year than if you had left the money in the bank.

The point I'm trying to make is that energy is currently ridiculously cheap compared to what it will be in the near future. With the ever increasing demand for oil, it is a case of use it or lose it, because someone *will* use it. A similar thing will then happen with nuclear power. It wont be until oil and Uranium run out that it will be in big business' interest to *seriously* pursue more sustainable forms of power. (how expensive does energy have to be before mining Helium3 on the moon becomes cost effective?)

No amount of solar/wind/whatever will stop the oil from running out. The only defence is to not need oil/plastics any more...

Of course, the countries/companies that are doing such sustainable R&D *now* will have a competitive advantage, but this may not be evident for 30/60/100 years. That makes it a *much* harder sell to the taxpayers/shareholders (except maybe in things like data centres, where most of the operating cost is energy).

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Glen 1
Stop

re: "outcome you prefer"

The preferred outcome is to be able to recycle everything at minimal cost, and maximum profit. If Tim could make a profit from recycling these marginal materials, he would.

As with any finite resource, as the supply dwindles, the price will go up. Materials that were not viably recyclable will become more viable. Unlike fossil fuels, these metals are rarely burnt off, they just get harder to get at as we move them around (with the exception of the stuff we fling into space).

Tim wants to recycle everything he *profitably* can, thus the emphasis on economics. You can be sure, even if Tim has let some of the marginal opportunities pass by, where there is a buck to be made, people will try to make it.

Given the volatility of the price of metals/energy, it would be pointless to quantify the numbers any further than a rough ratio. (for example, what will be the cost of moving XKg of Y metal Z distance in a months time? Ill bet it will be more than today)

As for "utterly vital" resources, you infer fossil fuels ("may already have peaked"), but this is simply the current cheapest way of doing things, *when* this is no longer the case, the *many* other options will be used, not because we will have run out, but because there will be cheaper alternatives.

note: I don't mean cheaper than *now*, I mean cheaper than the future sky high oil price at which solar/wind/whatever becomes competitive without subsidy. The price of energy will continue to go up while people are still having babies.

I think it is worth re-iterating that Tim (the author of the article) recycles as a business, and any assumptions he has made are either

a) not assumptions, but information that the origin of which could be commercially sensitive (such as his profit margin)

b) Discovered by hard won experience.

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Windows 7 overtakes XP - finally

Glen 1
Trollface

mobile os figures are interesting, especially given the anti-nokia stance many comentards have

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Boffins prove Queen ballad 'world's most catchy song'

Glen 1

indeed...

robbie williams on the other hand....

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Trust me, I'm a computer: Watson takes on health care challenge

Glen 1
Facepalm

hmmmm...

i cant help but think that watson will end up being the doctor's equivalent of 1st line tech support...

The assumption is that the doc is competent, and not just blindly following what the computer says to do.

The flip side of that is if watson *isnt* followed because the doc thinks he knows better, and then turns out to be wrong...

You cant exactly send the engineer round to to a re-install and swap the mobo...

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AMD snags Guinness World Record for clockiest chip

Glen 1
Boffin

@Rob - Fair Enough, in your specific case.

Your media PC is better specced i/o wise than my main system, so in your specific case, with all those disks, an older CPU, you are correct. However, I doubt that many people have that sort of setup, most NAS devices tend to be set up as either mirrors, JBOD or RAID5.

If people design the system to fit a specific task (as you have done), they can target the bottlenecks, and not waste money on new/overspecced equipment that wont benefit the job in hand. However, in general, when buying a ready made PC it is always the I/O that shows its age first (namely hard drive thrashing with too little ram). This is arguably down to software bloat (I'm looking at you Firefox :-|). Outside of games, there simply aren't that many things that are compute bound. At least not for the home user, and everyone else knows enough to tailor their machine to its task.

Id be interested to see the CPU load on the Xeon test you ran...

Atom processors and arm devices have taken off because these chips do almost everything the home user wants to do, despite being *much* slower than what is mentioned in this story. The rise of virtualisation came about partially due to how underutilised the contemporary server hardware was. BOINC and it's ilk are unobtrusive because they use very little I/O (as far as Seti/folding go). I could go on...

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Glen 1

@6hrs for dvd conversion

for my T5750 @2.0 Ghz, dvd encoding is i/o bound.

upgrading to a faster processor (and required mobo + ram) will do bugger all

(except for making faster busses available ;) )

For me, a faster HD will have a much bigger impact, at least until HD speed is fast enough for it to become CPU bound again.

Am currently leaning toward an APU with a nippy SSD...

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NASA offers space shuttle food and tiles to schools

Glen 1
Go

could also sell them to JML

market the tiles as cookware

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