* Posts by Richard 12

2188 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Mobe-maker OnePlus 'fesses up to flouting USB-C spec

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: This is what happens when you couple Chinese design to Chinese manufacture

I believe their products have to meet the same H&S standards as everyone else's in order to sell in, for example, the EU.

While true, a lot do not.

The liability for ensuring compliance lies with the entity that imported it into the EU.

Unfortunately, Trading Standards apear to only be interested in going after fake handbags, and have no time for dangerous electrical kit. Possibly not even after someone gets killed by them.

1
0

Ofcom asks: Do kids believe anything they read on the internet?

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Untrue stuffs on teh intarwebz

Several well-known news sites with "proper" journalists have republished The Onion stories (in some cases without permission) multiple times in recent years.

0
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

I wish the "page must contain this" and "page must not contain that" methods still worked.

Google became a lot less useful and a lot more frustrating when those ceased.

2
0

Taxi for NASA! SpaceX to fly astronauts to space station

Richard 12
Silver badge

Cargo doesn't need life support!

Even pressurised cargo.

4
0

How TV ads silently ping commands to phones: Sneaky SilverPush code reverse-engineered

Richard 12
Silver badge

Those frequencies are too high

IIRC, the broadcast audio bandwidth is 50Hz to 15kHz.

So TV broadcast will distort and alias that to buggery - not entirely convinced this can actually work at all.

4
3

£2.3m ZANO nano-drone crowdfunded project crashes and burns

Richard 12
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Convertibles

Damn - you're absolutely right.

1
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Bah!

Not really.

It is possible to build a quadcopter that does all that. You can even do it for that money.

No profit margin in it though, and you do need to know what you're doing and how to design for cheap manufacture.

0
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: So let me undersand this correctly...

But Kickstarter has nothing whatsoever to do with VCs. It doesn't resemble that relationship in any way, shape or form.

If the company becomes wildly successful, the KS backers will never see any return on their 'investment' at all - if they are lucky they get their trinket, at the very most.

It is simply a risky way of pre-ordering.

0
0
Richard 12
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Re: Investments

Kickstarter is not and never has been an investment - and sooner or later a regulator is going to take them to task over it.

Investment means that you take a risk and own some portion of the proceeds - or losses.

Kickstarter is a pre-order payment processor where if there aren't enough pre-orders, you don't pay at all. If there are enough pre-orders, you pay but might not actually get %thing% anyway - which puts it on fairly dodgy ground as the payment processor.

I have backed a couple of Kickstarter things - however these have been friends where I'd happily have given them the cash in person anyway.

0
0

Identifying terrorists: Let's find a value for needle in haystack

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Half a dozen cases where access to bulk communications datasets have produced results

So six cases since 1984?

That's such a miniscule hit rate that psychics can beat it.

Or darts thrown over your shoulder at a UK map. While blindfolded and newted as a piss.

3
0

Lithium-air: A battery breakthrough explained

Richard 12
Silver badge

Indeed

If by "significant chunk" you mean "at least double what we currently generate".

Transport uses a heck of a lot of energy.

1
0

Cell networks' LTE-U will kill your Wi-Fi, say digital rights bods

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: "listen-before-talk"

Indeed, listen-before-talk obviously cannot work.

You can demonstrate this quite easily with three walkie-talkies.

1
1

Voting machine memory stick drama in Georgia sparks scandal, probe

Richard 12
Silver badge

He claims to have found an actual ballot box.

It might be un-used, "empty", "filled" with fraudulent ballots or still "filled" with uncounted cast ballots.

There's no way to tell without a public investigation - and this would be necessary with a paper ballot box as well.

It's just that checking the state of a paper ballot box is much easier to do and to prove.

8
0

Let's get to the bottom of in-app purchases that go titsup

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Set Top Box - new acronym

These boxes are under the TV, so perhaps Box Under Television?

1
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Sacrebleu

To force the rhyme I read "view" as "v-yer".

The things I do for a cheap laugh.

0
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Youtube is not just for kitten videos

Those idents need epilepsy warning!

I've not seen anything so genuinely painful since the last art-house film I accidentally caught in the the corner of my eye.

0
0

Here's how TalkTalk ducked and dived over THAT gigantic hack

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Why Is Dido Harding Still in a Job?

Sounds like you already got "socially engineered", as ID protection isn't even worth the paper it's not written on.

What do they do to "protect" your ID?

2
0

Windows 10 is an antique (and you might be too) says Google man

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Note on Windows 8

I quite like Win8 on a touchscreen tablet with removable keyboard dock! It seems like the use case the OS was designed for, to the detriment of everything else.

It was.

The Win8 UI was exclusively designed for the Surface Pro, and worked pretty well there.

Unfortunately, most PCs are not Surface Pros.

11
0

In-a-spin Home Sec: 'We won't be rifling through people's web history'

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Eyes bigger than stomachs (as my mum used to say)

Everyone knows that the best way to find needles in haystacks is to make the haystack at least a billion times bigger.

The only possible use for any of the proposed mass-collection of personal data is to make targeted fishing and phishing expeditions easier.

It's so much easier to frame or defraud someone when you know their communication history.

3
0

Linus Torvalds fires off angry 'compiler-masturbation' rant

Richard 12
Silver badge

The Linux kernel is the most compiled thing anywhere

It has to be 100% compatible with every single C compiler on the planet, because they're all going to compile it.

It is not a place where you should - or even can - use funky compiler features.

It matters if it doesn't compile using the esoteric C compiler developed for a specific rare CPU, or causes unexpected side effects due to rare compiler bugs - or difference in interpretation of the C standards.

The Linux kernel is probably the only large library that is used on every CPU currently manufactured - as well as many that aren't.

9
3

The story of .Gay: This bid is too gay! This bid is not gay enough! This bid is just right?

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: @AC Religion really has become a very "special" form of politics....

Homophobic much?

62.1% is a resounding result, and 60.5% turnout is very high.

Ireland showed far more interest in and support for same-sex marriage than most other democratic questions. For example, the current president of the US had a higher than usual turnout at 57.2%, with 51.1% for Obama.

Yes, the Irish are far more interested in allowing equal marriage rights to all their citizens than most Western democracy are in who governs them.

PS: If two strangers love each other and want to, WTF shouldn't they get married? It cannot possibly have any negative effect whatsoever upon you or anyone you know, so why stop them?

3
1

Post-pub nosh neckfiller special: The WHO bacon sarnie of death

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: As to the danger of bacon

Indeed, and it's also important to round up the percentage change, preferably to the nearest positive hundred.

5
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Going hannibal with the weiners...

Given that 100% of hot dog factories are staffed by humans, that simply means they occasionally touch the produce.

Or forget their hairnets.

1
0

Think Fortran, assembly language programming is boring and useless? Tell that to the NASA Voyager team

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Replace technology drudgery by automated life-cycle convention.

Compilers can never produce code as efficient as hand-optimised assembly.

In most cases, this really doesn't matter in the slightest.

But sometimes it does - albeit very rarely these days.

Even in modern embedded hardware you can end up needing to hand-optimise (or even hand-write) assembly segments.

8
0

We suck? No, James Dyson. It is you who suck – Bosch and Siemens

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: A Lot of People..

The Dyson Airblade is an interesting hand drier.

Impossible to use if you're short or in a wheelchair.

Rather hard to justify given disability discrimination legislation.

8
0

Joining the illuminati? Just how bright can a smart bulb really be?

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Bayonet? - Why not a bayonet cap option?

Extra low voltage halogen is a lot more efficacious than 230V halogen. The filament is also a lot stronger so handles shock better.

And extra low voltage LED is usually more efficacious and lasts a lot longer than the 230V versions as well. It's the power supplies that die on those.

Unless you're switching to Florey tube, you're better off sticking with the 12V halogens and just making sure you get the really wide beam angle lamps.

The narrow ones are very common, and utterly pointless!

1
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: I agree with all of the posts so far (which is a first)

Indeed. My truly ancient smoke detectors have built-in lights.

MR12 halogens in fact.

1
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: cart before horse

We've been selling those for years - cheaper than these lamps and last much longer as well.

Including genuinely wireless and batteryless light switches to control them - yes, you can buy a stickyback light switch.

0
0
Richard 12
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: cart before horse

Yep. PLT happily goes between the lighting and ring final circuits.

Also through your electric meter, your neighbours meter and into their house.

And everyone else on your phase of the local substation.

You need a really big inductor to block it - or a passive termination circuit specifically designed for the task.

0
0

Wait a minute, Doc! Are you telling me that you built a self-driving car ... out of a DeLorean!?

Richard 12
Silver badge
Terminator

No, they need to know how to do this

Currently self-driving cars appear to be using "statically-stable" configurations, where the route presumes and requires that the wheels do not skid in such a way that requires any input from the nominal 'driver'.

In the real world, cars can and will skid. The road surface isn't perfect, and it's not always possible to tell whether the road surface is good enough until the vehicle is already on it. A collapsing road, a flooded road, a road with 'black' ice patches.

So if the wheels do skid, the computer needs to know how to maintain control and stay within a safe route - which might not be the route originally planned.

In theory, it should do a lot better than a human driver in a skid because it can have the same knowledge and power that the traction control does, along with control over steering and route planning.

3
0

So just what is the third Great Invention of all time?

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Limited Liability

No it isn't.

Shareholding is fundamentally a way that a business raises initial capital.

- Even Dragons' Den gets this right.

The shares are sold to get some money to start the business up. Later on more shares might be sold to raise more capital - several banks did major share issues in the wake of the recent financial crisis, in order to get cash to meet their new leverage obligations.

That dilutes the original shares so shareholders generally don't like it.

After the share issue, the business has more cash, and some obligations to those share holders - eg. to pay dividends.

All the other ways of getting capital (or goods to sell) involve debt - borrow from a bank, borrow from customers (ask them to pay up front), borrow from suppliers (buy on credit), borrow from the public (issue bonds).

0
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Limited Liability

In what way?

You pitch your great business idea to Mrs Investor, she agrees and wants to invest in your business.

She buys a 20% stake, and you agree to give her 20% of the post-tax profit. You keep the 80% for yourself.

You then screw up royally and the business goes bust, owing far more than its assets.

Without limited liability:

You go bankrupt, the creditors take everything you have.

She's also jointly and severally liable for your fuck up, and also goes bankrupt.

- If you run away, the creditors go after her instead.

So your screwup not only killed the business, it bankrupted you and everyone who believed in you - perhaps including all your employees if they had shares too.

Is she likely to let you run the business, or is she going to want to micro-manage absolutely everything you do?

With limited liability, the shareholders are only liable for the book value of their shares. If they already gave the business the money then they've already paid.

Thus if you screw up, you don't (necessarily) also go bankrupt. You personally only owe the 80% company share value, and your shareholders have already discharged their obligations.

They are still able - and may even be willing - to help you try again.

5
2
Richard 12
Silver badge

Surely it's the general-purpose computer itself

The idea of a single machine that can simulate any arbitrary thing, given time, energy and somebody to write the program.

Prior to that we had any number of specialised machines for calculating or simulating specific problems - log tables, addition, ballistic trajectories etc.

The big leap was realising that we could build a single machine that could do all of that - which leads to awe-inspiring levels of economy of scale.

8
0

In 2015, your Windows PC can be owned by opening a spreadsheet

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Office 2016 - Mac updates

Ah yes - the usual behaviour of Sparkle is also to download the whole thing.

Just automatically.

It does however appear to be possible to do patch updates using it, which would be nice.

0
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Office 2016 - Mac updates

Not heard of that before - interesting, thanks!

(Apple don't seem to think it exists.)

0
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Office 2016 - Mac updates

They're Full installers. Whole thing as on the original (maybe) DVDs.

Patching an existing install on a Mac is apparently "ungodly difficult"*, so all updates have to be a complete, full reinstall of the whole thing.

* At least, I cannot find any way to do it. If you, the reader know how, please tell! I really want to do it but it seems impossible.

3
0

Big biz bosses bellow at Euro politicians over safe harbor smackdown

Richard 12
Silver badge

Wrong recipient

The US Government is the entity that breached the Safe Harbor treaty.

Would these companies blame their beancounters if one of their customers refused to pay for years and the head beancounter told them "We can't ship that customer any more stuff until they pay their bills"?

3
0

The Emissionary Position: screwing the motorist the European way

Richard 12
Silver badge

They'll all have to change their cars

Well, most of them.

Diesels to Euro6 have been on the market since 2014, so some will already comply.

2
0

How much do UK cops pay for Microsoft licences? £30 a head or £137? Both

Richard 12
Silver badge

Traffic?

It's camera "enforcement" that's killed Traffic.

The beancounters can clearly see that a set of ANPR cameras can "enforce" many kinds of traffic offence so replaced most of the traffic cops with cameras.

Never mind that a traffic cop can do something on the scene, or spot a driver doing something silly or illegal before they actually crash.

0
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: buying an OS-less PC

Dell?

They used to do N-series desktops that came without an OS installed.

I'm not sure if they still do, but if you're buying 50, they will offer it!

However, as a supplier will obviously only offer hardware support if you do that, they can easily scare management away.

0
0

'Safe Harbor': People in Europe 'can get quite litigious about this'

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: One option

And for what the US does about it.

The result of that case will either kill all US "cloud" providers forever, or permit them to have wholly-owned EU subsidiaries.

Yet the US TLAs do not see that - or don't care.

0
0

PHONE me if you feel DIRTY: Yanks and 'Nadians wave bye-bye to magstripe

Richard 12
Silver badge

The usable range is longer than you think

Sure, using most of the certified CE-marked readers, the range is only about 5-10cm

Using a high-powered antenna package, you can get several metres - this is used in other RFID systems, eg automated warehousing to count widgets on a pallet.

However, 5cm is still easily enough to swipe a few hundred cards while on public transport or walking down a busy street.

5cm thick trousers are somewhat less common than casual plate armour.

To some extent, one protection is to fill your wallet with many contactless cards so they all clash.

Or chain mail. That probably works too!

29
0

VW offices, employees' homes raided by German prosecutors

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Only the first tree

Also, I would hate to be a software designer for company x and wake up dead one day.

You mean "differently alive", surely?

1
0

Understand 'Safe Harbor', Schrems v Facebook in under 300 words

Richard 12
Silver badge

That would likely be unlawful

Alas, proving they did it would be difficult in an individual case, and impossible in general.

0
0

Exposed Volkswagen 'n' pals get 2 more YEARS to sort out emissions

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Of course they are given time

Indeed, if the real-world figures are even close to accurate, then demanding those limits in 2017 means no new cars in 2017.

At all.

2
0

Search engine can find the VPN that NUCLEAR PLANT boss DIDN'T KNOW was there - report

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Can't upvote this enough!

One-way serial is extremely common.

I've installed that more times than I can count!

0
0

Lies from VW: 'Our staff acted criminally but board didn't know'

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Ignorance is not an excuse

Absolutely not!

If that switch was exposed, then only two positions would ever get used:

Maximum Fuel Economy

Maximum POWER!!

Neither of those are minimum emissions, by a long way!

0
0

It's the white heat of the tech revolution, again!

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: "Democracy is the worst form of government, apart from all the others"'

You have never, ever encountered crushing poverty.

It simply does not exist anywhere in Europe.

1
1

NOxious VW emissions scandal: Car maker warned of cheatware YEARS AGO – reports

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Today VW ...

The new ones do.

Citroën refreshed the engines in all of them earlier this year, and now even the 1.6 litre takes AdBlue.

That said, it's pretty cheap stuff. Just in daft amounts - seems that the storage tank is not "warning level plus a whole number of bottles", so you either don't top it off or have to store a part-used bottle for a few months.

0
0

VW: Just the tip of the pollution iceberg. Who's to blame? Hippies

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: It is all about R&D

So how do we get there from here?

It's no good saying "in 20 years we'll have a great system", because I for one expect to live through those years and want a decent standard of living throughout.

1
0

Forums