* Posts by Richard 12

2156 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

What Brexit means for you as a motorist

Richard 12
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Re: US visa waiver application form is at least 70% identical with a US visa application form.

And an Egyptian single-entry visa is as follows:

Pay $15, stick sticker in passport.

The US ESTA "visa waiver programme" is simply a different type of 2-year multi-entry visa.

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Chatbot lawyer shreds $2.5m in parking tickets

Richard 12
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Re: A small omission?

But they can go to court.

It is a civil matter, and can be challenged all the way to court.

It's just very rare that anything ever goes that far, as it's usually obvious which party will lose, so they back down.

But not always.

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25,000 malware-riddled CCTV cameras form network-crashing botnet

Richard 12
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Re: Just wait until you have

And creating penis-shaped dark spots in major cities...

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Special delivery: Activists drop 100,000 net neutrality complaints on FCC

Richard 12
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Re: What if our minds are more infinite than the Universe?

There are many infinities of many sizes.

For example, there are an infinite number of integers, but many more real numbers (with a decimal point".

So yes x.yyyyy.... is more infinite than x!

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Tech firms reel from Leave's Brexit win

Richard 12
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Re: Children

Because you Leavers won't get any of what you wanted either.

You were lied to. We tried to tell you, but you wouldn't listen. You wanted to believe the lies so much that you ripped off your ears and stuck your fingers in your eyes.

Gove: "We've had enough of experts", Farage "I never meant the NHS could have any of that"...

All you've managed to do is screw everyone.

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Richard 12
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Re: Assumptions, assumptions...

"Not good" because nobody knows whether it will be a little bit worse, a lot worse or a complete and total disaster.

The direction is generally agreed by everyone who examined the evidence, while the magnitude is not.

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Richard 12
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Re: FFS Calm Down Kids!

Boltar:

Norway and Switzerland both obey everything the EU imposes blindly and without discussion.

If you think that is in any way better then I have a bridge for sale.

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Richard 12
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Re: Really?

Why do you think Big Business would give a shit about the UK?

If you subscribe to that view of business, then logically, they'll simply leave and let the UK go to hell. No skin off their nose.

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Home Office ignores plight of BA techies as job offshoring looms

Richard 12
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@Ledswinger

Yes, they did.

They tore off their own legs, and slapped the establishment in the face with the wet end.

And they are now sat twitching and dying, watching the blood pool around their torsos, wondering what happened.

While the establishment look on, considering how to get the blood out of their shirt.

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'2nd referendum' topples site

Richard 12
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Might I ask why?

What were the top few things you wanted to get?

I ask because I have yet to see any reason at all that stands up to the cold light of reality.

They either don't exist are cannot happen.

Please reassure me that something the Leave campaign promised can actually happen.

Other than Boris for PM, I mean.

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Richard 12
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Re: 2nd Referendum

Frankly, yes.

We can now see that a large section of the electorate voted based on xenophobia and lies.

Even Farage admitted that Leave repeatedly lied through their teeth.

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Time to re-file your patents and trademarks, Britain

Richard 12
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The Budget did have In and Out options

The Out option was 5% tax rise and even more cuts.

Leave then complained that nobody knew what would happen and we shouldn't pay attention to any experts.

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'Leave EU means...' WHAT?! Britons ask Google after results declared

Richard 12
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Re: So how long before ...

Now.

The pound is down against the dollar, which immediately raises the cost of oil.

The price of fuel on the forecourt will rise within days, and everything else will follow soon after - how long depend on the hedging.

Gas will follow suit, as will electricity - as a lot of that is gas.

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Brexit government pledge sought to keep EU-backed UK science alive

Richard 12
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Re: "Hook demanded an immediate pledge"

As the pie is now smaller, some projects get less funding and some get none.

It's the economy, stupid.

:(

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'Plane Hacker' Roberts hacks cows

Richard 12
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Re: Why do we shoot the messenger still?

Two reasons:

1) He didn't hack the plane.

He might possibly have been able to do something to part of the inflight entertainment system. Annoying, but not dangerous and not even that serious unless it was persistent, as that gets power cycled a *lot*.

2) He claimed to have taken control of an actual live flight containing real passengers, without any permission whatsoever, apparently because he was a bit bored on the flight.

That's practically the definition of an idiot script kiddy.

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Energy companies aren't going to slurp your personal data. Honest

Richard 12
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Re: Not needed

Is it really sensible to spend approx. £50-100 at every single customer to install a remote cut-off, when it costs about £100-200 to do a cutoff on-site, or a similar amount to install a prepayment meter.

Almost everybody pays their bill. The rate of cut-off due to non-payment is miniscule, and in fact what normally happens is installation of a prepayment meter.

Thus, even if the technology was perfect, it would cost more!

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Richard 12
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Re: Not needed

They were never needed, never wanted and are almost universally considered to be a dramatic waste of money and resources.

The only groups that want them are a set of politicians, civil servants and idiot greenies who somehow think that they serve any purpose whatsoever.

The only plausibly useful purpose they could have is cutting off the supply remotely. Who benefits from that?

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Cats understand the laws of physics, researchers claim

Richard 12
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Re: Alternative Explanations

No, this deserves to be forgotten.

Ig-Nobels are for good, yet surprising science. This is just bad - the results do not support the conclusion.

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Password reset: 45 million creds leak from popular .com forums

Richard 12
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Looks like hash collisions to me

So enough to get into anywhere using the same salt and MD5, but not anywhere else.

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Crysis creeps: Our ransomware locks network drives and PCs. Bargain

Richard 12
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Re: "seemingly innocent installers"

A lot of sites seem to email links to their more useful documents, and even trial versions of software.

I've even seen ones that (claim to) send out documentation as an installer - given their profile (NXP!) I presume they are imbeciles rather than malicious, but I still refuse to run it.

So all the miscreant has to do is make it look a bit like a few of the more common ones for their target industry and spaff it out to a few million people.

One or two of them probably are expecting emails from "X" with a link - and get eaten.

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NHS e-prescription service goes TITSUP: Problems since Monday

Richard 12
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Possible suggestion

Find out what the "inactive" ingredients are in each of them.

Then say you're allergic to one of the inactive ingredients in the ones that don't work right.

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You. Comcast, TWC, Charter, DirecTV, Dish. Get in here and explain yourselves – Congress

Richard 12
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Re: Thank God!

One suspects that it may not be available on cable TV.

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Government regulation will clip coders' wings, says Bruce Schneier

Richard 12
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Re: I perfectly agree with Schneier

The inductors needed to attenuate powerline networking are really huge, and so very expensive.

Back before there was an EU standard written, we did some testing and it turned out that the only affordable way to block powerline is the local substation or pole-top transformer.

Which actually doesn't work anyway because the radiated emissions are such that it's basically wifi.

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England just not windy enough for wind farms, admits renewables boss

Richard 12
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Re: As I see it

Tesla's battery is a clever marketing solution to a manufacturing yield problem.

Manufacturing batteries is very expensive, and quite a few of the ones you make don't work very well.

Previously, the bad ones would be dismantled, recycled and remanufactured into a new battery, at great expense with the hope that it'll be good this time around.

Now they simply put it in a different box and bolt it to your wall.

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Richard 12
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It's worse than that

In much of the UK, the domestic water pressure comes from electric pumps either directly or by pumping water uphill into reservoirs and water towers.

So such turbines would actually be wasting energy by making those work harder.

In places where the pressure is such for it not to matter, more energy would be freed up by turning the pumps down a bit.

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Capitalize 'Internet'? AP says no – Vint Cerf says yes

Richard 12
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Re: words such as parliament and queen

There are only two queens on this planet.

Queen Elizabeth II, and Queen Margrethe II.

So The Queen is already rather disambiguated, as nobody other than the Danish has ever heard of Margrethe.

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Computerised stock management? Nah, let’s use walkie-talkies

Richard 12
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Re: Stock Control

I still think "Banana Ripener" is a much better job title.

And yes, it is a thing!

http://www.simplyhired.com/search?q=banana+ripener

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Smartphone sales falling

Richard 12
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Idiot analysts

Once almost everyone has one, sales will flatten to the replacement rate.

This is obvious!

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You deleted the customer. What now? Human error - deal with it

Richard 12
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Re: Ah... human error..

I assume this dates from before real source control, when at best, only file-control tools existed.

Like VSS.

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In-flight movies via BYOD? Just what I always wan... argh no we’re all going to die!

Richard 12
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Re: Bank Hols.

Yes they are, and they are good. Very good.

Nice one Dave.

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Surface Book nightmare: Microsoft won't fix 'Sleep of Death' bug

Richard 12
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Re: "Sleep", "Hibernate", etc. are engineering kludges.

Cold booting Linux can be done in under half a second - if the hardware is known and immutable.

Windows can also go quite fast, though nowhere near as fast as Linux.

A lot of the time spent during boot of a modern OS is hardware detection - the OS is checking to see if anything has changed or is new, so it can seamlessly bring it up or handle "missing" components in a better way than a black screen of death.

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Richard 12
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Re: 30 day warranty ?

In the European Union there is a law that requires them to repair, replace or refund any consumer product with a manufacturing defect.

There is no time limit.

During the first 6 months, all faults are assumed to be manufacturing defects, unless obviously otherwise.

This is one of the reasons the EU is great.

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One ad-free day: Three UK to block adverts across network in June

Richard 12
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Don't think so

It is effectively a slightly broken DNS.

There is no interception, your mobile browser asks Three where it can find the advert and Three says "Hell if I know"

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The underbelly of simulation science: replicating the results

Richard 12
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Re: Here's a simple experiment...

Indeed, compilers must be 100% deterministic, because otherwise they fundamentally could never comply with the standard for their language.

However, two different compilers - inc. versions of compiler or compiler settings - probably won't give the same result as each other as they will favour different optimisations when multiple are permitted, or use a different implementation of the appropriate standard libraries.

So if your code relies on undefined behaviour, it can and will blow up in your face the moment you update or change compiler.

For a great example of undefined behaviour: in C++, "char" is not 8 bits.

For others - illegal operations are not allowed, and thus the code path that results in an illegal operation cannot happen, thus can be optimised out of the binary. It can't happen, so why waste space?

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Richard 12
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Re: Can I just say...

They're just falling with style.

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Shakes on a plane: How dangerous is turbulence?

Richard 12
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AAIB reports are freely available

I can thoroughly recommend them as in-flight entertainment.

Though you may find yourself doing a pre-flight inspection as you board.

https://www.gov.uk/aaib-reports

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Google Chrome deletes Backspace

Richard 12
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Re: Don't care about backspace

Steve Jobs!

Apple keyboards have been slowly losing keys for years.

Eventually they'll only have the keys 0-9, A, E, I, L, O, P, S and X.

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Inside Electric Mountain: Britain's biggest rechargeable battery

Richard 12
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Re: Don't gloat yet awhile...

The UK might be 230VAC nominal, but almost everywhere is actually 240-245VAC.

230VAC +10% -5%

A lot of new builds are tapped high to allow for sag without retapping.

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Is uBeam the new Theranos?

Richard 12
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Re: Worlds best tranducer, Worlds best microphone

To be fair, they wouldn't care about distortion or even reproduction of more than a single harmonic series.

But even then, the concept makes radio-beamed power look incredibly efficient.

And air-core transformers like science fiction!

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Microsoft boots fake fix-it search ads

Richard 12
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Re: I don't know why people are so fucking stupid

A lot of idiot marketers advertise using "Search for X" as the way to find more/order the widget.

So it seems likely that people who would buy such things will just search.

On top of that, all three popular browsers will search if you make a typo.

Almost all the non-technical people I know just Google for the website they want. Even Facebook.

I've seen people Google for Google...

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Supernova bubble clocked at 19,000,000 km/h

Richard 12
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Re: 19,000,000 km/h ?

The Historical Documents.

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This is what a root debug backdoor in a Linux kernel looks like

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Malware scan stalled misconfigured med software, mid-procedure

Richard 12
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Re: Holy fuck

I'm utterly stunned.

Our users pay more attention to machine and network security, and the worst that could happen if they screw up is that somebody has an epileptic fit!

Or it goes very, very dark.

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You can always rely on the Ancient Ones to cock things up

Richard 12
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Re: Washing machine anecdote

Building regulations might se onerous and excessively prescriptive, but in most cases there are really good reasons.

(Except Part P, which is what happens when a politician's family suffers a tragedy.)

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'I thought my daughter clicked on ransomware – it was the damn Windows 10 installer'

Richard 12
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Re: Forgive me for not understanding how this happened

Windows 7 doesn't have an administration account. (That can be logged into locally)

It has accounts that can elevate applications to admin - similar to sudoers.

By default, every user except the Guest account is able to elevate - unless you know how to turn that off.

So why be surprised that almost everyone uses the default configuration?

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Have Microsoft-hosted email? Love using Live Mail 2012? Bad news

Richard 12
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Reaping the whirlwind

They invented their own protocol for mail and calendar sync, and now don't want to support it anymore.

Because now they have a new proprietary protocol.

How long before that one dies?

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Microsoft: Why we tore handy Store block out of Windows 10 Pro PCs

Richard 12
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Meanwhile Apple piss off professional users

Not only is there nowhere to plug in your equipment (without carrying a million little dangle adapters and unplugging power), but they deliberately broke their USB stack.

Twice.

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iOS apps must do IPv6

Richard 12
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So much for Internet of Things

None of them do IPv6, they barely do IPv4.

So there can be no "private network" IoT control apps on iOS after this cutoff.

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Paying a PoS*, USA? Your chip-and-PIN means your money's safer...

Richard 12
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In my experience, all stolen cards are used

When I got pickpocketed, all the cards in my wallet were used.

One at a cashpoint (presumably a shoulder-surfer, I'm more careful now), the rest were used at a couple of shops.

This was before online shopping became a big thing.

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Barclays.net Bank Holiday outage leaves firms unable to process payments

Richard 12
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Per affected customer

That should concentrate the mind

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