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* Posts by Richard 12

1502 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Laptop computers are crap

Richard 12
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Re: Amen on vertical screenspace.

My work laptop HDD is about 80% full, because it's what I use for development and customer support, in the office and in the field.

So I have most of the version history for several products and a few SDKs.

Those add up fast.

Though I suppose I don't need the local copies of 5 year old software installers anymore...

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Richard 12
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Re: Wise article

The reason there are no stick-up USB ports by Esc is you'd probably smash your screen.

How long do you think it would be before you accidentally close the lid (or someone shove by and do it) without removing the USB device?

It's bad enough the number that get ripped off the sides when putting into bags, but at least those usually only break the USB stick.

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Nokia on 'brink of failure', warns analyst

Richard 12
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Re: Why not revive the N9?

Meego was supposed to be for embedded systems, not laptops.

So cars, phones, ATMs, that kind of thing.

I gather it's doing OK in car entertainment systems.

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Renault Twizy budget e-car

Richard 12
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FAIL

Re: Or I could stick with my diesel

Exactly.

In London with the latest diesel prices I pay just under £70 for about 7 weeks commute, and mine's an older diesel in a relatively big car.

So my big car has only a little bit higher running costs (and cost me less to buy) than this quadbike - which nearly fits in the boot. (I think it's probably too tall, would have to cut the roof off and slip it in beside it.)

When comparing things of a similar size with newer engines do quite a bit better.

The baby Fiats, Toyotas and Citroens have similar 'up front' cost, are considerably cheaper to run, have windows, some of them aren't ugly*, and perhaps most importantly they can be charged in two minutes.

That said, this kind of golf cart runabout might suit a small Caribbean or Mediterranean island, or evil volanic lair.

* What is it with 'eco' models? Almost all of them look hideous, and there's no need for that.

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Netgear Powerline Nano 500 Ethernet-over-mains adaptor

Richard 12
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Re: Interference

Excellent question, and one to which I don't know the answer.

When I was doing these tests there weren't any "CE" EMC standards for PLTs, so we used the standards for normal PC equipment and looked at the complete point-to-point link over twin & Earth as being the "device under test".

- This also meant that every PLT shipped at the time was completely untested, the manufacturers claiming that as there was no "PLT" EMC standard they didn't need to meet anything.

We also looked at blocking PLT domains from each other - it needed seriously big blocking filters, and coupling between adjacent wiring easily bypassed it so we came to the conclusion it simply couldn't be blocked in any cost-effective way. This was before encryption as standard in PLT devices, so it's clear the manufacturers have realised this as well.

I gather that there are now standards for PLT, however I haven't read them - standards being very boring and PLT is not my day job.

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Richard 12
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FAIL

Re: Interference

Did similar tests a few years back when the standard was being worked out.

By using a radial spur, blocking filter and appropriately terminating* the mains wiring at both ends we managed to get a conducted emissions pass, and radiated didn't fail by much so could plausibly be sorted out.

However, the moment we used a ring final circuit (ring main) it failed quite spectacularly as this turns it into a loop antenna.

Notches work fine for avoiding radiated interference with specific other users, but you can't notch out everything so they will always squash somebody.

Put another way, it may be workable in much of mainland Europe because they mostly use radials, but it cannot work in the UK because we mostly use rings.

*Although the termination network drew more than half a Watt...

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Five charged after fanboi sells kidney for iPad and iPhone

Richard 12
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Re: Seriously?

I think it was the doctor who had the gambling debt.

The teenager just wanted an iPad and has no idea of the consequences - like most teenagers.

- When I was that age I built a zipline down a ravine with a couple of friends, and one of us swept through a holly bush when the brakeline snapped. So we tied the brakeline back together, tightened the zipline and had another few goes!

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The iPad 3 would make me so horny...

Richard 12
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Unhappy

Re: Blame your tools. not your ipad

If you do it as PDF, then you've got to licence any embedded fonts. Let's say you do that and it doesn't cost much.

Now the text looks better as it's rasterised on demand to fit the display - although by some accounts the original iPad couldn't manage that fast enough anyway.

What about your pictures and diagrams?

Most of those images are not going to be available as vectors, and even those that are may not be in usable formats so you've got to rasterise those anyway.

So you still have to rasterise some of each page.

Yet in all magazines there are full-page images on many of the pages, so you still have to handle full-page images either way.

So why bother?

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CSC, NHS extend jaw-jaw on disaster deal: 500 jobs go

Richard 12
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FAIL

Re: This lot almost make m$ look good

And that's why "big bang" implementations on this kind of scale are stupid and should never, ever be attempted under any circumstances whatsoever*.

You only find out that it's an abject failure once all the money has been spent with nothing to show for it, and either the customer pays huge cash for nothing or the supplier goes bankrupt.

Instead, if you do the project as a series of small changes, implementing each part of the system in a limited area (not the whole country) and expand it slowly, not only do you get a system that works (and is useful at each step) but there are many more companies that could bid for it because there's money at each stage so crazy credit isn't required.

As a bonus, when the credit requirements are smaller at shorter periods it's much cheaper to build, with less risk to all parties, and more of the cash goes towards the actual project rather than the banks that loaned the money.

As a bonus to the bonus, you can pause or even stop the project at almost any stage and still have something useful, and usually change the requirements of the next stage without penalties in time or money.

Yes, I just more or less described the Agile methodology.

It does work, unlike Waterfall which always fails.

*(C) Department of Redundancy Dept.

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IT urine bandit fired and charged

Richard 12
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WTF?

Re: What or who did he deem attractive?

Is that even physically possible without killing the duck?

Horses are one thing, but ducks?

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Browsium rescues HMRC from IE6 – and multimillion-pound bill

Richard 12
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Happy

Re: Really a fix?

I would expect that Browsium are now the ones providing support for the "IE6 Frame" and all the associated components that aren't part of Windows 7, as that would all need to be rolled into their plugin for this to work under Windows 7.

It sounds like a very good way to escape from IE6 - that was always a tricky problem as most large corporates dare not go for a "Big Bang" approach to that migration, even if they could afford it.

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What does the Titanic's sinking tell us about modern science?

Richard 12
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WTF?

Re: Wot George Said

Erm, he didn't treat her as a speedboat. The whole "let's go really fast" idea was an invention of later movies and never actually happened - Titanic was never in the running for the Blue Riband.

Olympic's stern collided with HMS Hawke, and the incident was blamed on the suction from the turning Olympic - though it could have really been caused by Hawke getting too close in the first place.

The real problem with modern ships is the quality of officer and crew training. Many bridge officers are basically incompetent, keeping their jobs because modern cruise liners navigate themselves and the few really good officers cover for them.

Possibly the most frightening thing about modern cruise liners is the fact that in many (most?) sinkings it was the entertainment staff (dancers, activities, theatre technicians and musicians) who saved the lives of the passengers guests, and not the officers or crew.

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Terrafugia flies first prototype: Flying cars 'within a year'

Richard 12
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FAIL

Moller is the definition of vapourware

They've been promising that their one is going to be available "really soon" for the last twenty years, and still have no solution to any of the tricky problems of a flying car.

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Richard 12
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Happy

Re: We don't want driving planes,

Quadcopters and other multi-rotor designs are already quite capable of flying themselves* on complex courses using only GPS-assisted inertial navigation.

Collision avoidance remains an unsolved problem but that will come as processing power and camera technology gets smaller, cheaper and less power-hungry.

Scaled up, they just might work - a Y6 or X8 design even has built-in redundancy, able to lose at least one rotor without significantly affecting stability - though you'd still want to land anyway as it would be burning more juice to stay up.

*For the 20 min to half an hour until the batteries run out. Skynet they ain't.

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Home Sec: Web snoop law will snare PAEDOS, TERRORISTS

Richard 12
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Re: hmmmm...

That's not the point.

The real danger of this kind of thing is that having arrested someone on suspicion of $crime$, they want to be able to trawl though everything that person has done online in order to find something, anything to pin on them. Regardless of what it is.

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Richard 12
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Trollface

Re: Bah

Thank God for that, we'd be utterly screwed if they were competent.

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Freeview TV shoved aside for iPad-compatible 4G

Richard 12
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My phone line has had more downtime than my ADSL

Over the last five years I've lost ADSL for a few hours at most, and so far not at a time of day when I really noticed it.

I've lost my phone line for two days - while the ADSL was still working. I still don't quite understand how BT performed that trick.

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Philips 42PFL7666 42in 3D LED Smart TV

Richard 12
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Re: distract from the dullness of the content

Yes, I suppose it does, given that I haven't used the built-in speakers of my main telly for two years.

I suspect that nobody who buys this kind of TV wants the speakers - why would you want 3D picture with 2D sound?

-Especially as 5.1 and 7.1 sound doesn't leave you feeling sick and dizzy.

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ALL Visa cards blab punters' names - not just Barclaycards

Richard 12
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FAIL

@ Anon: NFC is RFID

Also, it's a shame to see someone so taken in by marketing.

These are in fact the same technology.

Have a Wikipedia article (it's not outright wrong)

NFC is simply the branding of a set of RFID standards aimed at this kind of 'cash' and 'ID' usage.

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Richard 12
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Facepalm

Re: Anybody heard of TRACK1...?

Yup. I assume you're of the opinion that this simply doesn't matter in the slightest? Mastercard and Visa appear to disagree enough to try to keep it vewwy qwiet.

Name and CCN is enough to make a transaction in many countries around the world, and even in the EU it's still often enough to make an online or phone transaction.

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Richard 12
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FAIL

Re: Yes

10-20cm is more than enough in any kind of busy environment.

That's further away than pickpockets work, with the added bonus of not having to actually touch the mark.

It's quite normal for someone to come that close on a bus or train, even a nearly empty one (eg aisle seats) and normal for people to be that close on the high street, in a shopping centre etc.

Here's a game for you to play:

Next time you go out shopping in somewhere busy (New York in Lincolnshire doesn't count), try to count the number of people who come within 20cm of your wallet or handbag during the journey there and back and the actual shopping experience.

So, given that you could clone the name and card numbers of all those people, you've got rather a lot of data you could sell to overseas criminal gangs - or use on any online retailers that's not checking CVV!

In a single day you could get hundreds if not thousands of valid name/CCN pairs with no risk of being detected whatsoever. Flog 'em to some gan to use, and you've got yourself a pretty penny with no risk.

I can see this kind of fraud becoming rather popular over the next few years. Well done banks, you've only gone and broken it again!

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Richard 12
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Re: NOT Visa failing - It's AMAZON failing.

I disagree to some extent.

I really want to be able to have the goods sent to my work address, because that is where I will be during the 9-5 time period when couriers and Royal Mail deign to deliver physical goods.

If I don't do that, then I won't get my goods until the following weekend when I am able to go to the 'local' depot or sorting office and queue for a couple of hours.

Even if I was at home that day, half the time couriers just shove the 'You weren't in' card through the letterbox and run away. Presumably because the box was never loaded on the van.

They don't all do that as often with corporate premises.

I would however much prefer it if the invoice were to be posted separately to the cardholder address, as Amazon imply, rather than stuffed in with the goods.

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Linux 'internet of things' gizmo ships

Richard 12
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Re: Too expensive.

£40 for the interface hardware and casing sounds about right, especially as it's a rapid-prototyped case and very low volume interface PCB.

You can pay over £20 for low volume bare PCBs in that kind of size, so it's not exactly extortionate.

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Apple pushes patents for 3D avatar authoring

Richard 12
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WTF?

Re: Prior art?

The Wii one for making Miis is 3D and practically identical, even down to the icons used!

The only discernable difference is that the Wii one puts the user interface elements above and to the sides of the screen rather than below.

If this actually got approved then it really should be the final nail in the USPTO office. It's way past time for it to be totally closed down for being utterly incapable of doing their job.

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Who killed ITV Digital? Rupert Murdoch - but not the way you think

Richard 12
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Re: I have a genuine ITVDigital monkey :-)

I got one of those too - I gave it to my sister, and now you tell me it was worth something?

I signed up because I was in a rented student flat so dishes and cable were both out.

Then spent a year cleaning up the direct debit mess after they went titsup...

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Nvidia shows off first 'Kepler' GPUs

Richard 12
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Re: re: efficient performance, while consuming the least possible energy

A large and slow fan is much quieter than a small and fast one even if they move the same mass of air.

So you want a big fan if you can.

In my desktop the GPU fan is the only audible one, and it's by far the smallest.

At some point I will have to sort that out.

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Elsevier's backpedalling not stopping scientist strike

Richard 12
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Re: Pay?

True, those stupendously fat margins make up most of it.

That is what the argument is about - making excessively large margins. Especially galling becuase the vast majority of the work is done for free - the only thing the publisher is actually doing is collating, printing and distribution.

The prices they charge don't match up with what they do. Compare with other low-volume printers, eg Lulu, and the various University presses.

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Big Media drags 142,000 through UK's courts IN A YEAR

Richard 12
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WTF?

WTF are you smoking jacobbe? It's £12.13 a month!

The licence fee is £145.50 a year from April, and is fixed until 2016.

To put it another way, it's approximately half what the very cheapest Sky TV pack costs.

The monthly cost is less than a 20 pack of cheap beer from Tesco, or a meal for two from KFC.

It's even less than taking two people to the cinema. (In London that's even before you buy any popcorn!)

I'm sure you can come up with other comparisons.

If (as an extreme example) you really did only watch and listen to an average of one hour of BBC TV and radio a day, that's 40p an hour - less than iTunes.

Are you really saying that nothing the BBC makes is worth that to you?

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Firefox gobbles H.264 to serve up vids to mobes, slabs

Richard 12
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WTF?

Re: Can see the analogy.

@ath0

I repeat, supremely disingenuous. (That means true but phrased in a way intended to give the entirely the wrong impression, in case you were previously unaware of the word.)

Perhaps I could rephrase that precise statement you quoted:

H.264 and other MPEG-like encoders are better at screwing up the source material in the way that MPEG-like encoders screw up the source material.

Or perhaps another example would be clearer:

The Pope is better at being a Catholic than at being a Muslim.

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Richard 12
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Thumb Down

Re: Can see the analogy.

Rather disingenuous statement there, ath0

All lossy codecs show demonstrable loss of quality when re-encoding something that's already been compressed using another lossy compression method.

That's true of MPEG2, of VP8 and of H.264.

Even the original CCDs (or film negatives!) are lossy compared to the original light.

It's a fundamental of information theory - once the data is gone, you cannot get it back.

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Microsoft accused of leaking RDP attack code

Richard 12
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Re: "Confidential Inform,ation is to be protected"

Irony... That's like steely, but softer, right?

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Richard 12
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Re: "Confidential Inform,ation is to be protected"

It is used in hospitals. And airports.

In hospitals it's even running life-critical functions.

The main point of that famous clause is to indemnify Microsoft, not to improve safety.

- You find that clause in the spec. literature of damn near everything, from PCB material on upwards, so what do you do?

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Charge of the Metro brigade: Did Microsoft execs plan to take a hit?

Richard 12
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@dogged - They were all sold Vista, whether they wanted it or not

That's the thing - for quite some time, it you bought a computer from any OEM you got Vista pre-installed.

Almost all corporates wiped it back to XP SP2 using the corporate image - and all of those rollbacks to XP were still counted as Vista.

A lot of 'home' users probably did the same shortly after finding their hardware didn't work properly. Either that or they returned it as 'broken'.

I would not be surprised if >50% of the "Vista" sales were actually running XP SP2.

That said, the trainwreck was mostly the new driver model. MS changed everything about drivers so all existing hardware stopped working until the hardware people could update their drivers. That's a big job!

7 had the advantage of more time - the new driver model had been out for a while by then - and also added a host of shims to let legacy hardware and code work.

(Most of these shims don't work in the 64-bit edition, which is a pain but unsurprising.)

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Richard 12
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Facepalm

Re: @Ken Hagen

@dogged

That's kinda the point. "Click in the bottom left corner of the screen".

"Why? There's nothing there!"

"Trust me, just click there"

"I tried and nothing happened."

"All the way into the corner. Move the mouse down and left until it stops."

"My mouse fell off the table."

That's even before the fun and games of multiple monitors - if the "primary" isn't bottom-left then you're well and truly ****ed.

It's quite difficult to click on a single visible pixel. A single, invisible pixel is...

We've spent the last couple of decades making things look 'clickable', as if they are physical buttons. Even making them change colour to announce "Click me! Click me!" if you hover the mouse over them.

Metro removes all that. It takes away all the visual clues that every desktop interface has given users since the dawn of pointing devices.

That's painful.

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How a tiny leap-day miscalculation trashed Microsoft Azure

Richard 12
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Facepalm

Re: Whoever designs system that have changable clocks will always have problems

mad physicist Fiona, you appear to have spectacularly missed my point.

You aren't describing processing, that is all formatting. You'll need to do that no matter how you store the time internally, but you don't need to do it very often.

It's not as complex as the existential questions you get from storing and processing in local time - that way you don't know what time it was by the time it's stored to disk, because the local time definitions may have changed. Thus any stored local time also needs the definition of local time at the time to be stored alongside it to use in all future processing.

UTC changes much less often than local time, so that processing lookup table is much smaller - it will have 35 entries in total as of the end of 2012, all of which are +1 second and published in advance.

As opposed to the local time tables which are complicated enough to be worth defending a copyright claim over and change regularly on the whim of world politicians!

Storing local times means that your data set is dependant on those local time tables, and every single data point must state the timezone it was recorded in, for the data to be useful for any purpose at all.

Storing UTC means you can do almost all processing with no lookup tables at all and be fairly accurate about intervals - only 35 seconds out in 50 years - or have one adjustment lookup table that is valid for all data points.

Yes, you still need those complex lookups to display to the user but you don't need them for your data set to be useful.

Incidentally, Windows has been UTC internally since Vista, although its monotonic clock remains irritatingly 32-bit. (49.7 days is a magic number)

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Richard 12
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Re: Whoever designs system that have changable clocks will always have problems

Storing and processing in UTC removes >99% of the complexity.

You're left with the two (and only two) issues of leap year and leap second which happen roughly every four years and 1-7 years respectively.

As opposed to using local time, which for most people changes twice every year as well as the above leap years and leap seconds, and doesn't stay the same year-to-year either.

On top of that, most people who can afford computers also travel, so that's additional local time changes.

So, what to do? Store UTC and handle leap years and leap seconds, or local time and handle leap years, leap seconds, DST, political timezone changes, travel etc?

TAI would be better, but no common OS uses it internally and neither does the general Internet, making it more likely to be wrong.

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Richard 12
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FAIL

Re: @AC

Time is actually very easy:

Store and process in UTC.

Displaying time to the user and parsing user input is harder, but once you're always storing and processing in UTC it is no longer critical to the operation of the machine.

I've long since lost count of the number of failures caused by storing and processing in local time.

Local time changes.

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Richard 12
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Mushroom

Re: @AC

No it wasn't.

It was a total and utter **** up that is only possible if you genuinely have no idea what you are doing.

The reason is simple: This failure is only possible if you're processing the date as three independent numbers.

Listen very carefully Microsoft, I will scream this into your ear only once:

DATES ARE NOT THREE NUMBERS.

DATES ARE NOT TEXT.

A datetimeis a number of intervals after an epoch. Never anything else.

Feel free to pick your interval (either days or seconds would be sensible in this case) and your epoch, but doing anything else is sheer insanity that should result in instant termination because no programmer working with dates in any capacity should be that ****ing stupid.

I've known this since I was 12. Yes, this is quite literally a childish blunder.

The worst part is that you have to deliberately make this mistake these days, because every single modern framework comes with a Date or DateTime object that handles it for you. (Though 1900 and 2100 might be a problem in some.)

Heck, even Excel handles it!

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UK kids' art project is 'biggest copyright blag ever' – photographer

Richard 12
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Actually, many commentards are

The point is that this organisation is teaching kids "You must give away your Copyrights to large organisations, only big companies can own copyrights. You are small, you cannot."

So, is it surprising if these children grow up thinking that copyright doesn't matter, only big organisations can have it. When they were little some organisation 'stole' their copyrights, so why not infringe it.

An easy train of thought goes:

It's not like they are affecting real people by infringing. That company probably 'stole' the copyrights in the first place like someone did to theirs. So clearly they should take it back!

Put another way, if we want these kids to respect our copyrights then we should respect theirs, and teach them what copyright actually is.

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Could tiny ebooks really upset the mighty Apple cart?

Richard 12
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Re: Who cares about the publishers?

All of which can be hired.

Typesetting is dead already, especially with ebooks. It's entirely automated except for artistic purposes.

Illustration is often driven by the author anyway - they have a preferred partner to do that. So they could hire them at a percentage.

Cover design usually isn't but should be (how many books have you read where the cover bears no resemblance to anything in the book?

Editing - that is selecting which books a publisher is actually going to take. Self-published don't do it.

Copyediting can be hired easily at quite low rates, ironically made cheap by publishers.

Which leaves marketing and lawyers, neither of which tends to be very valuable these days. When was the last time you saw an advert for an author you hadn't heard of, or a lawsuit against an author of fiction?

Ok, non-fiction may want lawyers.

You forgot the real reason why authors want publishers though - advances. They would quite like to eat while waiting for the first royalty cheque.

Except that advances are getting rarer and worse...

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Tony Blair closes RSA 2012, denounces WikiLeaks

Richard 12
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Re: @JDX

Yes, they must.

In the case of 'sensitive' undercover operation then not during, but shortly after.

Otherwise how can anybody possibly know whether they are appropriate?

You're basically saying that the police/special forces should be permitted to wander around murdering anyone they like, because they think it was justified.

So ALL must be divulged. The only grey area is when.

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Richard 12
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WTF?

Re: @ Mahatma Coat

"A perfect/worst case example: Silvio Berlusconi, kept in power by a corrupt "AV" voting system where you have absolutely no say in who actually gets elected at all, you just get to choose the proportion of MP's taken from each party."

Italy uses a kind of PR, it's not even vaguely related to AV. (And Party-list representation is generally considered a rather poor form of PR.)

AV is "I want candidate A. If I can't have A, then I want B.".

This is trivial to understand by anyone who's ever asked someone to pop to the local shop to get some biscuits.

"I'd like chocolate hobnobs, if they don't have any then ginger nuts are fine."

AV allows you to vote for the one you want, and to say which alternative you can live with.

FPTP forces you to vote 'tactically' - you cannot vote for the one you want, you have to vote against the one you hate.

Unfortunately both Labour and the Conservatives knew damn well that AV would damage their future prospects so launched a massive FUD campaign against AV.

Did you notice that the entire against argument was "AV costs too much", "You're too thick to understand AV", "It might cause hung Parliaments"?

No reasoning. In fact nobody ever gave a single indication as to why AV would be a worse way to choose your MP than FPTP.

- Incidentally, the reason FPTP reduces the chance of Hung Parliaments is because it results in a two-party system for each candidacy.

Look at your local polls - there will only be two parties that stand a chance in your constituency. Mine happens to be Labour/Conservative, like most. Sheffield Hallam (Clegg's) is Liberal Democrat/Conservative.

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Richard 12
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Re: @ Mahatma Coat

I did.

Unfortunately the Sheeple voted against AV.

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Richard 12
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WTF?

@JDX

Analogy fail - Politicians are not parents.

MPs are supposed to be our representatives to the Crown - that was the point of the House of Commoners back when it was invented - a way for the 'common people' to exercise some control over the monarch.

They are our delegates. Our underlings. Our servants.

The ones to whom we, the public, have delegated the (boring) task of carrying out the functions of Government in line with our collective will.

That is what a Parliamentary Democracy is, involves and requires.

Thus is it self-evident that they must have all their actions exposed to the public eye - because otherwise how do you know that they are doing their jobs?

(Although the definition of 'common people' wasn't quite what we'd recognise today.)

The idea that MPs are some kind of 'parent' is dangerous and must be erased - that way lies dictatorship.

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Microsoft 'yanked optical drive from Xbox 720'

Richard 12
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Send a disc to MS for a licence?

You mad?

They will expect you to buy it again.

And again, and again.

In their world you never owned a copy in the first place.

This is purely a way to shut down the second-hand market completely and being able to lend a game to your friends and relatives, ensuring that everybody pays full price.

At least with PC gaming you have the choice to avoid Steam etc.

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Nuke clock incapable of losing time chimes with boffins

Richard 12
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Re: Chimes are one thing

Fundamentally impossible unfortunately, DAB simply cannot do real-time transmission or reception.

FM only suffers speed-of-light delay, DAB adds huge compression and decompression delays, and as each 'block' is compressed separately it's impossible to reduce the delay to less than one block of time, even if the processors at the BBC and in your radio could do it instantly.

Which it can't - and your radio is probably really slow.

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Cash-strapped graduates sell their own faces

Richard 12
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Re: Paying off your student loan is the worst idea possible

What on earth were you buying?

I went through Uni on a smaller student loan than you will have received on worse terms than you*, and did a post-grad degree as well.

When I finished I had a big student loan, and no other debts at all.

Perhaps some of that was because I did a summer job each year, but why the hell shouldn't you?

*I went through just after the terms became infinite, even surviving bankcruptcy. Shortly after they became limited to 25 years, and under the newest terms very few people will ever actually pay back the absolute amount borrowed. It's literally free money.

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BBC iPlayer boss: smart TVs not sufficiently simple

Richard 12
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FAIL

Re: If it doesn't pass the Mrs Miggins test it's a fail

The problem with CEC is that nobody supports it. That's according to several STB manufacturers, who presumably know what they are talking about.

If all your equipment is from the same manufacturer and the same generation, then maybe it works. Otherwise, it basically doesn't.

My STB, DVD player and TV all supposedly support CEC.

Unfortunately, it doesn't actually work. I only had it turned on for a few hours before giving up and turning it off - it felt like each source was grabbing control at random!

I'm sure there was some kind of logic to it, but I couldn't find it and it never got anywhere near matching my expectations.

There's simply almost no interoperability. Abject fail.

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Court rejects Tesla’s latest libel spat with Top Gear

Richard 12
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FAIL

A "proper" charger?

Top Gear were very specific about the charging times - if you use a standard UK 13A socket (~3000VA), it'll take 17 hours.

The "4-hour" charger is a 240VAC, 70A connector and apparently needs a 90A supply breaker so probably draws that on the supply side (at least sometimes).

My house service fuse (like most UK houses) is 100A. Thus charging this vehicle using the 4-hour charger requires 70 to 90% of my entire household electricity supply - leaving me a grand total of 10A to (maybe) 30A to run my entire house.

Thus if you turn on the kettle, or (god forbid!) while charging - pop! You're in the dark. Computer, TV and lighting? Forget it! And don't even consider an electric oven, hob or shower!

If you're unlucky then you'll blow the service fuse - which then requires an electrician callout to replace.

In other words, the 4-hour charger actually requires its own dedicated supply to be installed from the local substation. In the UK this can only be installed by the electrical supply company - in the US this varies from place to place.

The 6-hour charger needs a 50A circuit, so is plausible assuming you only have one of electric hob, oven or shower and not too many gadgets around the house.

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