* Posts by Richard 12

2290 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Researchers expose Mirai vuln that could be used to hack back against botnet

Richard 12
Silver badge

As you don't really know where the endpoint that is attacking you is physically located, the legalities are very sticky as you have no way of knowing which jurisdictions might apply and so which lws you would need to follow.

That said, you are highly unlikely to get caught knocking infected consumer kit offline unless you announce that you did it.

0
0

Uber drivers entitled to UK minimum wage, London tribunal rules

Richard 12
Silver badge

Who does the substitution?

Compare to what happens when an obvious employee calls in sick.

If the agent says "do the job", you can't/don't want to and so you send in someone else to do the job, then you may be self-employed.

If the agent says "do the job", you can't/don't want to and so the agent sends in someone else to do the job, then you are likely to be an employee of the agent.

6
0

Everything you need to know about HP's three-in-one x3 deals

Richard 12
Silver badge

It's for travelling salescritters

Powerpoint, email, a few small spreadsheets, PDF and light browsing.

As long you can run a hosted edition of the relevant ERP applications - which are rapidly becoming browser-based anyway - then it's actually near-perfect for that type of user.

The hard part is convincing these salescritters that they do not need an iPad or a Macbook Air

2
0

Samsung are amateurs – NASA shows how you really do a battery fire

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Priorities

I'm also really concerned by their risk management.

It seems that they didnt realise that charging a li-ion battery pack is a significant fire risk and did not have any of the appropriate measures in place.

The first one being "do not rely on a human to correctly configure the battery charger for each charge cycle", and the second being to have appropriate automatic fire containment and extinguishants in place during all charging.

Even model aircraft flyers get this right.

10
2

Microsoft goes back to the drawing board – literally, with 28" tablet and hockey puck knob

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Only 4GB RAM?

It's for WORK.

Photoshop, Vectorworks, Avid and more.

This is not a device aimed at people who are merely playing with spreadsheets, it's supposed to be a creative workhorse and that neans GPU intensive applications.

Most CAD is far more GPU intensive than any games. In fact "gaming" graphics cards are rather poor at CAD.

0
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Only 4GB RAM?

GPU RAM. 2GB, or 4GB on the very top end unit.

That's ludicrously low, especially given the screen resolution.

2GB of GPU RAM is entry level these days.

0
6

Not call, Intel – not call: Chipzilla modems in iPhone 7s fall short

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: There's only two reasons Apple is doing this

Act as a bug?

How, pray tell, does the modem get an audio signal from the microphone array without the cooperation of the CPU?

Remember that the modem is just a peripheral. It's not connected to the microphone array, it merely streams the data that the CPU makes available.

1
0

Chinese electronics biz recalls webcams at heart of botnet DDoS woes

Richard 12
Silver badge

$2 is way too expensive

The CPU on many IoT devices costs that much.

Even 10 US cents is probably too much, the margins on really are that tight.

They only exist because the hardware is dirt cheap and the software can be built with stickle-brick components from various open source projects.

It doesn't even need to be stable, let alone secure or supportable.

The map download software for my last (probably ever) satnav was the most unstable piece of **** I'd ever seen, yet three/four years later there has never been a single patch for it, despite the satnav itself still being a current product. I don't think it will run at all on Windows 10.

3
0

UK fintech firm reaches for Ireland Brexit escape hatch

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Java and low latency do not mix

Concurrency libs in Java?

Hah. The C++ ones are far better. Boost, Qt... Heck, even the raw stuff in C++11 and 14.

The exact details of threads and/or forking is OS-specific of course, but the libraries handle that quite nicely.

It's not really concurrency if everything has to stop for the garbage collector.

0
0

Meet the slimeballs who are openly sabotaging Virgin Media

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Open Invitation

I'm relatively ok with the service.

I only get two speeds - the 70Mbps they advertise, and zero when it breaks down.

They have finally decided to swap out the kit in the cabinet after a multitude of breakdowns, so hopefully the periods of nada will cease.

1
0

The answer to Internet of Things madness? Open source, of course!

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Open? Or is Money?

If OpenSSL had been closed source, it is quite probable that the serious security flaws in it would still be unfixed - and probably unknown.

However it's also certain that it wouldn't have been anywhere near as popular, so the impact of those bugs would be several orders of magnitude less.

On the gripping hand, those products would have used something else, with another set of security flaws. Almost everyone uses the "SDK pack", so there would be the NXP flaws, the Freescale flaws, the Intel ones, the MIPs etc.

So the fact that those OpenSSL flaws were found and fixed means that a lot of products got simultaneously better, instead of just one SDK.

On the fourth hand, a heterogeneous set of flaws across different products is much safer than a homogeneous set...

7
2

Outlook-on-Android alternative 'Nine' leaked Exchange Server creds

Richard 12
Silver badge

Nice of Microsoft to mention that.

Oh. Seems they don't.

Although nobody should be using the Outlook app anyway, because it's terrible.

4
2

German regulators won't let Tesla use the name 'Autopilot'

Richard 12
Silver badge

I regret that I have but one upvote to give.

:)

6
0

RBS debit card payments have gone utterly TITSUP

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: So what happens when...

In general they just have to trust that you'll come back. Most people in that situation would, and the rest are probably either fully written off or sold to some debt collection agency scum.

They can in theory use the numberplate and the DVLA to track down the registered keeper and then try to recover the debt from them.

However, unless they can somehow prove the registered keeper is the one that owes the debt, they have no actual way of recovering it.

1
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: So what happens when...

It is extremely difficult to maintain multiple current accounts

The banks do not want anyone to do it, and it takes a lot of work to maintain multiple accounts within the rules set down for each.

- if nothing is paid in or out for a while they go dormant and that kind of thing.

So almost everybody has exactly one debit card for their exactly one current account.

On top of that, many people either don't want or can't have any credit cards, for many valid reasons.

So go on, how many DEBIT cards do you have?

I have one (1). I used to have two but the effort required to keep the second current account active was just too much.

3
1
Richard 12
Silver badge

How many times must a bank fail at transactions

Before they lose their banking licence?

RBS and Natwest do seem to have suffered very similar failures rather more often than any other UK banks.

I wouldn't mind so much, except that my employer happens to bank with them. Maybe they won't for much longer.

1
0

Apple’s macOS Sierra update really puts the fan into 'fanboi'

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Activity Monitor

That is a very odd UI decision, as while you can explain that "It goes up to 800% on a quad core with hyperthreading", it is still very confusing for normal people.

The Microsoft and Linux way of "Up to 100%, and you can also look at individual core utilisation if you wish" is far more user friendly.

2
0

IBM: Yes, it's true. We leaned on researchers to censor exploit info

Richard 12
Silver badge

One correction needed

Every bit of software you don't write may will probably have to be removed/upgraded/patched and you should have some kind of plan to do so.

Which is why I find it so disturbing when people ship "un-upgradable" software and (even more commonly) firmware. Like most IoT crap.

6
1

Mercedes answers autonomous car moral dilemma: Yeah, we'll just run over pedestrians

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Hard decision but Mercedes are probably right

Don't be ridiculous. 70MPH to 0 in 10 feet would be a mean of about 15G, and that'd definitely kill you if eyeballs-out. And it might kill you eyeballs-in as well.

That Mini achieves a mean of 0.95G according to your figures, so 18MPH to 0 is plausible in 10 feet.

15MPH to 0 in 10ft is rather common.

Which is surprisingly fast, wouldn't you say?

0
1
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Hard decision but Mercedes are probably right

Modern cars can stop in ten feet from surprisngly high speeds.

However, human reaction time is such that most people would have barely started braking.

The reaction time of an autonomous vehicle will be quicker than the majority of meatbags - otherwise it's not useful. It'll also brake or swerve harder, as it knows the car handling better than most humans do.

So the "will collide zone" in front of a moving autonomous vehicle would become notably smaller, and the resulting collision would happen at a lower speed.

It's still there though, no matter what you do.

Obviously there are some talented people who can often take a vehicle right to the limit, but they are rare and even they can't do that all the time. The AI doesn't get tired.

11
1

Linus Torvalds says ARM just doesn't look like beating Intel

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Now that ARM has been bought by a bank its future is uncertain IMO

ARM doesn't make chips. They make CPU designs, and licence those out to a multitude of companies who put those CPUs into actual chip designs and manufacture them.

That's the general issue Linus is talking about. There's no such thing as a standard ARM based processor let alone motherboard, they're all custom implementations.

4
0

Building IoT London: Still working on your pitch?

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: So...

The pressure is a bit high, but underwater fires can certainly be arranged.

0
0

UK will build new nuclear bomb subs, says Defence Secretary

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Kim Jong Un would rather not die

Well our Government is also run by nutters, including several apparent xenophobes.

So it's a good job that Putin has his nukes as well, as they keep our crazies in check.

That's the "mutual" part.

Balancing is easy if everyone holds everyone else up there. It gets risky if somebody starts shoving - or lets go...

2
2
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Sir Humphrey said it far better than I could

We're doomed.

Actually the guys and gals in BBC engineering are pretty damn good, and have rather a lot of the right kit and people needed to keep the Longwave and FM stations on the air.

The DAB stuff is a different matter...

2
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

You do know that the "Brexit money" doesn't exist and never did?

We'll save Nigel Farage's salary, but that's pretty much it.

3
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Kim Jong Un would rather not die

That's what they're for.

They're to make sure that nuclear-armed states don't use their nukes.

I do not doubt that North Korea would lob their nukes into South Korea if they thought they'd get away with it.

There are other states that are less batshit crazy, yet they are also kept at least partly in check by the existence of the nuclear deterrent.

As time goes by and countries become more economically linked the need will reduce, but any country that withdraws or is excluded from world trade groups is a clear danger.

4
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Sir Humphrey said it far better than I could

And it doesn't really matter what the PM of the day thinks, because if the deterrent launch decision needed to be made, the PM of the day would be a shadow of their former self.

Burned into the remaining wall of Number 10.

The sub captains decide whether to nuke. If Radio 4 Longwave goes off air then pop goes the weasel.

2
0

BT Yahoo! customers: Why! can't! we! grrr! delete! our! webmail! accounts!?

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Bah!

I were using twisted triplets. We had the best string in the city by a country mile.

3
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

BT are the fixed-line monopoly

Everybody else except for Kingston Communications has to buy from them - competition is only in the reseller market.

And Kingston Comms are a monopoly in their region.

And Virgin is a monopoly for cable TV, voice and Internet.

Mobile cellular voice and data are the only non-monopoly communications provider in this country.

4
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: BT service is shit & now corrupt.

Data Protection Act 1998 (as amended):

(1)Subject to subsection (2), an individual is entitled at any time by notice in writing to a data controller to require the data controller at the end of such period as is reasonable in the circumstances to cease, or not to begin, processing, or processing for a specified purpose or in a specified manner, any personal data in respect of which he is the data subject, on the ground that, for specified reasons—

(a)the processing of those data or their processing for that purpose or in that manner is causing or is likely to cause substantial damage or substantial distress to him or to another, and

(b)that damage or distress is or would be unwarranted.

12
0

Robots blamed for wiping 10 per cent off the value of sterling

Richard 12
Silver badge

You won't be able to afford the peanuts

Peanuts are imported...

6
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: High frequency trading

Arbitrage basically.

It closes down the magic money tree circles where you can buy from X and instantly sell to Y at a profit.

2
0

What does Amazon have in common with Uber and Lyft? Road rage

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Don't like the check? Don't work for them

They're claiming that their conditions are such that they are not contractors, but are treated as employees.

For example, if you can't work for anyone else, turn down individual jobs, or send in someone else to do the work, you're probably an employee.

14
0

Google says it would have a two-word answer for Feds seeking Yahoo!-style email backdoor

Richard 12
Silver badge

I stand by the original comment

Anyone using Yahoo is clearly an idiot.

The company doing the outsourcing is the idiot though, not the end user.

Most users have no idea who actually owns and/or runs the servers their services run on, and have no desire to know either.

That's the magic of "cloud". Also why it's often hideous for business use, but you know.

1
1

My Nest smoke alarm was great … right up to the point it went nuts

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: When things go wrong...

False negatives?

This is why I have two smoke detectors made by different manufacturers.

I figure that greatly reduces the chances of them both going "dark" during a real event.

And so far no false positives. Some false alarms, but I suppose burning toast with the kitchen door open is one way to test if the sensor actually works.

1
0

These diabetes pumps obey unencrypted radio commands – which is, frankly, f*%king stupid

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: It must be enabled to be vulnerable

And is that configuration accessible to a malicious attacker via the radio?

0
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Check out the Fort Pinto

And courts then prove them wrong.

0
0

Apple to automatically cram macOS Sierra into Macs – 'cos that worked well for Windows 10

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: For an update that "Works"...

Automatic download is hideous.

A lot of people are on slow connections and charged by the MB, so they get a double hit of being charged for it and having a slower browsing.

Most people have a data cap (Also known as a "fair use policy") and either get throttled to near nothing or charged through the nose if they hit it.

Tell me the update exists, tell me how big it is and an estimate of how long it'll take to install.

The I'll decide whether I want it at all, when it's convenient to start downloading, and when it's a good time to install.

6
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Another major difference -

They broke video playback this time, that one is confirmed!

As of yet we do not know what else is broken.

Anyone using a Mac for work always needs to hold off for a few months at least, as so far every significant update - and many of the "minor" ones - has broken something important.

I am genuinely starting to think that there won't be any professional users of Macs in five years. Quite where new software will come from then is an open question.

11
0

A year living with the Nexus 5X – the good, the bad, and the Nougat

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Re Battery Life: Save me From Electro-pedants!

And putting my Galaxy S7 into dumbphone mode gives it about 3 days runtime.

My previous one claimed 5 days, but I never tried that long.

Smartphones of all flavours do appear to be getting worse.

2
0

Firefox to doctor Pepper so it can run Chrome's PDF, Flash plugins

Richard 12
Silver badge

So Mozilla, why should I use Firefox?

Now that it looks like Chrome, and you're making it talk like Chrome.

Why shouldn't I just use Chrome?

5
7

Dirty diesel backups will make Hinkley Point C look like a bargain

Richard 12
Silver badge

Brownouts don't really work anymore

Much of the domestic and industrial load is now constant-power, so just draws more current if the voltage drops.

Disconnectable contracts - and "rolling blackouts" - work better and the last National Grid report I read said that they expect to use them considerably more often in the coming years.

1
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: do you work for VW by any chance?

Stationary engines under continous load can be stupendously efficient and have incredibly low emissions.

Mobile engines, small engines and those under wildly varying load are generally inefficient and dirty.

Guess which type is in a car and which is in a generator set?

8
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Ignore the externalities, as usual

Ignore reality, as usual.

If the lights don't stay on then there won't be many children anyway, because the poor will die.

Although it's generally the elderly poor who die first, which I suppose would reduce the load on the NHS.

This is why it matters.

5
0
Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Greens just don't understand numbers

Several thousand years of uranium-based nuclear fission is effectively forever.

Because it is long enough to be completely replaced by some technology whose physics we currently barely understand.

Or large-scale fusion, whichever comes first!

6
0

Rosetta's last comet pic

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Sad in many ways...

67P is now forever the last resting place of Rosetta and Philae, and will remain so until it finally disintegrates.

It may even slowly subsume them, we don't really know.

That seems a fitting burial to me.

4
0

Complaints against cops down 93% thanks to bodycams – study

Richard 12
Silver badge

Studying police officers improves their behaviour

This same study found the same drop in complaints regarding the officers who weren't using the bodycams.

When both the control group and the active group have the same result, that doesn't indicate that the active group had any effect.

It shows that the act of studying has an effect.

9
1

USB-C is now wired for sound, just like Sir Cliff Richard

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: I wonder how does electrocution through your ears feel like

I have a 13A to headphone socket adapter. I use it to listen to and record the mains.

People do seem to freak out when I use it though.

11
0

Ordinary punters will get squat from smart meters, reckons report

Richard 12
Silver badge

Re: Can you switcj on/off via the keypad?

Isolate and LOCK OFF.

It's not off until it's got a padlocked off and the only key is in my pocket.

6
0

Ever longed to be naked in Paris? City council votes TODAY

Richard 12
Silver badge

Clothing optional (like the subject), as opposed to clothing mandatory (like the post).

So you wander into the area, remove your clothing - or not. Just remember to put it back on before leaving, as you'll probably need your wallet and keys.

2
0

Forums