* Posts by Richard 12

2155 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Tinder porn scam: Swipe right for NOOOOOO I paid for what?

Richard 12
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Re: That's the long play scam

In order to cancel your have to visit the porn site's complaints office in person and fill out the requisite forms in triplicate.

You'll find them on display in the lavatory, behind the door marked "Beware of the leopard"

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No, the VCR is not about to die. It died years ago. Now it's VHS/DVD combo boxes' turn

Richard 12
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Re: Actually VCRs still exist

I presume the actual limitation is decoder or HDD bandwidth.

The Humax ones I've used will happily record two channels while watching any third that's in the same mux as either of the others.

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Richard 12
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Re: Actually VCRs still exist

The VCRs in profrssional use were Beta though, never VHS.

And disappearing fast, as HDD based video archives are now so cheap that it's just not worth dealing with large numbers of tapes.

I don't think any UK broadcaster now uses Beta for new programming, though they probably still have a large library of tapes sat in storage.

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Richard 12
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Re: Stop making me feel old

Ah DAT. I used it for its intended purpose - 8-track audio (plus timecode).

Or rather 7-track audio because track 8 was the click track for the band.

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World religions stake out positions on Pokemon Go

Richard 12
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Re: Curious

The places one can "lure" are public attractions/landmarks like churches, shops and similar.

So there's no additional risk over existing "Come meet me by the church at midnight" comments.

The special locations with activity are all visible on the map from quite some distance, so to some extent it's a lesser risk as everyone playing the game can see that something is afoot.

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BOFH: Free as in free beer or... Oh. 'Free Upgrade'

Richard 12
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Re: in a HALaxy far far away

Old printers are probably best - as the drivers are so old that they're probably built into Windows and Linux distributions.

I'm very happy that my printer uses the built-in driver set.

The official driver installer from the manufacturer was both huge and included several completely pointless and annoying programs.

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Brit Science Minister to probe Brexit bias against UK-based scientists

Richard 12
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Re: Richard 12 TVU Scientists - just too "ethical"?

Theno please point to the negotiators we have.

Name five.

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Richard 12
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Re: TVU Scientists - just too "ethical"?

Matt, in your own comments you have spent the entire UK contribution to the EU at least five times before I lost count.

There is no magical money tree.

Also, your own future probably does not exist any more as EU data protection rules currently require that all EU data is stored in the EU, so watch all those data centres you apparently build vanish.

The US "Safe Harbor" agreement took a long time to negotiate and turned out to be tosh, do you really think that a UK Safe Harbour could be done in under two years?

Along with the other negotiations with the EU and rest of the world, when we don't even have a professional negotiation team any more?

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Richard 12
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Re: Shock

Or rather, the people warning that there would be Consequences for voting out have been repeatedly proven correct.

Would you say the same if I warned you that hacking off your finger is really going to hurt and will make it quite difficult to type, then you did it anyway?

It's not scaremongering when it's true.

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OneDrive go for Pokemon Go

Richard 12
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Hmm...

There must be a charging model somewhere.

They've already done "Pay us or we delete things". Is the next one "Pay us or we won't delete things"?

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She wants it. She needs it. Shall I give it to her or keep doing it by myself?

Richard 12
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Re: Sham about the image

What, you mean you lied?

I trusted you Mr Dabbs, I trusted you so much and now it's gone. Gone, like my soul!

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Apple Watch craze over before it started: Wrist-puter drags market screaming off a cliff

Richard 12
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Re: @Bob Dole ... Could Also Be...

No, while the smart watch might know exactly what the time is, it can't give you that information very easily.

Mostly because the battery goes flat if they try.

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We're not looking for MH370 in the wrong place say investigators

Richard 12
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Re: No One Wants The Flight Found

You'd need the entire crew to be involved in such a conspiracy, or one of the cabin crew would pop to the "toilet" and hit the button on the emergency locator beacon.

There is no large conspiracy here. The plane suffered an event that incapacitated everyone on board, and it's computers kept it flying until they couldn't.

There are things to learn from this, and one of the big reasons for keeping looking is to find out what that initial event was, and why the pilots and crew did not communicate during or after it.

The aircraft itself did keep squawking, it just had nothing to say - so that's one obvious change to onboard systems.

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Richard 12
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Re: Comms?

Every aircraft has several Emergency Locator Beacon units, which have independent batteries.

- You might remember a fire in a parked 787-Dreamliner at Heathrow on 12th July 2013.

The ones built into the structure of the aircraft are all relatively simple for the crew manually trigger, precisely for this type of situation.

They work by satellite and are automatically activated in the event of a crash, so the fact no signals were received implies an impact that either destroyed them, or sank them very quickly.

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Microsoft to rip up P2P Skype, killing native Mac, Linux apps

Richard 12
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Re: 5 Steps to mobile freedom.

Some mobile phone operators have transparent "WiFi calling" that you can just turn on.

I found it hideously bad in places with poor signal strength as it'd try to use the even worse WiFi, and thus not work at all, however you might have better luck.

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GMB tests Uber 'self-employed drivers' claim at London tribunal

Richard 12
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Re: This is an extremely important case..

Not that important. It's one in a long line of cases against companies trying to claim that employees are contractors.

UK law uses Duck-Typing. If it looks like a duck, it is a duck.

If the person looks like an employee, they are.

And the employer (in this case Uber) are then immediately required to pay the taxes (NI etc) that they have evaded, as well as that which they owe to the employees.

They can also be held criminally liable for tax evasion.

HMRC will be looking on with great interest.

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Firefox to banish hidden Flash files – and kill off sneaky ad snoopers

Richard 12
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That graph is seriously dodgy

The trend line is way off!

It's already flat, according to that data they haven't notably reduced the base rate of crashes at all since YouTube lost Flash.

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Microsoft ordered to fix 'excessively intrusive, insecure' Windows 10

Richard 12
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Re: Constitutional Right

The US Constitution has no legal standing outside of the USA.

If they want to sell in the EU, they have to follow EU rules.

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Ban ISPs from 'speeding up' the internet: Ex-Obama tech guru

Richard 12
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Re: Slow it down, speed it up

This is even a plot point in a few books.

For example the Venus Prime series has a murder perpetrated by flipping a remote control system from the expected "local" to a "satellite" route.

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IPO spews email addresses to hundreds of recipients. Twice

Richard 12
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Re: Why oh why...an even better solution

To 12 different companies?

How many external recipients at different domains would you be doing that with?

In some cases there might be multiple consultancy firms with overlapping responsibilities, though that usually indicates a project that is going to fail anyway.

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Security gurus get behind wheel of driverless car debate

Richard 12
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No it isn't

The manufacturer must publish the official guide to maintenance, and garages carry liability insurance against bad repairs.

Like they currently do.

For a rather large example in another industry, look at commercial aviation. Airframe and engine manufacturers can and have been held liable for incidents - whether anyone was actually hurt or not.

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Your next storage will be invisible (for a while)

Richard 12
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Re: An ogoing problem for over 30 years

Flash-based SSDs are interesting as they are fundamentally built of a large number of very small "disks" (pages) that the on-board firmware already retires as it fails.

Thus a "dead" SSD isn't all dead, and in theory at least, could keep being used as pages fail, by stepping down its apparent size.

The hard part is working out when to give up of course - down to 70% or 50% original capacity? Further?

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AT&T: We wanna be a drone company, not just a phone company

Richard 12
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Re: Tethered drones

"Cell on wings" requires tethered power, otherwise the loiter time would be way too short (electric) - or the aircraft far too large (infernal combustion)

Cell-on-Blimp would be far more sensible, as well as safer.

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Ad blockers responsible for rise in upfront TV ad sales, claims report

Richard 12
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Re: Subliminal ads

IIRC, there was never any evidence that they "worked", but there is plenty of evidence that flickering frames causes headaches and seizures.

All the good PVRs have "skip forward", which is much better for the viewer than fast-forward.

Sky boxes don't, but those are well known to be by far the worst PVRs on the market.

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Dear Tesla, stop calling it autopilot – and drivers are not your guinea pigs

Richard 12
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Re: scan their instrument panel to work out what ... and then start looking around

Alarms can be dangerous though.

A loud alarm is likely to make the driver look at the source of the sound - and not at the dangerous situation developing outside the vehicle.

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Ad viewability worsens

Richard 12
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Depends

If that's the money they spent on the adverts that are being totally ignored, then yes, they didn't get the service they purchased.

Wouldn't it be great if the ad brokers realised that people would look at unobtrusive adverts, and if they rejected the malware and flashy, noisy crap instantly, the remainder would be viewed.

Eventually. Because it's too late for most consumers, we've already installed an adblocker and we're unlikely to turn it off.

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If we can't find a working SCSI cable, the company will close tomorrow

Richard 12
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Re: Pournelle's law, well one of them anyway...

Too vague to be useful.

A capacitor stores *charge*.

One could say that an inductor stores magnetism.

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White hat hacker AI bots prepare for DARPA's DEF CON cyber brawl

Richard 12
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Makes no real difference to the machine

After all, bytecode and machine code are not different to the source as far as the executable code paths are concerned.

The comments and variable names are extremely useful to humans, but not so much to machines unless anyone is trying for natural-language processing of reading the comments and variable names to infer the intended results and identify places where the code doesn't match the comments.

They only need the source code because they are supposed to create patches, and humans find it much easier to examine source code for correctness.

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Smartphones aren't tiny PCs, but that's how we use them in the West

Richard 12
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Re: Bar & QR Codes suck for the blind.

I presume that touchscreen interfaces suck even harder.

Buttons you can't even tell exist

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Tupperware vehemently denies any link to storage containerisation

Richard 12
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The rules mean they have to do this

Trademarks aren't like copyright.

If you don't defend a trademark, you lose it. So they have to send the "cease and desist" letter, even if they really don't care and even if they rather like the comparison.

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It's 2016 and Windows lets crims poison your printer drivers

Richard 12
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Uninstall Flash anyway

You uaed to be able to set your Http headers to ask for the mobile site. Not sure if this still works.

The sooner Auntie sees a drop in usage of their Flash iPlayer, the sooner they'll officially offer an alternative.

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Florida U boffins think they've defeated all ransomware

Richard 12
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Re: Defeated ALL Ransomware?

Chances are good that the 0.2% are files that haven't changed at all since the last backup, so unlikely to lose any data.

0.2% is also much better than the 50-75% or more before a user spots an encrypted file, or the 10% or similar before an alert sysadmin spots an unexpected traffic spike or hears fans running more than usual.

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Facebook deleted my post and made me confirm pics of my kids weren't sexually explicit

Richard 12
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Re: It's not your platform and you are not a customer

Of course Facebook has no long-term value.

The history of social media is that a single one gets huge, then passes of its membership and they leave.

People follow people, both in and out.

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Richard 12
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Taking down food porn is the logical next step...

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Rolls-Royce reckons robot cargo ships are the future of the seas

Richard 12
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Re: Rolls-Royce are deluded

I have done almost exactly that.

The autodock is far better at it than any pilot - the only real reason for pilotage these days is because of not wanting to update all the charts daily.

I never sailed the English Channel, but the run up to the Gatun Locks is considerably more congested - albeit that was a 76000 tonne as nothing bigger fits.

Ship maneuvers are laughably simple to automate, while also being incredibly difficult for a human, because they are slow.

Humans don't really see cm/s speeds, but sensors can - and so actually stop the ship before ramming the pier, where a human is fairly likely to overcook it.

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Richard 12
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Re: Rolls-Royce are deluded

The actual sailing is trivial, and a solved problem - pretty much all large ships sit in autopilot and auto-dock most of the time.

The crew maintain the ship. They de-rust it, paint it, fix leaks, replace pumps, strip and rebuild the engines...

All while under way, and actively earning money for the owner.

A robot ship with no crew quarters would have to come into port for all maintenance, costing a huge amount and even more importantly, being out of action.

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UK patients should have greater data slurp opt-out powers – report

Richard 12
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Re: What it should be

And if they actually did this, then GPs would start recommending that their patients opt in.

Instead, they built a system where GPs not only recommended that all their patients opt-out, but actively made sure that they all did.

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UK.gov wants to fine websites £250,000 if teens watch porn vids

Richard 12
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Re: Number twelve. The naughty bits of a lady

I've heard somewhere that the sun was going to stop having a page 3.

I assumed that meant it was becoming a 1-sheet rag.

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Prominent Brit law firm instructed to block Brexit Article 50 trigger

Richard 12
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Re: The honourable way

Is explicitly prohibited by that treaty.

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Richard 12
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Re: What about my EU Citizenship

It doesn't exist and never did.

You are only an EU citizen because you are a citizen of a member state of the EU.

If you cease to be a citizen of an EU member state, you cease to have any EU status.

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Sterling's post-Brexit dollar woes are forcing up tech kit prices

Richard 12
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A fall against USD costs everyone, especially those who drive, use public transport or buy food and other goods transported by road or rail.

It also increases the cost of things imported from China, as they are priced in USD as well.

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Man killed in gruesome Tesla autopilot crash was saved by his car's software weeks earlier

Richard 12
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Re: ZanzibarRastapopulous

You're right of course.

I missed the word "perhaps".

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Richard 12
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Re: Wouldn't have happened in the UK.

And this article would tend to support this, albeit sadly lacking in sources or detail.

http://www.cnbc.com/2014/07/30/truck-accidents-surge-why-no-national-outcry.html

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Richard 12
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Re: Wouldn't have happened in the UK.

I suspect that it probably is quite common in the US, because most people are really bad at understanding statistics and legislators know this.

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Richard 12
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Re: No bars?

That is the cause of death.

Drive-under crashes are extremely deadly, as they avoid all possible crash safety equipment and peel off the top half of the car.

Nobody can duck far enough or fast enough.

The driver/autopilot combination caused the crash, but it's that truck design that killed.

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What Brexit means for you as a motorist

Richard 12
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One of the facts

Fuel is more expensive.

Oil is priced in USD. The pound is way down against the USD.

All oil products now cost more.

The moment the current supplies and futures hedging start to run out, prices at the pump rise.

That affects everyone who buys or uses anything transported by road, or any road transport.

100% certainty, because it has already happened.

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Richard 12
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Say what?

That would lead to an instant increase in dodgy and just plain criminally insane landlords, as all the good ones immediately leave the market.

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Richard 12
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Re: Yawn.

Indeed. Funny how that is exactly what Article 50 says, and his job is to remind countries what the treaties they signed say.

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Richard 12
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Re: Yawn.

If house prices do crash, you definitely won't be able to afford one.

If they fall it's because mortgages become far more expensive, thus completely ****ing over everyone - repossessions, and only cash buyers can afford anything.

The more likely scenario is that they don't rise as fast, because mortgages become a little bit more expensive and the big cash buyers go elsewhere.

If you can't afford one last week, the effects of leaving the EU makes it far less likely you'll be able to afford one in three years time.

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Richard 12
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Re: US visa waiver application form is at least 70% identical with a US visa application form.

And an Egyptian single-entry visa is as follows:

Pay $15, stick sticker in passport.

The US ESTA "visa waiver programme" is simply a different type of 2-year multi-entry visa.

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