* Posts by Richard 12

1597 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Did GM food cause GIANT TUMOURS IN RATS?

Richard 12
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Re: Summary

Rather sloppy thinking from a lot of quarters!

Even taken at face value this is not a reason not to use GM technology.

A result that said "GM crops are safe to eat" would also be utter bollocks.

It's just like saying "welded boxes are safe", ignoring that a welder can make a main battle tank or a water tank - one of those is not very safe at all.

- Which one depends where you are...

A particular GM crop can be tested and found safe (or unsafe), direct GM itself is merely a tool.

And a very effective tool as well - much more likely to give the intended resultant crop than the genetic modification via blind breeding that we've been doing for the last few thousand years.

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Richard 12
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Your "everyone" are mightily ill-informed

First of all, without intensive farming, your lifestyle could not exist. You'd be out in the fields every day along with everyone else not of noble birth.

Secondly, without intensive farming, you'd probably have starved to death by now, or never been born because your parents did.

Look at Africa, parts of China etc. Subsistence farming is not the idyll you think it is.

Finally, humans have been genetically modifying animals and plants for the last ten thousand years or so. How do you think we got from crab-apple like things to the large tasty cox pippins, or from grass to wheat, corn etc?

Selective breeding, cross-breeding - both forms of genetic modification.

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DAB dad Pure deploys DVR

Richard 12
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So it looks nice but can't cope?

Silly Pure.

A stuttering GUI is pretty much the worst thing you can do, and there's simply no exuse for that in a product in that kind of price range.

Either put faster hardware in there or cut some of the bling.

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Win8 tablets may cost MORE than iPads – AND LAPTOPS

Richard 12
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Re: Sad thing is, I wouldn't bet on it

A bloke who does WHAT!!?

Now that is truly the definition of insane, almost anything else would have been better and safer.

I'm really hoping that was a slight exaggeration and he's actually merely using Excel to auto-generate the g-code (or whatever program the robot runs on), but even so...

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Windows 8: Never mind Office, it's for GAMING

Richard 12
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Mushroom

Re: MS already has a Windows gaming "ecosystem" for the PC

Valve are worried that MS are going to abuse their monopoly to try to push Valve (et al) out of the games on PC market.

Just like they did to the browser market many years ago.

And while that would again be grounds for an antitrust lawsuit, that didn't help Netscape very much.

From here it certainly looks like MS are trying to create a walled garden inside TIFKAM, and that would indeed be a disaster (and yet another abuse of monopoly from a convicted abuser).

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Ballmer: Win8 'certainly surpasses' Win95 in importance

Richard 12
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They changed the UI more than "a bit"

They threw away almost everything good from the previous version, and even tried to get rid of the idea of Windows (plural) and replaced it with something that is the exact opposite of the last 20-30 years of human-computer interface research.

Ref flat, monochrome "buttons", multitude of invisible functions, hiding everything from you instead of layering like, well, windows.

Windows 8 itself may well be a pretty good technical improvement underneath, but the TIFKAM interface is what they are pushing, and it's utterly terrible on a desktop or any multitasking device.

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Microsoft bod dreams up 'Star Trek holodeck' games console

Richard 12
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Re: Madness.....

Sorry, but the answer is yes, it can.

d3's system dynamically alters the 'virtual' projection source - otherwise known as the 'eyepoint' - using an arbitrary 3D control input.

While it's true that the last demo I saw was using a mouse to control where the 'virtual' projector was and the direction it was pointing in, it's trivial to hook up anything capable of handing out a position and direction.

It's a seriously cool bit of kit.

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Richard 12
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WTF?

Re: Madness.....

Neither does Microsoft's patent application, except in extremely general terms.

My guess is that they watched the Queen's Jubilee celebration last year and decided to try to steal d3's technology out from under them.

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French firm snatches Italian set-top contract from Blighty's Amino

Richard 12
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Re: "Intel-based set top market. "

I suspect a lot of the more expensive set-top-boxes do use x86 processors, however I'm absolutely certain that consumers do not care in the slightest.

A 'technical' consumer might look at the power consumption in running, 'soft' standby and 'powersave' standby, and if it's their second STB purchase what the box will actually do in the latter two. (Once bitten, twice shy and all that)

The only ones who really care are enthusiasts 'hacking' on a given STB care, but only so they know which toolchain to select for cross-compiling.

I have no idea what the CPU in my Foxsat HDR is. It might be interesting to know, but I'm not bothered enough to spend much energy finding out.

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Windows Phone 8 stands a chance as Apple, Android dither

Richard 12
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Re: Cyanogen

So as has been the case since time immemorial, the operators are ****ing up perfectly good phones with their pointless and awful additions.

I genuinely think that the best thing Apple did to the iPhone was telling the operators they were not allowed to ruin customise it.

Almost every complaint I've had and heard of about Symbian, Windows Mobile and Android was "Why the hell can't I delete this useless <insert name here>?"

When will the operators learn?

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Smack your phones up, says Microsoft

Richard 12
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Re: That's actually pretty clever.

Too late, they already existed long before this patent was filed.

I also seem to recall at least one manufacturer (HTC?) advertising this as a feature of some of their phones a couple of years ago, and InvenSense describe this kind of function in several of their accelerometer data sheets.

You can also tell that the patent applicant doesn't really understand the basic hardware either, because the "shock" and "freefall" outputs of many MEMS accelerometers are still active in 'sleep' mode, when they are drawing uA.

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Google offers tool to bridge Android and iOS app dev

Richard 12
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FAIL

Re: *Whoosh* as the point flies over your head

Oh dear. You really don't get it, do you?

Google wrote this tool. Google want people to develop for Android, and Google would prefer that people did not develop for iOS.

Ask yourself this question:

Which of these statements are in Google's interest to say:

a) "Develop Android first, and you can make an iOS version easily."

b) "Develop iOS first, you can make an Android version easily."

Hint - if you said, (b), you're wrong.

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Richard 12
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FAIL

*Whoosh* as the point flies over your head

Which is riskier - developing for both of the two most popular platforms, or developing only for the second-most popular platform?

Of course, neither are as risky as developing for the fourth or fifth (depending on how it's measured) that hasn't even been released yet.

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Richard 12
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Google want devs to write the Android first

They are saying "Here, write your application for Android and you can easily port it to iOS in the future."

The idea is that development houses will start by writing an Android app, as that way around carries less risk.

It's also pretty likely that many will never actually convert it to iOS at all, merely having the option is enough.

If you only develop for iOS it's pretty risky, as you're screwed if/when iPhone popularity dips*, and indeed vice-versa.

*It will probably dip fairly soon, because iOS is starting to stagnate - what's new in iOS 6? An extra screen size?

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Richard 12
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Re: It's A solution

There is, it's called Qt.

Unfortunately an idiot by the name of Elop didn't understand what he had and threw it away.

It's now managed by Digia.

It currently handles Android, Symbian, Mac OSX, Windows, Linux (many platforms) and a lot of more specialised targets.

I believe that an iOS target is under development, though I don't know how far away.

WP7 & 8 are not currently on the table, which is rather strange.

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Work for beer, Neil Gaiman's wife tells musicians

Richard 12
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WTF?

Very interesting

Given that she says throughout that her sums are based on a backing of $1,000,000, and she actually raised $192,793 more than that.

Last time I checked, $35k was less than $192k, and she'd still have $157k more than budgeted.

Unless of course the budget was simply wrong. However being out by more than $150k is pretty serious, enough to bankrupt many companies.

The odd thing is that she acknowledges that the designers and crew aren't going to work for free, yet she expects the musicians to do that.

I suppose the weirdest part is that it's usually the other way around in the UK.

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Richard 12
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Very big difference there

In am-dram, the director, designers and cast don't get paid, they are members of the am-dram society - paying subscriptions just like being a member of any society.

When they put on productions, the society will pay for the materials, venue hire and venue technician(s) and in the UK they will often pay the orchestra.

The up-front and running costs are met by the society members by their subscriptions, the ticket sales are intended to pay for the rest.

The article is about a professional tour. Would you do you job for free when everyone else is being paid?

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EU greases up orphan works copyright loophole for Big Culture

Richard 12
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Re: So things published under a law to stop other people publishing them

I like that idea, use of any image with no metadata at all should be considered the copyright equivalent of receiving stolen goods, and the only possible defence being producing the original which does contain the metadata.

Doesn't do anything about replacing the metadata though - how do you prove it's the right or wrong metadata?

I can see this general idea resulting in one heck of a watermarking gold rush.

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Ten iPhone 5 challengers

Richard 12
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Re: iTunes

It's such a shame then, that iTunes has become such a bloated hog with hideous GUI making it damn near impossible to use as a music library.

It used to be really good, but they destroyed it with so many changes, it has suffered a death by a thousand cuts.

Now I don't even start it up, and I simply uninstalled it last time it wanted to update. It went from slick and useful, to nagging utter crap in a few short years.

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Can Windows 8 developers be ‘the new rock stars’?

Richard 12
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Notch?

Definitely had (has?) groupies, and at one point his avatar did grace some posters.

More seriously, the difference is actually social - music and film stars do tv appearances and tours, and much of their fame is based on that projected stage persona(s) rather than their raw skill in music/acting.

Thus people know what they look like and think they know the person as well. They don't of course, but hey, a fake personality generally beats a real one anyway.

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Windows 8? Nah: Win Phone 8 should give Apple the fear

Richard 12
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Re: Fanboi amusement...

Well, I don't like it but I'm not surprised.

My phone syncs with Exchange using push email, and ActiveSync is the way Microsoft does that.

The reason I don't like it is the same reason that SMB is public and free to use, namely interoperability with the monopoly holder.

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Sparkfun punts bonkers banana-piano kit at hardware hackers

Richard 12
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Boffin

Re: Mad science at its best

Conductive paint probably won't work, skin alone is of a very similar conductivity.

That said, you can probably build a variable resistor into someone's skin, by using a pair of contacts and measuring the resistance between each of them and to the other person.

If that works, then a 2D touchpad is simply a case of another pair of contacts and multiplexing.

This calls for an experiment!

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Airbus predicts catapult takeoffs and formation flying by 2050

Richard 12
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Re: Wing Root

Did a Comet ever suffer a rotor burst (in testing or in service)?

Genuine question, I don't know.

Modern airliners contain those inside the engine pods, but the pod may be very badly damaged and deformed by the burst.

So I'd also be a bit worried about that idea, as a bent engine pod is not going to seriously affect the lift while a bent wing would.

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UPEK fingerprint scanners insecure, says Elcomsoft

Richard 12
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Re: Hold on there...

It's in the Registry as a simple to unscramble key value.

Programs don't need admin privileges to read an arbitrary Registry key, only to write one, so this is trivial to exploit the moment a miscreant gets any of their code running client-side.

Really quite astoundingly bad for supposed "security" software.

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The world's first Windows Phone 8 hands on – what's it like?

Richard 12
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Re: Disappointing

Pixel count isn't everything.

What's the point of a 10 MP camera if half the pixels only show random noise?

A lower pixel count can be better because the pixel sensors can be physically larger, so less susceptible to noise.

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Sceptic becomes UK Environment - but not Climate - Secretary

Richard 12
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Re: Misnomer

Oh dear. I hope you're joking!

Evolution by means of natural selection can be tested like this:

Take a rapidly-breeding population, seal them in artificially-controlled environments, then change the environment of each in a different way.

Wait a few hundred or thousand generations, then compare the populations of the different environments. If each has changed in some way beneficial for their environment, the theory is correct.

If they have not changed, or all changed in the same way, it is incorrect.

This experiment has been done many times, most often with fruit flies, yeasts, bacteria and other small and rapidly reproducing life forms.

Evolution by means of natural selection is proven pretty well.

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'This lawsuit is not about patents or money, it's about values'

Richard 12
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Re: Hang on a mo...

With or without ARM doesn't matter, simply assigning different GPIO pin functions would have the same effect!

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Richard 12
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Samsung will almost certainly win the appeal

They only meed use the lead jurors interview comments they can get the verdict overturned. "Run without error", seriously?

That's either a complete and utter misunderstanding of the law, or a statement of fact that it is fundamentally impossible for Samsung (or indeed anybody else) to infringe on Apple's patents without using exactly the same iPhone/iPad hardware.

Samsung's S2 spin of Android won't run on an iPhone without error, and vice-versa.

TBH, I half wonder if that juror is now at risk of a contempt charge.

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Hands on with LG's 21:9 monitors

Richard 12
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Happy

Re: Who thinks of those things?

Not really the right forum for this, but anyway:

In Windows 7, right-click the Desktop and choose "Screen Resolution". One of the options there is Orientation.

(I think this was a driver-specific option in Windows XP, though I did think every nVidia in the last ten years offered it.)

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Richard 12
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Re: Who thinks of those things?

All graphics cards in the last few years support rotation, it's even offered by the OS directly these days.

Windows 7 calls this Portrait. It's about the only way Office 20xx becomes usable.

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Windows Phone 8: What Nokia and Microsoft MUST do

Richard 12
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An odd position to take

Personally, I don't care what stock Android, WP, iOS or whatever does or doesn't do.

I care what my particular phone does. The OS only matters in so far as it determines the pool of available applications.

To some extent, differentiation between Android phones is a good thing, it means manufacturers can give you a reason beyond mere hardware stats to buy their phone instead of another, thus you have a reason for brand loyalty beyond the label itself.

WP has a big problem with that - all WP of a given version are of necessity practically identical. So why buy a Nokia over an HTC or Samsung?

With WP, the only way to differentiate is the raw hardware, which is a far higher unit cost than software changes.

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So, just what is the ultimate bacon sarnie?

Richard 12
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Re: It's all about the cooking of the bacon

Not rape, that stuff is awful. Corn oil is much nicer.

Proper dripping is best but can be harder to get hold of.

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Windows Phone 8: Microsoft quite literally can't lose

Richard 12
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Re: why would windows phone 8 succeed?

Way to miss the point on multi-core!

(Not surprising though, Microsoft publicly did the same)

Multi-core can be used to give lots of CPU grunt while saving battery.

You can only slow down a CPU a certain amount before latency gets awful and you stop really saving power. (Which happens first depends)

In a multi-core system, you can completely turn off all except one of the cores (~75% saving for quad) and then slow down the final one a bit.

So dual and quad-core gives you both more CPU power when needed, and much improved battery life.

Obviously it's not all sunshine and roses, there will be a point where the increased complexity overcomes the benefit, and the OS applications do need to be written to take advantage of the multiple cores rather than pure single threading.

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Why Java would still stink even if it weren't security swiss cheese

Richard 12
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Re: Got the same feeling about Delphi.

Hang on, have they gone completely mad?

The whole point of Delphi was for making database-driven applications, that's why it's called Delphi!

(ref. "Oracle at Delphi". Yes, horrible pun but there you go.)

Castrating the database functionality is just killing the thing.

Shame really, I quite liked Delphi 6 and it made very small and reasonably fast applications. Upgrading the projects to later versions was deemed too much work though as they are legacy, so it's fallen by the wayside here.

(Moving projects between machines was hideously awful though. True dependency hell.)

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UK ISPs crippled by undersea cable snap

Richard 12
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WTF?

@ravenviz: Ever used a satellite link?

They're the only thing available to mobile stations like ships or "internet to a field/beach in the middle of nowhere". (Or oddly Hyde Park a few years ago, before 3G took off)

Approximately 500ms ping is normal. In some cases I've had to adjust timeouts to get a connection to stay up - under poor signal quality roundtrip time goes up quite a bit due to retries.

I rather doubt you'd be happy over that one.

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Visual Studio 2012: 50 Shades of Grey by Microsoft

Richard 12
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FAIL

Grey icons traditionally indicate disabled or unavailable options.

I'm pretty sure that's actually specifically stated in a previous version of a Windows GUI style guide.

So clearly the GUI screenshots are intended to convey that every single feature has been disabled and is unavailable.

I'll stick with a version that actually works, thanks.

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Shove off Prince Harry, now Norway's teen royal in fresh photo uproar

Richard 12
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There's more to it than geotagging

Background details will give approximate location, and foreground may give precise coordinates.

Plus, they are supposed to be working rather than taking photos anyway!

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Kidney-for-iPad fanboi sues after illness strikes

Richard 12
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Merely giving up a kidney doesn't make him an idiot.

After all, in the UK alone there are hundreds of living donors who have done the same - for free!

It seems that the actual donation part was not done all that well - either he wasn't really a suitable donor or some aspect of surgery or aftercare was botched or poor.

Good luck to him though - most teens do at least one spectacularly stupid thing, just most get away with it.

I can think of a lot of adults who would probably have been taken in by this kind of thing - most of the people on the Jeremy Kyle show, to begin with.

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Vodafone and pals can't kick the habit of cheap mobe prices

Richard 12
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Re: Hi, Mr. Cynical here

Rule of thumb is that price-to-retailer is around 3-4 times cost, and price to end user 4-5 times manufacturing cost.

That's to cover all the fixed costs of bringing a device to market - things like the hardware & software engineers, testing etc for compliance with standards and regulations, IP licences, marketing etc.

Then the retailer you buy it from needs to make some money as well to pay their rent and staff.

So those prices all sound pretty reasonable.

Also, remember why iSupply do those tear downs in the first place - they are advertising their services in finding suppliers and manufacturers for similar devices.

So they are probably going to underestimate the cost to get more business, as nobody can bring them up on it anyway.

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Euro NCAP to mandate auto-braking in new-car test

Richard 12
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Re: @Richard 12

Yes, to drive safely you do have to do that.

However, if you take a look at a motorway you'll clearly that that very few drivers really do so.

I see a lot of tailgating action on the motorways that looks exactly like "Set cruise control slightly too fast, get really close to the car in front then suddenly realise too close and slow down a lot."

Oddly enough, almost always the cars that have this feature as standard.

Adaptive cruise control is supposed to fix that, perhaps it does.

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Richard 12
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Unhappy

Re: Even better idea

I really dislike cruise control.

It means that drivers have an incentive not to maintain a good separation between them and the car in front because they have to disable it (and thus re-enable it) to do so.

It probably also increases stopping distance because they won't have their foot on a pedal - so further to physically move before braking starts.

I've driven a few cars with it, tried it out and decided that I had less control of the vehicle so I don't use it at all now.

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Microsoft tightens grip on OEM Windows 8 licensing

Richard 12
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Facepalm

Re: Well you are overlooking something

Corporate installs?

We have our own images and buy our own licences, and I don't think we are alone in that.

Yet Dell still ship the machines with Windows pre-installed. Hoping that they don't actually end up double licensed by some magic or other, but as that isn't directly my problem I don't pay much attention.

Remember that home use remains a small proportion of PC sales.

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Martian lakes seen where NASA Curiosity rover WON'T BE GOING

Richard 12
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Happy

Re: `miffed`

They are intending to, in the 2016 and 2018 missions.

The 2018 mission is even hopinh to bring some stuff back!

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Valve: Games run FASTER on Linux than Windows

Richard 12
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Happy

Re: You seem to be missing something here

If the hardware will run at a 16% higher framerate, then that's 16% more detail that can be put into the game.

So higher resolutions, more realistic meshes, better texturing and/or more complex shaders for better lighting and Other Things.

Which is nice.

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Richard 12
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Nah, it'll be simpler than that.

It will be "Click this link, type your Steam login details. Now go have a cup of coffee while Magic Happens."

Partly because it will fail if it isn't - their key target market wants one-or-two-click solutions with the minimum of fuss - but mostly because completely automating that kind of thing is much easier in Linux than Windows.

If they manage a good (soft) launch, then a lot of people will start wondering "Why buy Windows for my next computer when the Linux version is easier and runs better?"

That's clearly Valve's aim, and it will be interesting to see if it comes to pass.

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Richard 12
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FAIL

Re: Gabe!

Different situations - Steam worked from day one, the initial annoyances were down to needing an internet connection to initially register back when broadband was less common and more expensive.

When Steam first launched (9 or 10 years ago? I feel old!), I did find it annoying to have to take my laptop to an internet cafe for a couple of hours to download updates for Half-Life 2 after installing it. The box did say that I needed a connection to 'register' the game and the downloads were clearly marked as updates and I could just click "Go ahead" and let it run while I did other stuff (emails home etc). Once done I could play whenever I wanted without a connection, and these days that download would have taken five minutes and I may not have even noticed.

Heck, I didn't have to wait long for *everything* to get downloaded and install on my new PC last year - all I neeedd to do was install Steam, type in my username/password once and click "download all my stuff". A win for Steam as I didn't need to bother finding my disks.

Everyone I know who has tried Steam has found that it works pretty well and doesn't distract from the game - the complaints about it for the last five years or more are merely about DRM as a concept, rather than Steam's implementation.

None of that applied to GFWL. I had to keep clicking through loads of things, retype my details many times and I could not leave it going while doing something else. It simply doesn't work, and it's now pissed off enough people that nobody who has heard of it is going to want anything to do with it or its successors.

Basically, this kind of system is only accepted if it's seamless and almost invisible.

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Richard 12
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Mushroom

Re: Gabe!

I doubt Windows Marketplace will affect Steam much.

Yesterday I bought a game that used "Games for Windows LIVE". This was a terrible, terrible mistake. DO NOT DO THIS.

After it downloaded and apparently fully installed, it took over an hour just to 'create' an account so I could play my game (despite already having a Windows LIVE account), it adds about a minute to the game startup and actually kicks me back to the main menu after it logs in - I click "Play single player game", it moves on to Load/Resume/Options, sit there for a minute while GFWL logs in and then have to click OK to get kicked back to the main menu and I have to click Play Single Player again.

It's totally destroyed my appreciation for the game, because it slaps "GFWL!!!!!" in my face like a wet herring every time I play and I'm never going to forget spending a completely frustrated hour pissing about with this unnecessary crap.

Steam on the other hand - it took me about a minute to sign up, and almost every game I've bought through it worked fine with no messing about. I barely even register its existence when I want to play, and it does let me play offline with no internet conection - which GFWL does not.

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Lenovo: 'Us, buy Nokia? Surely you jest'

Richard 12
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Headmaster

Re: Please, please

Presumably Nokia have entered the Olympic archery contest and forgotten their arrows, so are shooting wads of cash at the targets.

You know, that actually makes about as much sense as their current market strategy...

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UK's thirst for energy falls, yet prices rise: Now why is that?

Richard 12
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Re: Brown Out Blair Out Cameron Out

Our hydro is "STOR" (surge) demand - the typical example is a cup of tea in commercial breaks.

The "interruptible" contracts you're thinking of are probably the frequency response loads which can shut down instantly for up to 20 minutes (freezers and the like.) They exist to keep the Grid itself up and running while STOR starts up (75-360 seconds). They aren't there to get the peaking generators running.

CCGTs take a lot longer than you think to reach max. output - 40-50 minutes when 'hot', 75-110 minutes from 'warm' and 75 to 150 minutes from 'cold'*, although they can generate about 2/3 capacity within 30 minutes if you really go for it (treat them as a gas turbine). This is seriously fast for a fossil fuel system, the only faster ones are open cycle gas/petroleum turbine and conventional diesel generators which are used for UPS and grid STOR.**

The CCGTs are currently intended as "peaking" generators - peak demand is predictable so they are brought to temperature just in time to meet the peak demand at full efficiency.

You are right that at the moment we don't need to keep the gas running because wind and solar penetration is very low, and fully coverable by our existing STOR for long enough to get enough high-efficiency CCGTs going.

If current wind peneratration plans come to pass then frequency response plus STOR isn't going to be big enough for long enough to warm up CCGTs from cold.

So that leaves us building a lot more STOR diesels & turbojets and keeping more of the CCGTs warm and hot - both increase CO2 emissions.

Even now it is unclear whether we're actually reducing CO2 emissions when balancing the extra CO2 from the low-efficiency fossil-fuel STOR etc against the lower CO2 emissions of wind***.

Reading their recent publications it's clear that National Grid are shitting bricks. (Very diplomatically, but still...)

* Kehlhofer, R., et al., Combined-cycle gas & steam turbine power plants. 1999, Tulsa: PennWell Publishing Company.

** Boyce, M.P., Gas Turbine Engineering Handbook. 2006, Oxford: Elsevier.

*** Wind is not carbon neutral as it needs a lot of expensive maintenance, offshoire wind doubly so as it takes a lot of fuel oil to get out to the turbines.

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Richard 12
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Flame

Two thing - fractional distillation and crackers. Look them up.

The oil that comes out of the ground is a mix of many different types of oil, petroleum and impurities, so one of the big jobs after extraction is separating the stuff out.

Even after doing that, it's also relatively easy to crack heavy oils into lighter oils like petroleum if that's what you want.

These are what refineries are for.

Light oils into heavier ones is more difficult but can also be done.

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