* Posts by Richard 12

1766 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Friday beers scam up 240 percent, inflicts $1.2 billion in damages

Richard 12
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Re: Out of date Email database

Nope.

It only has to work once in a million emails - possibly even less. Email is incredibly cheap to send - they can send a million every Friday for practically nowt and if just one business falls for it, the scammers still win.

What's needed is for the victims to come forward (I suspect most don't) and press wire-fraud charges.

We get many of these scam attempts every week, even including phone call ones - I've had a lot myself, though being a mere pleb they're barking up the wrong tree to begin with.

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So, was it really the Commies that caused the early 20th Century inequality collapse?

Richard 12
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Re: Not so much public ownership but public wealth creation

The National Grid was extremely significant though.

Built and expanded throughout the 30s to 70s, it finally brought standardised electricity to most of the population and industry - instead of the myriad of slightly different and incompatible systems scattered around the country and even individual cities that existed before.

Massive infrastructure like that has a huge impact.

It also has nothing to do with unions or high marginal tax rates.

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Richard 12
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Re: A bit simplistic

I'd argue that all economic theories are simplistic.

The socialist ones are possibly the worst, as they assume (almost) everyone is happy to be a "worker bee".

The capitalist ones are possibly the worst, as they assume (almost) everyone cares the most about accumulation of wealth.

Reality is neither of these things.

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Win10 Insider build 10532: Avoid if you run Chrome 64-bit

Richard 12
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Re: Corporates

Corporations are legal persons, with many of the legal rights and responsibilities of actual persons.

Some of that is a necessary legal fiction - if a corporation does something that harms you or your property, there has to be a way for you (or your loved ones) to sue the company and for the state to hold them to account.

That's the cost of Limited Liability - in some cases no individual human can be held legally fully responsible, so the company is - and thus the company directors.

For example, In corporate manslaughter cases, the company is prosecuted. I'm not sure what consequences lead from that though.

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Honor 7 – heir apparent to the mid-range Android crown

Richard 12
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Re: 16 GB is pointless

I've got a 16GB phone. Just over 3GB free space.

For me and users like me, it's plenty.

For others, it'd be nowhere near enough, which is fine - and why I really think every phone should have an SD-Card slot, so you can drop in whatever extra space you need, and increase it for very little cost if your needs change.

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Spaniard claims WWII WAR HERO pigeon code crack. Explain please

Richard 12
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Re: Howt to heap shit on your own head

Signing or not is irrelevant, though nationality is.

That said, it's pointless self-aggrandisement anyway.

They used one-time pads for this encryption.

Make two identical lists of totally random code:value pairs, send one out to the field and keep the other for decoding.

As long as your one-time-pad generation system is truly random with sufficient entropy, and you can keep both pads secure, it is genuinely unbreakable.

Inconvenient though, as once the pads are used up, no more messages until you can get a new one to the other party.

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Associated Press sues FBI for impersonating its site to install spyware

Richard 12
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Re: Is AP angry because FBI hindered a big piece of news?

So it'd be ok for them to use your details to honeypot somebody in this way?

Perhaps someone violent?

Even ignoring everything else about it, this appears to be blatant copyright and/or trademark infringement, which under US law is punishable by multi-billion-dollar* fines.

Not to mention unnecessary. A blank page that redirected to an actual AP story would have been just as good.

Also, how many people ended up with this malware installed? Such a drive-by infection would get any vulnerable systems that happened to visit, so it's rather unlikely that the nominal target was the only infected computer.

(*Only a slight exaggeration)

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BACS Bank Holiday BALLS UP borks 275,000 payments

Richard 12
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Re: "Bacs is aware of an isolated issue affecting one of its member organisations"

Translation:

"One of customers has properly ****ed up, we're pretty sure it's nothing to do with us but not certain enough to invite the lawsuit."

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Windows 10 market share growth slows to just ten per cent

Richard 12
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Re: At what cost

They lost the phone API war a long time ago.

It was lost before they even started, and they even deliberately sabotaged themselves just to make sure.

When they partnered with Nokia, they could have supported Qt (at that time it already supported Android and Meego/Meamo). When they launched WinRT, they could have allowed people to develop for it under Win7 for free.

They did neither of these things. They made it expensive and difficult to develop for their new platform - so guess what, nobody did.

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Richard 12
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Re: Dear Microsoft, good luck with that.

Seriously? Ads in solitaire and minesweeper?

They've gone mad.

No corporate facility is going to accept that, and none will pay to remove them either. What are bored receptionists supposed to do?

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Second Ashley Madison dump prompts more inside-job speculation

Richard 12
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It's a dangerous business model to begin with

If your business is based around helping people do stuff that their partners don't want them to do, sooner or later one of those partners will find out and create Consequences for you.

Some of those people will even be willing to break the law to cause those Consequences.

- It doesn't even matter whether it's familial, business or "business", partnerships you're affecting.

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Richard 12
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Re: What theft?

Copyright theft could only be fraudulently arranging to have the copyright assigned to you (or your stooge) instead of the rightful party.

It'd pretty much require a team of lawyers to perpetrate that theft.

Copying something when you don't have permission from the copyright owner is "infringement".

Words are important, copyright law says so.

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'Unexpected item in baggage area' assigned to rubbish area

Richard 12
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Re: I must be to young

Dabbs isn't very good at it.

I know some very good ladies who would be happy to give him a lesson.

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Richard 12
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Re: Fucking self-scan tills!

It's closer to 1%, probably less.

Minimum wage, 2min per customer is 21p. Double that for employer costs, so 42p.

Staff spend far more of their time shelf-stacking, so you got your money's worth.

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Microsoft will explain only 'significant' Windows 10 updates

Richard 12
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Re: "Darling, it was a moment of madness"

On the bright side, they'll probably have less hang-ups about nudity, and their tabloids will publish fewer "celebrity long-lens" shots.

As everybody's bits will already have ended up in public view at some point.

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Richard 12
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Re: what is this telling you?

You're a bad person and should be ashamed.

If you don't give useful names to your commits then you're hurting everybody in the project - especially yourself.

I bet you-from-the-future hates you.

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Richard 12
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Re: Under UK law

As far as I know, no EULA has ever been tested in court.

There have been legal opinions sought and given by many parties, and a few out-of-court settlements, but no actual case law.

EULAs almost certainly contain unenforceable clauses, and may even be unenforceable in general - beyond the general protections provided by copyright laws, anyway.

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LA explosion knocks LogMeIn's British customers offline

Richard 12
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Re: Bah!

General telecoms also has backup and redundancy.

At least, it does in the EU - it's a legal requirement of being a telco.

Perhaps that's not true in 3rd world countries.

So if you pay for "last mile" redundancy yourself (separated links to different exchanges), you're covered for most.

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Now Ashley Madison hackers reveal 'CEO's emails and source code'

Richard 12
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Re: Or the opposite could happen....

That's comparing apples with spacescraft.

Cheating is an action that is expected to cause harm, by definition.

Swinging is fine, as those affected know and agree to it, but this place didn't claim to be helping swingers.

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Intel's Compute Sticks stick it to Windows To Go, Chromecast

Richard 12
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ARM without binary blob means no GPU

You can usually get a basic framebuffer running without using any binary blobs. Most ARM Linux BSPs do this for boot splash.

However, you cannot get any hardware graphics acceleration unless you use the binary blob that from ARM, Broadcom, Vivante etc.

They don't publish how their GPUs work because that is a mixture of patented works and trade secrets, which they can't/won't divulge.

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Richard 12
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Re: power over HDMI

Presumably there's also hope that it'll run Crysis, create world peace and make a nice cup of tea.

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Why do driverless car makers have this insatiable need for speed?

Richard 12
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Re: Driverless cars do not need to be owned

Trouble is that you need a dual-clutch auto to get decent performance and decent efficiency.

And only the really pricy cars have those.

Everything else has the single-clutch boxes that are so slow you can lick the windscreen every gear change, or torque convertors that are hideously inefficient.

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Ofcom coverage map: 7/10 – must try harder next time

Richard 12
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Re: Good start

Geolocation is far more precise out in the boonies than in a city.

The urban canyon is pretty much the worst case for a GPS receiver.

GPS is amazingly precise and accurate when there's no buildings to confuse the receiver.

The problem with the OFCOM stuff is that they use calculated for almost everywhere, and only measure raw signal strength in the few places they've measured.

Thus they don't spot the overloaded cell that couldn't carry a connection of any type, or the noisy link that can't carry anything more than a text message.

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Assange™ is 'upset' that he WON'T be prosecuted for rape, giggles lawyer

Richard 12
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Re: So is there a statute of limitations about skipping bail?

No.

Contempt of court is one of the things that will never expire, and has quite significant consequences - especially when apparently pre-meditated.

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Exploding Power Bars: EE couldn't even get the CE safety mark right

Richard 12
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CE is simpler than that

It means that the person who signed the Declaration of Conformity was willing to sign that it meets the applicable EU Regulations.

No more, no less.

The entity that places it on the market in the EU is legally responsible for this being correct.

UL is different, in that UL is a pure paper exercise with (almost) no testing at all, but does require that the papers are lodged with Underwriters Laboratories.

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Google to bung next-gen Vulkan 3D graphics spec into Android

Richard 12
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The biggest win is the name

If you search for OpenGL, most of the results you get are promoting ancient techniques, if not plain wrong.

And given how hard it is these days to convince Google that you really, really mean "Don't show me any results with glBegin in them", I for one welcome our new volcanic overlords.

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Perhaps middle-aged blokes SHOULDN'T try 34-hour-long road trips

Richard 12
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The M25 is a bad compromise

It's actually several different motorways and dual carriageways that got stuck together into one ring when the money and enthusiasm ran out.

There's several places where this is pretty obvious, as the route is just daft.

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Death to DRM, we'll kill it in a decade, chants EFF

Richard 12
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Re: People slowly realise how much of a problem it is

WTF?

¿Who thinks of region coding toner?

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All hail Ikabai-Sital! Destroyer of worlds and mender of toilets

Richard 12
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Leaks are usually simple to fix

Either replace the washer, fill the hole with inappropriate gunk or put a bucket under it.

My sink drain uses the inappropriate gunk method. I did get some appropriate gunk afterwards, but never needed to actually use it.

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EE recalls Power Bar phone chargers after explosion burns woman

Richard 12
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Re: Glad...

You don't use water on electrical fires.

Also, Lithium reacts with water quite enthusiastically.

Also, most people don't have a tap in their bedroom.

Finally - do you know how you would react to waking up to a fire?

Unless you've had special training, you would probably panic to some extent, and it's very unlikely that you'd use the most appropriate firefighting technique.

She did well enough.

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Windows 10 Start menu replacements shifting like hot cakes

Richard 12
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Re: Windows 8 isn't a good comparison

You're wrong.

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Stop forcing benefits down my throat and give me hard cash, dammit

Richard 12
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Re: Flexibility doesn't exist at lower income levels

I'm pretty sure the unemployment rate isn't 38%.

In the short-term it was.

Over the longer term, new technology often creates jobs in new sectors that replace many of those that were lost due to it, but there's no reason why it would be the same number and this takes a long time.

- In the UK, what actually happened was lots of people emigrated, and even larger numbers got killed in various wars. That said, it seems unlikely that current UK unemployment rates would be much different if that hadn't happened, as we did import huge numbers of people later on.

Full employment is a very unstable position. You can only balance on that needle in a Star Trek post-scarcity economy or if the Government decrees that everybody is employed.

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Richard 12
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Re: @DaveDaveDave

If it was then he didn't understand any of the post at all.

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Richard 12
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FAIL

@DaveDaveDave

Tautologies tell us nothing. Why is a given job worth more than another?

You are buying a specific product.

Do you buy the product from Supplier A who charges £10, or Supplier B who charges £5?

If you said A, you're either a liar or an idiot and there's no point in continuing the discussion.

- Though if you said "It depends why A costs more", then that is a very good question.

According to economic theory, jobs are the same. When hiring somebody to do a thing, you want to spend the least overall.

That might mean hiring one person instead of two, paying the more skilled person more than you would have laid either of the less skilled ones - because a 1.5 multiplier is smaller than 2.

You might pay a very skilled person a lot because the cost (in time and money) of replacing them is very high.

The goal remains as spending the least.

However, none of the actors have perfect knowledge and they all have biases (inertia, not wanting to do certain things, wanting to live in particular places). In general, this tends to lead to employers offering more, and potential employees and contractors asking for less.

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Richard 12
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Re: Flexibility doesn't exist at lower income levels

You work in a skilled market.

Take a look at an unskilled one. It'll really, really scare you.

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Richard 12
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Re: Flexibility doesn't exist at lower income levels

Full employment is impossible in a free market.

It can only be done by making the Government the only employer.

- Not the employee of last resort, as that's the same as having out-of-work benefits.

A thought experiment:

Everybody is employed.

Somebody invents a machine that does the work of 10 people.

9 people are now unemployed.

1000 other business units have the same need, and purchase the machine.

9090 people are now unemployed.

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Richard 12
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"...more than minimum wage..."

And there lies the wub.

The law is to protect the bottom.

According to economic theory, all jobs are valued by the employer at "the least we can get away with paying".

There have always been more people of working age/capacity in the region than there are jobs to be done - and modern transport means that the region in question is even larger than in history.

All low-skill jobs can be done by anybody.

Thus, in the absence of external force (law), low-skill jobs will be paid the absolute minimum, with the least benefits, shortest holiday etc.

On top of that, if your pay is low, unpaid holiday is infinite cost as you can't make rent/eat etc.

I already see this in the UK's care industry. Many care workers have multiple jobs, doing shifts at B during their time off from A.

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It's enough to get your back up: Eight dual-bay SOHO NAS boxes

Richard 12
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Re: RAID-0 FFS?

I can't think of any reason to use RAID-0 in a NAS box.

It's useful where performance is critical but data integrity is not - eg, the working copy of something large.

So unless you have SATA-3 or better access speeds, it's worse than useless. No SOHO NAS has that.

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Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo crackup verdict: PILOT ERROR

Richard 12
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Re: Seems little margin for error...

Presumably the instructions did say that, as the copilot wouldn't have made the flight if he didn't believe he knew what to do.

But requiring a human to pull the handle inside an 11 second window, while they're doing all of the other "fly the plane" things, with disaster occurring if they are early or late is just stupid.

Automate it.

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Windows 10: Buy cheap, buy twice, right? Buy FREE ... buy FOREVER

Richard 12
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Re: Windows vs Linux

On the bright side, showing the EULA after your device has already upgraded and not offering any way to reject it and roll back, means that it cannot be enforced in any civilised countries.

Probably not even in the USA either.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 Torrent-U-Like updates GULP DOWN your precious bandwidth

Richard 12
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Re: How come...?

The podcast app on my phone has settings to say "only update on wifi while on charge"

If it can do that, why can't others?

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W3C's failed Do Not Track crusade tumbles to ad-blockers' Vietnam

Richard 12
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Re: my own DNT

Easier - set your browser to barf its cookies when it closes.

I whitelist the small number of sites that I want to keep their cookies, everything else is destroyed when the browser closes.

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Richard 12
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Re: Do not eat

@Smooth Newt - You still missed the point.

Many advertisers have decided to be intrusive, abusive, and deliberately and overtly ignore the viewers' preferences.

Thus, many people install ad blockers and see no adverts at all.

If advertising on the Internet was unobtrusive and obeyed the viewers' preference, then very few people would bother to install ad blocking software.

The ad agencies are burning their golden geese.

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Peering closer at 3D XPoint memory: What are Intel, Micron up to?

Richard 12
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Re: layer limit

Cost.

Every layer adds cost to manufacture, and is another set of failure points that can ruin the chip, reducing yield.

At some point the cost gets so high and the yield so low that it's not worthwhile.

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Hurrah! Uber does work (in the broadest sense of the word) after all

Richard 12
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Near-zero risk though

Until recently, it appeared to be zero risk.

There aren't many ways to invest $1 million with a guaranteed 4% return.

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Just ONE THOUSAND times BETTER than FLASH! Intel, Micron's amazing claim

Richard 12
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Re: @Lamb0

There's a lot of embedded systems which still use supercap/battery-backed SRAM, and a bit-addressable NVRAM would be a perfect replacement.

Even at higher chip cost, because ultracaps and batteries are very expensive.

Many of them don't use Flash due to the block-erase problem - lose power at the wrong moment while updating settings and the data is lost forever.

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Hurrah! Windfarms produce whopping ONE PER CENT of EU energy

Richard 12
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Yes it bloody does.

Now please, stop spouting garbage.

Either post your sources, or put on a hair shirt and go live somewhere where you don't use any of the things nuclear research has provided. For example, computers and the Internet.

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Richard 12
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Re: how long

It's not a trend.

All the "easy installations" have been done, and only the ineffective or extremely expensive sites are left.

Wind farms need a lot of space, as far away from trees, buildings, shipping routes etc as possible.

You can't just put them up anywhere, and very quickly run out of suitable locations.

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So what the BLINKING BONKERS has gone wrong in the eurozone?

Richard 12
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Re: Rescue the banks or the bankers

However, we are now charging them for bailout insurance.

So that's an improvement.

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Southern biscuits and gravy

Richard 12
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Re: Buttermilk

Or more easily, buy skimmed milk.

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