Feeds

* Posts by Stuart 22

324 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Page:

So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL

Stuart 22

It's the Apps Stupid!

"Market share is I think poorly understood by your typical journalist... possibly deliberately to make a statistically meaningless point which suits their own biases?"

I remember when Android was struggling against Apple. The reason was not price, not cool but fewer apps. Only when it got to near parity did the reason not to buy Android disappeared.

Those market share figures are important to the app market. They don't quite match the percentage revenues to the App makers but a majority and increasing share of revenue is coming from Android. Now if I produce an App it is going to be both Android and Apple. I might consider Windows but is it worth the effort in support & development - especially for the smaller companies (still responsible for the width of app offerings for each platform).

If Apple goes lower than 10% and my development/support costs are appreciable higher then the Apple variant may be late (when Android has amortised the development cost) or even not at all.

If 'premium' Apple costs you Apps you may not buy. That could herald a Blackberry/Nokia tumble. It can happen inside 18/24 months. Aston Martin is not a business model. They wouldn't sell many if it could only use motorway or A roads.

0
0

Judge nixes HP deal for director amnesty after $8.8bn Autonomy snafu

Stuart 22

Re: Sounds normal

Remind me - what percentage of lawyers/corporations manage to lose to "utterly without merit" cases. And what does this say about them?

1
0

DNS cockup locks Virgin Media customers out of ntlworld.com email

Stuart 22

Re: Expired

It may feel like 23/09 but the outage didn't last that long. MX (five google servers) records are now showing. Maybe the Chocalots are the root cause? And yes your NTLWorld mail is now both fully Google and NSA approved - if you got it!

4
1
Stuart 22

Re: dig ntlworld.com mx

"Unless its been de-listed from DNS because they've shut the server down....."

Something like that - accidental or deliberate. It only takes seconds to put the MX record back - to direct it elsewhere (surely they have a receive/store/forward reserve server for when the mail system goes tits-up - a not unknown risk at VM).

Indeed taking hours to not getting a workaround in place suggests the Virgin problem is managerial rather than technical.

7
0

Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons

Stuart 22

Are you talking to me?

Could I just request El Reg journos to add a line indicating vulnerable operating systems and/or software version number on security stories.

Because this is flash it could just be one os - or all? I could take time to find out - but as so many turn out to be just one it wastes a significant amount of time for people using others. Alerting people to real security issues is good journalism. Posting vague scare stories is not.

7
0

LG takes on Nokia X, Moto G: These are the cheapie 'droids you've been looking for

Stuart 22

Landfill!!! Fill my pants!!!

Moto G is landfill product?

Its the fanbois that splash out £500 on the latest gizmo and dump it after 18 months that treehuggers might worry about. I have a feeling longevity may be inversely related to price. I have too many friends with really retro budget Nokias.

7
0

New twist as rogue antivirus enters death throes

Stuart 22

Re: Be a pleb

"It is much harder to corrupt the hosts file if you are running as an unprivileged user"

The default on most Linux distributions? Why would you do it any different for end user installations home or away?

Just askin'

3
1

Need a green traffic light all the way home? Easy with insecure street signals, say researchers

Stuart 22

Re: Given that this could cause crashes

"The one with the keys to the classic mini in the pocket"

Errr ... you don't need keys to get in or start an original Mk1 Mini. And it don't understand anything less than 12 real live volts up its distributor ;-)

1
0

Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy

Stuart 22

Re: Does the court case matter?

"Assange may be a narcissitic, self-aggrandizing asshole, but I've seen nothing to suggest that he won't get a fair trial in Sweden, nor any good reason that the Swedes wouldn't want him to have one."

Nor do I. Does that surprise you?

You do seem intent to take and twist almost every word I have written to try and present it as saying the opposite. For example claiming I am prejudging the court when I speak of evidence at face value. Did you miss the word 'face'? The point of a court is to subject evidence to the highest scrutiny before accepting it. Otherwise we could just let the prosecution attorney to decide guilt. Face value is what it is before scrutiny.

Can courts get things wrong, not uncover ... yes they do. That's why you have appeal courts, and supreme courts and pardons.

Please don't make me suck eggs. I'm going to stick with the idea that so many games are being played around and by Assange that you or I don't stand an earthly determining what is or is not true. You appear to have complete confidence the court can. I believe they may be our best chance of determining the issue which is the very reason we have courts. I have no evidence that Swedish Courts are anything but amongst thee best in the business. But are they are not immune by being manipulated or deceived by external forces?

The bottom line is I have less confidence than you. Let's leave it there please and not keep on accusing me of stuff I never did. You certainly don't deserve any place in court other than the dock.

3
3
Stuart 22

Re: Does the court case matter?

"That's why we have courts and legal systems in the first place. If you're assuming that they are all incompetent or corrupt (which is a considerable insult to the millions of people who work in them) then perhaps you should just get a bigger tinfoil hat and go back to hiding under the bed?"

I am afraid it is you who is assuming stuff that I neither wrote nor thought. Which is why I fervently hope you are not one of the millions working the system.

A competent and uncorrupt court can only come to its decision based on the evidence presented. Well crafted fake evidence looks just like the real thing. We can assume (oops I know that is dangerous) there is enough evidence (real or fake) at face value to convict Assange. You assume that all fake evidence will be rooted out Rumpole like. When it is done by professionals that is an unsafe assumption.

Tin foil time? Well that's the problem. A cursory conclusion from their own documents liberated by Snowden and Assange would suggest the American authorities do not feel bound by their and other jurisdictions to not do illegal stuff. So does this include this case?

I don't know. The fact you think you do know invites me to ask - how?

3
3
Stuart 22

Does the court case matter?

The trouble is - we all assume the Feds were out to get him and framing him might be too tempting. How are we - or any court or judge - be able to tell the difference between a well crafted set up and a genuine case of rape?

The guy's best hope is go and take his (small?) chance in court and serve his time and hope he can avoid a deportation. Surely it doesn't take this long to negotiate that?

He might be not a nice person or even worse. But he did some good in his Wikileaks days.

6
6

Take the shame: Microsofties ADMIT to playing Internet Explorer name-change game

Stuart 22

Re: New browser names:

There is an excellent browser called BROWSER on Android. Maybe they could buy that for a little less than Nokia. And have perpetual rights to the name?

0
0

Rupert Murdoch says Google is worse than the NSA

Stuart 22

Re: Pick any Comparision

"He ruined the print media, he ruined television"

You forgot FOOTY. Glad to know there are no Sky subscribers here. No RegReader would be so duplicitous?

2
0

Time to move away from Windows 7 ... whoa, whoa, who said anything about Windows 8?

Stuart 22

Re: Linux maybe, but OSX.. You'd need to be off your tree.

Yep - we went Linux after the Vista debacle and never looked back. OK we only have about a dozen PCs but do have a network server and are building up our own remote cloud.

I guess we don't have the problems (or expertise) of a major world player but there are more businesses like ours then those. Why they make it all so difficult and expensive using restrictive MS software despairs me.

Linux is not rocket science. Whereas these XP => Win7 migration have a bit of putting a man on the moon feel and take around the same number of years to plan, build and complete.

Why having done that once you would even think about doing it again is quite remarkable. Your choice.

6
0

AVG stung as search revenue from freebie scanners dries up

Stuart 22

Re: I feel a vote coming on...

Q. What would you advise your Grandmother to use?

A. Linux - probably ChromeOS

Q. What wouldn't you advise your Grandmother to use?

A. Anything from MS. I might have suggested MS Essentials until they left XP people high and dry.

16
4

4K video on terrestrial TV? Not if the WRC shares frequencies to mobiles

Stuart 22

Re: Cut or compress

Can't we just cut the dedicated shopping and porn channels?

Some people like them and they do add to the breadth of material available. The real hogs are the time shift channels. Yep I use them too and it can be easier that catching up on iPlayer and cheaper than a PVR. But they come at the expense of breadth (like BBC1+1 replacing BBC3).

Actually iPlayer is brilliant and I use it a lot. I'm using ITV3+1 because ITVplayer is s**t. Should we really have each provider rolling their own or would it not be in the interest of the consumer to have it delivered through one coherent technology as DTT is done through Freeview. That is some sort of FreeReplay. One readily understandable iinterface for young and old delivered directly by the device manufacturer.

Then we could phase out all the +1 channels and argue about whether the spectrum be used to expand either breadth or quality - or even both.

1
0

Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg

Stuart 22

Re: Just close your accounts.

Did that ages ago hence helping to improve FB's ARPU. And they never even said thank you.

Ungrateful creeps!

4
0

SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud

Stuart 22

Re: Ruthless cutting

I'm obviously not the target market - or the cutting is going to have to go way deeper.

I've rented dedicated and VPS servers for over ten years - beginning with the price breaking RackShack @ $99/month a dedicated server. Indeed I'm still paying around that level today but getting more for my money (but not that much more!).

I've looked into going cloudy but the prices are significantly higher yet offer no discernible advantage. The reliability on our servers (touch wood) has been exemplary - except from the VPS we have at AWS which doesn't fill me with confidence in using any more of their stuff.

The obvious opportunity for us is to switch our backup servers to the cloud. We want to set up servers that can be turned on instantly when needed for production or updating. So most of the time the vendor is getting money for non-use and a premium when used. Overall that means they get more money for providing an active server and we don't pay much more than a nominal sum when it isn't being used. Less for us. Both win.

But I've yet to see a pricing model that gives us that.

0
0

BSkyB slurps Murdoch's Italian and German Sky assets to beef up European pay-TV biz

Stuart 22

Re: Moving money and assets around

A little more than that. A cynic might say he trousering a few billion of value from other shareholders for a company he still effectively controls. More fool them methinks. Do they get to vote?

And of course he has ways of extracting money from the bigger Sky into his own companies to grab back some of the profit that might have leaked to the other shareholders.

The $64 billion question is where is Uncle Rupert on his succession planning and dynasty creation?

3
0

Australia floats website blocks and ISP liability to stop copyright thieves

Stuart 22

Get your retaliation in first ...

... and block Australia until they can elect a less authoritarian government.

That is all.

6
0

Putin: Crack Tor for me and I'll make you a MILLIONAIRE

Stuart 22

Someone on the red line Vlad ...

Langley to Putin: "Clear out of Ukraine and we will share our code for free"

Win -Win?

2
3

Microsoft swings axe at 18,000 bods in its largest ever round of layoffs

Stuart 22

Encarta - could have mapped M$'s future

Wow - I had forgotten that market leading product of its time. If only M$ could have thought past selling CDs and keeping it in house they could have been where Wikipedia is now. Except, like YouTube, it would be earning a fortune from ads.

5
0

Rackspace chases the channel with hands-on 'managed cloud'

Stuart 22

We now control your data - and here our our new charges, T&Cs ...

Cloud computing is a great euphemism for centralization of computer services under one server ~ Evgeny Morozov

Our commercial and technical relationships with these companies was cloudy. Perhaps murky would be a better word. It all starts so well cheap or even free storage, one click to donate your data. It's so easy.

Then you are no longer in control. Opting out is difficult and expensive. Rackspace are now doubt taking notes on the ways IBM held hegemony over their user's IT and data for decades.

This week we went with the open source ownCloud on our own servers. We are in control and its just our time that costs. We understand exactly where the backups are and can go poke at them at any time if we want to experiment.

I now sleep sounder at night.

0
0

US freemium mobile network eyes up Europe

Stuart 22

Re: I'm sure they know what they're doing

Blyk, Ovivo ...

2
0

That AMAZING Windows comeback: Wow – 0.5% growth in 2015

Stuart 22

Re: What's to look forward to?

"Okay, then I apologise for the rather strong wording of "stupid". Misinformed would be a better and less confrontational term."

Which still presumes you have an exclusive on how best to configure our company IT. As you know nothing about it may I say that may be both presumptuous and even wrong?

We were a mixed XP/Linux environment. The Linux bit arose from the disaster that was Vista. The XP bit was helpful in maintaining legacy applications. The security aspect was containable and we would have preferred to continue as is until the legacy apps died naturally of old age.

Removing XP support threatened to take XP over our risk threshold. Win 7 & 8 had issues with legacy apps and some of our hardware. It was just easier, cheaper and faster to take the hit on legacy apps (which we had been ducking) and go all-Linux.

So there you are - one unfortunate outcome of Microsoft's decision to 'roll their base'. It also means that we are unlikely to trust Microsoft again. We were Microsoft Partners and evangelists for something like 10 years. Yet we moved in the opposite direction to you.

You might have made the right decision for yourselves but please do not blow your credibility by presuming to know what is best for every other old XP shop.

38
0

Mobe-orists, beware: Stroking while driving could land you a £4k fine

Stuart 22

Regressive Punishment

Four grand is six months work for some or a good night out for others.

Why, oh why did we abandon the idea of making it a percentage of income?

17
0

Freeview's rumoured '£100m YouView killer' is real – and it's yet another digital TV thing

Stuart 22

3.142 platforms

I'm totally confused by all the complications. Freeview isn't ancient. It is what most people use and understand now and will continue until something else cheap and likely to last longer than the next PR launch.

Meanwhile a Raspberry Pi with XBMC does 80% (ymmv) of the job for £25 and a bit of fiddling*. If only I could make the WiFi as stable as a wired connection I wouldn't even think of using something else. When I do its using my Chromebook to drive the TV.

* Any fiddling is preferable to a visit to Currys.

4
0

Samsung's 'OS of Everything' Tizen still has little to offer

Stuart 22

Re: Its the Apps Stupid!

Sony was possibly an even more aspirational brand than Apple or Samsung in its day. Betamax was superior in almost every department to the competition. The market was won by Apps availability (in the form of film cassettes).

So many technology companies are determined to ignore and repeat history. If Samsung swopped to Tizen tomorrow their market would swop to LG/HTC/Moto by the next day. Their management, maybe not their developers, know this. Hence the realignment of Tizen's target market?

7
0
Stuart 22

Its the Apps Stupid!

Apart from Fanbois - who cares about the OS in the smartphone market - its Apps availability that makes a successful platform.

Android struggled not until it became refined but when it could deliver a critical mass of apps. Nowadays iOS & Android are so far ahead the only chance for anybody else is if they can successfully create an emulation environment to hijack existing apps with or without the owners permission (are you listening MS?). Only then is the mass market going to care about anything else it can deliver.

Or is this an admission that it will never get consumer acceptance - and its future is embedded in iThings where the manufacturer, not the consumer, chooses the OS to do a predefined set of tasks.

9
1

Queen's Speech: Computer Misuse Act to be amended, tougher sentences planned

Stuart 22

Fiddling with fiddlers while London turns (into an exclusive haven for the robber barons)

And I guess the British Museum had better check out its ancient Greek library pretty fast.

18
0

Linux users at risk as ANOTHER critical GnuTLS bug found

Stuart 22

Re: Open source was supposed to be secure

Found and fixed promptly on Linux. Now had MS used that code in XP would it have been fixed that fast, or indeed at all?

The real question is not bad code but which system (closed or open) is more likely to encourage it and less able or willing to fix it.

6
1

REVEALED: GCHQ's BEYOND TOP SECRET Middle Eastern INTERNET SPY BASE

Stuart 22

Re: TRAITORS

I worked for a company one of whose major markets was sensitive parts of the UK IT infrastructure. It too had a specialist relationship team. The point was to create a firewall in the transference of both information and product between us and them. This enabled us on the outside to behave both legally and morally correct.

By definition we did not know what happened the other side of the firewall. Whether it was moral or legal. Neither, I suspect, did the CEO. That was left in trust to the relevant government structure. It is the responsibility for government to govern itself on this. When corners are cut or worse we need whistleblowers. When they get too awkward, like Snowden it is a message that an internal whistleblower process is not working and that is the real damaging fact.

Silly names for BT or the payment for services contracted is neither here nor there. Better it be part of the corporation than having our security services infiltrate them. More expensive and less efficient. But it isn't going to stop anything.

8
0

You've got two weeks to beat off Cryptolocker, GameoverZeus nasties

Stuart 22

Are you pointing at me?

Bit unspecific: Any or all of Windows x.x, iOS, Android, Linux, BSD, TRSDOS ... ???

Some of these suppliers don't let you update the OS ... maybe the cyberplod should be having a word in their shell-like ... oh and http://www.getsafeonline.org/nca appears to be offline!

4
0

Toshiba's CB30-102 13.3in Chromebook – imagine a tablet with a keyboard

Stuart 22

Re: Sadly

No go for you. Just the thing on the go for me.

I'm an SysAdmin and do all sorts of IT stuff. I have a Kubuntu 14.04 crouton. Number of times I switch to that on an average train journey? Well less than one. The problem with non-Chromebook users is sometimes they focus on what they could possibly use a computer for rather than what they actually do use it for - especially when travelling.

As the reviewer noted - Chromebooks are a part of the complementary set of devices we use these days (smartphone/tablet/chromebook/laptop/desktop). I use all five but smartphone & chromebook satisfies almost all my on the move needs.

Those that dismiss the value of chromebooks to others are, perhaps wrapped up in their own peculiar world or needs. Yep - gaming on the train appears peculiar to me so maybe i'm not so different ;-)

15
1

FAA: All systems GO for Virgin Galactic space plane to launch from US

Stuart 22

Re: VG

"As easy as it is to knock Virgin Galactic it is at least doing something to get ordinary (rich) people into or near space."

Yes a truly great idea. Its bringing them back that's the bad bit!

1
0

Google's driverless car: It'll just block our roads. It's the WORST

Stuart 22

Re: Agenda 21

A tin foil helmet and a bicycle may spare you a conspiracy theory or three ;-)

9
0
Stuart 22

Re: Stuff it can't hope to deal with

@knarf: Respect you obviously have a really evil eye.

Car drivers look at me and still pull out in front. Car drivers do see me and deliberately give me a punishment pass merely for riding in the correct place (which just might infringe their right to not slow a little). I have the wounds to prove it. And its a cultural issue. Just come back from France where it was a joy to ride. Got off the train at Norwood Junction on Monday night and the first car to pass on an empty road late at night gave me inches not feet of clearance.

This is why I think programmers might just do a better job than drivers. Its hard to think they can do worse.

And not having to drive the car as a bonus I can keep posting on TheReg en route. OK I could do without those ads on the right but someone has to pay for the servers ...

6
0
Stuart 22

Re: Real issues

Those of us trying to take pictures on a Nexus 4 know google coders ain't perfect. There will be crashes caused by imperfect software. They will cost and kill.

The point is that by driving safely for, say, 99.9% of the time will mean this will be at the cost of avoiding nearly all the human error crashes. The insurance company will still see risk but a smaller risk. As most crashes are dealt with 'knock for knock' responsibility is not a major issue.

The bottom line is which car will insurers offer the lower premiums. Google (and government) will not go public until the risk, such as it is, is significantly lower than grey matter powered hulks.

Don't we want lower insurance premiums and less dead?

3
1
Stuart 22

Re: Haven’t we forgotten something?

Do think about this. Advertising is what Google do now. They can do more but will soon be hitting monopoly/anti-trust issues. Their future is bigger than that if they get their way.

Obviously they ain't going to displace GM, Ford, Toyota. Anti-trust will see to that. Nope I reckon they have learnt their lesson from Apple and Microsoft that patents is the easier way forward. The GoggleCar and its successors will just be the Nexus 7 of the car trade. Demonstrators to set a standard and price point. They will earn their money from the old dinosaurs paying for the technology they can't avoid.

They are the only people in the automobile trade who can offer governments and society a future free of congestion and a bit greener to boot. Eric has the ear of more global leaders than the rest of the big motor boys put together. And its not to ask for bail outs.

5
0
Stuart 22

Re: Built for America

Yes going around the Arc is a bit of a challenge. Not being able to keep a 360 degree view at all times means a lot has to go on trust. You can't actually optimise your movement. Whereas a GoggleCar not limited by a single pair of eyes with restricted viewing angle and often without the required glasses place on a wobbly neck that has a finite swivel point might possibly have a better idea of what is happening around it.

Yes, you are right GoggleCars will be programmed not to go where they can't see and can't stop. Shocking isn't it?

1
0
Stuart 22

Re: Stuff it can't hope to deal with

"Drunks on road at 11pm

Buses / Taxis the raptors of the road

Filtering Cyclists

Filtering Motor Cyclists"

I'm guessing you are not a cyclist. GoggleCars may not be perfect but they are going to be a lot less danger than WhiteVanMan. Like being programmed to give space when passing. Not passing when it isn't clear. Even consulting sensors (mirrors) before making a manoeuvre. That sort of thing.

I certainly know who I would rather take my chances with.

Of course if you have been caught using Bing you may be fair game ...

22
0
Stuart 22

Re: FUD

The first few paragraphs clearly indicate the writer has no knowledge of how traffic flows and density and speed interact. Frankly Nigel Farrage & Jeremy Clarkson could have knocked up a more thoughtful traffic analysis after only 10 pints.

What they and the writer should be very afraid of is that if this project ever goes public then it is going to seriously question how most of us drive. Currently over 80% of us admit to driving outside of the law. Interacting with vehicles driving within the law will be kinda interesting. It also tests the dubious idea that individuals acting in their own self interest will maximise traffic flow.

I predict a gaggle (goggle?) of Google cars will more likely maximise the efficiency of our streets. Easily accommodating the extra numbers of blind and the old. Moving to a rental model (click your mouse and the nearest free GoggleCar arrives at your front door) will also largely clear the the streets of those grossly underused parked vehicles that clog traffic.

It would also be the end of the black taxi trade.

25
3

More chance you came a cropper on a UK road than bought a Chromebook this year

Stuart 22

Re: Hmmm...

@Eddy Ito "Glad to know chromebooks do it all and I can pull up dxf, stl and step files quicker and easier than a usb stick. So can they finally print my boarding pass without either a special cloudy Chrome enabled printer or a Chrome cloud print server? That was my deal breaker but hey, according to your enlightenedness I'm just a shill for somecorp."

You got me there. Last time I hauled my HP LaserJet 4L printer all the way up to Birmingham on the train - could I get it to print out my Ryanair boarding pass from my Chromebook. Well no.

Like, I guess, everybody but you I print stuff when I am at home or in the office before i become mobile. I did once have a tiny printer I packed in my briefcase for printing on the move. But the paper would go all black before I could get to the departure gate.

3
0
Stuart 22

Re: Gullible Twat Dribbles into Beard

@AC "But a Chrome book is pretty useless without WiFi / 4G."

Do keep up.

* Certain railway companies provide excellent free wifi

* When this is not available android tethering provides excellent free wifi

* When this is not available you can still work offline with a choice of excellent free crouton based linux distributions

Does this make it any worse than any other portable device? Or you could get a Chromebook with inbuilt 3G if that is really important to you. But I fear facts can seldom overcome prejudice n'est ce pas?

But carry on down voting truth because it does not fit.

7
3
Stuart 22

Gullible Twat Dribbles into Beard

My weapon of choice on railway journeys:

* No worries about battery running out, no need to carry charger

* Online 10 seconds after sitting down, just shut the lid when finished

* Email/Web/CMS/SSH stuff 100% as good/better than anything else

* Crouton gives me full Kubuntu if I ever need it

* Don't usually need it

* Use 64Gb nano USB sticks if I need more room

* Don't usually need more room

* So slim it slides into the smallest spaces, no worries about spinning disks

* ...this is getting boring ...

I have a 10" android fondleslab, 9 & 10" netbooks and a 15" laptop which implies it is the best match for my particular needs in that situation. Its £200 I did spend that I needn't but glad I did. YMMV

Yep I'm so gullible I became an over experienced SysAdmin to boot. By gum you are even stupider than me.

10
3

Indian climate boffins: Himalayan glaciers are NOT MELTING

Stuart 22

Re: Gravy train

"Can we stop this silly nonsense that the likes of Friends Of The Earth and Greenpeace and the WWF are poor little cash-strapped organisations"

Presuming the payment may be lightly correlated with what they pay their CEO - then how would you compare that with the income of G8 leaders and those of leading multinational CEOs?

I just think I might be a bit smarter than you in picking the guy/guyess with the fatter wallet.

"Are you kidding? Once a politician has poured money into "green" intitiatives, the last thing they want is for it to come out that that expenditure was unnecessary."

You missed the point. Certain politicians of a certain hue do not want to spend tax they do not want to pay for green initiatives. They look for any straw to undermine AGW. They become energy ministers and Nigel Lawson and his interesting perspective on science is their friend.

Little is clear cut. Its how you measure and balance the risks that is the point.

2
2
Stuart 22

Re: Gravy train

I've yet to see some scientific research on the climate science gravy train. Now working from first principles - there must be three major markets for research:

1) Green governments/NGOs wanting doom fast - not very rich

2) Capitalist/Low Tax governments not wanting doom - a bit more money

3) Fossil fuelled Corporations who desperately don't want AGW - more money

Now as a marketing man for a group of obedient researchers I think I know which markets I would go for. The remarkable result is at least two of these are not getting clear cut results their money has paid for. I wonder why?

I guess there may be a market for people who just want the best objective information they find. You know academics who just want to discover stuff rather than a higher paid job in politics, industry and the media.

Not everybody wants gravy, just the unadulterated me^H^H truth.

10
10

Boeing shows off 7-4-heaven SPACEPLANE-for-tourists concept

Stuart 22

Re: "soothing mood lighting, Wi-Fi (probably) and personal storage space"

Pan Am didn't make the future. The remake will feature Ryanair on the outside. Don't even think about the inside ...

8
0

LA air traffic meltdown: System simply 'RAN OUT OF MEMORY'

Stuart 22

You too?

So this venerable old spookybird has been relegated to spotting conservatories in Orange County backyards?

The Ruskies had a quicker solution for removing this problematic plane from messing up ATC.

1
0

Beached whale Symantec watches revenues recede 7%

Stuart 22

I remember ....

... the days when they produced good and useful software tools.

Then they turned a decent anti-virus program into the greatest virus program of all time. Sucking both celerons and wallets dry. I have lost count of the number of exorcisms I executed on that particular demon. Some companies deserve to die.

6
0

Page: