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* Posts by Stuart 22

308 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

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Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg

Stuart 22

Re: Just close your accounts.

Did that ages ago hence helping to improve FB's ARPU. And they never even said thank you.

Ungrateful creeps!

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SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud

Stuart 22

Re: Ruthless cutting

I'm obviously not the target market - or the cutting is going to have to go way deeper.

I've rented dedicated and VPS servers for over ten years - beginning with the price breaking RackShack @ $99/month a dedicated server. Indeed I'm still paying around that level today but getting more for my money (but not that much more!).

I've looked into going cloudy but the prices are significantly higher yet offer no discernible advantage. The reliability on our servers (touch wood) has been exemplary - except from the VPS we have at AWS which doesn't fill me with confidence in using any more of their stuff.

The obvious opportunity for us is to switch our backup servers to the cloud. We want to set up servers that can be turned on instantly when needed for production or updating. So most of the time the vendor is getting money for non-use and a premium when used. Overall that means they get more money for providing an active server and we don't pay much more than a nominal sum when it isn't being used. Less for us. Both win.

But I've yet to see a pricing model that gives us that.

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BSkyB slurps Murdoch's Italian and German Sky assets to beef up European pay-TV biz

Stuart 22

Re: Moving money and assets around

A little more than that. A cynic might say he trousering a few billion of value from other shareholders for a company he still effectively controls. More fool them methinks. Do they get to vote?

And of course he has ways of extracting money from the bigger Sky into his own companies to grab back some of the profit that might have leaked to the other shareholders.

The $64 billion question is where is Uncle Rupert on his succession planning and dynasty creation?

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Australia floats website blocks and ISP liability to stop copyright thieves

Stuart 22

Get your retaliation in first ...

... and block Australia until they can elect a less authoritarian government.

That is all.

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Putin: Crack Tor for me and I'll make you a MILLIONAIRE

Stuart 22

Someone on the red line Vlad ...

Langley to Putin: "Clear out of Ukraine and we will share our code for free"

Win -Win?

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Microsoft swings axe at 18,000 bods in its largest ever round of layoffs

Stuart 22

Encarta - could have mapped M$'s future

Wow - I had forgotten that market leading product of its time. If only M$ could have thought past selling CDs and keeping it in house they could have been where Wikipedia is now. Except, like YouTube, it would be earning a fortune from ads.

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Rackspace chases the channel with hands-on 'managed cloud'

Stuart 22

We now control your data - and here our our new charges, T&Cs ...

Cloud computing is a great euphemism for centralization of computer services under one server ~ Evgeny Morozov

Our commercial and technical relationships with these companies was cloudy. Perhaps murky would be a better word. It all starts so well cheap or even free storage, one click to donate your data. It's so easy.

Then you are no longer in control. Opting out is difficult and expensive. Rackspace are now doubt taking notes on the ways IBM held hegemony over their user's IT and data for decades.

This week we went with the open source ownCloud on our own servers. We are in control and its just our time that costs. We understand exactly where the backups are and can go poke at them at any time if we want to experiment.

I now sleep sounder at night.

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US freemium mobile network eyes up Europe

Stuart 22

Re: I'm sure they know what they're doing

Blyk, Ovivo ...

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That AMAZING Windows comeback: Wow – 0.5% growth in 2015

Stuart 22

Re: What's to look forward to?

"Okay, then I apologise for the rather strong wording of "stupid". Misinformed would be a better and less confrontational term."

Which still presumes you have an exclusive on how best to configure our company IT. As you know nothing about it may I say that may be both presumptuous and even wrong?

We were a mixed XP/Linux environment. The Linux bit arose from the disaster that was Vista. The XP bit was helpful in maintaining legacy applications. The security aspect was containable and we would have preferred to continue as is until the legacy apps died naturally of old age.

Removing XP support threatened to take XP over our risk threshold. Win 7 & 8 had issues with legacy apps and some of our hardware. It was just easier, cheaper and faster to take the hit on legacy apps (which we had been ducking) and go all-Linux.

So there you are - one unfortunate outcome of Microsoft's decision to 'roll their base'. It also means that we are unlikely to trust Microsoft again. We were Microsoft Partners and evangelists for something like 10 years. Yet we moved in the opposite direction to you.

You might have made the right decision for yourselves but please do not blow your credibility by presuming to know what is best for every other old XP shop.

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Mobe-orists, beware: Stroking while driving could land you a £4k fine

Stuart 22

Regressive Punishment

Four grand is six months work for some or a good night out for others.

Why, oh why did we abandon the idea of making it a percentage of income?

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Freeview's rumoured '£100m YouView killer' is real – and it's yet another digital TV thing

Stuart 22

3.142 platforms

I'm totally confused by all the complications. Freeview isn't ancient. It is what most people use and understand now and will continue until something else cheap and likely to last longer than the next PR launch.

Meanwhile a Raspberry Pi with XBMC does 80% (ymmv) of the job for £25 and a bit of fiddling*. If only I could make the WiFi as stable as a wired connection I wouldn't even think of using something else. When I do its using my Chromebook to drive the TV.

* Any fiddling is preferable to a visit to Currys.

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Samsung's 'OS of Everything' Tizen still has little to offer

Stuart 22

Re: Its the Apps Stupid!

Sony was possibly an even more aspirational brand than Apple or Samsung in its day. Betamax was superior in almost every department to the competition. The market was won by Apps availability (in the form of film cassettes).

So many technology companies are determined to ignore and repeat history. If Samsung swopped to Tizen tomorrow their market would swop to LG/HTC/Moto by the next day. Their management, maybe not their developers, know this. Hence the realignment of Tizen's target market?

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Stuart 22

Its the Apps Stupid!

Apart from Fanbois - who cares about the OS in the smartphone market - its Apps availability that makes a successful platform.

Android struggled not until it became refined but when it could deliver a critical mass of apps. Nowadays iOS & Android are so far ahead the only chance for anybody else is if they can successfully create an emulation environment to hijack existing apps with or without the owners permission (are you listening MS?). Only then is the mass market going to care about anything else it can deliver.

Or is this an admission that it will never get consumer acceptance - and its future is embedded in iThings where the manufacturer, not the consumer, chooses the OS to do a predefined set of tasks.

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Queen's Speech: Computer Misuse Act to be amended, tougher sentences planned

Stuart 22

Fiddling with fiddlers while London turns (into an exclusive haven for the robber barons)

And I guess the British Museum had better check out its ancient Greek library pretty fast.

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Linux users at risk as ANOTHER critical GnuTLS bug found

Stuart 22

Re: Open source was supposed to be secure

Found and fixed promptly on Linux. Now had MS used that code in XP would it have been fixed that fast, or indeed at all?

The real question is not bad code but which system (closed or open) is more likely to encourage it and less able or willing to fix it.

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REVEALED: GCHQ's BEYOND TOP SECRET Middle Eastern INTERNET SPY BASE

Stuart 22

Re: TRAITORS

I worked for a company one of whose major markets was sensitive parts of the UK IT infrastructure. It too had a specialist relationship team. The point was to create a firewall in the transference of both information and product between us and them. This enabled us on the outside to behave both legally and morally correct.

By definition we did not know what happened the other side of the firewall. Whether it was moral or legal. Neither, I suspect, did the CEO. That was left in trust to the relevant government structure. It is the responsibility for government to govern itself on this. When corners are cut or worse we need whistleblowers. When they get too awkward, like Snowden it is a message that an internal whistleblower process is not working and that is the real damaging fact.

Silly names for BT or the payment for services contracted is neither here nor there. Better it be part of the corporation than having our security services infiltrate them. More expensive and less efficient. But it isn't going to stop anything.

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You've got two weeks to beat off Cryptolocker, GameoverZeus nasties

Stuart 22

Are you pointing at me?

Bit unspecific: Any or all of Windows x.x, iOS, Android, Linux, BSD, TRSDOS ... ???

Some of these suppliers don't let you update the OS ... maybe the cyberplod should be having a word in their shell-like ... oh and http://www.getsafeonline.org/nca appears to be offline!

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Toshiba's CB30-102 13.3in Chromebook – imagine a tablet with a keyboard

Stuart 22

Re: Sadly

No go for you. Just the thing on the go for me.

I'm an SysAdmin and do all sorts of IT stuff. I have a Kubuntu 14.04 crouton. Number of times I switch to that on an average train journey? Well less than one. The problem with non-Chromebook users is sometimes they focus on what they could possibly use a computer for rather than what they actually do use it for - especially when travelling.

As the reviewer noted - Chromebooks are a part of the complementary set of devices we use these days (smartphone/tablet/chromebook/laptop/desktop). I use all five but smartphone & chromebook satisfies almost all my on the move needs.

Those that dismiss the value of chromebooks to others are, perhaps wrapped up in their own peculiar world or needs. Yep - gaming on the train appears peculiar to me so maybe i'm not so different ;-)

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FAA: All systems GO for Virgin Galactic space plane to launch from US

Stuart 22

Re: VG

"As easy as it is to knock Virgin Galactic it is at least doing something to get ordinary (rich) people into or near space."

Yes a truly great idea. Its bringing them back that's the bad bit!

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Google's driverless car: It'll just block our roads. It's the WORST

Stuart 22

Re: Agenda 21

A tin foil helmet and a bicycle may spare you a conspiracy theory or three ;-)

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Stuart 22

Re: Stuff it can't hope to deal with

@knarf: Respect you obviously have a really evil eye.

Car drivers look at me and still pull out in front. Car drivers do see me and deliberately give me a punishment pass merely for riding in the correct place (which just might infringe their right to not slow a little). I have the wounds to prove it. And its a cultural issue. Just come back from France where it was a joy to ride. Got off the train at Norwood Junction on Monday night and the first car to pass on an empty road late at night gave me inches not feet of clearance.

This is why I think programmers might just do a better job than drivers. Its hard to think they can do worse.

And not having to drive the car as a bonus I can keep posting on TheReg en route. OK I could do without those ads on the right but someone has to pay for the servers ...

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Stuart 22

Re: Real issues

Those of us trying to take pictures on a Nexus 4 know google coders ain't perfect. There will be crashes caused by imperfect software. They will cost and kill.

The point is that by driving safely for, say, 99.9% of the time will mean this will be at the cost of avoiding nearly all the human error crashes. The insurance company will still see risk but a smaller risk. As most crashes are dealt with 'knock for knock' responsibility is not a major issue.

The bottom line is which car will insurers offer the lower premiums. Google (and government) will not go public until the risk, such as it is, is significantly lower than grey matter powered hulks.

Don't we want lower insurance premiums and less dead?

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Stuart 22

Re: Haven’t we forgotten something?

Do think about this. Advertising is what Google do now. They can do more but will soon be hitting monopoly/anti-trust issues. Their future is bigger than that if they get their way.

Obviously they ain't going to displace GM, Ford, Toyota. Anti-trust will see to that. Nope I reckon they have learnt their lesson from Apple and Microsoft that patents is the easier way forward. The GoggleCar and its successors will just be the Nexus 7 of the car trade. Demonstrators to set a standard and price point. They will earn their money from the old dinosaurs paying for the technology they can't avoid.

They are the only people in the automobile trade who can offer governments and society a future free of congestion and a bit greener to boot. Eric has the ear of more global leaders than the rest of the big motor boys put together. And its not to ask for bail outs.

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Stuart 22

Re: Built for America

Yes going around the Arc is a bit of a challenge. Not being able to keep a 360 degree view at all times means a lot has to go on trust. You can't actually optimise your movement. Whereas a GoggleCar not limited by a single pair of eyes with restricted viewing angle and often without the required glasses place on a wobbly neck that has a finite swivel point might possibly have a better idea of what is happening around it.

Yes, you are right GoggleCars will be programmed not to go where they can't see and can't stop. Shocking isn't it?

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Stuart 22

Re: Stuff it can't hope to deal with

"Drunks on road at 11pm

Buses / Taxis the raptors of the road

Filtering Cyclists

Filtering Motor Cyclists"

I'm guessing you are not a cyclist. GoggleCars may not be perfect but they are going to be a lot less danger than WhiteVanMan. Like being programmed to give space when passing. Not passing when it isn't clear. Even consulting sensors (mirrors) before making a manoeuvre. That sort of thing.

I certainly know who I would rather take my chances with.

Of course if you have been caught using Bing you may be fair game ...

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Stuart 22

Re: FUD

The first few paragraphs clearly indicate the writer has no knowledge of how traffic flows and density and speed interact. Frankly Nigel Farrage & Jeremy Clarkson could have knocked up a more thoughtful traffic analysis after only 10 pints.

What they and the writer should be very afraid of is that if this project ever goes public then it is going to seriously question how most of us drive. Currently over 80% of us admit to driving outside of the law. Interacting with vehicles driving within the law will be kinda interesting. It also tests the dubious idea that individuals acting in their own self interest will maximise traffic flow.

I predict a gaggle (goggle?) of Google cars will more likely maximise the efficiency of our streets. Easily accommodating the extra numbers of blind and the old. Moving to a rental model (click your mouse and the nearest free GoggleCar arrives at your front door) will also largely clear the the streets of those grossly underused parked vehicles that clog traffic.

It would also be the end of the black taxi trade.

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More chance you came a cropper on a UK road than bought a Chromebook this year

Stuart 22

Re: Hmmm...

@Eddy Ito "Glad to know chromebooks do it all and I can pull up dxf, stl and step files quicker and easier than a usb stick. So can they finally print my boarding pass without either a special cloudy Chrome enabled printer or a Chrome cloud print server? That was my deal breaker but hey, according to your enlightenedness I'm just a shill for somecorp."

You got me there. Last time I hauled my HP LaserJet 4L printer all the way up to Birmingham on the train - could I get it to print out my Ryanair boarding pass from my Chromebook. Well no.

Like, I guess, everybody but you I print stuff when I am at home or in the office before i become mobile. I did once have a tiny printer I packed in my briefcase for printing on the move. But the paper would go all black before I could get to the departure gate.

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Stuart 22

Re: Gullible Twat Dribbles into Beard

@AC "But a Chrome book is pretty useless without WiFi / 4G."

Do keep up.

* Certain railway companies provide excellent free wifi

* When this is not available android tethering provides excellent free wifi

* When this is not available you can still work offline with a choice of excellent free crouton based linux distributions

Does this make it any worse than any other portable device? Or you could get a Chromebook with inbuilt 3G if that is really important to you. But I fear facts can seldom overcome prejudice n'est ce pas?

But carry on down voting truth because it does not fit.

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Stuart 22

Gullible Twat Dribbles into Beard

My weapon of choice on railway journeys:

* No worries about battery running out, no need to carry charger

* Online 10 seconds after sitting down, just shut the lid when finished

* Email/Web/CMS/SSH stuff 100% as good/better than anything else

* Crouton gives me full Kubuntu if I ever need it

* Don't usually need it

* Use 64Gb nano USB sticks if I need more room

* Don't usually need more room

* So slim it slides into the smallest spaces, no worries about spinning disks

* ...this is getting boring ...

I have a 10" android fondleslab, 9 & 10" netbooks and a 15" laptop which implies it is the best match for my particular needs in that situation. Its £200 I did spend that I needn't but glad I did. YMMV

Yep I'm so gullible I became an over experienced SysAdmin to boot. By gum you are even stupider than me.

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Indian climate boffins: Himalayan glaciers are NOT MELTING

Stuart 22

Re: Gravy train

"Can we stop this silly nonsense that the likes of Friends Of The Earth and Greenpeace and the WWF are poor little cash-strapped organisations"

Presuming the payment may be lightly correlated with what they pay their CEO - then how would you compare that with the income of G8 leaders and those of leading multinational CEOs?

I just think I might be a bit smarter than you in picking the guy/guyess with the fatter wallet.

"Are you kidding? Once a politician has poured money into "green" intitiatives, the last thing they want is for it to come out that that expenditure was unnecessary."

You missed the point. Certain politicians of a certain hue do not want to spend tax they do not want to pay for green initiatives. They look for any straw to undermine AGW. They become energy ministers and Nigel Lawson and his interesting perspective on science is their friend.

Little is clear cut. Its how you measure and balance the risks that is the point.

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Stuart 22

Re: Gravy train

I've yet to see some scientific research on the climate science gravy train. Now working from first principles - there must be three major markets for research:

1) Green governments/NGOs wanting doom fast - not very rich

2) Capitalist/Low Tax governments not wanting doom - a bit more money

3) Fossil fuelled Corporations who desperately don't want AGW - more money

Now as a marketing man for a group of obedient researchers I think I know which markets I would go for. The remarkable result is at least two of these are not getting clear cut results their money has paid for. I wonder why?

I guess there may be a market for people who just want the best objective information they find. You know academics who just want to discover stuff rather than a higher paid job in politics, industry and the media.

Not everybody wants gravy, just the unadulterated me^H^H truth.

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Boeing shows off 7-4-heaven SPACEPLANE-for-tourists concept

Stuart 22

Re: "soothing mood lighting, Wi-Fi (probably) and personal storage space"

Pan Am didn't make the future. The remake will feature Ryanair on the outside. Don't even think about the inside ...

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LA air traffic meltdown: System simply 'RAN OUT OF MEMORY'

Stuart 22

You too?

So this venerable old spookybird has been relegated to spotting conservatories in Orange County backyards?

The Ruskies had a quicker solution for removing this problematic plane from messing up ATC.

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Beached whale Symantec watches revenues recede 7%

Stuart 22

I remember ....

... the days when they produced good and useful software tools.

Then they turned a decent anti-virus program into the greatest virus program of all time. Sucking both celerons and wallets dry. I have lost count of the number of exorcisms I executed on that particular demon. Some companies deserve to die.

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UK's pirate-nagging VCAP scheme WON'T have penalties – report

Stuart 22

I am very strongly in favour of reducing copyright infringements ...

... by reducing copyright to a maximum of 50 years from first publication. That is all.

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Voice-babble-over-Wi-Fi lands in Europe – take that, mobe masties

Stuart 22

Crikey, VOIP on a mobile! Whatever next?

Android comes with optional VOIP phoning built in. I presume the iPhone does too. I just enter my Sipgate details when I set my phone up and there it is right alongside my MVNO when I want to make any call.

Will there be an App for switching the thing on soon?

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It's spade sellers who REALLY make a killing in a gold rush: It's OVER for graphics card mining

Stuart 22

Re: re "unless you can find a better use for them"

Is there not a sound case on banning these virtual currencies on environmental grounds alone?

And don't get me started on the ethics of high frequency trading ... sad to see IT exploited by the greedy with no thought to the consequences.

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Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS

Stuart 22

Re: @asdf The desktop deadend.

I've had little problem upgrading Kubuntu since about 10.04 - which included the KDE 3.5 to KDE4 transition.

AFAIK Ubuntu is great - unless you actually choose the Ubuntu desktop of the day.

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Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker

Stuart 22

Selfies can be good.

The pain of getting, renewing and now revoking certificates is a complete and unwelcome pain. Actually most of our https stuff is between our servers and close clients. They trust us, they would trust our servers except for those big red screens Chrome et al throw up when they see a self signed certificate.

So we dutifully used proper ones. Whereas the old self-signed could be replaced instantly. Hence paradoxically our users were more secure with selfies.

And millions/billions of Wordpress users will have been exposing their usernames/passwords in plain text since Z80 Assembler ruled the world - mostly without incident. Its security with a hole that's really dangerous at attracting the hacking flies.

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NSA denies it knew about and USED Heartbleed encryption flaw for TWO YEARS

Stuart 22

Re: Protect?

Protect themselves.

The Twitter claim of knowing nothing until public disclosure is breathtaking. I mean by April 7th a patch had been written and committed for 1.0.1e, heartbleed.com had been registered for 3 days, there had been considerable correspondence between the Finnish company and the authors. Google had allegedly already patched it servers.

And the NSA had not known this?

Which leads to the conclusion they are incredibly incompetent or barefaced liars. Your choice.

And if they lied about 2 days or 2 weeks how can one believe it wasn't two years?

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OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts

Stuart 22

False Positives

Just a warning. There appears to be a proliferation of websites 'testing' for the flaw and getting it wrong. Do be careful.

I think this is because they are only testing for the creation date (of the flawed software) and not the modified date when it was fixed. Good checkers should actually send a string and show you the return if its worried about it.

This is the command line return I'm typically getting from our Centos servers which confirms the fix:

# rpm -q --changelog openssl-1.0.1e | grep -B 1 CVE-2014-0160

* Mon Apr 07 2014 Tomáš Mráz <tmraz@redhat.com> 1.0.1e-16.7

- fix CVE-2014-0160 - information disclosure in TLS heartbeat extension

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Biz PC market's looking healthy – but is it just an XPocalypse bounce?

Stuart 22

Landfill Tax

PCs are not as bad as mobiles. I've a whole drawerful of good mature working phones that are really superfluous to need.

But this week's event has had us looking hard. Kubuntu is the weapon of choice. We even took out our last Vista and did it fly under the big K. Trouble is we still have working PCs without PAE support. Do we revert to 12.04 or one of the specialist non-pae distributions (the first two I tried just didn't cut it).

Which goes to show that hardware just goes on and on. And that's what we want with the software. i mean most business computing hasn't really changed in ten years. That's why XP is just what we need. Shame to create landfill. Its the companies that pay the tax - which really ought to be MS as they are the folks causing much of the problem.

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Scandal-hit Co-op Bank's CIO hits eject button after one year

Stuart 22

Re: Um, Co-op Bank now 70% owned by US Hedge Funds and VC investors.

"Yout might also note their CEO turned out to be a Ketamine popping (among other things) Methodist minister with a liking for hookers of both sexes."

Flowers was the chair not CEO. His expertise was supposed to be liaising and cajoling the myriad of independent co-ops and labyrinth processes. For all his failings he was more successful at it than the banker's banker!

Horses for courses.

But it is an awful shame they have screwed up so badly and the management lacks the guts to sort themselves out. As ever its the employees and members who will suffer most. That's why i'm keeping my money in the Bank at the moment. The staff have been great, they don't deserve this.

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Partner firms: Microsoft kept Surface from you for YOUR OWN GOOD

Stuart 22

Go grab market, kill competition ....

Why not dump the written down stock on the market? HP proved £99 is a very sweet spot. It would have given them some more base and damaged Android and Apple. It's not as though they would lose that many sales at full price ...

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Google confirms Turkish ISPs 'intercepted' its DNS service

Stuart 22

Talking sense ain't going to get you anywhere when the most popular papers are The Sun & Daily Mail. They are the real villains.

Judging by the Turkish election results I guess they must be replicated over there.

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Sticky Tahr-fy pudding: Ubuntu 14.04 slickest Linux desktop ever

Stuart 22

A small part of a bigger story ...

Worth a reminder that the same day we also get 14.04 *ubuntu (where *=letter of choice).

Which, by definition, is more attractive to users who have issues with Unity.

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Microsoft issues less-than-helpful tips to XP holdouts

Stuart 22

Life Story

Long ago I had two XP computers on my desk. Then I excitedly updated one to Vista on launch. One week later it was running Kubuntu (which kinda networks better with Windows then Windows).

My XP computer still got most use especially for real work. Kubuntu was fine for browsing, email and the odd thing like SSH for which Windows needs apps. It wasn't until last year that I found myself using Kubuntu more than XP. It took that long to adjust and gradually replace Windows apps with platform independent apps. Yep it would have been a lot faster if I had no choice. Well on April 17th (yes I'm going to risk 9 days) the XP computer will be replaced with a Kubuntu 14.04 LTS system so it will be two Kubuntus on my desk. I'll keep a XP laptop under the desk 'just in case'.

So that's my life story on how Microsoft lost me without trying. But its also how heavy users just can't switch from one to the other happily even if, like me, they have been Linux Sysadmins for a decade. So junk XP get Linux next month may perversely be an option for people only requiring browsing and email - its going to take a lot longer to do a sensible transition on a larger scale.

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Ad-funded mobile carrier goes titsup

Stuart 22

Re: A worrying precedent

On the assumption that either administrators or the upstream provider is in control then this preserves some small incoming payment whilst removing new costs. It may also be an OFCOM requirement (and if not, should be).

Indeed the role of OFCOM regulating what appears to be a blatant Ponzi scheme by MVNO is a question that should be answered. Mobiles are pretty important in many people's lives these days and there should be some better way of handling the customers of failed operators.

An obvious one would be for operators to lodge a bond covering, say, a forward month's worth of revenue to the network supplier giving time for people to rearrange their mobile supplier without too much disruption.

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Stuart 22

What a surprise!

Why would anybody not think this was a Ponzi scheme?

The early investors' minutes being financed by new users' £20.

The actual crash was well telegraphed. Going for more funding in early March. No intelligent outsider is going to put £4m into this venture. Then suddenly, without funding, the minutes, texts and Gb are INCREASED - that is any forward obligation by 50% making funding even more difficult. That can only be last desperate attempt to lure the stupidly greedy into buying a SIM.

Oh the ad funded bit? Well we remember everybody else who tried that don't we (Blyk?) and there was no sign from Ovivo that this was real.

If it looks too good to be true ...

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MH370 airliner MYSTERY: The El Reg Pub/Dinner-party Guide

Stuart 22

Re: What if it was ditched and sunk intact?

The danger in landing on anything other than on the undercarriage on a flat hard surface is one of the wings or engines touching down before the other. The sudden enormous asymmetrical drag will spin the plane into oblivion. The trick is to pancake it perfectly flat. Not easy to do on a flat surface (and the Hudson was effectively flat) but in any swell next to impossible if you think about it. The middle of the Indian Ocean is likely to have quite a swell whether the surface is rough or smooth.

There is no way a pilot could plan to ditch with any confidence of success. It would make "Miracle on the Hudson" look like landing a Tiger Moth on a deserted JFK.

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