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* Posts by Derek Kingscote

37 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws

Derek Kingscote

Sauce for the Goose

Of course if phones can be hacked, how long before all the data is trawled by some bent person and secret affairs go public

Liz Truss had an 18 month affair with then culture spokesman Mark Field

Edwina Curry & John Major - who knew

Many others

Plus ANPR cams tracking them

There's nowhere to hide

Don't forget to put LOL at the end of your email

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Satya Nadella: Microsoft's new man presses all the old buttons in LONG memo

Derek Kingscote

Invent this

We will re-invent productivity to empower every person and every organization on the planet

Put XP on it and Office 2003

Hey presto - Productivity and Empowerment for all

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Samsung's 'OS of Everything' Tizen still has little to offer

Derek Kingscote

IOS & Android - Your greatest strength is your biggest weakness!

IOS & Android - Your greatest strength is your biggest weakness!

If you want current proof - see Tesco [HSBC market analyst David McCarthy said: 'Tesco looks like it is experiencing more than one million fewer customer visits per week on a like-for-like basis']

Suggestions are that Tesco is past its sell by date.

Remember when Apple itself was a basket case?

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REVEALED: GCHQ's BEYOND TOP SECRET Middle Eastern INTERNET SPY BASE

Derek Kingscote

Re TRAITORS

Luke 11

There was a great article in the Guardian last Thursday by Eben Moglen

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/may/27/-sp-privacy-under-attack-nsa-files-revealed-new-threats-democracy

I didn't see the article the previous Tuesday [which is the first part of this link] and the paper is now recycled.

The Thursday article starts below the picture of one of four server rooms at the Facebook data centre in North Carolina.

Extracts below:

Edward Snowden has revealed problems for which we need solutions. The vast surveillance-industrial state that has grown up since 2001 could not have been constructed without government contractors and the data-mining industry.

In this context, we must remember that privacy is about our social environment, not about isolated transactions we individually make with others. When we decide to give away our personal information, we are also undermining the privacy of other people.

Many people take money from you by concealing this distinction. They offer you free email service, for example. In return, they want you to let them read all the mail. Their stated purpose is advertising to you. It's just a transaction between two parties. Or, they offer you free web hosting for your social communications, and then they watch everybody looking at everything.

This is convenient, for them, but fraudulent. If you accept this supposedly bilateral offer, to provide email service to you for free as long as it can all be read, then everybody who corresponds with you is subjected to this bargain. If your family contains somebody who receives mail at Gmail, then Google gets a copy of all correspondence in your family. If another member of your family receives mail at Yahoo, then Yahoo receives a copy of all the correspondence in your family as well.

The same will be true if you decide to live your social life on a website where the creep who runs it monitors every social interaction, keeping a copy of everything said, and also watching everybody watch everybody else. If you bring new "friends" to the service, you are attracting them to the creepy inspection, forcing them to undergo it with you.

If you have a Facebook account, Facebook is surveilling every single moment you spend there. Moreover, much more importantly, every web page you touch that has a Facebook "like" button on it which, whether you click the button or not, will report your reading of that page to Facebook.

If the newspaper you read every day has Facebook "like" buttons or similar services' buttons on those pages, then Facebook or the other service watches you read the newspaper: it knows which stories you read and how long you spent on them.

Every time you tweet a URL, Twitter is shortening the URL for you. But it is also arranging that anybody who clicks on that URL will be monitored by Twitter as they read. You are not only helping people know what's on the web, but also helping Twitter read over everybody's shoulder everything you recommend.

This isn't transactional, this is ecological. This is an environmental destruction of other people's freedom to read. Your activity is designed to help them find things they want to read. Twitter's activity is to disguise the surveillance of the resulting reading from everybody.

Commercial surveillance then attracts government attention, with two results that Snowden has documented for us: complicity and outright thievery.

The article is quite long so you probably won't bother to read it.

If you have a Google or Yahoo email account, use Twitter or Facebook are you happy with what they do with your data?

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EE boffin: 5G will be the LAST WORD in mobe tech – literally

Derek Kingscote

Powerline & Mission Critical 4G system based on SIP

Suppose your electricity transformer sub-station serves 1000 people [in reality it's probably a lot more], spread over 3 phases, that's 300+ per phase. All of those 300+ are on the same cable and earth, what use is 500Mbit/sec to each street? There's a main road junction at the bottom of our street; how will you give 500Mbit/sec up our road and 500Mbit/sec along the main road at the bottom of the street and 500Mbit/sec to all the roads off the main road?

You can't beat physics.

.

4G and SIP

An application on the phone could easily allow an officer to see a directory, add people to custom groups for raids etc., and probably easily roam between forces transparently.

The last thing you do is to allow "an officer" to "add people to custom groups for raids etc."

This would result in chaos and anarchy. This has to be managed centrally, and the radios locked down.

How would the Police Control Room control anybody under your scenario? and what about all the other functions e.g. recording voice calls; recording radio traffic; logging systems; time stamping calls; emergency button function; encryption and over the air rekeying; integration with other systems such as mapping [eg tracking a moving car in real time and displaying it on a map, where the rate of update is dependent on vehicle speed]; centralised voice mail system with a mailbox for each radio.

I could go on...

There are many things that are possible, but not all are practical.

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Derek Kingscote

Re Also, your math is wrong...

Mea culpa. It was late – it should, of course read £1.2Million and £100Million

Even on lower techs with 8 cells, one channel was always for emergency use and if 2 calls came in, on same cell, all other calls were dropped. Nothing new here.

So are you saying that if all 8 channels on GSM are busy and you call 999, one call gets booted off – or do you get "no network" signal?

Electric cables can be used to backhaul data. This is seen with home plug tech, turning your house electrics into a LAN.

How you gonna manage all that data, also you have to get across power distribution transformers – all that lossy inductance at RF and capacitance which will look like a short circuit. In the old days on Long Distance copper cables even the spacing of the ink bands identifying the pairs was important.

This is not at issue in a home network.

With IP, you can program whatever you like, as most is software based. Device to device is not actually an issue either..

TETRA handsets are not like ordinary phones with a SIM card. They are programmed with the all the various talkgroups they need. When the handset connects with the network it has to match up with the TETRA network, the TETRA talkgroups available to it, the security keys, and subsequently the SICCS system. The Network for UK emergency services is run by Airwave, and there are charges for using the Airwave network. As an end user organisation you don't have overall control, so end to end IP is not an option. TETRA handset to handset calls are certainly not a problem, except that when you do this, you are not available to the control room, and you are not listening to your home talkgroup, so in the event of a 'shout' you won't hear it, so you are useless to the control room.

The missing person was probably done by triangulation.

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Derek Kingscote
Stop

Who is this guy?

Microcells present special problems, namely control and handover, and how will the network keep on top of where you are all the time?

With so many cells and limited range for a cell, RF power levels will [necessarily] be very low – will this even work indoors?

If the networks are overloaded or destroyed; –ok destroyed you can do nothing in the short term until the networks bring their events kit in [the additional kit they install for special events like Glasto; Silverstone; Cheltenham Races] but if they are truly overloaded in a disaster they have the authority to switch the network off and only users with priority class have access.

TETRA

Have you any idea how the police configure and run their TETRA networks? If they are on 4G and the network's down they will be affected too. Will this release 12 enable them to set up multiple talk groups; programme the radios depending on the function/area the officer is covering; will they be able to do over the air rekeying for security? How will that integrate in the control room with their SICCS system? How will the emergency button work? Can higher priority kick lower priority calls off the network e.g. emergency button has been pressed and will the channel be kept open for the audio to get through. Device to device is problematic because the control can't get hold of you if they need you.

They may, in future, use 4G on a completely stand alone network as they have at the moment, but the upgrade cost are enormous. It is quite a few years since I was involved but over 10 years ago the SICCS [integrates absolutely everything in the control room] was about £500k and the radios [which are personal issue] were about £700. Ours was a fairly small force, but saying that 1000 officers have to have new radios, where is that £700k coming from. £700k + £500k = £1.2Bn, and I haven't even covered the cars with their GPS and tracking the vehicle in real time on the mapping system. If you ever get the chance to look round an operational police control room do take it. They are not in the dark ages any more.

[The Fire control set up was a complete farce. The number of firemen and vehicles are a fraction of anything that controls working police officers. We specified off the shelf hardware for most of our kit. The SICCS screens were delivered on standard PCs and running off servers. Not bespoke hardware and overspecced mapping. But I digress]

There are 43 Forces in the UK so it'll be in the order of £100Bn for the total roll-out costs.

He says :"this will involve a mix of running fibre – either by digging up the ground or through existing power ducts." Most power cables are in the ground with a yellow tape over them saying Danger, Electric Cable.

I appreciate he's employed by EE and has to push their technology but it's a bit early for 5G vapourware.

The rest of us live in the real world!

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Bugger the jetpack, where's my 21st-century Psion?

Derek Kingscote

Cykey

This is the one of the original chorded keyboards :

http://www.cykey.co.uk/

He wants to implement bluetooth so anyone with the requisite expertise should get in touch with him and help everybody.

Derek

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Thanks a lot, Facebook: Microsoft turns Office 365 into social network

Derek Kingscote

Me Too!

Microsoft - the outfit that thought the internet was irrelevant!

This is just "Me Too" and they are way behind the curve. Facebook and Twitter are high maintenance. [i.e. they waste a hellava lot of time] The last thing any productive individual needs is another high maintenance "tool".

Facebookers and Twitterers are, most likely, using smartphones and tablets for access [just go to anywhere where people congregate and see how many people have their heads down looking at a diminutive screen].

If this don't run on a tablet it's nowhere [and that means working with Apple and/or Google - how ironic ! ]; people are not going to run up a PC just for this.

Some other important factors are deployment, [inc backups], training and support, who is going to deliver and manage that? Facebook and Twitter are user [mis]managed.

How are you going to control this ?

Will Microsoft be producing regular updates and patches ?

Will you _ever_ have a life?

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Microsoft asks pals to help KILL UK gov's Open Document Format dream

Derek Kingscote

Thinking Ahead for Once

They are preparing for a post-Microsoft world !

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Facebook pays $19bn for WhatsApp. Yep. $45 for YOUR phone book

Derek Kingscote
Big Brother

It's worse than you think!

It's worse than you think!

Databases of the telephone book and the electoral register are commercially available, so it's a [relatively] trivial task to run every phone number they have hoovered up and reverse engineer from that, who that number relates to, where the address is and who lives there. The postcode will give them the likely socioeconomic group you [and all your contacts] are in.

Targeted marketing doesn't get any better than this.

Of course GCHQ and the NSA will want the reverse engineered data. They'll be _very_ interested in who you associate with, and you won't be able to lie when you get the 5.0am visit!

Oh, and they probably hoovered up all your data before you got off, so it's too late now!

Who knew that Big Brother would be reincarnated as Mark Zuckerberg ?

No need to worry, just trot off now and get on with the rest of your [spied on] life!

D

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3CX PBX for Windows: Everything you ever wanted from a phone system

Derek Kingscote

Power Fail

What about bypass

i..e. make a 999 call when the power fails

Also if you have remote sites using IP telephony on your server, when they dial 999 the BT EISEC system will show where the call is breaking out to PSTN, NOT the remote location.

for EISEC see www.sinet.bt.com/278v2p1.pdf‎

what's the costs of the electricity for all the POE routers and the transformers to power the phones. i.e cost of electricity for standard router vs additional cost of electricity for POE - I've never had a satisfactory answer for that

even big conventional PBXs run off a 13amp socket and transform down to 48V with hefty battery backup and bypass lines

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TWO can play this 64-bit mobile game, says Samsung, crossly

Derek Kingscote

Step Change

Chance for Samsung to step change, leave Android behind and migrate to Tizen

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Modular smartphones floated by Dutch designer chap

Derek Kingscote

Modularization

How many of these modules could find their way into other embedded kit e.g washing machines; microwave ovens; TVs; TV remotes; Skype cameras/speakers? Car media players/reversing cameras and screens; Journey video cameras; media players;

You name it and build your own!

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Psst.. Wanna Android all-in-one PC? We have the chip tech, says Intel

Derek Kingscote

Raspberry Pi

This thing is proposed to have HDMI in.

Perfect for a RasPi

Media Server; Libre Office; Youtube, Gmail, Facebook and Twitter etc

As was recently asked in a magazine :

"is there anything a RasPi can't do?"

Pity they don't do a 10inch version

Microsoft will start Pooping themselves real soon now!!!

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UK micro pioneer Chris Shelton: The mind behind the Nascom 1

Derek Kingscote

Ah The Memories

Just had to go and dig out my Issue 1 of Personal Computer World featuring the Nascom 1 on the cover.

Imagine my surprise to find a Nascom 1 programming Manual alongside. I must have sent off for this - it is very comprehensive .

The Nascom 1 was too expensive for me - this was early 1978 and eventually when Sinclair brought out his ZX80, I said to SWMBO when they are £100 I will buy one. The ZX81 hit that pricemark and many happy hours programming late into the night followed!

I was a regular subscription reader of PCW and it was fun until the focus shifted to business machines and the software was costing more than the hardware. Flicking through these early PCWs there were some evocative names : the Exidy Sorcerer, Altair, Research Machines 380Z. PCW August 78 featured an Apple II review. That machine was a stupendous £1250 for a 16k machine only. Complete cost including TV and cassette player was £1520 +VAT.

Explains why homebrew and kit machines were so popular and I am sure a lot of readers on here cut their teeth on such systems.

Fun looking back through the very early PCWs - brought back some memories.

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Microsoft warns of post-April zero day hack bonanza on Windows XP

Derek Kingscote

It was fun while it lasted

Ironic isn't it? When Netbooks were flying out the door with Linux, suddenly Microsoft realised that it could be the end of the line for them so did a quick and dirty deal for flogging XP for Netbooks.

Now they say they are stopping support, how many Netbooks are capable of running Win7? Don't talk about Windows 8 it's unusable.

www.microsoft.com/Windows8 states : Windows 8 has everything you need, right from the Start.‎ [except it doesn't have a start button]

Don't talk about the money either. On the Microsoft store the OS is £100 - OK may be less on the high street, but with CDs, the cost of the initial effort is spread across hundreds of thousands of disks, but each extra disks cost only a penny.

Same goes for Office.

Fact is, Microsoft is scared. This is a company that said the internet was irrelevant. They got left behind. Linux on Netbooks – they only just got that back by playing hardball with suppliers. Suddenly tablets are very powerful, the genie is out of the bottle and they are not in control. The others have got that sewn up for now. I haven't seen one review that says Win8 is really really good. Their tablet ? Hmmm…

Tablets – a bit of Text; a bit of Spreadsheet; a bit of Mail; a bit of browsing; a lot of Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube; then why do you need a full blown PC with a full blown OS? Put your tablet in a docking station with keyboard, mouse and big screen and you're away. Oh and thousands and thousands of Apps – like Where's my car? Star Maps, Mapping, you name it.

I'm not working full time these days, so I don't know what businesses are doing, but it's a fair bet that a lot of stuff is browser based and it's only the managers that need the full monty to write reports to send upstairs.

For the business user a lot of mission critical stuff was running on NT and XP. Microsoft said Vista is coming, business said OK we'll see. Vista was a turkey so Microsoft said Windows 7 is coming. Business said OK we'll see – we heard all about Vista so we're not going to do anything soon and our mission critical stuff is plodding on nicely. Business didn't move. Then Microsoft said Windows 8 is coming. Business said OK we'll see. Windows 8 is a) unusable and b) how the hell are we gonna migrate our mission critical stuff onto that?!. Then Microsoft said if you don't migrate, we'll break the thing that runs your mission critical stuff.

Business doesn't trust you.

Unless Windows 9 delivers, like really delivers, you could see the biggest, fastest business collapse in history.

It was fun while it lasted.

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Upstart's 'FLASH KILLER' chips pack a terabyte per tiny layer

Derek Kingscote
Holmes

Cost

Who was it that said every chip costs $1 apiece eventually

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RBS collapse details revealed: Arrow points to defective part

Derek Kingscote
FAIL

Crasharama

Where the software is and where the staff are is irrelevant.

Experience and competence are essential.

The head honchos at all companies are paid inflated salaries because you have to have "World Class People" to run the business.

All board members should only ever be bonussed on the customer experience and NOTHING ELSE!

They think they are running the company, but it is everyone below them that are doing it.

When I was working I always said, I'd settle for annual salary increase on the same basis as the chairman in either cash or percentage terms.

This is a massive fail. Hester and the person responsible for the Banks IT should fall on their swords.

Customer Experience = No bonus for any of the board this year!

[The person responsible for the Banks IT or may not be Ron Teerlink. He is Chief Administrative Officer of Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc. He joined the RBS Group in April 2008 as Chief Executive of Business Services, becoming the Group Chief Administrative Officer in February 2009. At the same time he was re-appointed to the Managing Board of ABN AMRO to oversee the integration programme. Ron started his career with ABN Bank in 1986 as an IT/Systems analyst and held various functional positions before becoming Chief Operating Officer of the Wholesale Clients Business in 2002. He was appointed Chief Executive Officer of Group Shared Services in 2004 and joined ABN AMRO’s Managing Board in January 2006, where he was responsible for Services and Market Infrastructure. Ron holds a Masters degree in Economics from Amsterdam’s Vrije Universiteit.]

Anyway, Teerlink is the only board member that has any IT experience listed.

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Successful remnant of Motorola acquires successful remains of Psion

Derek Kingscote

Psion Linux netBook Repost from 2009

I remember going to a trade show, ooh must be 5 years ago (maybe more) [8 years now] , and a saw a new Psion netBook running linux. It was the same underlying machine as a netBook pro I think.

And it was linux from the ground up. It had a white case because it was a demo unit; wonder where it went. Suspect it never got to market due to M$ licensing of Windoze CE restricting the use of any competing OS.

Taking on the point of Open Office and a suitable browser and the ability to send a PDF direct to your printer, if one of these linux machines had mobile telephony functionality, video resolution & the requisite connectivity and MP3 player driving bluetooth earphones it would probably clean up.

There was a guy somewhere who had considered gutting a Psion netBook and installing a single board ARM processor a new higher res screen and running linux. Dunno what happened with that. Anyone know?

Could the netBook now be resurrected with RasPi Innards - a great student project methinks

Lament for Psion, great products, clever keyboards but lost through the netBook pro WinCE

Microsoft kills again!

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Reborn UK internet super-snooper charter to be unveiled today

Derek Kingscote
Stop

Outrageous!

Of course this is outrageous!

How the hell are the ISPs & Telcos, Services: iOS/itunes; twitter, facebook google bing android youtube and 1001 other sites going to capture all this stuff in real time and index it so it is easy to search.

One question: when I visit El Reg, the spooks can see that ok - I click a story and something appears in the URL bar at the top. I've come to the Register site and they have connected me from the Register to their story. Can the spooks see that, or does it all look like the Register whatever I visit?

Sorry Reg, you'll have to capture all this data too !

I know ... we'll completely build a parallel internet with loads of storage - that would do it!

Oh hang on - we might have a problem with recursion? I couldn't possibly say, you'd have to check for recursion!

Shouldn't be too difficult to build a networked sniffing server with removable storage to snivel across all in and out lines; then when they ask for the data - give them the disks with the raw data as it is and say this is the start and finish dates but I've no idea what's on here, I've no idea what format it's in, hell I've no idea even if it's plain text that you can search [you've seen the Google search results bar haven't you]. Don't come back to me with follow-up questions cos this is all I've got! Best of luck!

How do I get on the suppliers list cos this will be a nice little gravy train, guaranteed payment, permanent employment and never deliver any meaningful results. And I'll get compensation when the contract's abandoned [just exactly how many gov't IT projects have run the full distance and delivered the specified requirements???]

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Derek Kingscote
Coat

Bring it On

They should implement this forthwith and capture all the contents too.

Would have made Leveson a whole lot more interesting!

Notice how no one appearing has been skewered yet.

The guy on the left is rummaging through my pockets just to find the non-electronic stuff - hope he doesn't find my one-time code pad !

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Waterstones stores surrender to Amazonian invaders

Derek Kingscote

Re This will not end well

With more and more stuff issued on Kindle, we will wind up with Tescoisation. The supermarkets only list the top 20 books. Other than self publishing, the likelihood is that the number of books published will decline. And a consequent decline in bookshops.

The great thing about bookshops is that they allow browsing across all subjects as you wander through the store – this is difficult to do online [until we get 3D headsets to wander through a virtual bookstore]

Our local library service is not allowed to provide e-books on Kindle, other e-readers do not have this problem.

Personally, I avoid, where possible, any service where you are locked in, so I would avoid the Kindle out of principle

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Gore, Bush, and Berners-Lee rock into 'net Hall of Fame

Derek Kingscote

Remedy Required

On the assumption that the "Inductees Alphabetically" list is complete

One or two serious omissions here methinks...

Licklider and Clark should be there as visionaries Licklider is mentioned in the "A Brief History of the Internet"

In August 1962, Licklider and Welden Clark published the paper "On-Line Man Computer Communication", one of the first descriptions of a networked future.

Len Bosack and Sandy Lerner, a married couple who worked as computer operations staff members at Stanford University, later joined by Richard Troiano founded Cisco Systems in 1984

and perhaps most important

1978 -- Dennis C. Hayes and partner Dale Heatherington, working on Hayes’ dining room table, developed the first personal-computer modem and formed a company.

Us oldies will now get all nostalgic thinking of the MF dialling tones; the b'doing b'doing and hiss of handshakes and data.

and the AT command set ...

Remedy required forthwith !

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Home Office 'technologically clueless' on web super-snoop law

Derek Kingscote
FAIL

Of Course They're Cluless

First of all, apologies, this is a long post

Of course they’re clueless. They are mostly arts graduates!

How many technically savvy people are there in govt? There are a few in the Lords on a range of different subjects and for that reason in my view the Lords should remain. They don’t have to pander to the electorate to get voted in – do we need a system like America where they have one house dominated by the Republicans and the other by the Democrats so nothing gets done? [There is a potential issue of corruption : consider the number of muppets paid by the health care lobbyists so that the health bill went through. Anyroad that’s a different can of wurms.]

To get back to my point, in 1994 I worked for BT, and they decided that they would have a single call logger to log all the internal BT telephone traffic. I warned them that they wouldn’t be able to do it because it there was too much data. After a lot of “yes it will”, “no it won’t” panto, they did try. Surprise, surprise there was too much data and they had to have two monster call loggers with a front-end processor before it sort-of worked. OK, OK, things have moved on a lot since 1994, but we were only talking about internal BT traffic.

Consider national telephone traffic now, they will be wanting to see everybody’s bills on a daily slice arrangement, rather than waiting for 3 months like the rest of us. How much data will that generate for analysis? How many people are they employing to do this? The previous lot also wanted records of all calls, even the ones that weren’t answered. There’s only one way they’ll get that and that is logging all the inter exchange signalling data. That’s the CTITT SS#7, known in the UK as C7 signalling.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signalling_System_No._7

Now this gives you everything you could ever want!, calling party number, called party number, time, date and the termination data i.e ringing, busy, number unobtainable, if the call was answered or not, and call duration etc.etc. but you would have to do that on every C7 link in the country and incoming and outgoing to the country.

Just imagine the data volumes. You have to get the calling party name and address and the called party name and address for every one of those calls. The previous govt wanted all that in real time. Ha!

Then you’ve got Mobile Phone traffic, mobile data and SMS traffic.

Then all the Facebook and Twitter traffic.

And all the me too social network sites etc.

And all the YouTube traffic.

And all the Instagram traffic.

And all the website traffic.

And all the ebay traffic.

And all the spam traffic.

And all the stuff we haven’t thought about yet traffic.

Most of this is all pretty pointless, but if they want to sift it they can.

But how do they know what they’re looking for?

Oh, and if there are blokes doing this monitoring they’re bound to get sidetracked with all the porn that “nobody” looks at!

In my last job I got way too much email to the extent that people complained that I didn’t respond to it. I did a little experiment, and I calculated that if I read everything that came into my mailbox, I would be reading a million words a year! [save your emails and document attachments into a single rolling Word document for a month and use the wordcount function, you’ll see!] I was never going to do that!

So capture, log and analyse it all. Best of luck with that!

After a day they’ll have too much data

After a week they’ll have way too much data

After a month no one will bother to even look at it!

Save your money in letting a contract. Just give me the money and you can have this advice instead : don’t bother!

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Nokia on 'brink of failure', warns analyst

Derek Kingscote

Here's my Analysis

3 points here:

1 Microsoft strangles anything not microsoft

They did Symbian once before when Psion started using microsoft winCE

Interesting that people are praising Symbian Belle

2 There are phone buyers and phone renters

The phone buyers want something that looks cool

The phone renters are on a 18 or 24 month replacement cycle

How does Nokia and microsoft sit in those spaces

3 Apps, Apps, Apps

Are the app writers just protecting what they already have on the other platforms

Sad to say, but it looks terminal to me. How the mighty are fallen!

Although resurrection is possible - who'd have said that Apple would be a trillion

dollar company 15 years ago?

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Derek Kingscote

Here's my Analysis

Here's my Analysis

3 points here:

1 Microsoft strangles anything not microsoft

They did Symbian once before when Psion started using microsoft winCE

Interesting that people are praising Symbian Belle

2 There are phone buyers and phone renters

The phone buyers want something that looks cool

The phone renters are on a 18 or 24 month replacement cycle

How does Nokia and microsoft sit in those spaces

3 Apps, Apps, Apps

Are the app writers just protecting what they already have on the other platforms

Sad to say, but it looks terminal to me. How the mighty are fallen!

Although resurrection is possible - who'd have said that Apple would be a trillion

dollar company 15 years ago?

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Hello? You'll never guess where I am ... I'm under a ferry

Derek Kingscote

How did they do that?

What they haven't said is how they've done it.

The most likely method is by leaky feeder.

A leaky feeder consists of a coaxial cable run along tunnels which emits and receives radio waves, functioning as an extended antenna. The cable is "leaky" in that it has gaps or slots in its outer conductor to allow the radio signal to leak into or out of the cable along its entire length.

This system is also used for underground mobile communication in mass transit railways. In Hong Kong the leaky feeder aerial was incorporated in the specification of the capital project and installed during construction. This allows emergency services seamless mobile communication from the underground to the surface.

Aircraft also use a leaky feeder antennae system for the latest generation of IFE systems.

More details on leaky feeders here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaky_feeder

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Tiny transistor stays where it's put

Derek Kingscote
Boffin

Keep it Cold

"It also needs to be kept at -196°C to operate"

So, keep it cold or the smoking hairy golf ball is back !

1
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Injunction suspended: EU can buy Galaxy Tabs again

Derek Kingscote
FAIL

Surprised Siemens has nothing to say

Surprised Siemens has nothing to say

Take a look at this

http://www.pdastock.com/Siemens-SIMpad-SL4-616.html

Title: Siemens SIMpad SL4

Brand: Siemens

Release-Date: April, 2002

Dimensions-width-x-height-x-depth: 263 x 181 x 28 millimetres

10.4 x 7.1 x 1.1 inches

Embedded-Operating-System: Microsoft Handheld PC 2000 (Galileo)

Operating-System-Kernel: Microsoft Windows CE 3.00

Oh look this device had rounded corners and featured a flat surface centred within

It was colour and touchscreen [it had wince but we'll let that go]

It seems that when companies get really big [you know who they are/were] they lose all sense of proportion and they live in their own reality, not the real world.

Oh and they like megalomaniacal control over what you can or can't do

You're too late Apple. Horse bolted, stable door wiiiiiide open.

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Microsoft COO: Our greatest enemy is old Windows

Derek Kingscote

"Our greatest enemy is old Windows"

Fact is, most people don't need any more than XP and Office 2003.

I've never used IE at home

Things went wrong a long long time ago when the software started to cost more than the hardware.

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Microsoft's Office Web Apps - a long way from here

Derek Kingscote
FAIL

Three essential items

Microsoft's Office Web Apps - a long way from here

Yeah, but a lot, lot further than you think!

at first consideration :

1 Ubiquity Can you connect to your stuff anywhere in the world

2 Functionality It's got to work properly

3 Availability It's gotta be there whenever you want it

Soooo

1 Where will it be hosted ?

2 much of it is not yet done e.g. :

This is one of the least complete Technical Previews that I have known Microsoft to release

I soon found other shortcomings ...

no printing

to mention just three of countless missing features ...

You can share a document with others and enjoy simultaneous editing, but I found this problematic in practice because there is no indication of what another person is currently editing. This means you can inadvertently overwrite another person's work

The preview uses Windows Live, though, and according to product manager Chris Adams, this partly explains why it is so rough

3 See 1! Plus support; maintenance; backup etc etc

Another case of Microsoft pre-announcing something in the expectation that business will wait.

This time, however, they've missed the boat. Lookout for M$ buying companies to provide what M$ is incapable of delivering themselves.

M$ also has the following issues to contend with :

20 per cent of companies already use Google Docs [and students too since some of their work is done in teams - sitting in your own room scoffing pizza and sharing data!]

If it's the end of June next year, they have 40 working weeks to build, test, debug and deliver a usable product.

What are their chances ?

The "irrelevant" internet turned out to be their nemesis.

Later consideration will identify other stuff too !

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ARM wrestles Intel for netbook crown

Derek Kingscote

Psion Linux netBook

I remember going to a trade show, ooh must be 5 years ago (maybe more), and a saw a new Psion netBook running linux. It was the same underlying machine as a netBook pro I think.

And it was linux from the ground up. It had a white case because it was a demo unit; wonder where it went. Suspect it never got to market due to M$ licensing of Windoze CE restricting the use of any competing OS.

Taking on the point of Open Office and a suitable browser and the ability to send a PDF direct to your printer, if one of these linux machines had mobile telephony functionality, video resolution & the requisite connectivity and MP3 player driving bluetooth earphones it would probably clean up.

There was a guy somewhere who had considered gutting a Psion netBook and installing a single board ARM processor a new higher res screen and running linux. Dunno what happened with that. Anyone know?

Lament for Psion, great products, clever keyboards but lost through the netBook pro WinCE

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Why would anyone run their own base station?

Derek Kingscote
FAIL

Too Many Questions

This is of great benefit ... to Vodafone - they get their network expanded at your expense. And they need to ... 3G : Always on, Sometimes connected.

They want ubiquitous 3G and this is a cheap way to get it. Since the connection is over your broadband; can you prevent someone else using your cell ? Is the broadband call datastream interceptible by you? [i.e can you listen in or monitor it ?] Or will they be running an encrypted connection over your network and broadband ? Will their connection be dynamically allocated or do they take a fixed slice of your broadband ? What about when you want to download a lot of data, will they be gobbling up your connection? If your cell is very busy, will your ISP be throttling you back ?

The cellphone companies are storing all kinds of data on calls [dates, times, cells etc.] so any dodgy calls or data going via your cell may implicate you. [Police raid at 4.00 in the morning anyone?]

How many simultaneous calls will these things support ? [probably 1, 2 or 4] You won't have any priority, so youll be pretty annoyed that you are paying for this and the rest of your neighbourhood is benefitting and you can't get on!

Will there be a contract, and do you have to guarantee to have this for, say 3 years. If you are in the sticks and the power is iffy, is there battery back up for this or is it no mains = no signal. Will you have to agree to have your broadband modem on all the time?

This is only scratching the surface; there will be lots of other questions but I'll have to do some more thinking [and it's Saturday and it's too hot so I can't be bothered right now! ]

I'm done here. I'll get my jacket - it's the one with the worn brown leather patches on the elbows.

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Union attacks fire-brigade control room IT modernisation

Derek Kingscote
Coat

Two and a half years is more than enough time

Re AC "It's not that simple"

1 EISEC - See VOIP vs Land Lines in

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/06/15/voip_999/comments/

2 And regarding the comment above : no you can’t knock up a control room system from scratch before 2012. It does involve integrating touch screens, telephony, mapping, TETRA and VHF radio with a decent GUI and ensuring the thing is stable.

The police have had integrated touch screens, telephony, mapping, TETRA and VHF radio with a decent GUI and stable systems for some years now and from different suppliers.

Software Integrated Communications Control System (SICCS) are used worldwide in mission-critical, emergency services environments. It seamlessly merges radio despatch, telephone call handling, video monitoring and web services, enabling control room operators to conduct their duties effortlessly in a stressful environment.

Furthermore there are a number of suppliers for SICCS systems and the best suppliers have plenty of experience with this now.

It does, however, depend on how well the tender spec was written and the management of the tender process.

This SICCS stuff is pretty much off the shelf now, the radio software and hardware is on at least version 3 and the only limiting factor is the depth of your pocket.

The fire service have had this coming for about 7 or 8 years now and there are about 125 working [5 day] weeks from now to the end of 2011. So, - two and a half years not enough time?

Nonsense. The whole thing can be designed, delivered and tested and be ready for service in under 12 months if the building is ready. Just get on and do it!!!

I'm done here. I'll get my jacket - it's the one with the worn brown leather patches on the elbows.

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Race to pinpoint VoIP callers in emergencies

Derek Kingscote
Coat

VOIP vs Land Lines

NB This is a long post - but Quite Interesting.

BT provides a service called EISEC [Enhanced Information Service for Emergency Calls]

BT has enhanced the service it offers the Emergency Authorities (EA) [Police; Fire; Ambulance; Mountain Rescue, Cave Rescue, or Coast Guard services] by enabling the network to

allow electronic transfer of the callers Calling Line ID (CLI) to the EA, and to allow the EA access to an EISEC-DB in order to directly collect address information relevant to the point of call origin.

The BT SIN 278 covers this service in full detail - it's well written and interesting too!

http://www.btwebworld.com/sinet/278v1p6.pdf

EISEC is a brilliant service that delivers the actual location of the caller (not the billing address, but the physical address of the line) to the Emergency Authority. The latest EA Control Rooms can automatically tie the postcode of this address from the EISEC database to their command and control databases and mapping systems and can hence log and identify the location of the incident and the nearest resource for deployment.

[Don't knock it, your life might depend on it one day!]

The local fire services are up in arms about Regional Fire Controls and argue about the removal of local knowledge but EISEC will perform the location identity stuff; it's not going to take away the need for fire appliances to rush to the scene, but the technology will automate the call handling front end of the service.

Mobiles have Zone information passed on but this is only covers a fairly broad geographical area.

VOIP was recognised as an issue some years back [well before I retired three years ago] and they wanted to do something before the genie got right out of the bottle!

Clearly they're trying to do something to fix what is now a major problem [they're not interested about where you are all the time] - "The EA will ... only be able to access name and address data for customers who have made a recent 999/112 call. Following a 999/112 call the customer data will be held on the EISEC Client machines for a period of approximately thirty

minutes, during which it will be available for access by the EA" - so it really is a time limited 999 service address access function.

VOIP is location independent so there's no EISEC database for you - and the best way to fix this would be to have a GPS module in your VOIP handset that transmits your position at the front of the 999 call. Or you have to enter your location postcode as part of your VOIP logon - don't be tempted to put your Exeter postcode in because you're too lazy to find out what the postcode is when you're in Leeds.

Under Airwave, most of the EA vehicles now have GPS modules that transmit both on radio messages and when travelling [the mapping systems show vehicles moving across the maps in real time - that's how they identify the nearest available resource]

EISEC -great for PSTN; so-so for mobiles [that'll probably be fixed (and also be great) when mobiles have GPS modules - I know some do already].

VOIP - all 999 calls go to operators spread around the country so you can tell them your location - but you'd better hope you're not in Ashley; there are 9 in the road atlas I have, and two of those are in Hants, so you'll have to be very precise with your location details. [I didn't bother to go through the rest of the atlas, 9 Ashleys made my point]

That's why they want to automate it. Any bright sparks got a good, cost-effective method for automating your physical location related to your VOIP connection (other than my twopenn'orth above) ?

I'm as concerned as the rest of you regarding the surveillance state, but EISEC is an outstanding good use of technology in my view.

I'm done here. I'll get my jacket - it's the one with the worn brown leather patches on the elbows

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