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* Posts by Peter R. 1

336 posts • joined 15 Jun 2009

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Foxconn to take on 100 THOUSAND workers prior to iPhone 6 launch

Peter R. 1

Oh, come off it.

Really ? They've built Intel chippery and AMD (or is it nVidia) into a thrash can package, locked it an threw away the key.

I'll give you the case design, but bar the presentation there is absolutely nothing groundbreaking about it.

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Apple settles ebook price-fixing damages lawsuit with US states

Peter R. 1

And once again...

...the fines for allegedly 'duping' the consumer wil disappear without a trace in the gouvernment's bottemless coffers while the duped consumer will be left holding their matrimonial apparatus'.

...And Justice for All.

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Quantum teleportation gets reliable at Delft

Peter R. 1

Question.

Is this teleportation per se ?

Being of the Star Trek generation, teleportation - to me - has always suggested 'disassembling' matter in one place and, after transporing it to another location by e.g. an energy beam, 'reassembling' it in it's proper form. This suggests some sort of 'freedom' in the location where the reassembling takes place, even if this requires two 'assembly-disassembly' units. One of the main problems doing this was postulated by a certain Mr. Heisenberg.

What this guys are doing may be teleportation in the literal sense, but it does have a drawback. Since the system relies on entangled pairs, you would first have to 'construct' an entangled pair, and then transport one to whatever location you wish to transport stuff to, whereupon you could proceed to 'teleport' to that location, and none other. Teleporting somewhere else would require you to either transport one 'unit' to a new location or construct another 'pair'. Since only the two entangled bits (I use the term loosely) can communicate with each other communication is very secure, however not very flexible.

I could see an application in instantaneous secure communications, but I don't think beaming an underwear change to the lads on moonbase Alpha is on the cards just yet.

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JJ Abrams and Star Wars: I've got a bad feeling about this

Peter R. 1

Guys, this isn't difficult.

When Lucas made his first SW movie, he wanted to tell a story. He wrapped it up in a galactic bow tie, but it was good guys, bad guys. White hats and black hats. The whole 'a long time ago in a galaxy far away' premise was just a vehicle to smuggle in space ships, tractor beams and megalasers. But the story was there. And there was nothing whatsoever in it that did not contribute to the story.

It all turned to excrement when he decided he wanted to make a movie not to tell a story, but to sell theatre seats. He wanted to reach as many demographics and target audiences as possible. Jar Jar for the kiddies, Jedi for the slightly older kiddies, Pod Racers to sell video games. Special effects to show of the capabilities of ILM. Anything even remotely able to generate merchandising. If the story needed to be modified to sell lunch boxes, so be it. The later 3 films are merchandising commercials. Nothing more. I don't believe for one second he wanted to tell a story. In my - often not very humble opinion - the only thing that interested him was to increase the share price of his companies.

And a lot of people fell into the trap because of the rep of the first three. And Lucas laughed all the way to the bank. And Disney saw the money making protential and bough the franchise. And now THEY want to make as much money as possible from it. Not to tell a story, or ponder good and evil, or even pay hommage to the story. All they want is fill seats and sell the lunch boxes, the shampoo, the towels and so on and so forth.

I think he should be ashamed. But then, I'm not a billionaire, and will never be one.

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Supposedly secure Dogecoin service Dogevault goes offline

Peter R. 1

Re: What did the Doge do?

This has got something to do with the pellet with the poison being in the vessel with the pestle, hasn't it ?

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Apple inaugurates free OS X beta program for world+dog

Peter R. 1

Anyone read the whole agreement ?

Does it say anywhere said software can only be installed on an Apple computer ?

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Spanish village called 'Kill the Jews' mulls rebranding exercise

Peter R. 1

Porno, Nigeria was already wiped of the map completely !

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=porno+village&oe=UTF-8&ie=UTF-8&ei=MQdRU9_aB4nbPOrYgIAO&ved=0CAoQ_AU

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Report: Apple seeking to raise iPhone 6 price by a HUNDRED BUCKS

Peter R. 1

Re: Yep, it'll work.

Are you suggesting, sir, that everyone who owns one of the aformentioned brands is a wanker or that every wanker owns one of the aforementioned brands ?

Either way, would you not consider this perspective a bit narrow ?

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Neil Young touts MP3 player that's no Piece of Crap

Peter R. 1

When I visited the Pono website all I got was two paragraphs of blurb and a 'visit us on facebook' link. It was a piece of crap.

Seriously, for an outfit that claims it is dedicated to music reproduction without added bullcrap they sure seem to subscribe to a different philosophy where other forms information are concerned.

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Voracious alien flatworm hits French in the escargots

Peter R. 1

The Zerg are here !

Time to polish the power armour and grease the chaingun.

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Wikimedia wants forced disclosures of paid edits

Peter R. 1

Good idea.

But, unfortunately, a waste of effort.

The fact that these 'oganisations' publish wiki articles WITHOUT disclosing their motive or origin is because they fear this will, in some way, detract from the message they are trying to get across.

If every Tea Party statement would need to carry an statutory warning along the lines of 'this message was in large part paid for by the Koch brothers' they would very soon loose their perceived 'grass roots' image. (This is just an example, of course).

So it will not be long before the writers of such articles will simply claim they have written them 'in their own name' and claim their right of freedom of expression, strenuously denying any financial (or other) encouragement.

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Murdoch dumps Microsoft, prepares to Hangout with Google

Peter R. 1

Re: A fool and his money are easily parted...

Murdoch has made a career - and, may I add, a great fortune - out of pain and suffering. Right up his street, then.

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Stephen Fry rewrites computer history again: This time it's serious

Peter R. 1

Re: Somebody put it far better than I could...

A quote from someone even stupid people regard as a stupid person.

Fry may not be the most technologically savvy out there, but if he's half as amiable in real life as is his public persona, I will gladly suffer his sometimes ill informed tweets.

Which is more than I can say of Burchill.

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Peter R. 1

If memory serves...

It is also untrue that Sir Bill of Gates licensed his OS to IBM. The licensing racket started a lot later. He sold - again, if memory serves - IBM the right to put the OS on their PC (or ship with it) for a lump sum which was relatively low, but indeed - and this was the master stroke IMO - to sell it to anyone else if he so chose.

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A BBC-by-subscription 'would be richer', MPs told

Peter R. 1

Scandinavian model ?

So, are we going to apply this logic across the board to what can be broadly labeled as 'indespensible' services ? Is a bus fair going to be cheaper if you make less money ? Drinking water ? Electrical power ? Or does this logic apply to every form of spending by the general public ? A Bentley perhaps ? A family holiday to Ibiza ?

Granted, the two last examples seem silly. But is it not true higher incomes already pay more taxes ? And not only in absolute numbers, but higher tax brackets. Are people who spend more not only paying more taxes, but also more sales tax - in absolute numbers - because they by more and more expensive consumer goods ? Are we returning to 'there's one for you, nineteen for me' ?

It reeks of communism. And I thought we had generally come to the conclusion it doesn't work.

Bear in mind Scandinavian politicians are no different from the ones in Blighty, or Belgium for that matter : they keep trying to find new ways of extorting money from citizens and use a never ending supply of bovine excrement to sell it as 'fairness'.

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Snowden speaks: NSA spies create 'databases of ruin' on innocent folks

Peter R. 1

Don't oversimplify. It tends to weaken the argument.

Indeed, there is little difference between plod err...plodding around asking questions when they suspect possible malfeasance and the NSA doing this by electronic means, except for the scale.

The analogy however breaks down in the face of what happens next.

Plod wil have to present their evidence - a lot of it possibly circumstantial - to a judge and ask for a mandate to officially open an inquiry and gather evidence on the suspect (s). In this case the judge also decides the scope of the mandate. Any broadening of said scope has to be equally sanctioned by the judge. This guarantees separation between the powers.

The NSA, however, broad as their mandate is, is not hampered by such trivialities. They qualify every fart as a threat to national security (much as Homeland does, apparently), have the resources and manpower to open an unlimited blanket investigation against which there is no legal protection, decide for themselves if the evidence supports their claim, and nick whoever they want. They can not hauled into a courtroom to explain themselves, and are not bothered by details such as habeas corpus.

This is wherein the problem lies : not the collection of the information, but the action which is taken upon it. And we all know absolute power corrupts absolutely.

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Survey: Yoof too COOL for Ferraris, want state-sponsored hybrids

Peter R. 1

You're not going to like this...

...but when such a large portion of people asked about their opinion on vehicles do not actually have the money to buy one, what's the actual value of the poll ?

They may very well claim their desire to want a 50K 0-emission vehicle, but I wonder what they will buy once they've managed to scrape together that money by hard graft.

And I'll bet they'll go for the 20K Golf diesel and spend the rest on their mortgage, putting their kids through school and a family holiday or two.

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A whopping one in four Apple fanbois uses OBSOLETE TECH

Peter R. 1

Alternatively, maybe those 25% are the smart ones.

Considering the 'improvements' Apple has made to, e.g., the book management (taken out of iTunes and into iBooks), the rather large security holes that needed patching, the fact we're already at 7.04, the fact that 7 has become even more of a walled system than 6.x was, may I respectfully suggest the 25% that held off 'updating' to 7 may indeed be the more savvy users ?

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Apple's 'Smart Dock' patent filing makes Siri your new roommate

Peter R. 1

Not again !

I wish Apple put as much time, energy and talent into developing their new and existing product line than they do in wording their patent applications so they cover every device and application known to man.

Then they would actually conform to their marketing image. These days, they seem to be putting more energy into retooling themselves as patent trolls with a product lineup that is 10 years old.

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What's wrong with Britain's computer scientists?

Peter R. 1

Re: Your choice of degree is an example of lateral thinking

AC Wrote 'As a CS graduate, I guess I have to set your little a$$ on fire'

You lost me right there.

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Peter R. 1

The problem with comp sci degrees....

Is that they are not producing computer scientists.

Right off the bat I must admit I do not know the specific state of Britisch Comp Sci curriculae. I DO however know something about technical degres this side of the pond.

And the truth is we are not producing scientists. What we ARE producing is circus monkeys. Graduates are tought specific skills tailored to specific markets. They are tought Java, XML, some C++ perhaps, or even SQL, and some general approaches to coding a solution.

They are however not ought to FIND a solution. They are not given a thorough mathematical and statisctical foundation that teaches them how to solve problems.

Turing was a maths graduate. Lovelace was taught maths by, amongst others, de Morgan. Hopper has both maths and physics degrees.

The graduates we are producing are equivalent to people mounting wheels in a Toyota factory. They'll do wheels in the Volvo factory no problem, but ask them to set valve timing and they're in trouble. OK, it's a silly hyperbole, but you get the point.

Knowing how to write an app does not a computer scientist make.

The flip side is that we never produced very many Turings. Neither did the UK.

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OH what a LOVELY, well-rendered WAR: Yes, it’s 'Call of Duty: Ghosts'

Peter R. 1

To quote Mel Gibson in Lethal Weapon...

...my money's on the mutt.

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Hands on: We play with the slippery Lumia 1520, Nokia's first phondleslab

Peter R. 1

Ah ! This one's for me

Finally a phone that befits my failing eyesight. I will most certainly be giving it a try when the battery on my 4S finally dies, which I estimate to be in a month or three.

Very well done, Nokia, there is hope still.

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Pop OS X Mavericks on your Mac for FREE while you have LUNCH

Peter R. 1

Not good

It looks like the gates still left in the walled garden are being closed one by one.

I also wonder what this 'free OS' is going to do to the thriving enthusiasts corner known as the Hackintosh. In the past these users could argue that they 'bought' the licence and could use it the way they wanted. By giving OSX away for 'free' I imagine things are going to be changing there as well.

The good news is the pricepoint of the new Pro's : I would almost call it 'reasonable'. OTOH it's become an iMac without a screen. You configure it, you buy it, game over. Locked in.

I see a plan emerging here. And it's not for the better

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Murdoch calls for world+dog to 'expose' Google

Peter R. 1

Just to clarify...

He got a message in response to his tweet, asking him to expose Googles antics during the courtcase, effective using it as a soapbox.

Unfortunately, he screwed up the reply and tweeted it, partly exposing the defense strategy.

Just in case you wondered : he's not going to cop to it and do a mea culpa. But you knew this, of course.

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Apple's new iPhones dope-slap Samsung in US

Peter R. 1

Re: Well, I'm not having one.

Well, there is of course import duty, and 21% VAT (which is partly deductable).

II was, however, not complaining about the cost, but about the fact that Apple is charging me a premium for a product that is, quite frankly, no longer top of it's class.

When I got my 4S a few years ago, it was after a truly frustrating time with a 1st generation Galaxy S, and I found it to be an outstanding product. Thes days, however, the 5S offers me very little extra over the 4S bar a tiny increase in screen real estate and a fingerprint scanner.

I'm definitely with Mr. Not Sartacus here. There are much better products out there these days, and for a much more competitive price.

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Peter R. 1

Re: Well, I'm not having one.

Yes. The 32GB S is 799 Euro's ( a little over 1000 USD), and the C is 699, a fraction under.

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Peter R. 1

Well, I'm not having one.

The 4S I have has a slowly dying battery, and I don't think I'll shell out 1000+ USD for the exact same phone plus fingerprint scanner.

Apple has innovated itself clean out of my business.

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Barmy Army to get Wi-Fi to the seat for cricket's Ashes

Peter R. 1

Barmy Army ?

Like in the Exploited fanclub ? I'm going to watch THAT game ! :D

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Tell me why I don't like Moon days: Bob Geldof heads into SPAAACE

Peter R. 1
Joke

Good good...

Just don't bring him back...there's nice lads !

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Chrome turns five, gains new 'desktop apps'

Peter R. 1

It started out well...

But lately it has turned into a pervasive means for google to lob ads at everyone. The thing is bundled with every imaginable piece of software (even Java these days) and the default setting is 'install'.

And Google can try and convince me of their honorable intentions, but after countless incidents of snooping, rifling through peoples mailboxes, and statements by their crypto-fascist leader Schmitt I simply don't trust them anymore,

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Microsoft fattens Exchange Online mailboxes to 50GB

Peter R. 1

Maybe they need the extra storage

No thy've bought Nokia they're preparing for all the customers that want to send email forms to complain.

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Bradley Manning is no more. 'Call me Chelsea,' she says

Peter R. 1

This may backfire badly

This announcement is not going to buy him any goodwill in the nick. The prison management may well decide he is a risk to internal order and incarcerate him in solitary 'for his own protection''.

His lawyer will then argue for cruel and unusual punishment, but the military don't put much truck in what they see as 'civilian bullshit'. At least not here.

He may eventually get a limited pardon for humanitary reasons, but by then he will have suffered greatly.

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Manning's lawyer plans presidential pardon campaign, says client will appeal

Peter R. 1

Hot off the press...

Manning now claims he's actually a woman named Chelsea (eh ?) and joined the army to cure himself of this 'affliction' (sic). There is even an alleged email to his CO about this.

His lawyer (make that HER) lawyer claims his situation is unrelated to the leaking of documents.

Draw your own conclusions.

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US highway agency awards Tesla Model S RECORD safety score

Peter R. 1

Trade in value will make it or break it.

Well, it looks like Tesla's got all but one of the boxes ticked now. Range, performance, reliability (if stats so far are to be believed) and safety. What remains is the trade-in value. For me as a business owner this is important, anyway. It is, after all, quite an expensive vehicle, and I need to know what it will be worth after it's written off.

And, unfortunately, I do not have high hopes. Considering the price of the battery pack and the pace at which the technology is still advancing a 4 or 5 year old 100K Tesla may prove to be an unwanted relic .

I'm watching, though.

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Leaked photos of iPhone 5C parts portend ugly Google legal battle

Peter R. 1

Magical...

AND revolutionary. You left out revolutionary.

And lethal cunning...and an almost fanatical devotion to the pope. Or wait...I may be confusing things.

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WoW gold farmer throws sueball over real world gold theft

Peter R. 1

2000 AUS$ a day ???

I'm in the wrong business. WHO did you say was the gold digger ?

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So, you gonna foot this '$200bn' hacking bill, insurance giants asked

Peter R. 1

Nothing is impossible...

...for those who never have to do things for themselves.

In this particular case, I would recommend first installing an in-sewer-ants scheme against hare-brained schemes.

Einstein famously postulated that a problem which can not be suitably described can not be solved. Let us apply this gem to the above.

What is the problem ? Certain services are deemed so critical to the functioning of society that a large scale failure of said services wil cause untold damage to society.

So HOW exactly will in-sewer-ants protect society against -say- a catastrophic failure of the water supply or electricity grid, for example by terrorist attack ? My guess...not whatsoever. Utility companies may (or may not, if their in-sewer-ants is anything like the ones over here) receive a large chunk of change after a claim, but this money will most certainly not be paid out immediateley, the insurers will go to great lengths to weasel out of coughing up, and all the while the great unwashed masses will still not have their electricity or water supply restored. Receiving a great deal of money will not make new HT masts appear magically.

I would understand mandating critical systems be insulated from non-critical sysems, e.g. nuclear power plants not being attached in any shape or form to commercial backbones. AFAIK this may already be the case. Or water companies be mandeted to invest in a minimum backup water capacity which can be rolled out in a hurry. But money after a disaster ? Not really.

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US feds: 'Let's make streaming copyrighted content a FELONY'

Peter R. 1

Re: unlimited bandwidth and capless download plans

You are claiming you need a 120 Mb capless internet connection for watching porn ? You must have some serious callousses in odd places.

For the record. I'm not an anti piracy maniac. In fact, I'm not any kind of maniac.

I just find it odd that all these measures that are allegedly put into place to combat piracy always seem to focus on the alleged user, and never on all the companies providing the infrastructure.

I submit that ISP's and usenet providers would record a dramatic drop in high volume subscriptions if the downloading of movies, games, tv shows and the like were taken out of the equation. And hence a substantial drop in revenue.

I therefor equally submit it is the ISP's that are the major beneficiaries of the alleged distribution of illegal content.

It is of no consequence whatsoever what I think about the use, the user or the provider. It is merely a statement of opinion which I think can be supported by traffic statistics.

And I encourage you to disagree by statement of fact. Not, however, suppositions about my character or mental health.

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Peter R. 1

Sounds promising...

because íf 'facilitating the distribution of copyrighted material should then equally include :

- ISP's who provide access to usenet and streaming services

- You guessed it, Astra, UNS, GegaNews et all

- Makers of torrent utilities

- Torrent indexing websites

etc. Because, let's face it, these outfits actually make money off the illegal distribution of copyrighted material, unlike the lady in the US (What was hetr name ? Whammy or something ?) who shared a few songs or the toddler in Scandinavia that had dad's laptop impounded.

Honestly, and I DO mean honestly, what do all these companies provide unlimited bandwidth and capless download plans for ? Downloading emails ?

But no, as usual they will turn some poor individuals into examples fining them tens of thousands of dollars and possibly putting them in the slammer, while their cronies with the big telco, ISP and related industries continue to line their pockets.

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Limbaugh: If you hate Apple then you're a lefty blog-o-twat hipster

Peter R. 1

Re: As if anyone with a brain gives a rat's ass about Rush's opinion.

Unfortunately, as with any Gauss curve, the intellectually challenged far outnumber those of a more informed persuasion.

If indeed Mr. Limbaugh's radio programme is the most widely consumed one in the US, the US gets everything they deserve.

I have TRIED to listen to Mr. Limbaugh making a point on his radio show on several occasions, and lost the plot on every one of them after about a minute,

The man no more than a school bully who's been given a platform. You may agree with him or disagree, but he IS going to take your lunch money from you, even if it means beating you up behind the sanitary block. With a few of his 'friends' holding you down.

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Microsoft cuts Surface Pro price by $100

Peter R. 1

Attn. Mr Ballmer

Microsoft cuts Surface Pro price TO $100

Maybe this works. MAYBE.

Kind Regards,

Pete

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Tick-tock, Apple: Obama has just days to stop US iPhone iPad sales ban

Peter R. 1

It"s done.

The verdict has been VETO'd. Must be the first time in what ? 25 years ?

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Terror cops swoop on couple who Googled 'backpacks' and 'pressure cooker'

Peter R. 1
WTF?

We're missing something here

I'm pretty convinced we've not been given the facts.

If the black helicopter platoons are going to be activated every time someon goes online to research a pressure cooker, the only thing that is going to get cooked is the law enforcement budget.

I'm not buying it. What I DO buy, is a dirty trick by the former employer. WHY did he start going through the search history of a former employee ? This smells of payback.

I suspect the employer was asked why on earth he wanted to examine former employees' computer use, and being fearful there would be privacy issues, he cooked up a plot to explain his sudden interest in someone that no longer worked for him anyway.

So he invented all manner of slip-of-the-tongue, clues and other bull. By the time he finished the poor ex employee was chairman of the worldwide Osama fanclub.

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Typical! Google's wonder-dongle is a solution looking for a problem

Peter R. 1

I don't see the point.

I have a cable subscription and an internet connection. This costs me in the region of 60 quid a month.

I can not - for the life of me - discover what Google can offer me that I don't already have.

To make things worse : I am systematically cutting loose all manner of 'upgrade packs' on my existing cable subscription. The reason ? Channels like Discovery, History, SyFy, 13th street as well as more local channels are becoming increasingly unwatchable as 60 minute programs are interrupted 4 or 5 times for commercial breaks. Add the commercials before and after the show and that's 7. SEVEN !

And I'm NOT paying to watch commercials.

Maybe if I could, as some have suggested, use it as a very cheap and compact HTPC solution. But I can pretty much guarantee google will NOT be happy with people buying the cheap hardware but not buying into the expensive content.

I believe this will be a short lived gizmo. At least, I think it will be.

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Apple: 'Average' iPad toiler does a mere 46-hour week

Peter R. 1

Let's face it.

They don't take workers rights very seriously over there. The only thing they DO take seriously is not getting caught. Hence, they will investigate not who's rights got violated, but who had their name plastered all over the media.

But fret not. This problem will take care of itself. Al this 'workers rights' lark is driving up the price of Chinese labour, and the relatively low investment sectors like fashion are already leaving China because it is getting to expensive and the Chinese are starting to require elementary environmental and worker protection.

I predict the next wave of high-tech assembly plants will be passing China by.

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