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* Posts by Andrew Orlowski

1066 posts • joined 6 Sep 2006

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Huawei prez: A one-speed internet is bad for everyone

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: The difference is not traffic priority....

"As Andrew showed with the RFCs, the internet is already built to allow traffic to be prioritized based on need. What the ISPs want to do is to change it to allow traffic to be prioritized based on greed."

Paranoia strikes again.

Sadly people are not willing to exercise their power and switch - making life very easy for ISPs. They would rather whinge, or support Net Neutrality's goal of utility-style regulation - would enshrine Comcast forever.

Third rate internet is good news for Europe and Asia, but bad news for Americans.

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iPhone 6: The final straw for Android makers eaten alive by the data parasite?

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Samsung's Business model

Samsung's margin is enough to see it stay in the game for now.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: An unsually poor comment

"The idea that only Samsung and Apple make money from smartphones is wrong."

Huawei et al make money from smartphones - and if you had read the article, you would know this. But in mature markets, the numbers don't lie. Ask Sony, HTC.

Basically, you're rejecting all the evidence you do not like - so you can reject the arguments that follow. This is not the strongest position from which to construct an argument.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

I've been hearing "Silver is scrapped" since the Silver details first emerged in the Spring. Not surprisingly.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Once some players drop out then....

"Slice of the pie" doesn't butter any parsnips - or direct capital. Profit does.

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Comcast exec: No, we haven't banned Tor. I use it. You're probably using it

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Tor

Not again:

"Man discovers his Net wasn't Neutered"

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/04/23/bellovin_neutrality_mob_rule/

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Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Phones4U

"their marketing seemed to be aimed at the more erm... chav infested end of the market"

"Are you a Top Gear Tiger or an iPod Babe?"

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/04/05/mobile_marketing_segments_pt1/

Or a Flashing Blade?

Or a Bingo Boiler?

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European Court of Justice allows digitisation of library books

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

What you call "manufacture" - in this case writing a book - isn't "free".

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BBC Trust candidate defends licence fee, says evaders are CRIMINALS

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Think you overestimate goverments' fear of the beeb.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peacock_Committee

Hardball on funding? That's as hard as it got.

Hardball on political pressure: yes, an unelected official on behalf of the ruling party succeeding in forcing out the DG and Chairman. So much for independence, when push comes to shove.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Independence?

Rotherham has probably rendered that defence irrelevant.

PC public sector institutions find it difficult to hold other PC public sector institutions accountable. It was Andrew Norfolk (at a hated 'Murdoch paper') that pursued the story.

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Net neutrality protestors slam the brakes on their OWN websites

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Cretins.

@Ole "In any case, from my, and many people's perspective, the only way to create a fast lane is to add a slower one. I guess that makes me a cretin. There's a lot of us."

Yes it does, in the same way as thinking the Earth is flat makes you a cretin. If "many people" believe the Earth is flat, that still doesn't make it an accurate description of physical reality.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/05/09/net_neutrality_explained_and_how_to_get_a_better_internet/

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OH SNAP: Getty Images sues Microsoft over Bing pics widget

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

@DestroyAllPhotographers

Getty made 35m images free to embed back in May to bloggers, etc.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/03/06/getty_image_embed_opens_up_35m_for_bloggers/

One-click licensing should be here in the UK by the end of the year.

http://www.copyrighthub.co.uk

Then there's "free shit" people can legally license.

Microsoft has little excuse for not keeping up with the news.

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'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

@Joseph Haig:

Joseph Haig:

>> I do not recognise it in the description as a "bureaucratic, centralised scheme".<<

Neither do I. You're putting 2+2 together and getting 94, there.

We'll have a centralised scheme working in a few days in England and Wales, taught with reluctance, by exhausted non-experts. Any guesses how it'll turn out?

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Cracking copyright law: How a simian selfie stunt could make a monkey out of Wikipedia

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: I'm puzzled by this article

It leaves the impression that Slater has rights to the monkey selfie.

Oh dear. RTFA?

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US Copyright Office rules that monkeys CAN'T claim copyright over their selfies

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"No, but it does seem to put the monkey's image in the public domain."

I suggest you read what the USCO actually says, not what you wished it said.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

This doesn't put Slater's image "in the public domain" at all.

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Simian selfie stupidity: Macaque snap sparks Wikipedia copyright row

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Good article.

@Levente: "UNLESS it's claimed by someone it is public domain BY DEFAULT."

Well, that explains a lot. You don't understand how copyright works.

The first Berne Convention in 1886 specified copyright is automatic. You don't need to register, fill out any paperwork, or draw a symbol. You don't need to re-apply to retain your rights. Almost every country is a Berne signatory today.

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Cut price Android on steroids: OnePlus One – should we look gift horse in the gob?

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Invite

I don't have one.

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Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Maybe his photos weren't very good?

I expect working photographers, who are still eking out a living, might have something to say about that.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: [no payment was supplied]’

@ Tom 38

"We've all paid for Sherlock".

He's in the USA, and so he hasn't "paid for Sherlock". I'm pointing out he can watch them all, for a few cents per episode - and he says that's too much to pay. Do try and keep up.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: [no payment was supplied]’

@veti:

"A single short season of a modern show, such as Sherlock, will set me back $30."

"even if I'm lucky enough that it's one of the tiny handful that's actually available at all"

The first two Sherlock seasons are on Netflix, to watch as many times as you like. Season 3 streamed a month ago.

"I just go without these cultural treats. "

Because you didn't want to pay $4.99?

That is pretty fucking tragic.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: bunch of tw@ts

I see still you're still active in the Pirate Party, Andrew.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/05/26/european_voters_make_pirate_party_walk_the_plank/

(Yar!)

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

[no payment was supplied]’

@moiety

"All rights holders need to do is make their products available everywhere, to everyone, at a reasonable price and much of their infringement problems will go away."

Well everyone wants cheaper beer.

That's what everyone was saying ten years ago. Now everything pretty much *is* available for free or at very low cost; even Sky has unbundled itself, and flogs it off piece by piece via Now TV.

Some people spend a fortune, most people don't mind paying ... but some people absolutely don't like paying at all. The average pay out by Spotify is shockingly low. This is now affecting production. Only rich kids can afford to do art now.

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ICO: It's up to Google the 'POLLUTER' to tidy up 'right to be forgotten' search links

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"Is there some standard test for what is in the public interest?"

Yes, there are several years of case law.

Next question?

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OK, EU chiefs, 3 years of copyright wrangling - let's get it sorted. Now this white paper... DOH!

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Professionals will see this differently

A change in the law would ensure you would never be paid anyway, no matter how popular your work became globally.

Generally it is better to strengthen people's rights, and then allow them to opt-out from being paid if they wish, rather than weaken *everyone's* rights and hope a few people remember to opt-in, before they're ripped off.

In fact, why stop there? Why not make the interest banks pay on your deposits and savings optional, too? Fairly soon with low rates, nobody would expect to get any interest, and most people would forget to "claim" their interest.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: What version of Yourtube does Andrew upload his UGC to?

"Because the one I use doesn't offer me any expectation of compensation."

Background music is already licensed, so you are not describing a realistic threat. As the EU concluded, the problem here isn't lawsuits, because there aren't any - it's individuals not realising their rights, and being ripped off.

Internet aggregators rely on people being mugs, and having low expectations. Your probably should be a bit more demanding.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"the right of ordinary people to be paid"

Ah, so fair remuneration for a popular work is "moonwalking". The plebs should just give up!

I think having naively pushed for this for so long, you're now being confronted with the consequences. Which are anything but "fair" or "progressive". So it goes...

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EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

@Man With Burning Brain:

Your comment shows some difficulty with reading comprehension.

Android is open source and GMS is a binary blob. The MADA contracts, which interest the authorities, put conditions on the access to GMS. Google is free to put conditions on GMS and has good reasons to do so, to avoid fragmentation. However, a real or inferred Roach Motel clause that prevented a phone maker from making a non-GMS phone in their product range could be considered to be anti-competitive.

Yes, Google own GMS and "get to decide what's what". But only up to a point. This is one of the perils of being a monopoly.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

@ Man With Bleeding Brain

I'm not convinced you tried very hard to read the article. Google's GMS is a binary blob that sits on the open source Android base. The MADA contracts that interest DG-COMP govern access and conditions for use of GMS, not the open source base.

Yes, Google own GMS and "get to decide what's what". But if accepting the GMS "privilege" means you can't then make a non-GMS phone in your product range, because you break the GMS contract, then this may be anti-competitive.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Hardly any different than....

@Pott:

Business regulation is necessary to ensure a monopoly incumbent doesn't prevent superior services from reaching the public.

"Google doesn't have everyone's best interests at heart, but neither does Microsoft...and it's Microsoft that's behind this, mark my words."

Cute speculation, but irrelevant here. It doesn't matter who is "behind it". (Conspiracy Theory Alert). European investors, entrepreneurs, coders, and even the old lady next door to me all want better services and more competition. A Roach Motel clause may or may not be preventing that. We shall see.

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PICS: Nokia Lumia 930 – We reveal its ONE unique selling point

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"They are no longer the only notification method "

They never were, WP always had Toast notifications.

WP tiles should have a Large (2x) size by now, as they do on Win 8.x desktop, and be able to display more than one email /calendar entry etc.

One thing I didn't notice in the Dev Preview: "Some of your applications are running in the background and are using power, would you like to close them?"

Just like Android.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Are you sure about that?

Not on the 930 there isn't.

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Listen: WORST EVER customer service call – Comcast is 'very embarrassed'

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Comcast v. Verizon

Yes, competition works. It's the only thing that strikes fear into them.

Sadly most people who have a choice prefer to whinge rather than switch. Quite why anyone is on Comcast when FiOS is available is beyond me.

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Google de-listing of BBC article 'broke UK and Euro public interest laws' - So WHY do it?

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: not illegal

Google makes editorial decisions every day. It made 12 million domains disappear one day. Google has some more responsibilities because it can no longer evade EU law, but these are nowhere near as onerous as Google makes out.

(Google would not be in this position if it had chosen the option of protection as a publisher - an option it declined.)

You are free to argue for the abolition of data protection laws in the EU, but if they're there, you can't argue Your Favourite Corporation doesn't have to abide by them.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: not illegal

He's sort of right, although Safe Harbour is a technical term that doesn't apply here. Applied metaphorically, he's on the right lines.

The ECJ wasn't "chasing search engines" - it has to apply European data protection law as it's written. There is an exemption (a "derogation") for publishers and Google could have applied to be one. And saved itself all this both. But it declined to take that route.

If the EU wants search engines to be exempt it will have to pass a rule that says they are. But given Google's behaviour with regard to data protection, that's not very likely now. And even less likely given how it's behaved in response to Gonzalez.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Radio 4 this morning.

What Tierney is saying is that a commenter does not have the right for the article to be removed from the search results, because their privacy is not being breached. At least, not by the CJEU's criteria.

But Google removed it anyway.

Remember that Gonzalez only won because the law had not kept pace with technology; a) the info being continually re-published is irrelevant and out of date and b) Google is a massive, pervasive information source, with huge social impact, and it's continually republishing this info via its search results "snippets".

A responsible search engine would have done this:

"Oh, hello, we've got a request from a commenter on some page we've indexed. We'll reject it and they can complain to the ICO".

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Radio 4 this morning.

Exactly.

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When PR backfires: Google 'forgets' BBC TV man's banker blog post

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Google arrogant?

That's the next shoe to drop.

But then Wikipedia can claim some privilege as a publisher. Google had this option too, but declined to use it.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"And how much would it cost Google for lawyers and administration to individually dispute each and every one of those 50,000 (and counting) requests?"

Given that it's free, not very much. 40 per cent have come from Germany. The UK ICO deals with thousands already, and most are not appealed; the appeals procedure is free in the UK up to the highest level.

A month ago Google fanbois argued it would be too expensive for Google to de-link on request, Google couldn't possibly do it. It would go broke trying. Now Google will go broke appealing a couple of dozen decisions a year. Funny, that.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: To what end?

"I believe what makes it weird is that the original copy (say, the article or blog post) may have different legal status than those duplicates and links. "

Yes, Google could apply for protection as a publisher. But it has chosen not to do so.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: and so, ad infinitum

Perhaps, but that contradicts what Google itself argued - that it would be too expensive to de-link on demand. Google would grind to a halt if it de-linked. The web would break.

Now it's decided it's politically useful to "break the web" and de-link on demand, intentionally, and hope the blowback doesn't blow its way.

Before writing that, you did know appealing an ICO decision is free, didn't you?

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: To what end?

Ah, so the law must conform to Google's interpretation of what is wise, and the Courts must accept Google as the ultimate technical authority of what is feasible.

You wouldn't say Google is an interested party in all this, would you?

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: and so, ad infinitum

So Google says it's removed a link, inferring Stan O'Neal complained. Emails Peston expecting him to cry "Censorship!", "The internet is broken!" etc.

But Stan O'Neal hasn't complained and the link hasn't been removed. Peston doesn't perform the little jig that Google expected. Funnily enough, neither does James Ball.

The Comments is a red herring. Either way, Google was entitled to reject the complaint, and it was up to Joe Bloggs to then complain take it up with the Information Commissioner.

A responsible search engine would have been expected to do that - if it takes freedom of expression seriously.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: and so, ad infinitum

"He" (Stan O'Neal) didn't actually make the complaint.

So the complaint should have been rejected at the first hurdle. Only the individual or someone with delegated authority can complain, not some random third party.

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Aereo presses pause on 'tiny antenna' TV-streaming service

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Ridiculous

It's more about the future loss and risk from basic terms being re-defined in a whacky way - which is what a ruling favourable to Aereo would have meant. It's up to Congress to define those terms.

The Supremes decided Aereo was really a cable company - but cable companies have extremely cushy terms, they can use a compulsory license and pay a set rate far below market value for their content. No one denies Aereo has value - and that their technology could be useful to consumers and the industry if they licensed it. Much like picocells are useful to operators.

This story simply demonstrates what we already know - that the whole case was designed around fighting and winning court battle.

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Aereo has to pay TV show creators? Yes. This isn't rocket science

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Good. Now it's time to end retransmission fees.

@JohnyQuiz: It is not directly a copyright case but it is very much about whether either copyright can be avoided.

There is a compulsory license regime for US cable companies - so they can use the free-to-air transmissions and TV companies can't stop them, but they must pay a statutory below-market rate.

This sounds like the opposite of what you would wish to see, which is control but not compensation.

Aereo was arguing it was *not* a cable company, but the Court used the "looks like a duck" test to decide that really, it was.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: I Wonder

You probably need to reassess the power balance in light of the YouTube indie contracts, and Amazon's new contracts for publishers. Particularly the YouTube contract, which relies on piracy for leverage to keep YouTube stuffed with music against the owners' permission. Google can try this on not because these property rights are too strong or too long, but because they cannot be enforced effectively.

It isn't 1995 any more.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Not quite.

Not really. They want to control their stuff for sure, and they want to be paid for it.

Aereo has useful features, there is no denying that. They can still build a business adding value to other people's TV. What they can't do is build an ersatz cable business that pretends it isn't.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Aereo is NOT re-broadcasting

Neil, You're looking at "how it does it" and hoping this defines "what it does": the process defines the purpose.

The Court concluded the opposite: that Aereo is an ersatz cable operation, and should have the privileges and responsibilities of being a cable operation. That's all.

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