* Posts by Andrew Orlowski

1204 posts • joined 6 Sep 2006

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Honor 7 – heir apparent to the mid-range Android crown

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Release date?

Their outlet also launched: http://vmall.eu

£40 off currently, so it's £209... but "sold out". I assume Huawei has to honor this deal.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Stock Android in 5.x is one pane, you just keep pulling down and the quick settings eventually appear. No lateral / sideways gesture needed.

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Vodafone UK rocks the bloat with demands for vanilla Android

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: @Twilkins - yup, me too...

Black, Red or Silver?

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Enjoy vaping while you still can, warns Public Health England

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Wales

All true. Clumsy wording by me, we'll fix it.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: "Almost certainly"

"I spoke to a GP about this, her position was that there is not enough time/evidence to say that vaping is safe. "

My GP said something similar to me. When I asked for the basis for his caution, he cited "science in the BMJ" which I knew to be opinion pieces.

It's a group practice, so I changed my GP. I'd advise anyone else faced with the same kind of clueless moralising twerp to do the same.

Eventually Doctors who have no interest in health will find the audience/patients they deserve.

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Hey, folks. Meet the economics 'genius' behind Jeremy Corbyn

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: There's an interesting point about those industries being crap

"the NHS might get slagged off a lot but it way better than the alternative"

What if the alternative to the NHS turns out to be a European-style health system? They have excellent care, are much more responsive to patients rather than number targets, and are very efficient.

I'm puzzled by you holding up the NHS as an example of a well run public service, because the NHS is exactly the kind of post-war command and control monopoly that you don't like.

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Jimbo 'Wikipedia' Wales leads Lawrence Lessig's presidential push

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: More hypocrisy from Jimmy Wales

I think it's an excellent combination.

The candidate is an "ethics professor" who helped himself to cash from a self-confessed felon in the gaming industry. And a "humanitarian" who franchises the brand to help out dictators buff up their image.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/12/22/the_withinthelaw_jimmy_wales_on_the_run_with_500000/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/06/22/lessig_poker_money/

You could Lessig and Wales go together like peaches and cream.

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Secret US-Pacific trade pact leak exposes power of the copyright lobby

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Reality Check

Here it's worth studying the evidence of the leaks, and comparing them against the claims, to get a sense of the influence of the competing lobbies.

Copyright section:

http://keionline.org/sites/default/files/Section-G-Copyright-Related-Rights-TPP-11May2015.pdf

"But if you had any doubt about the power of the IP lobby in the US..."

In the late 1990s the copyright lobby was indeed more powerful than the internet lobby. But it isn't 1998 any more. The power of the IP lobby is far outweighed by the power of Google, Facebook and the rest of Silicon Valley, which is now indistinguishable from the Obama Administration. The results of TPP demonstrate this.

Google backs TPP because it leaves the balance of power over liabilities for infringement unchanged (the individual continues to be powerless), while it can use the process to try and undermine regional data protection, claiming it is a trade restraint. TPP works out nicely for Google, but not necessarily for you. The long term plan to replace property-based markets (in which the law takes your side) with a kind of plantation is going quite nicely.

Silicon Valley's greatest trick has been to convince people to act against their own economic interests. And even better, to campaign against laws which protect their rights as individuals, which allow you to own and control your own property. I'm all for "rebalancing" IP in favour of the individual, amateur or professional. Ideas such as non-assignment (the German model) for example should be more widely discussed. But sometimes changing things to benefit the individual means stronger IP, not weaker IP. Why do you think Google and Facebook fight this so hard?

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Open source Copyright Hub unveiled with '90+ projects' in the pipeline

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Sounds like a good idea

Spot on. That's one of the job a trusted Hub can do. The rest of the world just sees a GUID, while a Hub only issues what you want it to issue.

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Windows 10 on Mobile under the scope: Flaws, confusion, and going nowhere fast

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: @TheVogon Re: "......that it not even really a beta yet."

And also...

90 per cent of the review discusses design and usability (not performance or reliability).

So when do you suppose would be the optimal time to point out design and usability flaws?

A month before release? A week before release?

Heck, maybe six months after release we could have a little whinge: "Ooh, Microsoft designers. Can you redo X, Y and Z?"

Yeah. That'll work.

So the earlier the better, really.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

I thought Hamburger has been done to death (even here) and hamburger menus are at least recognisable and make sense in places (like the Office apps).

But mainly because they're a symptom not a cause. The cause is the mandate to stick a generic / adaptable UX onto Phones, then not work out how to do this elegantly in advance, but instead let different teams cook up their own answers.

Maybe a generic / adaptable UX can't be done elegantly. But doing it inelegantly in 3 or 13 or 25 different ways at once is nuts.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: @TheVogon "......that it not even really a beta yet."

"This is at pre-beta stage"

Well... It's been out for three months, and the fanbois sites are advising the two most recent builds are "good enough to test as a daily driver".

So I did. And this is what happened.

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UK.gov makes total pig's ear of attempt to legalise home CD ripping

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Re: I'm not stopping now

"Well, like the majority of people commenting here and elsewhere (from what I can see - please don't ask me for a detailed analysis), I object to the very idea of charges for format-shifting and backups."

I'm glad you mentioned that. That's a fair enough gripe, so would I. But there aren't going to be any charges for format-shifting or backups. 100 per cent of commentards who think there are wrong. Not even slightly wrong - completely wrong. The Government said there isn't going to be a levy and the industry hasn't asked. There was a small compensation fund mooted a few years ago, of a few million quid.

Do you think you or other commenters will start a campaign to stop such a fund being created? To stop British musicians being compensated just as European musicians are compensated? I am genuinely curious. If so, do you think this would be a popular campaign with the general, non-freetard public?

"STOP BRITISH MUSICIANS GETTING PAID" doesn't really sound like a winner to me. But maybe I'm wrong.

So. If commentards are angry about something that isn't going to happen (it was quite explicitly ruled out in Parliament, there hasn't been one call from any UK trade group requesting a media levy, most have also ruled this out)... then aren't we looking at some other phenomenon in these comments.

Something like a collective hallucination, or a persecution-induced or anger-induced psychosis?

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Pub-landlord-onomics

Uh, Graham - why not read the two judgements, linked in the article, then Google the evidence, before offering armchair "common sense" economics?

The Government lost a million quid trying to make your argument, that didn't have the evidence to support what you say is "common sense".

Even the academics told to find the Right Answer (the same one that's in your head) couldn't find it; then the Government basically lied about the quality of evidence. And not surprisingly, got its bummed kicked.

You are basically saying the world should work in a particular way, and getting angry that it doesn't.

Perhaps you're making the argument that was lost in the 1990s about whether format shifting creates lost sales? That's gone now. Are you going to start a campaign to repeal paying musicians across Europe?

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Fair use

"Do I have to pay?"

No you don't.

(That disposes of 80 per cent of complaints here)

And nobody is obliged to give you or me free upgrades for life, every time a new format is devised. Nor is anyone obliged to buy a new format every time it comes out.

(It's nice to get free upgrades, or have multiple licenses bundled like we have today, but none of this is a human bleedin' right.)

(That disposes of the other 20 per cent of complaints).

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: I'm not stopping now

"Once again, sections of the music industry attempt to punish those who contribute most to their profits, their incomes, by extracting more revenue from them for recordings for which they have already paid."

[citation needed]

"Right now I'm part way through ripping my collection to hard disk. I'm not stopping now, regardless of the change in the law."

Of course, nobody will.

If you want the EU to repeal that part of the InfoSoc Directive that the principle of uncompensated copying is fine, please go ahead.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Has anybody ever been convicted of format shifting?

Congratulations for spectacularly missing the point.

The Government acted illegally and got its bum kicked. It spent a lot of money doing so, having been told that this is exactly what would happen. And now we in the UK don't have a format shifting exception again.

You applaud this incompetence, for which people would be fired in the private sector, because of your prejudices (ie, blind hatred) align with the Government's.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Compensation for what?

Thanks. You got the point.

The Government on the advice of an activist copyfighting IPO tried to argue black is white, got walloped, and it cost the taxpayer hundreds of thousands of pounds.

If commentards had to pay a few hundred thousands of pounds for every barmy assertion, I think it would concentrate minds wonderfully.

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Neat but narky at times: Pebble Time colour e-paper watch

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Yep, which takes you to two Pebble apps.

The commentard is clearly allergic to reading.

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Shapps launches probe into Wikimedia UK over self-pluggery allegs

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Not quite. You're right that the WP community revolted, and made their own changes to disable the WMF's WYSIWYG (Visual Editor). But WMF buckled a few hours later, as it lacked the powers to force them to use anything.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/08/01/wikipedians_reject_wysiwyg_editor/

Since then, WMF has sort of given itself the power to override democracy if it doesn't like the decision:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/08/18/class_war_wikipedias_workers_revolt_after_bourgeois_papershufflers_suspend_democracy/

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Trebles all round: The BBC's won this licence fee showdown

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Public service remit

"Another anti-BBC polemic from Mr. Orlowski."

This isn't just wrong, it's wrong in a quite interesting way.

Assuming I am "anti-BBC" presumes two things, and then assumes everyone who disagrees with these presumptions is either morally defective, or stupid, or both.

Presumption #1)

"If the BBC is made to do something it doesn't want to do, British TV gets worse"

British TV can be very good. The BBC has historically contributed to making great TV, as have other companies, once they were allowed to. Today, you don't even need to ask permission to make great TV. Lots of excellent science TV being made today is not even broadcast.

The primary goal of any examination of British TV should be how to make British TV better, not how to preserve this or that institution or corporation.

When the BBC was a broadcast monopoly it fought the introduction of ITV tooth and nail, and the newspapers backed it up. What followed was a renaissance in British TV and the BBC itself. Sometimes what the BBC wants to do isn't best for the BBC. Sometimes what the BBC hates and fears turns out to be very good for the BBC.

Presumption #2:

2) "A flat rate TV tax is the only way to fund the BBC and any change in that is bad for both the BBC and British TV".

The BBC could be enormously richer and financially secure if restrictions on how it operated and how it raised revenue were removed. Many of the fairness complaints would also disappear. The people who oppose the lifting of these restrictions tend to be major commercial rivals - not me. A wealthier BBC could bid for sports rights that are out of reach today. It could offer far more diverse programming than it does today. Ways of making the BBC richer that the present BBC management fears should not prevent these being discussed.

The commenter's presumptions are not just childish, but sentimental.

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Wikipedia jumps aboard the bogus 'freedom of panorama' bandwagon

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: EU snipers

Please see the response to JH123 and then express the threat level as a probability.

(It died today anyway).

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: A stitch in time

Thanks, but you don't really challenge the proposition that it's a bogus scare that won't be implemented, which is fairly critical context needed to understand this story.

I know some people will want it, Europe has professional copyright bureaucrats who would love to start another society or four. But you've missed two important things.

One, the amendment wouldn't be on the table if the rapporteur hadn't done such a bad report. One things leads to another.

Two, these are the stages that would need to happen to lose the Panorama exception.

1.The European Council writes exactly the same amendment. Council members vote on it. Since most of its members have a Panorama exception they would vote against it. It dies.

2. But assuming it doesn't, it goes to Parliament, where MEPs are from countries that have a Panorama exception and don't want it. They vote, it dies.

3. But assuming it's still alive, it has to be implemented in all the countries in Europe that have a Panorama exception. Which is most of them. They have an exception because it's a good idea. So it never gets into legislation. Because if it goes to each Parliament, it dies.

It was never a danger to either photographers or Wikipedia. Oettinger ruled out any prospect of 1) today.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/07/03/wikipedia_saves_internet_from_fictional_threat/

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Newton's Third

I agree with you actually, it is overused.

It's a figure of speech, though, that applies here. The doofus Amendment wouldn't have been tacked on to the rapporteur's report if the rapporteur hadn't made a doofus suggestion. That's because she doesn't understand the framework at all, she doesn't understand why people need copyright, and why we have exceptions.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

He's also wrong when he says Google is in the position of being "judge and jury". It isn't at all. That wasn't challenged either.

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UK TV is getting worse as younglings shun the BBC et al, says Ofcom

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

2. didn't need 1. to happen. It happened because there are more choices of media, and more choices about how you get your TV.

The best thing I've seen recently is The Secret History of Our Streets, BBC factual at its best. Incredible research worn very lightly:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01jt9zh

Then I found out its 3 years old. Lost the habit.

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BBC (sort of) sorry for Grant Shapps Wikipedia smear reportage

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Michael Green

That's a fascinating concept of justice you have there.

It's one we abandoned a few hundred years ago, but fascinating nonetheless.

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China's best phone yet: Huawei P8 5.2-inch money-saving Android smartie

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Need moar reviews

If Jolla send us one, we'll review it. Maybe they don't think it's ready?

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

What bloat?

Just curious.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: How the heck can they sell this in the West...

Huawei is employee owned. These things aren't hard to find out, you know.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Ok, all well & good, but...

Fair enough! It sounds fine, no wobblies on the noise cancellation. We'll add this to the review.

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Pirate MEP pranks Telegraph with holiday snap scaremongering

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

The idea that you think your property rights are "bollocks" shows what a good job Silicon Valley has done brainwashing you.

"[AO]The laws are there to protect you and your work from exploitation that you don’t agree with, by somebody much more powerful – such as a record company or Google. But in the copyfighter's mind, this is inverted, and the purpose of the law is oppression, prohibition and exclusion.

[Freetard] Seriously?"

It's far easier to persuade people to relinquish their freedom if they do so voluntarily. Even better if they do so with a smile. I think it's Big Tech's greatest achievement, to be honest: to get people actively campaign against their own interests.

cf Lenin, and "useful idiots".

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Maybe nothing. but why take the chance

Sorry, but you don't really understand the law - which is a bit alarming even for a hobby photographer.

You may be being hassled under terrorism laws, but that is nothing to do with copyright.

The "freedom of panorama" doesn't need "saving", as this is not a legislative proposal.

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California über alles? Is MEP Reda flushing Euro copyright tradition down the pan?

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Limit the Term.

The main complaint with the copyright system today is that people get ripped off, and can't get access to justice. This applies to you whether you are an amateur or a pro. You expect to be ripped off, and can do nothing about it.

This affects livelihoods. Whether term duration is 70 or 90 years doesn't really affect livelihoods at all.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Privilege not Right

Sorry, but you need to much better informed before you can comment usefully.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights:

Article 27, Paragraph 2

“Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author”)"

+

American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man of 1948

Article 13, Paragraph 2

“Every person has the right…to the protection of his moral and material interests as regards his inventions or any literary, scientific or artistic works of which he is the author”

+

Additional Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights in the Area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights of 1988 (the Protocol of San Salvador)

Article 14, paragraph 1 (c)

“The States Parties to this Protocol recognize the right of everyone…[t]o benefit from the protection of moral and material interests deriving from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author”

+

Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of 1952 (the European Convention on Human Rights)

Article 1 of Protocol No.1

“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law”

Just as useful is Samuel Johnson in 1773:

"There seems to be ... in authours, a stronger right of property than that by occupancy; a metaphysical right, a right, as it were, of creation, which should from its nature be perpetual."

What you're saying is that you want none of this to be real, so removing rights from people is painless and has no collateral damage.

Author's Rights are human rights

It's a Human Right as expressed in

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Farewell then, Mr Elop: It wasn't actually your fault

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"Jolla's Sailfish platform show what Nokia could have had, an independent platform that was good enough at the time which now runs android apps. Basically, if Nokia had put the effort into Meego that they put into WM, I'm certain it would have turned out differently."

If Meego had been as slick as it was in the N9 but two or three year earlier, then I'd agree. By 2011 nobody else wanted Meego and Nokia didn't think it could build an ecosystem on its own. The board agreed.

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LG G4: Be careful while fingering this leather-clad smartie pants

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: RTFM Mr Reviewer

I know.

It's not as convenient. RFTA next time.

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Chill, luvvies. The ‘unsustainable’ BBC Telly Tax stays – for now

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Am I the only person...

@sed gawk

"For 4p a day..."

Bloody hell, I hope you don't teach maths.

14,450 / 365.25 = 39.56p a day.

You're off by a factor of 10.

You make a lot of interesting points but none of them address the objections to the BBC that have been raised. Just repeating that's its traditional and that you like it hasn't stopped other institutions getting shafted. They were traditional and well-liked too.

Also, you could have declared that you worked for the BBC.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"But would I think lead to less people subscribing as and when they needed to tighten their belts for whatever reason"

But the number of "it's worth it for Radio 4 alone" comments here shows how much more revenue it could get.

You can do the modelling for yourself on the back of an envelope. We've done it before (search for Elstein). Even with 20-30pc refuseniks you're looking at a lot more money, because it's cheaper than all the other subscription services. Would you cancel the BBC before you cancelled Netflix.

It's smart to jump before you're pushed sometimes. But if you were smart you probably wouldn't be in BBC strategy.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: re - Much quoted now is Whittingdale’s view ...........

@Alan Denham

The sources for all the numbers are in the story, you can look them up yourself. The ones you doubt were compiled for the BBC Trust.

You seem a bit concerned that the poor (with their ghastly satellite dishes) might move near you, possibly lowering your house price. But at the same time you're happy for them to subsidise what you use.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Am I the only person...

"I. I'd pay a chunk of the license fee for Radio 3, and I only regularly listen on a Saturday morning.

2. I'd pay almost all of the license fee just for Radio 4. It's great, really. I'm not a heavy user but there's no commercial equivalent.

3. I'd pay the license just for 6 Music, and would do so just for Radcliffe & Maconie."

Great post, Andrew.

From your numbers it looks like you'd pay almost 2x the current license fee to get services you value, maybe £250-£300. I know some people who'd pay even more.

Even at £500/yr it's still much cheaper than Sky.

This is a compelling case for the middle class users paying subscriptions - it suggests the middle class don't pay enough. Until that happens though, the poor who don't use it subsidise your media habits.

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EU geo-blocking: Ansip's crusade liable to disappear through 'unjustifiable' loophole

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Sorry

"Sky certainly should not be allowed to be a pay TV platform (in many countries) AND ALSO have control of Pay TV channels. They must divest Sky1, Sky Sports and Sky News etc, or be a content provider and divest of the Satellite Pay TV platforms."

I think beer should be free, and benefits the population enormously. That doesn't mean its going to happen.

Europe isn't the USA, Europeans aren't going to abandon 40 languages for slacker English, and have the same income across the EU. Well, at least not overnight. So in the mean time, we can expect that attempts to coerce a single market into existence by dictating the terms of trade that result in harm, are going to meet resistance.

Ansip didn't spend any time listening to small indies, but took what the soap-dodgers told him on trust.

If you think that is weird, check out the stuff about how the cloud makes us E400bn richer ... just like that.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: There should be no loopholes at all.

Like the USA?

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Welcome, stranger: Inside Microsoft's command line shell

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

+1 for 4DOS. It was the first thing to install on a new box.

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What is the REAL value of your precious, precious data?

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: It's the Difference Between Data and Information

This isn't a argument over whether our personal data has value when processed. Tim says none of the value accrued by the processing should go back to the people who contribute it. There shouldn't be an economic relationship or a market in data.

Obviously, thermometers are not really in a position to bargain.

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: NO.

"Tim's argument works only if the individual are able to control"

should read:

Tim's argument works only if the individual is UNABLE to control'

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: NO.

Tim's argument works only if the individual are able to control either your privacy or your property rights.

As DropBear and others have pointed out (better than I can), merely being able to withhold the data, and to name a price, makes you an economic participant. You'd have a market for that data.

So tech companies would have to bid for your data, or induce you to part with it in other ways.

Of course this is the last they want. Silicon Valley isn't really all that innovative - it's extremely lazy, and basically relies on legal loopholes, and the bet that people won't assert either privacy or property rights.

File Tim's pieces under "Free Marketeers Who Hate Free Markets".

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Ex-Windows designer: Ballmer was dogmatic, Sinofsky's bonkers, and WinPho needs to change

Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: So blameMicrsoft because it doesn't innovate...

Under Steve Jobs, Apple didn't do any UI testing. So doesn't your third paragraph contradict your second?

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Andrew Orlowski
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

When Bell uses jargon in the AMA (which isn't very often) he explains what it means.

https://medium.com/i-have-no-idea-what-im-talking-about/i-have-no-idea-what-im-talking-about-microsofts-rumored-spartan-browser-5a046e3079b5

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