* Posts by Lusty

935 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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Ford: Our latest car gizmo will CHOKE OFF your FUEL if you're speeding

Lusty
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Re: Is this a lost in translation

@John, I don't keep repeating it, I responded to what I thought were two different threads spouting the same crap, which you repeat here. There are LOADS of roads in built up areas which do not have street lighting at all, are you saying these are 60MPH limit simply because the local council decided not to light them? The highway code doesn't mention street lights, and I would wager that bringing up street lights in a court defence would be met with laughter from the judge. The current trend is to remove street lighting to save energy and reduce light pollution so if there were mention of lights in the speed laws it would be time to remove it.

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Lusty
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Re: Is this a lost in translation

"On single carriageway roads with streetlamps and no reminders otherwise, the limit is 30 mph."

No, single carriageway roads are 60MPH whether lit or otherwise. Built up areas are 30 whether lit or not, and whether single or multiple carriageway. Street lighting is sometimes an indicator that an area is built up, but not the best one. Pavements are better, lots of houses and schools are a dead giveaway.

https://www.gov.uk/speed-limits

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Lusty
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Boffin

Re: Is this a lost in translation

"e.g. look for lamp posts, they are relevant in the UK"

No they aren't unless they have a speed sign on them. Plenty of motorways have lamp posts, as do numerous dual carriageways (which, incidentally, doesn't mean 2 lane roads is means two separate carriageways which can each be a single lane and still 70 limit) and many single carriageways, multilane and otherwise. If lamp posts are your method of determining speed limits then it must take you forever to get around :)

https://www.gov.uk/speed-limits

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And the prize for LEAST SECURE BROWSER goes to ... Chrome!

Lusty
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Chrome security

Is there anyone running Chrome who wasn't expecting at least one massive global corp to have full access to all their data? If you want security then a data mining ad company is not your best bet for software.

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Wind turbine blown away by control system vulnerability

Lusty
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Re: Sir

"The problem is that the "big ones" are not any better"

My assumption was that the big ones were installed by people who were capable of installing their own cable infrastructure. If that's not the case then web GUIs are the least of our problems!

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Lusty
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Re: Oh Good Grief

"Either don't connect it to the Internet, or do it properly."

I suspect that's exactly what the programmer was thinking - why would anyone connect these to the internet? They are small turbines to use on site rather than national infrastructure size so surely will just go on the local network behind the firewall and therefore don't need excellent security. If you're putting power cables to your garden then popping an ethernet link in as well is no bother. This announcement is probably because some "hacker" worked it out and contacted them, forcing an announcement. I would imagine whoever coded it already knew about the "exploit" and just didn't care enough (or had too few resources) to do anything about it.

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Lusty
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Re: Sir

"Are these wind-turbines considered Critical National Infrastructure?"

No, these are for people with large gardens and businesses trying to look green. They are not proper big turbines.

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Nutanix 'working on a homebrew hypervisor', sources tell El Reg

Lusty
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Re: Xen?

All of them are small and lightweight, then various layers of crap have to be added for them to work such as drivers and machine management. Lightweight is marketing directly aimed at OCD techies who like things to be optimised and small.

Xen also had the unfortunate problem of being used by Citrix which effectively killed it and caused the birth of KVM, which has the unfortunate problem of not being VMware or Hyper-V and lets face it Hyper-V only made progress because it's bundled with Windows and is cheaper than VMware to buy.

In reality, Nutanix don't need their own, they just need to package a hypervisor so that the install is slick with a single package. Xen or KVM will achieve that as long as they play nicely with the licence folks (yup, looking at you VMware...)

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Review: McAfee Endpoint Protection for SMB

Lusty
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Re: Fellow commentards - help needed pls...

Just uninstall McAfee and let the Windows one do its thing. AFAIK all modern AV uses the MS API anyway so it's really just interface and definitions you're worried about. Make sure the firewall is on and configured and you'll stop 99.99% of modern malware. Don't click on stupid emails/links/pictures and you'll stop most of the rest. For the one in a million remaining, Microsoft are quire capable by themselves because it's really a crap-shoot as to who gets a definition out first. Anyone who genuinely is first every time with a definition for new exploits I would recommend not funding simply because they probably also wrote or funded the malware!

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Woman caught on CCTV performing drunken BJ blew right to privacy

Lusty
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Re: Dazed and confused ...

Having now googled it, she really ought to pursue this case under the DPA.

Guidance is at https://ico.org.uk/media/for-organisations/documents/1542/cctv-code-of-practice.pdf and clearly suggests this is in violation of the rules.

For instance, the signage should tell the public that they are being monitored, and for what purpose. If the lift said "for the purpose of crime prevention" then selling footage to C4 is clearly not that. There are many, many other rules broken here though.

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Lusty
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Re: Dazed and confused ...

"unexpected outbreak of common sense in a Regulator's judgement."

How on earth is this common sense? CCTV cameras are not there for amusement, they are supposed to be there for protection. I was always under the impression that there were rules regarding what the footage could/couldn't be used for, and that the purpose was supposed to be protection.

Given this usage has now been ruled legitimate, I'm forced to conclude that I am no longer in favour of the millions of CCTV cameras "protecting" us. Regardless of what she was doing, it shouldn't have been broadcast on TV for entertainment purposes.

If she was committing a crime, then use the tape as evidence.

If she couldn't be identified, use just enough footage to ask the public to help identify her.

Given that they don't appear to be prosecuting her for urinating in the lift (the only actual crime described, assuming that's illegal) then the footage should be destroyed.

When did the rules on CCTV change?

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CIOs: What tech will be running your organisation in 2020?

Lusty
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"BES server for Blackberries"

Lol they were asking about 2020 - you won't be using Blackberries in 2020! You probably won't even remember who RIM were by 2020...

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Home Office splashed £35m trying to escape e-Borders contract

Lusty
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Re: Ratheon don't even have to win in order to win...

"A company as large as Raytheon should know that you never, ever get involved in poorly defined projects, especially large ones."

You've not worked with the public sector much then? Raytheon would close overnight if they didn't work on poorly defined projects!

It's a public sector problem which is linked to public perception. They have to award business in a bid process and usually do this in a bid, win, design, build manner where the winner must say upfront how much the design and build will cost while knowing very little requirements.

It's possible to do this as bid, win, design, bid, win, build so that the build phase could be properly scoped ahead of time. Unfortunately this results in CompanyA doing the design, CompanyB winning the build phase and then blaming CompanyA for the delays and problems. This isn't much better than the guesswork above.

Ideally, they would select a preferred partner based on competence rather than cost and then use them to design and build in a structured and well thought out project. Sadly, this leads to corruption or at least claims of corruption, bribery etc. in the public sector.

The private sector deals with this nicely. They simply don't care about perception of corruption and choose the best partner for the project then get on with it. If you can think of a way to fix the process then go ahead, I've thought it through and there doesn't seem to be a system which will give good results while also preventing corruption while also not affecting votes for the people bringing in such a system.

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Lusty
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Re: Ratheon don't even have to win in order to win...

No, the reason Raytheon don't want to lose is that it's probably not their fault. The coversation probably went:

Gov: "can we have an e-borders thing please"

Raytheon "be more specific"

Gov: "we know nothing about it, you design it"

Raytheon "No problemo, we'll need parameters though"

Gov: "We don't really have them, can you do it?"

Raytheon "No problemo, design phase will be x Million"

Gov "We need a fixed cost for the whole shebang including delivery, with a fixed timescale and you're blind bidding against 2 other companies so we look honest"

Raytheon "Very well, here is a timescale to deliver very specific X. Hope you don't mind, we made a buttload of assumptions because you didn't tell us anything"

Gov "No worries we'll add the detail later"

Raytheon "you can try, but any changes are on you my lovely"

Gov "La la la can't hear you..."

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Google Glass DIED from TOO MUCH ATTENTION, Captain Moonshot admits

Lusty
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Re: He missed the main problem...

"In what way is that a stupid idea?"

It's not a stupid idea, they just should have finished them before release. This is why the Newton failed and the iPad succeeded, and why in all likelihood Apple would be first to market with usable glasses. Apple are no longer in a hurry to be first to market with anything and it's paying off for them. We can only hope that Google realise this soon as they can make some good stuff when they try. Their search for instance was far from first to market, but they won because they did it right. Advirtising and mapping are other areas where they were late to market with a winning finished product. Glass is an example, probably along with their watches where they rushed to be first and pretty much failed.

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Noobs can pwn world's most popular BIOSes in two minutes

Lusty
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Re: Maybe the operating system shouldn't use the BIOS.

"Then the running operating system wouldn't have vulnerabilities."

It would still be vulnerable because there would still usually be a moron sitting in front of it. Anyone remember sheep.exe? Why don't virus writers use that kind of thing to spread these days, I'd probably still run it and I should know better :)

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Delving into Office 2016: Microsoft goes public with new preview

Lusty
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Re: I wonder if...

"current retail versions are only licensed for the life of the PC hardware"

Are you literally just making things up? Current retail versions are now all Office 365 and licenced by the user. This is why the retail version is actually now a little plastic card behind the tills rather than a box on a shelf.

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Lusty
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Re: I wonder if...

O365 gives you 5 PC/Mac installs plus a couple of mobile devices. All user managed through the portal.

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MOVE IT! 10 top tips for shifting your data centre

Lusty
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Re: eh?

I suspect that's where we differ, I design and implement then go to the next company/project so I am always making changes therefore cable ties drive me nuts!

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Lusty
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Re: 4 labels per cable

You don't add descriptions in the switch config?

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Lusty
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Boffin

Re: 4 labels per cable

As an alternative to labels, you can just ask the devices what is plugged in at the other end if you configure your systems properly and buy the right kit. With HP smart racks they know what rack unit they are in and which power sockets they are connected to, and you can create a 3D model in the software to see the data centre. With network cables the functionality has been there for years to just query the port.

You do seem to love labels though, so I'll leave you be :)

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Lusty
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Re: eh?

So you're happy to cut and retie every time a change is required? Perhaps it's because in my role my whole life is changing things for other people that I have a tainted view. If I had my own data centre it would probably be static enough that it wouldn't bother me as much :)

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Lusty
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Megaphone

eh?

"Some bits are obvious: cable ties "

You missed the words NO FSCKING before cable ties. Anyone using cable ties near me in a data centre will lose their fingers PDQ to stop them committing such a sin again. It's velcro or untidy cables for me, I've seen too many snapped fibres, cut cables and impossible to rewire situations over the years and every experienced techie I know feels the same.

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Badges for Commentards

Lusty
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Is there a way to find out how many non anon upvotes I've had? The suspense is killing me ever since I passed 2k!

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Zuck: Get your FULLY EXPOSED BUTTOCKS off my Facebook

Lusty
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Re: NSFW flag or different pic needed @sisk & Lusty

It's not just schools sadly, you'll find someone in most environments these days who will take offence at very minor things (as is their right) so the rest of us have to fall in line unfortunately. I also try not to swear while at work, certainly I try harder than when I'm at home anyway!

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Lusty
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Re: NSFW flag or different pic needed

Indeed, it's not so much that people mind adults looking at a bum picture at work, but it's entirely conceivable that caught at the wrong moment it could be misinterpreted as showing bum pics to a minor (say the admin is reading the article just when a child enters the room to ask for a password reset). There are also a lot of people who do find those pictures offensive and interpret being shown them as sexual harassment - this is partly why these things get blocked at the firewall as it avoids the problem in the first place.

Sadly, marking the article NSFW wouldn't help with the new look site since articles seem to randomly appear on the top of the frontpage along with their NSFW pictures. The Reg don't seem to understand the issue, or at least don't seem to want to act on it in a sensible way, hence my suggestion of adding them to Internet blacklists. This is the 4th article I've seen the issue on, although this one is the mildest example.

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Lusty
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Re: NSFW flag or different pic needed

I think the only thing that will make the Reg listen about NSFW images is to get them added to blacklists so that nobody behind a corporate firewall can read their site. The number of examples recently is almost certainly enough to justify adding to those lists but with the loss of ad revenue it might well kill the site.

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Lusty
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censoring

Surely the way to censor your Facebook feed is to unfriend people who post stuff you dislike? It's the same reason why flashers don't have large friend groups in real life, because people just stop inviting them places. The only thing that needs censoring or rules here is those stupid clickbait adverts that Facebook themselves put into the feed - whether Zuck likes it or not they certainly are publishing those themselves.

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Are you clever enough, and brave enough, to give a Register lecture

Lusty
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Pint

I was with you until..

the bit about convincing fellow readers I'm clever. This lot can be bastards in the comments section!! I'm off for a pint instead...

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Let's talk about the (real) price of flash and spinning disks

Lusty
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Re: Power?

Again though you're concentrating on price not cost. The capacity of a ups, generator and cooling must be related to load, and spinning disks have significantly higher load which is more constantly high than their flashy brethren. Flash drive power usage is related to the data going in and out while spinners use power all the time if you need responsiveness.

The true cost of the infrastructure must include the various maintenance contracts in place which are also based on capacity loading. Bigger cooling means bigger bills which are far from small bills.

Regardless, my point was that the cost of power for a disk in the data centre is nothing like that of the same disk in your under stairs cupboard. The two are not comparable in any way.

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Lusty
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Re: SAS Disk

"I know of legacy servers with disks spining for a decade*"

Running servers without support is your own call, as is running legacy hardware which begins to become a risk nightmare the older it gets thanks to lack of available patches and spares.

In the real world, as long as I'm not swapping MLC units out every two weeks I couldn't give a monkeys how many failures I get because the vendor will swap it out and I won't lose data because I have more than one disk.

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Lusty
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Re: Power?

To be fair, you probably don't have diesel generators, industrial UPS, air conditioning and monitoring systems in place within your "power and cooling solution" at home. Which was his point. Looking at the numbers without understanding the whole picture just leads you to a bad conclusion. I've no idea if the numbers were correct but certainly industrial UPS is expensive as hell because you need to swap the batteries out regularly, and you have to have N+1 of everything. Same with the generators etc.

In pure power costs though, I do know a server from a few years back would consume enough energy that power cost more than the device over 5 years.

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Lusty
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Re: IOPS

I wasn't saying flash is bad, just that IOPS are pointless in certain scenarios because various other things limit performance. Most people don't even realise that a SATA SSD limits IOPS because the SATA bus speed is insufficient and that a PCIe flash device is better as a result (by a massive wide margin). Amazingly Apple are one of the few to notice, hence they don't have any devices with SATA Flash..

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Lusty
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IOPS

The article is talking about random write IOPS presumably (not even remotely explained). While sequential read IOPS makes far less difference, so for requirements such as large media files (4k video for instance) SATA drives would still win for performance/cost over ssd because for streaming the interface is often the limiting factor, flash only really helps when the workload is random once you hit a certain (quite low) number of drives. The maths is easy on this one, just work your way back from the bandwidth on FC, SAS or iSCSI and divide by IO size or throughput to work out where the line is drawn between the technologies.

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Pi(e) Day of the Century is upon us! Time to celebrate 3/14/15 in style, surely?

Lusty
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Re: Load of bollocks

How I wish I could calculate Pi...

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A gold MacBook with just ONE USB port? Apple, you're DRUNK

Lusty
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Re: Welcome to the wireless world

@gribbler yes I do. My job mostly involves writing documents for customers and connecting to systems over rdp or ssh, but that 18 hours also includes a few hours of video and web browsing. I'd imagine if I were compiling code all day it wouldn't last as long, and if I didn't use power saving functions as designed then it would die sooner. I don't have the brightness all the way up, but not all the way down either, and I don't have a bunch of host powered gadgets connected either. Not sure what you're doing to kill it in 5 hours but it must be pretty hefty like running a load of VMs to do that.

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Lusty
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Re: You forgot...

"the fuss Apple made about the mag safe adapter when it first came out"

When it came out you needed to have the laptop plugged in most of the time to work. This device is designed to be charged when not in use overnight and then used untethered. I'd have liked to have seen magsafe on it anyway but realistically laptops don't need to be used that way anymore. If you feel uneasy working without the power cable in, you bought the wrong laptop!

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Lusty
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Re: 1 USB port? Seriously?

Pro DSLR cameras are compact flash so an SD slot won't help there. The high end eos 1dx also has an Ethernet port so a wireless laptop would be fine, especially if it doesn't add weight to an already heavy camera bag.

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Lusty
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Re: Welcome to the wireless world

You're close, but missed the point that the power won't actually be plugged in while you use it. My iPhone only has one port and that's pretty much always free except over night. This new MacBook has one port which will always be free because you'd also charge that over night (or at the office I guess). In real usage, just like the MBP the battery will last with plenty to spare after a day of working. Yes, it's 10 hours if you spent 10 hours actively browsing the Internet for 10 hours solid. Personally I take a lunch break and speak to colleagues occasionally and get 18-20 hours from my rMBP. I suspect most of the people worried by the power port currently have shitty Wintel laptops which need to always be tethered. At least they were cheap though, eh?

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Unidesk jumps into Hyper-V VDI

Lusty
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"Microsoft's happy that Unidesk has come to play, because VDI on Hyper-V is not something many organisations have looked at. That's partly Microsoft's fault, because it has offered difficult licensing conditions for Windows under VDI."

Surely this is the entire point of Hyper-V Server. For VDI there is no server licence other than System Center when using this edition, and many companies have looked at it when they've received good advice about licensing VDI on Hyper-V.

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GoPro cameras' WiFi security is GoAmateur

Lusty
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I suspect that's just the crappy previews. The GoPro doesn't have enough battery life to copy a full size video over wifi so I still feel safe :)

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Lusty
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Thanks VinceH that makes it much clearer, but I'm still more than happy with the way this works. GoPro doesn't need to be secure given what they are used for, I don't see any real issue for most users of the cameras.

My bike isn't secure leaning against a picnic table in a beer garden. This also doesn't bother me, because I'm right there next to it so someone couldn't do anything without me knowing about it. I don't even think my GoPro allows downloading videos over the wifi, just crappy previews.

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Apple Watch: Wait a minute! This puny wrist-puter costs 17 GRAND?!

Lusty
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Re: Need a bigger laptop bag

"How innovative."

To be fair, it is innovative since nobody else has designed such a thin light laptop yet, and everyone else is reducing the price of their laptops. The expense of a device isn't always linked to spec, sometimes it's the fact that the device fulfils a requirement which people are willing to pay for. Anyone who carries a laptop around the city will be glad of thin and light, allowing a smaller bag. The fact that it lasts a full working day on one charge is nice too so you can leave the charger at the office or at home - I never take my rMBP charger to work with me and that has similar battery life. As for ports, they've been right most other times they ditched things. Floppy drive, CD drive, serial ports, the list goes on and they were usually the first to jump with very few users missing the old stuff. Even the processor is fine for most work done by most people. My 800MHz Duron with 512MB memory will still run Office just fine and display the Internet, photos and videos and that covers most non techies just fine.

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Lusty
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Re: Need a bigger laptop bag

"the new MacBook doesn't have either, so how am I supposed to plug it in? :-S"

With the display port adapter I'd imagine, which the screen works fine with and the "USB3 port" supports natively.

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EU court: Mobe makers not liable for users' copyright badness

Lusty
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Muddy waters

Could they make this any more complex? There appears to be no clarification of what they are trying to achieve to me.

My mobile phone makes personal copies of my music for me to listen to when I'm not at my computer - this is what I consider a copy for personal use and as far as I was aware digital music includes this in the terms so no further payment is necessary.

Tapes and CDs used to include a payment for the industry because they were used for piracy before the Internet. This had nothing to do with personal use and everything to do with copying for a mate while still compensating the artist.

If this stuff continues, we need to be absolutely crystal clear about what we are buying. If I'm buying the rights to the track or the movie for my own use then you can't charge me twice by taking a payment for my phone and my memory cards. If I'm buying one copy of the track then fair enough, but if I'm buying one copy of the track and need to pay for every copy I make then a levy on memory cards may be in order. If they are trying to stop piracy then for the love of god just give up, it nearly killed the industry last time, which has since recovered despite the removal of DRM. Shocker, people actually want to compensate their favourite artists.

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Violin Memory's strings snap as losses DOUBLE from last quarter

Lusty
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Re: Violin Memory ?

They are the makers of very niche hardware which offers extreme low latency and high performance for enterprise applications. The technology is truly excellent and beats most "all flash SANs" hands down. Unfortunately the price tag means it's only really relevant for people who need it and can afford it like the gambling industry or stock trading.

There are two realistic outcomes here as I see it. Either Violin shrink and find a status quo with a small but loyal customer base while still making profit, or they start licensing the patents for reasonable sums and exit the hardware business. Unfortunately they got to the size they are because they used to be the only way to get that kind of performance. Now everyone offers flash SAN which is good enough for most cases so the extra premium is no longer worth it for most.

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Tinder Plus charges oldies MORE to ogle young hotties' pics

Lusty
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Re: NSFW

Reading tech news is part of my job, dumbass!

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Lusty
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Re: NSFW

@AC the picture appears to have been changed.

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Lusty
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Re: NSFW

For the record, the Reg has been doing this a lot recently and many, many people have complained on various threads about it.

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SanDisk launches 200GB microSD card

Lusty
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Re: SDHC can't read 64GB either

"imagine a 2.5" ssd full of these"

Kind of makes you wonder how the SSD manufacturers are so slow at getting better densities doesn't it? Oh that's right, a vested interest in keeping spinny disks around for a while, silly me.

I realise that the chips are different, but they aren't THAT different that a MicroSD can be 200GB and a 2.5" can only get to 1.9TB!

As you say, if someone made a handy caddy it would force their hand PDQ and we'd all benefit. Anyone have a 3d printer and a soldering iron handy? Almost worth buying a 3d printer to make a caddy, patent it and then get bought out by WD or Seagate :)

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