* Posts by Lusty

881 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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Tim Cook chills the spines of swingers worldwide

Lusty
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Re: @lusty and all the others who missed the preceding sentence. OH RLY?

"When people buy Apple stock"

Yes, but we're talking about their profits, which come from people buying their devices. I'm sure I'm not the only one to have a complete mistrust of Google and other companies who have consistently mined customer data for profit and advertising? I don't personally buy the devices because they are more recyclable, but I'm aware of it and it probably would sway me if everything else was equal. I certainly don't buy the devices because their employees have a great health care plan and paternity leave etc. but again, all else being equal I definitely think this is a good thing. It's certainly going to help keep their staff around in the long term making for a more consistent product set.

There are far too many forumites here who assume Apple must be doing evil simply because they are making lots of cash. I prefer to see evidence before assuming bad things. With the competition I see plenty - Sony root kit (amongst other things), Google intrusiveness, Facebook same, Microsoft anticompetitive behaviour. I'm more than happy for someone to point at something Apple have done that's genuinely wrong but in this whole thread that has been missing as far as I can see, and so the argument comes over as simple jealousy of their success. The only one people seem to keep pointing at is that they, along with the rest of the industry, paid Chinese workers local rates for factory work. They were a big target so were attacked for it, and then they began to fix it before any other company even considered doing so. I'd still call that a win.

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Lusty
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Re: @lusty and all the others who missed the preceding sentence. OH RLY?

"You do realise that glueing reduces repairability and screwing doesn't?"

Yes I do. Do you realise that most of these devices are replaced within a couple of years regardless of repairability, so recyclability is actually the overall better option in terms of planet hugging? There are almost no repairable parts in modern gadgets anyway besides the battery, which can still be easily replaced with the glued case as demonstrated by the fact that Apple offer a battery replacement service - if your device lasts long enough to require it. None of mine have so far, with my iPod approaching 10 years.

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Lusty
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Re: @lusty and all the others who missed the preceding sentence. OH RLY?

You still have yet to offer a shred of evidence that they don't do the right thing. Your entire position is based on not accepting the many and various good things that Apple have done and continue to do. I can't imagine there is anything anyone can say to get reality across to you so I'll give up there and leave you to your dim view of the world.

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Lusty
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Re: @lusty and all the others who missed the preceding sentence. OH RLY?

You really don't get it at all. Apple make money as a side effect of doing the right thing. When they ditched doing the right thing they very nearly went bust.

You're right, Foxconn had really shitty employment policy. Foxconn is not Apple. The only reason Foxconn are improving their policies is because Apple are forcing them to do so. Samsung have not done similarly...

I was primarily speaking about the employment policies in the west, which are second to none. These are the ones on direct Apple employees who see various benefits not available elsewhere. I included the factory workers simply because Apple could just as easily have done what Samsung did and do, and ignore them, but they didn't. They removed dangerous chemicals from the manufacture process, and reduced working hours while increasing pay to the point that it's having serious implications for the rest of the country who as a result earn considerably less than these factory workers. Yes, they earn considerably less than I do, but they also earn way above average locally. If Starbucks charged 2p for a coffee in Blighty and my rent was 50p I probably wouldn't need as much cash as I have either!

You say Apple were castigated for not being recyclable, but the fact remains that they are top of the pile in this regard and lead the pack in recyclable products. Name some companies making more green tablets, laptops and phones and I'll accept your point, but only if your company didn't follow Apple in this regard. Yes, it took a while to retool and redesign all of their range but many other companies still have not even started. Where do I take my Google phone for recycling and refund?

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Lusty
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Re: @lusty and all the others who missed the preceding sentence. OH RLY?

@M0rt, the massive stacks of cash they make are a by product of doing the right thing. The Apple way has always been to make the best product possible and hope people see the value in the higher price tag. Yes they do make billions selling shiny gadgets, but generally that's where it ends. Contrast this with Google who "don't be evil" by selling you devices for far less money but then invade your whole life thereafter. There's even a creepy page on Google where you can see a map of where you've been since you bought an Android phone. Apple offer a very rare alternative these days where you buy a quality product for more money than the competition, and then you own that product end of story. believe it or not, I actually miss the days when there was a paid for alternative to much of the "free" stuff we have now. I'd gladly give Facebook some money if they offered a non invasive version of their services for me to keep in touch with friends. The problem is that it's not worth their time because there are infinitely more people who don't realise Facebook isn't truly free, and their corporate value system doesn't push them into doing such things.

Another example of Apple doing the right thing is their employment policy. There have been many stories on the Reg recently about Apple changing working policy for the better, both in the west and in their factories. They didn't have to do most of the things they have done, but they did them anyway.

ANOTHER example of doing the right thing, is making devices almost entirely recyclable. Using materials such as aluminium and glass, and glueing rather than screwing means their shiny gizmos won't end up in landfill. Their policy of return to store for recycling backs this up, they even give you money to return old gadgets!

Maybe they don't make the absolute best technology out there, and lord knows their software could do with having fewer bugs, but their values certainly seem fine to me

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Lusty
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Re: OH RLY?

"Since when, and please give examples..."

Can you give examples of where they have sold customer data? Sure, they do collect some, but they don't use it for advertising or sell it on. The only example I can think of that this is a core value is that they never have sold customer data. I don't see why they would need to, they are the wealthiest company on Earth simply from selling shiny gadgets. It doesn't make sense to risk that by selling customer information as well. Perhaps I've missed something evil they have done though?

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Lusty
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Re: We don't sell your data..

"Who wants to bet that they're going to be going down that route?"

They haven't so far, and their health app already has tons of this kind of data.

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Don't pay for the BBC? Then no Doctor Who for you, I'm afraid

Lusty
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Re: Telly Tax exit stage right!!

"If he does watch BBC stuff on Netflix then he's paying Netflix you idiot"

If you're calling me an idiot then I suggest you learn to read. I specifically said not paying the licence is fine by me and perfectly legal even if he doesn't pay Netflix. My issue is that he's insulting the BBC and implying they are no good at what they do. My point was the hypocrisy of watching the programs while insulting their maker. I then went on to make the completely separate point that I'm proud to pay the tiny fee for some of the best content in the world to be created.

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Lusty
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Re: Telly Tax exit stage right!!

I assume you're not watching any of the many, many BBC programs on Netflix then, given your apparent dislike for the BBC? It's fine that you're not paying, but calling them a bloated corpse and then watching Dr Who and Red Dwarf, or David Attenborough would seem a little off. I think they are worth every penny even if I can now choose to get the content for free. I'd much rather see them continue than go the way of American TV!

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Fibre Channel's looking a bit flat. Bad news for these three firms

Lusty
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Re: Eliminating tape

Tape doesn't in itself meet any regulatory obligations for archival - disk would just as easily achieve this and for all but the largest data sets disk will be comparable in cost too. Old backups are not an archive, either. Very few companies actually have a true archive, most I've seen simply keep years worth of backups and pretend it's an archive.

In the hundreds of companies I've worked with, large and small, exactly two of them had a genuine requirement for tape archival. One works with media files and wants to keep everything just in case they need to reuse. The other keeps detailed pictures of the whole of the planet. Everyone else just didn't realise there was a good alternative.

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Lusty
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Re: FCoE

"Pull the other one, mate, it's got bells on."

No, I was quite serious. Buy a couple of FC switches and plug in a bunch of computers and generally things will work once you install the drivers. I have yet to see a customer break a FC setup enough to reduce throughput.

iSCSI (my preferred protocol for various reasons) on the other hand, I have had to fix for numerous customers after they set it up. MTU, multipathing, dupex, speed, load balancing algorithm, LACP believe it or not, insufficiently powerful switches, flow control and various other things have been incorrectly set up on iSCSI networks. There are also the various occasions where people have made changes or cockups on the core network which have knocked all storage offline because the core network was the storage network.

Trust me, I have enough experience of all of the protocols, and especially other peoples configs to know that FC is easier to get working acceptably. It doesn't help that most people never do proper load testing to make sure it's working, and even when they do, most people don't seem to know the difference between throughput and capacity measurement, and almost nobody at all knows the difference between GiB and GB leading to an assumption of the imaginary "formatting losses" or that there is some kind of magical overhead in the link making up the difference.

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Lusty
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Re: FCoE

"FCoE was touted as lowering the entry cost for fibre channel as there was no need for fibre, dedicated switches or NICs: "It's all just ethernet"."

If that was how it was sold to you then it was mis-sold which happens a lot. Realistically you'd have at the very least needed the extra NICs to maintain bandwidth. Extra switches have nothing to do with performance and everything to do with operational management and preventing accidental network changes from making disks disappear. You don't want your database going offline because some end user created a loop, or the network team made a routing mistake, VLAN mistake, port ID mistake etc.

As for simplicity because it's "just Ethernet" I'd say FC is way harder for newbies to get wrong. Just plug it all in and it's normally good enough. ISCSI on the other hand needs all sorts of fettling to get it performing correctly.

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Lusty
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Re: FCoE

They could just plug the legacy tape library into a FC port as they always have done. It's easy enough to hook one up to a Nexus if designed properly. I would question why tape was still in the solution for someone going UCS though, the solution itself would indicate a forward thinking customer who would likely have also worked out how to eliminate tape from the environment. There are always exceptions though.

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Lusty
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FCoE does, however, offer advantages in the cloudy automated data centre world though, since adapters can be easily repurposed without cabling or hardware changes. This also offers the various niceties of FC which are fairly engrained in larger enterprise environments. I certainly agree for most it offers no advantages but there are some places where it can add value.

What concerned me more was the assertion that iSCSI is taking some share and virtual SAN some more - what protocol are these virtual SANs using then?! All the ones I've seen take DAS and present it out using iSCSI so that more than one system can see it. I realise from their performance claims that all of the virtual SAN vendors believe in magic, but surely the SAN protocol isn't magic too so they must be using FC or iSCSI of some sort.

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Microsoft: You want on-prem wares, UK.gov? We'll make you pay

Lusty
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@busby

It bothers me far more that public sector IT is badly mismanaged than it does that a private company is taking advantage. One has a responsibility to the tax payer, the other to their shareholders. Only one would appear to be fulfilling their responsibilities. At least MS can give specific numbers - I doubt IT.gov is even able to say how many licences they actually require!

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HAWKING ALERT: Leave planet Earth, find a new home. Stupid humans

Lusty
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Re: LOOSE != LOSE

@Uncle Slacky you don't know that it wasn't meant to be like that since you clearly didn't understand the authors meaning....Oh you did understand the meaning? Then surely message conveyed, language succeeded. The human race would fall over tomorrow if everyone had to use your specific version of English for communication. When coding I even manage to set colours without trouble despite the American gibberish used. If the author posts genuine unrecognisable nonsense then go ahead and point it out, but if you understand the meaning then at least be nice about it!

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HP flicks white box switch: NOT a Facebook wannabe? Stuff our open kit in your cloud

Lusty
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Perhaps they were 2nd in numbers of units, but I certainly wouldn't consider them a serious network company and see very few core networks using HP switches. They are often used for ROBO and access switching due to cost though. They may even be second on revenue but then half of their network line up includes rebadged kit. I only used IOS as an example because most low end network pros learn via the Cisco exam route and hence know the command set. What I meant was that just as Linux used to completely mimic Windows, Mac and others this probably will too for a while.

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NetApp brings Hadoop functionality to its ONTAP customers

Lusty
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I can't see an advantage in having a conversion done off box. I can, however, see an advantage in having it on box - it's the same advantage to having NFS and SMB on box in fact :)

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Lusty
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I'm amazed they haven't just implemented HDFS on the controllers, it should be possible with their architecture.

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Linux kernel dev has gone well and truly corporate – report

Lusty
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Re: Snowballing

"In other modern kernels you can load in the driver almost regardless of the kernel version"

I believe this was a choice by Linus early on since it forces open source drivers and makes it insanely difficult for vendors to supply binary drivers like they do with Windows. This led to many, many years of poor hardware support where graphics cards never had all their features, win modems simply didn't work, wireless cards didn't get support for years and the list goes on. Now that Linux is popular enough it's become worth while for vendors to open up and start contributing to the drivers which at the very least means more consistent results. A lot of the instability on Windows is due to poor third party drivers being loaded regardless of kernel :)

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Lusty
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Re: Snowballing

Any term widely used and understood for two decades is proper usage. Original meaning becomes irrelevant after a certain period, such is the nature of language. For instance Americans have been misusing the term Billion for quie some time to the point that their nonsense has become the standard. Stop being an ass hat.

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Lusty
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Re: Snowballing

"hint: Monolithic does not mean "not made with modules."

Actually, back in my day that's exactly what it meant. Your comment even made me go and check myself but all of my old Linux printed books, and all the old threads and documentation on the Internet I can find refer to modular vs monolithic when compiling. You're right that Wikipedia and other current sources define it your way, but that has changed in the last 10 years for some reason.

Thanks all for the downvotes though, presumably from people who thought I was wrong because they weren't compiling kernels when the old definition was used.

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Lusty
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Re: Snowballing

The drivers are in the source code. Whether they are in the kernel you compile or not is a choice you can make for yourself. I don't think many people use monolithic kernels these days so usually the drivers are not in the kernel.

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Re: Snowballing

It's entirely up to you :)

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Vodafone didn't have a £6bn tax bill. Sort yourselves out, Lefties

Lusty
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Re: "Branch" line

"Our roads are in one hell of a state"

Not sure where you're from but here in the UK (the subject of debate) the roads are in the best condition they have been ever. The majority of the motorway network either is now or soon will be managed motorway (Smart motorway in some places) which has drastically reduced delays and improved safety. This is the main infrastructure that keeps the country running, and it takes priority over the slightly rough surface on some local roads in terms of both money and manpower. Once the people putting managed motorways in, and extending more lanes on the motorways have finished I'm sure their very next job will be to fix that pothole near your house which affects a couple of hundred people.

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HP Split: Naming the big dogs for new-look giant

Lusty
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HP Inc

I thought it was ink :)

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Alca-Lu cooks up 400 Gbps router interconnect

Lusty
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It's designed to stretch across Apples new HQ ;)

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IT knowledge is as important as Maths, says UK.gov

Lusty
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Re: Great...

Why will anyone need Powerpoint, if their boss was replaced with a 4 line script there will be nobody to present to. Given that we are in the process of replacing the vast majority of IT workers with automation this seems a very short sighted policy. Of course, government could easily be replaced with a secure phone app where the public votes directly on issues so they may be the first to go in the new regime. The only question is how to ensure the public are informed before they can click the voting buttons. Perhaps a short online test :)

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NetApp: Don’t know about the hybrid cloud? Then you’re a dummy

Lusty
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Re: Appeal Americans.

If you don't know how to use a search engine, maybe. The Internet is actually fast becoming the only source of good information on a lot of topics because research doesn't need to be published in physical form any more, and physical reference books are gradually going away too - for instance it's almost impossible to buy a new Encyclopaedia these days. When searching the internet, if you narrow the search to .edu and .ac domains such as .ac.uk then you get real reasearch returned.

Your time would be far better spent making sure the kids can use current tools properly rather than trying to get them using outmoded tools. By the time current young ones leave college there almost certainly won't be a local library for them to visit, and definitely won't be any local book shops.

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Lusty
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Re: Appeal Americans.

What the hell is a Reg reader doing in a library full of dead trees?!

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Torvalds turns to Sir Mix-A-Lot for Linux versioning debate

Lusty
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Re: I hate to be a whining prude...

And me. Pointless NSFW images will very quickly put me off this site.

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Thecus N4310 4-bay: A NAS-ty beast for the budget-conscious

Lusty
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Re: RAID6

"I wouldn't say that this thing really has enough bays for RAID6 -- especially not with a hot spare -- but it'd still be nice to know how fast it is."

And RAID 5 is statistically unwise for drives over 2TB, with all real SAN vendors dropping support. There is no good RAID solution for large drives at home. The really worrying part is that nobody warns amateur users of large drive data loss issues.

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REPORT: UK needs online eBay-style court for civil justice

Lusty
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Prepare for the deluge

I can see a lot more claims being made when the requirement to miss work and turn up at court goes away. Great move as far as I'm concerned, this sort of stuff really needs modernising

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CAR? Check. DRIVER? Nope. OK, let's go, says British govt

Lusty
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Re: Having a Drink?

@kirstian you say you're from Bristol so you should be aware that your key and yourself don't need to be in the car to. Be prosecuted for drunk in charge of motor vehicle. If you are in the carpark walking towards it with your keys on you, you could still fall foul of the law, and many people have. For this reason, never leave your coat in the car to collect after the pub for the walk home!

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Lusty
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Re: @Chewi - Bristol? Try taking them to Clifton...

I'd like to see it start by connecting up GPS to the ECU to stop people breaking the speed limit. That would set up a much safer environment to start the driverless cars.

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Lusty
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Re: Would you actually, really get in one?

I trust the London DLR all the time so yes, why not?

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Lusty
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Re: There is no "software" that can comprehend .......

"Given a completely unexpected scenario, a human will try something, anything, unconsciously drawing on all past experience. JohnnyCab, on the other hand, will probably display a divide by zero error and stop working."

Johnny cab would probably not be driving in such a manner as to make instant response necessary. Humans on the other hand have a blind spot for 30 signs!

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Lusty
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Re: Wow!

Did they even do anything? I've never had a law pointed out to me that forbids driverless cars. As far as I was aware it was purely an insurance issue, which the government were not in charge of anyway.

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Linux kernel set to get live patching in release 3.20

Lusty
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Re: Very clever stuff

If HA is pointlessly expensive then you clearly have the ability to take the service offline, which was my point. If you can't take the service offline to patch then it ought to be highly available. Realistically it will take years for this to prove itself enough for production anyway, but as I said it's interesting and clever stuff.

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Lusty
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Very clever stuff

But if you're worried about restarting the machine then you've architected your service badly. Uptime is the enemy of good design practice. Instead, high availability should be used so you don't care about restarting hosts, losing hosts, moving servers in the rack, or any other interruption at the server level. There are very few tasks out there that need a single thread to stay alive for lengthy periods of time without moving. There are a few, of course, but they are quite rare.

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Air gaps: Happy gas for infosec or a noble but inert idea?

Lusty
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Timing is everything

Coincidence that this comes at just the moment lots of security people are talking about air gapping their legacy 2003 systems to mitigate end of life trouble? Given the lack of security updates, 2003 will become particularly susceptible to this as there will be plenty of unpatched vulnerabilities.

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HP’s Mr 3PAR, David Scott, is retiring

Lusty
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Re: Leave before it all crashes down

"Oh and "no questions asked" yeah thats legit, after 10 hours on support calls justifying to a 3rd world call center jockey working off a script."

Actually all of the proper SAN vendors now replace hardware without you calling them at all. They just turn up at reception with new drives or controllers and you either fit them or let the engineer fit them. If you're calling up a script drone for 10 hours then you're not talking about real SAN hardware!

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Linux 3.19 released for your computing pleasure

Lusty
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Re: If there's no reason to go to 4.0...

It was the sign of a mature product, but considering the move to 3.0 was pure whimsy on the part of Torvalds there is no way to tell any more. This is especially true when he says he released knowing there were bugs which he didn't deem important. At least Microsoft have the decency to pretend they don't think there are bugs!

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At the third beep, the Atomic Clock will be 60 ... imprecisely

Lusty
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The problem with wind turbines is more that they disrupt the interconnected whirly weather patterns of the planet, surely? If we stop the whirl over Britain, it may disrupt the arctic whirl which could lead to warm wind directly finding it's way to the ice, which is apparently so precious we have to stop burning things. The problem with hippies is that if something doesn't look damaging they ignore it. Oil spills, deforestation and burning stuff they flock to and protest, but anything which looks clean like Prius' or windmills and they won't even consider that there may be a downside for the planet.

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RIP Windows RT: Microsoft murders ARM Surface, Nokia tablets

Lusty
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Re: A workable solution

"e.g. you live in fear that your Onda warranty might not be next day, on-site"

My main fear is that it will catch on fire and burn down my house and kill my family. There's a reason they can offer these things cheaper, and it's not because they have more efficient R&D, test, manufacturing and regulation departments than Apple, it's because they choose not to do those things and hope for the best...

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Google gets my data, I get search and email and that. Help help, I'm being REPRESSED!

Lusty
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Re: Not so fast

"It's okay until the Police start working with Facebook and other sites"

But that doesn't make Facebook or Google evil, and that's not Facebook or Google misusing your data. That is the state misusing and abusing your data which Facebook and Google were using for perfectly harmless things like advertising.

Those on this site who think the answer is to not use Google or Facebook are mistaken, the answer is to replace your government with a trustworthy one which will not take such liberties and will instead make sure you and your data are protected.

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Microsoft eyes slice of Raspberry Pi with free Windows 10 sprinkled on top

Lusty
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Re: With Microsoft nothing is free

"Kool-Aid for WinCE-based OSes"

You mean like the millions of winterms, tills and handheld scanners still in use today? WinCE was still supported until very recently, might even still be supported, and was extremely popular in the embedded market, just like its successors and just like Win10 IoT probably will be. Microsoft don't want you to buy a Raspberry Pi to run as a computer, they want you to buy one to turn into a popular gadget, like an internet connected kettle, internet connected thermostat, wifi scales, or something yet to be invented. Each of these devices needs an infrastructure component in the web - see Withings as a great example with their health portal. That's where the money is right now.

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Lusty
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Re: With Microsoft nothing is free

"Office and Server - same place they always got money."

Well Office is now effectively free, and they are discouraging use of Server through O365 and PaaS so it may be time to read some updates :)

This is very clearly Microsoft planning Azure as their next big thing, or rather continuing to plan something which is already a very big thing.

The plan is that some geeky kid buys a Raspberry Pi 2 with Windows 10 on it. Said kid then develops an amazing widget which we all want, but which has a cloud backend. The billion users of the widget then somehow fund Azure services, probably via advertising.

In this scenario, Azure can already offer image hosting, content delivery, machine learning services, media encoding, database services, web platforms, mail infrastructure, scalable server infrastructure and much, much more. Unfortunately for Linux, they also offer a very compelling integrated coding platform which allows said youngster to take advantage of all that power with about 10 minutes training. The platform is also effectively free (Visual Studio) along with the code repository which I forget the name of but it's cloud based and free.

There are a great many startups who have used Azure or AWS to rapidly scale a great idea and then end up worth billions. Mirosoft are betting that they will get some of those billions if the startup is started by someone who got free Windows, free Office, free Visual Studio, free code repository and free trials of Azure services. That person may also be somewhere not in "the West" too given the price tag of these things. They are probably right too, and sadly I suspect that not only will 2015 still not be the year of Linux on the desktop, or Linux on the server, it's probably also not the year of Linux in the cloud either because Microsoft are very good at this game.

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HMRC fails to plan for £10.4bn contract exit... because it's 'too risky'

Lusty
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"If the software licence costs are lower,"

Software licence costs are barely even a consideration in projects of this scale, and neither is hardware cost. Regardless, your argument is moot since Red Hat costs more than Windows...

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UK Scouts database 'flaws' raise concerns

Lusty
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Re: CRB

It has nothing to do with protecting the authorities, the authorities would do just fine with or without the checks. The purpose of the checks is to allow the service (scouts, schools, whatever) to continue functioning after a bunch of morons get in the papers saying "something MUST be done!" without fully thinking through the practicality and privacy issues of actually doing something. These checks are as far as you could go without being overly invasive and costing so much as to shut down the whole system - they do, however, nicely deal with responding to those whose words would otherwise close everything down.

The reality is that some people will always get into positions they shouldn't ideally get into. There is nothing practical that can be done to stop that aside from a weak deterrent. Our society is full of such weak deterrents - CCTV for instance, or the locks on your front door/windows at home. Neither stops the crime, they just deter the less determined from trying.

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