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* Posts by Lusty

775 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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Everything your users ever need to know about BYOD

Lusty
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Really?

This is the opposite of why BYOD catches on. People don't want your shitty windows desktop on their iPad, they want an iPad experience with a rewritten corporate app (OWA, Salesforce etc.) which either is an app or is a web interface. If you're thinking terminal services, VDI or the like then trust me when I say your users already hate you and it's the reason they will begin to create THEIR content outside of your network. Information workers are the ones creating the data, and if you make it hard for them to do so they will just cut you out of the loop, just like the CEO will when he goes for a full cloud strategy...

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Two driverless cars stuffed with passengers are ABOUT TO CRASH - who should take the hit?

Lusty
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Re: collision detection systems can't currently see around corners

Agreed, the fact that so many people believe that there are unavoidable collisions just underlines how urgent it is to get the humans out of the driving seat!

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NetApp cyclists part from storage firm... go to Bora Bora

Lusty
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Re: NetApp did actually ride the 2014 Tour de France

"Victories 5

Seconds 10

Thirds 14

Discovered Doping incident 0"

There, fixed that for you :)

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Microsoft exams? Tough, you say? Pffft. 5-YEAR-OLD KID passes MCP test

Lusty
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Re: Biased?

Microsoft tests have not been multi choice all the way through for several years. May be time to update your qualifications if you ever had any. They now include quite a few simulations where you actually have to set something up or correct something in the interface without help files etc. if a few more sys admins did these tests I'd probably see a lot fewer systems with major problems, and that goes for Linux as well as Microsoft stuff.

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Don't like droopy results, NetApp? Develop server-side SAN

Lusty
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Re: NetApp customers

I can do both myself since I know how it works and have a partner account to look up pricing :)

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Lusty
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Re: NetApp customers

Not sure why you think the Azure/AWS stuff doesn't work. It's ideal for replicating data to be consumed within the cloud either on dedicated hardware with solid sovereignty for important or large workloads or on a software defined SAN with cloudy sovereignty for smaller workloads. It's also ideal for cloud migrations alongside project shift to reduce downtime during the move since you can mirror data disks to the cloud ahead of time.

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Lusty
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Re: Doesn't surprise me...

You're clearly missing the point of NetApp. They do actually have a VSA appliance, as well as one for the public cloud, it's just that those of us who understand the value in NetApp never use them. Your HP VSA will definitely not have similar performance to the NetApp hardware solution for a start, but it also won't be able to cover you for backup purposes in quite the same way, so on your bill you will also need to pay for some kind of backup media be it d2d or tape libraries as well as a software suite to go with it. You also need to add to that mix the extra effort required to manage that backup solution and the extra bandwidth required to stream those backups around the place not to mention the strain on your virtual hosts in performing the backups. You're also missing the business benefits such as instant recovery of large data sets such as Echange databases, sql databases and the end user recoverable file data which can drastically reduce service desk calls and hence staffing.

I too get the money for services when selling NetApp, but it's because I justify my time by properly explaining performance and business benefits which the StoreVirtual cannot compete with.

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Pixel mania: Apple 27-inch iMac with 5K Retina display

Lusty
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Re: Value for money?

"As an aside, I'm lost for words that Windows cannot scale the UI properly on screens,"

Windows scales identically to the Mac on my rMBP. The difference here is sitting between screen and chair, rather than on the disk. Windows does indeed look awful if you just switch to native retina resolution without setting it up for hi res viewing although I suspect that the person claiming to have issues was trying to make a point against the iMac rather than saying anything useful. I'd like to think anyone who actually has a 4k screen would know how to set their display properties correctly...

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Lusty
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Re: 4k video editing

You're ignoring the fact that this won't be worthless in a years time. If you want to swap out your computer then it's no more effort to swap out the screen at the same time, so sell this and get the new model. The Apple backup regime makes this extremely simple, and their resale value is second to none.

The real bonus here is that real professionals don't have time to fart about with drivers and upgrades. If your time is valuable it's much better to replace the whole caboodle and carry on working so component upgrades are less likely the further up the tree you go, especially given that for professional use as a tool, £2k is really not that much money!

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Samsung's flagging phone fortunes hit profits hard

Lusty
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Analysts

Does this mean the analysts will finally stop telling Apple to release cheap phones? Seems to me that at least part of the issue is the many people with crappy Samsungs telling everyone who will listen how bad their Samsung is. With the all or nothing approach everyone gets the top experience so there are fewer as reports. The high end Samsungs are generally good but they are sabotaging their own market with the cheaper models

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MEN: For pity's sake SLEEP with LOTS of WOMEN - and avoid Prostate Cancer

Lusty
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Re: a study from Canadian health researchers

"It could indeed appear so to someone with little knowledge of statistics or of the concept of prior plausibility."

That's kind of my point though, I do know enough about statistics to know that this is no more meaningful than saying that male drivers "statistically" have more accidents. There are so many variables being completely ignored that the results are meaningless and potentially misleading until they actually demonstrate cause and effect. In the case of the male drivers, they also happen to statistically drive far more miles, statistically when they are more tired such as a long commute than women who are statistically less likely to be working, and if they are then statistically less likely to be dragging their ass all over the country.

Possibly the best example is drink driving - this study is akin to saying that 30% of accidents involved drunk drivers therefore driving sober is more risky. You can't just use statistics in isolation, and if you knew as much as you imply that you do then you wouldn't have responded to my comment the way you did.

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Lusty
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a study from Canadian health researchers

Why are they calling themselves researchers? It would appear on the surface that they asked a statistically quite small group of people some questions and then inferred some "results". They then made up some gibberish to justify a potential cause/effect. This is not science. They could just as easily have been asking who liked chips and come up with a similar bias for cancer (yes, this happens a lot too). Until every single person on the planet has everything they do recorded and every health issue recorded this kind of statistical "study" is just a waste of money. It will take the IBMs, Googles or Apples of the world to use big data techniques on all available data to come up with anything even remotely useful out of statistics.

Until that day, your best bet to avoid cancer is to eat healthily and do plenty of exercise while being vigilant about your own health. If you can, then sure have as much sex as you like but can we stop paying these "researchers" to tell us sex is a good thing?

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Storage array giants can use Azure to evacuate their back ends

Lusty
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Thanks AC, that makes much more sense. I was wondering how it sucked the data out of a NetApp to send to the cloud without being insanely inefficient. Even using the new NetApp in the cloud I couldn't work out how I'd get the VMs to boot on Azure since they wouldn't be on bootable storage. With your comment though, this now reads as MS released a reasonably priced SRM killer which works with cloud too :)

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Microsoft unwraps new auto data-protection in Office 365 tools

Lusty
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Ahh clippy...

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gS0vZFPnksk

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Apple's OS X Yosemite slurps UNSAVED docs into iCloud

Lusty
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Re: Glass half empty?

"The reason I bring this up is that I suspect this also occurred to Apple users in the past and is going to get more prevalent unless Apple drives a User Privacy Interface Standard that all Mac and iThing applications should (must?) adhere to."

They do have a privacy standard with quite a good web page explaining it. Apple users expect that their information should be available on all of their devices (magically) and that if they lose their device a backup can be restored (magically) without that data being snooped, sold or other things not of benefit to the user. With a single iPhone there is enough free cloud capacity that backups happen with no issue, I only needed to pay once I had two phones and an iPad but I was happy to do so since I had previously lost a phone on a night out, the replacement had my half written drunken text message restored before I left the Apple store. I expect Apple to not interfere or use the data being synced and stored, and the privacy policy backs this.

As I said, Google are just as open with their policy, but their policy is to make as much money from your data as they can in return for lower device and subscription costs. I'm fine with paying massively over the odds for cloud storage and upgrade options on hardware, and I'm glad at least one company gives me the option to just pay them for the service I want.

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Lusty
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Glass half empty?

Surely this could just as easily be written as Apple backing up your work by default for you, for free. This is just how the Apple ecosystem is designed - if it's easier for the user, or if the user gets some benefit then it's on by default. The difference between the Apple cloud and the Google cloud is that the Apple one is paid for by the users through higher device prices and higher subscription costs. The Google one is paid for by whoring out your information to all and sundry. The Apple privacy statement says they won't share your stuff, Google says they absolulu share everything you give them. Except it's not sharing, it's selling and it's not you giving it's them taking.

Why do I trust Apple? Because I paid Apple for the products, people didn't pay Apple for me to take the products (lookin' at you Google and Facebook...)

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Revealed: The amazing magical innovation in the iPad Mini 3 – a lick of paint

Lusty
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Re: Thinness.

I'm led to believe that NZ is a pretty different market than the rest of the globe for this kind of thing though. Something about shipping costs vs volumes.

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Lusty
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Re: This is one issue that the EU could for once be useful on.

The EU are the ones who started it with the WEEE directive, why would they strive to make things less recyclable? These things are not allowed to go to landfill anymore, and you'd be surprised how little rubbish in the UK actually does go anywhere near landfill now with the various recycling schemes in place. I found that there's even a scheme to turn plastic into diesel the other day, and all those nasty batteries get frozen and smashed for recycling, but to get at them it's easier to melt some glue than have an army of slaves undoing screws. Sadly iFixit have a fairly simple view of the world and a single point to make over and over again so purposefully ignore these facts.

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Lusty
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Re: Thinness.

No, it's their quest for WEEE directive compliance, meaning that devices need to be recyclable as cheaply as possible since it's the manufacturer paying the bill. A bit of heat and the iPad falls apart ready for separate recycling processes, screws make that impossible and so have been ditched by all of the sensible manufacturers. That this makes thinner devices more easily achievable is a happy side effect.

That almost nobody would get their devices repaired anyway seems to be ignored by everyone when these articles are published. Yes, we would all replace a broken hard drive in a recent PC, but how many people actually repair a TV, washing machine or microwave these days? My washing machine was replaced because a replacement pump plus labour would make it more costly than a shiny new one. I could have done it myself but to be honest I value my time more than the repair man valued his!

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Violin: Don't weep for Tier 1 storage... it'll soon be flashtastic

Lusty
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Two PCIe cards do not count as a highly available solution. My entire point was that the performance claims by these companies are entirely at the cost of other things which anyone who actually understands storage refuses to do without. Now clearly you've spent two years boning up on marketing nonsense from these vendors, but those of us in the real storage world with real workloads such as databases can only accept low latency if it comes with security. That still means dual controllers in a proper SAN whether you like to accept it or not.

You've mentioned RDMA several times. I'm amazed you're seeing so much uptake of this outside of marketing since literally none of our thousands of clients are currently using the technology. Loads of people have been using the term since MS used it in SMB3 material, but I have yet to see a single RoCE adapter in the wild and IB is beyond the means of even quite large companies unless they have specific needs such as with Violin arrays.

It's not a willy waving contest, and I'd appreciate if you could avoid trying to make this personal - you seem to have some kind of problem with me as evidenced by your past posts. If you genuinely believe in your arguments then please just make coherent points and let them speak for you.

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Lusty
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The fact that you don't agree doesn't make what I'm saying FUD, and what I'm saying is based on considerably more than a couple of years experience.

To make storage highly available you need to either have two controllers able to see the same blocks, or you need two separate copies of the blocks, one for each HA controller. Currently it's pretty much only SAN hardware which can do the former since SCSI died off, SAS switches are beginning to become available which will eventually allow multiple hosts to see the same disks for a reasonable cost. Until these become cheaper than SAN hardware then the alternative is the two copies approach which absolutely requires a round trip over the network which raises latency. This is a physics thing. If you genuinely believe your data is in a good place with only a single controller having access to up to date info then fair enough, our opinions differ perhaps based on the types of solution we work on. Again that doesn't make what I say FUD, it just means my customers value their data and its consistency more than yours do.

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Lusty
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Trevor, the interconnect problem is certainly not the same for server SAN compared to traditional SAN (counting P4000 as server SAN in this instance). In a traditional SAN you send the data to the storage and it's confirmed as written, in the case of Violin this is done via the PCIe interconnect ideally or IB, Fibre for the less well off. With server SAN, that same write has to go out and back to the second copy server, usually via Ethernet over an Ethernet network. In almost every real world case this results in higher latency for the server SAN. Anything the server SAN guys say to the contrary is from their "testing" which ignores data consistency issues completely in favour of better stats. EMC, NetApp, HP, HDS never ignore data consistency for their tier 1 systems even in testing, hence the apparent difference to the layman.

As for using volatile memory for storage, the same is true - yes it's quicker, but only in the same way as strapping solid fuel rockets to your car. Survival rates are considerably lower in exchange for a faster ride.

In addition to the above, CPU and memory usage for modern SAN operations are huge. I don't really have that sort of spec to spare on my virtualisation platform, and if I did, it would have cost as much as a real SAN to purchase the extra hardware and more importantly software licences. For each virtualisation host with Windows and VMware you're looking at more in licence costs than hardware costs - these are usually ignored by the software SAN guys.

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Doctor Who and the Dalek: 10-year-old tests BBC programming game

Lusty
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Re: hold on...

"So what does that leave?"

Ada is what that leaves. The perfect language for either teaching or torture depending on viewpoint. Those who understand programming will get on fine and those who don't will never try coding again thanks to the torture that is the Ada compiler. Problem solved, written code quality improves, wages go up and all the pretend programmers leave the profession forever. As a result we would probably drop 80% of the project managers too since there would be so few programmers required...

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Watersports-friendly e-reader: Kobo's Aura H2O is literary when wet

Lusty
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Re: No Amazon Lock-in is possibly the best feature.

Just checked the last 6 books I bought on Google play and they were 2-3 times the price I payed on the Kindle, although as you say slightly cheaper than Waterstones. Also Amazon doesn't require me to give Google my details. Win win.

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Lusty
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Re: No Amazon Lock-in is possibly the best feature.

Yeah, every time I buy a book I think to myself "I wish I could have bought this from one of those other more expensive shops". I used to think ePub was a good idea until I realised that Amazon are consistently much cheaper for books than the competition. True, they may decide to abuse that monopoly some day but right now they are winning for a reason.

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MasterCard adds fingerprint scanner to credit cards for spending sans the PIN

Lusty
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Re: The law suits...

Why cut off a finger? The card will have the fingerprint on it anyway from when it was put in the wallet. More to the point why wouldn't you put the sensor on the pay point?

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NetWare sales revive in China thanks to that man Snowden

Lusty
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ROFL

Thank goodness Attachmate isn't a 'merkin company otherwise they'd be subject to the same laws as MS...

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Iron out the kinks and all-flash servers just might have a future

Lusty
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Diskless

It's not diskless if it's stuffed full of disks! I assume you meant "spinning disks"

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Windows 10 feedback: 'Microsoft, please do a deal with Google to use its browser'

Lusty
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WTF?

Never mind Chrome vs Firefox, didn't we JUST finish moaning at MS to get spyware OFF of default builds on OEM systems? Why would anyone now ask for spy software to be included. Chrome isn't all that much better than IE, and at least IE isn't writing down your every move...

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Re-light my diode: Trio of boffins scoop physics Nobel for BLUE LEDs

Lusty
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Re: Curious

"Did Edison just go, hmm bit of wire, bit of electric, hey presto light? No he spent a long time trying out different methods."

Maybe not, but Edison wan't a physicyst either. As someone else said, another Nobel prize would have been appropriate for the outcome, but the physics of LEDs is well known already so this wouldn't appear to be much of a breakthrough in that field.

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ARMs head Moonshot bodies: HP pops Applied Micro, TI chips into carts

Lusty
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Re: Ubuntu - Seriously?

From what I was told on a course recently, replacing the OS may not be as easy as all that as these blades are pretty bespoke to the task. The idea being that if you need one to do X then they design one around X with hardware and software. If you have a software stack they can design and test you a blade in a couple of months ready for deployment so it's quite flexible despite the inflexibility.

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Netflix bullish after six-country European INVASION

Lusty
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Re: Scifi

Time to go Netflix then :) not sure they have Universe yet but I can only assume it's in their plans

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Lusty
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Scifi

seems pretty good on Netflix now, they have all of Star Trek, Stargate SG1 and Atlantis and several others I've forgotten. I never seem to get to the end of one series before they've added something else I want to watch. I'm still getting through Mythbusters after nearly a year of watching it almost every day.

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iPhone 6: The final straw for Android makers eaten alive by the data parasite?

Lusty
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Re: lets look at this in another way..

"My Android phone can do 100% of anything useful I've ever seen anyone do with an iPhone"

Try looking on fitness/running/cycling forums, there are quite a few happy Android users shouting the exact opposite of what you said there. Compatibility is the issue, with many and various bits of third party hardware. Primarily because until a few months ago Android didn't support Bluetooth LE at all, and so fitness hardware manufacturers have been slow to port any of their apps across.

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Lusty
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Re: lets look at this in another way..

@QXL I'll be interested to hear your comments after using the software on that phone which matches the specs of your iPhone. Hardware specs are very easy to replicate and improve upon but user experience is a whole other ballgame, and the reason Nokia used to be king of phones in the feature phone times. Many of us fell for the specs of competing models and regretted that we had to spend a whole year with a POS phone that had great hardware but couldn't use it. For instance, my Samsung D900 could take 1GB SD cards, yet their software only allowed me to play a maximum 20 MP3 files in total spread over a maximum 4 playlists.

That's not the only example of my poor purchasing decisions with phones so these days I'm much more careful about jumping ship. Luckily work have given me Android and Windows phones so I haven't needed to use my money to realise what I prefer for a while.

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Lusty
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Re: Really can't get this

"costs 50 to make"

You're confusing manufacturing cost with the cost of producing a device. The R&D budget required to produce a top end phone is enormous, and those costs must be recovered alongside the component costs. For example, the iPhone has two custom designed processors and custom memory chips (to reduce size) with a unique flash and custom designed camera. The people designing these things didn't do it for fun, they did it because they get paid to, and because Apple, Samsung etc. pay for the very expensive machines they need to design, prototype and produce them. In addition to those, someone needs to design the exterior of the device, the packaging, write documentation, support end users and many other costs. Every single phone design also needs to go through costly approval processes in every region it will be sold, otherwise it wouldn't be legal to sell them.

but yeah, they only cost like 50 bucks to make so why do they cost so much...

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Stray positrons caught on ISS hint at DARK MATTER source

Lusty
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Re: Pedant alert

Cartographers say datum all the time...

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Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets

Lusty
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Re: Apple pay...

"But what Apple will do except skim the cream????"

Apple wrote the software stack, spent years researching how people want to use their phone to pay, designed the hardware and brought to market a working solution where many, many others have failed. They will also do the ongoing support of the system and possibly reduce the number of cards the credit card companies need to issue, thereby saving them some money.

The banks on the other hand simply change two lines in a database...

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Lusty
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Re: Apple NFC

" the iPhone's Bluetooth stack is so limited as to be useless"

Compared to Android which only started supporting BTLE 4 in version 4.3 this year and even then only on a limited number of handsets?

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Lusty
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Re: Apple NFC

"Useful things like tap to pair Bluetooth speakers"

No need, Bluetooth 4.1 includes tap to pair and doesn't require NFC to do so. Apple have the hardware in iPhone 4S and above to achieve this and will probably update iOS to allow it as soon as the standard is complete later in the year.

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NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine

Lusty
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Re: NoSQL I thought was Not Only SQL

"Normally, no. Hence the name...."

You mean the name which is short for "not only SQL"?

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Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT

Lusty
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Re: Few questions

Really, I didn't realise the Nexus 4 now had a separate low power processor which monitors movement even when there are no apps running. Does it have optical image stabilisation in the camera too alongside the white balance flash? And an integrated payment system which uses fingerprints to confirm identity while storing no card details in the phone and allowing configuration of new cards by simply taking a photo?

Maybe I will look at Android alternatives when my contract is up after all...

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Apple's ONE LESS THING: the iPod Classic disappears

Lusty
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Perhaps

perhaps they looked at their list of every customers iTunes library of legally purchased music and found zero people had paid for more than about 30GB of music. I'm sure by now they are able to extrapolate what a heavy user will require based on spending habits of their top customers. Given the classic doesn't really do video there can't be many who even filled one with music let alone legally.

Obviously there will be some nerd along to explain how much better lossless MP3s sound through their iPod headphones, and that they only get 37 tracks on their iPod before it's full...

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Fedora gets new partition manager

Lusty
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Derfag

My new fav word, thank you.,

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It's official: Vendors are NOT shifting that networked storage

Lusty
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Curious

Do we count NetApp being at the bottom of overall storage market share as actually a good thing given their preference for dedupe and compression?

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Square Kilometre Array reveals its 1.6TB-a-day storage and network rigs

Lusty
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Re: Not quite...

Plus with tapes you don't have 1000 electricity sucking disks spinning all year, or the intern whose job is permanently seeking out duff drives, or the engineering team trying to scale a RAID solution instead of just adding another shelf of tape to the robot library.

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Lusty
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Tape

There we go then..tape isn't dead, official. For those who really really need it...

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Zuck: Yo, Mexico! My $19bn WhatsApp could connect THREE BEEELLION people

Lusty
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Re: Stopped..

Wow you're so cool. Not only have you stopped using Facebook but you're also telling EVERYONE you don't use it. Just think how cool you'd be if you stopped using other mass communication services like phones, email and the Internet too! You could go back to writing cheques and using postal services too to make sure you're properly retro.

You'll have to trust me when I say that Facebook and Whatsapp are much better when people accept your friend requests.

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Don't bother with Apple's 9 Sept hype-day: Someone's GONE AND BLABBED IT ALL

Lusty
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No but it's the same as any other phone based HRM. If you want proper monitoring you'd need an ECG band, the BTLE versions of which work fine with the iPhone and newer Android phones. Alternatively you could use an optical sensor, but since we were discussing sensors in the phone my point stands - there is zero advantage to a dedicated sensor over the camera. I have compared to my ECG and it's just as accurate.

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Lusty
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"If they add a heartrate monitor I'll be disappointed. I can measure my pulse with a finger and a clock if I really wanted to."

You can measure your heart rate with the camera on existing iPhones too with the Withings app. No need for special hardware...

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