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* Posts by Lusty

720 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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Apple takes blade to 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display

Lusty
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Re: I bought the last of the non retina range.

"and will have a nice fast SSD when the HDD dies."

Oh really? how will you match the PCIe bus speed with that crappy old SATA 3Gbps interface? I've tested mine at 4GB/s on the new Pro which was sustained for 5 minutes while the SATA interface isn't even capable of 400MB/s in ideal conditions. But hey, at least you can swap it out eh? Oh wait, so can I on the PCIe flash module in the Pro Retina...

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UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco

Lusty
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Re: Are there ANY success stories?

The problem is not really the government, its the requirement of the people that government is fair. The Gov has to ask for a project and three vendors have to bid, minimum. These bids are essentially random guesses since the spec is not written at that stage, yet the entire budget must be specified in detail along with hardware requirements despite knowing nothing of how the system will work. The reason they can't ask three companies to do the design is that that would allow the other two to undercut on the implementation and blame failure on the winning design. Because there is no design, the wording goes to the lawyers and everything gets very specific. Profit comes from changes to the spec, which was written before the design.

I've racked my brain and can't think of a better way which would be allowed to happen without MPs being accused of back hand deals with their IT supplier mates. We can either have open government spending on "failed projects" OR successful overpriced contracts to mates. The two are mutually exclusive because the design must be done by those who implement and the design should be done before the budget is set and hardware agreed.

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Microsoft and HTC are M8s again: New One mobe sports WinPhone

Lusty
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One Mate

Surely if HTC had any sense they'd have named the WinMo version One M8 and just called the Android one the One?

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NetApp: Revenues are down – but own brand kit wasn't to blame

Lusty
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Better?

"is not being evangelised as a radically better piece of kit, with the all-flash EF-Series products being shown in the slide above as a faster performer."

If your only concern is raw performance then you're looking at it wrong as far as FlashRay is concerned. The FlashRay is a vastly better piece of kit (or will be when the code is completed) because not only does it offer flash performance nearly as good as the EF series, it also will do everything the FAS can do - the business value and efficiency stuff for which NetApp is famous and generally trounces the competition. The EF series is quite dumb by comparison, so although it performs very well it's a bit of a one trick pony.

It's quite possible today to go out and buy a very fast SAN, but many of my customers are waiting for one which also manages the backups, DR and automation of private cloud functionality, and most importantly fits in with the company strategy which for many of my customers is currently NetApp FAS for these same reasons.

Since I don't work for NetApp the above is based purely on hearsay and speculation, but I believe it's the aim of the platform

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BAD VIBES: High-speed video camera records your voice from trash

Lusty
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"The pretty blue and green blinking lights on your routers, switches and computer monitors emitting electromagnetic frequencies tell us some interesting things too."

No need for LEDs, the monitor cable gives off sufficient EM to read the screen remotely if you're clever about it. El Reg reported this years ago.

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Lusty
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Re: Er....

The real question is, now that this is public what did the spy agencies just invent that's so much better?

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Ancient pager tech SMS: It works, it's fab, but wow, get a load of that incoming SPAM

Lusty
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Re: Hmmm

Indeed, any spam filtering would be much easier at the sending end - anyone sending a message with 10000 recipients ought to have some kind of permission to do so since it's unlikely to be an invite to the pub to some mates. Why the receiving end would need to look is beyond me - same as with the postal service, Royal mail offer filtering at a cost to individual households while also charging the person sending the bulk mail for delivering it. I for one don't want to see this same situation on mobile networks where everything is much more traceable.

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DAYS from end of life as we know it: Boffins tell of solar storm near-miss

Lusty
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Re: Just goes to show...

"No, success in death is having a large personal debt that is wiped upon you shuffling off your mortal coil."

Yup, ultimately the only way to make a profit is to die in debt, any kind of assets or savings would technically be a loss...

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US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account

Lusty
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Re: sigh

"doesn't Google Mail T&C stipulate that you shouldn't use it for business purpose?"

Not their corporate mail offering, no. It would be subject to the same court order, as would an internal Exchange system.

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Apple 5S still best-selling smartphone 8 months after launch

Lusty
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Perhaps

Maybe it's because the iPhone adverts concentrate on how the device can improve your life, while Samsung adverts concentrate on slagging off the competition. Apple show me how to use my phone to do stuff like making music, educating kids, getting fit etc. while Samsung tell me the stuff Apple devices can't do which I haven't noticed by myself while out using them for all that stuff. Yes, call me a wall hugger if you like, but I still have no idea why a Galaxy is more use than an iPhone.

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10Gbps over crumbling COPPER: Boffins cram bits down telco wire

Lusty
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Re: Wire up my home?

Surely your home already is wired up - that's the point of this.

What I want to know, is why nobody is ditching the requirement for legacy telephones to share the wires, surely that will give massive gains in bandwidth as the frequencies available increase. I don't know many people who feel a desperate need for a house phone these days but most people would love streaming 4k video!

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Conformist Google: Android devices must LOOK, WORK ALIKE

Lusty
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Re: Google, your megalomania is showing

"What Google is doing is denying any design or creative input from any source other than themselves"

What Google is actually doing is trying desperately to prevent Android being stricken down by the same crap that made those same manufacturers fail without it. Phone manufacturers and networks have a long history if ignoring user needs and randomly changing things to get some imagined competitive edge while actually making the experience worse for the end user. What Google are saying is that the platform will succeed because people are familiar, just like with Windows, and that the hardware people just need to make nice hardware which is what they are good at.

This is one of the things I quite like about Apple - they may not advance very quickly but they are oblivious to the competition and so user experience is pretty stable as a general rule. Even when they completely changed their interface recently all they did was skin it. I realise many people think the opposite, and I guess change and chaos is what Android is there for so maybe Google are wrong after all.

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Psst. We've got 400Gb/s Ethernet working - but don't tell anyone

Lusty
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Re: Reg's standard for this?

"I suspect industry may skip 400Gbps as they pretty much did 40Gbps"

I think you'll find 40Gbps is incredibly popular among those who need it. The reason you may not have seen much of it is that very few people do need it. 10GbE is sufficient for the vast majority of infrastructures with 40GbE and 100GbE only really necessary when connecting up lots of large switches, for instance in data centre use or at very large companies. It's occasionally useful on very fast flash based SAN too, although this is also pretty rare.

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Canon offers a cloud just for still photos, not anything else. Weird

Lusty
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Re: Marketing bollocks

"Yeah, quite - what's it doing new that Flickr doesn't?"

Anyone who has ever read the T's and C's on Flickr could probably answer that. All Canon need do is not require your firstborn child in exchange for picture storage and they are winning. I'm not usually the kind of person to even read conditions of use, but somehow I've decided against Flickr several times due to their legal jibber jabber.

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Confirmed: Salesforce partners with 'evil empire' Microsoft

Lusty
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Re: ms dynamics crm

Dynamics, like Sharepoint, is an excellent product which is almost exclusively installed on inappropriate hardware (usually WAY too much memory and insufficient disk) and crippled by badly written customisation code added by IT staff.

Often the main driver for bringing this type of thing internal is to make sure the information is locked down locally. Usually as a result of a recent breach where a salesperson leaves and takes all the customer info with them. It rarely works, but that's what I see happen :)

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PEAK NAS? Peak NAS. I reckon we've reached it

Lusty
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Where would you suggest is more appropriate than massive cheap drives? NetApp customers tend to be the types who don't want legacy tape systems about the place...

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Lusty
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"something that intelligently stubs files according to a policy and puts them on media that isn't backed up like active data"

Not used NetApp much then? This actively works against their best practices of using humungous BSAS drives for primary storage and simply keeping the backups online. It would also break their integration with VSS horribly in NAS scenarios, and that's one of their customers favourite features! The only media I can think of that would be cheaper than 4TB BSAS (SATA) is tape, and tape only works out cheaper if you have a F&*^ ton of data to offload, like the good folks at CERN, or people taking pictures of the whole planet for instance. For almost everyone else big cheap disk now works out cheaper in the long run as well as offering a better feature list. NetApp can even make your disks into WORM if you like, although I hear that often ends in tears because admins refuse to read the manual and end up locking the drives for eternity :)

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HP breaks ranks: Foresees data ARCHIVING on Flash

Lusty
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Re: For marketroid values of "archival"

The fact that it took several months is the reason it's done so rarely. As I said, with SSD that process wouldn't take anywhere near as long and could be an ongoing background process to ensure the data is always fresh, therefore the security of data is potentially much better on SSD.

Writing 30 years on the side of a tape box does not guarantee that the data will last 30 years on that tape, it simply states that the data might last 30 years. People rewrite their tapes because their data is valuable, not always to move to a new format. The only way to know your data is good is to read and write it regularly.

Since we have no data on how long static information lasts in SSD yet I find it odd that people are arguing against it. SSD dies due to write cycles, and for archiving even if we rewrite all of the data every week those cycles won't run out for decades, and given the lifespan of computer hardware I suspect they would be replaced once a decade just to reduce power consumption if nothing else.

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Lusty
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Re: For marketroid values of "archival"

You'd be right apart from the bit you're ignoring which is that the medium is NEVER considered reliable in long term archival. Tape archives are re-cycled every 5 years to make sure the data is there. Tape makes this process a right PITA too because some junior IT person needs to move them about unless there is a room sized robot to do the work, and even then replacement tapes and cleaning tapes need loading etc.

With Flash, the logistics are somewhat better. You can re-cycle every week if you like because everything is always online. Flash drives don't require cleaning like tape drives do, and when the capacity goes up you can usually put the new drive into the old slot whereas with tape you need to change the tape drive to use higher densities.

People who think archiving is write and forget on any medium are generally not trusted with data more valuable than lolcat pictures!

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Google: 'EVERYTHING at Google runs in a container'

Lusty
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Re: about to deploy a few containers

"I believe there are several projects aiming to either migrate a process to another kernel (i.e. host) or write a process and its state to disc, and then restore it later on.

However, I have no idea if they're actually usable...."

I doubt it. For a start, the system you're migrating to would have to have the exact same patch level in order to properly execute the running code. It's likely it would also need the same drivers in many instances too, and this is what virtualisation is there to solve - move the OS at the same time and you have none of these issues.

For the above poster who said Google have solved this - when they said portability I believe they meant porting the code to give a single API, not porting the containers. Google have no use for moving a running container since everything they do is highly available, they simply move the workload to a different container somewhere else. That's why Google don't need virtualisation, the benefits don't suit their workloads. For everyone else on earth without a factory full of quality code monkeys though, virtualisation is often the only way to manage workloads sensibly.

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Lusty
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Re: Back to the Future?

" I wonder if we'll see this amazing new feature in Server 2015, or whatever the next new release is"

App-V is basically most of this functionality and has been available for a while. The manageability aspect makes full virtualisation far more attractive for most normal workloads. Google can make use of this because their workloads are massively parallel, automated and redundant so the management aspect means far less to them.

This is also why Virtuozzo didn't catch on as well as the marketing guys hoped. Although it does give better density and performance, the drawbacks for the average IT department far outweigh these benefits.

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Microsoft: Pssst, small resellers, want to sling our cloud?

Lusty
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Re: It's what you might call a limited offer....

I was actually referring to your previous reference to you dealing with fairly unique verticals, but smashing rant nonetheless. I'm not really pro Microsoft, I work for a Gold partner but we're also a Red Hat partner as a result of my pushing for us to become one to meet a demand and I use Mac and Linux at home. Linux has a place, as do most systems, and it's excellent at what it does. Many of our Linux customers still integrate it with AD though for security reasons since almost everyone has an AD domain.

I didn't actually quote any statistics specifically so not sure how I'm cherry picking. Again, nice rant though :)

I should point out, I'm actually not your nemesis - I think a lot of what you say is useful and clever, and my earlier reference to you was only to respond with a useful definition of a "server". The MS one actually is very good if you care to read it. I'm not aware of anyone else even trying to define in clear terms what a running system is but if you care to offer one the industry uses I'm happy to read it.

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Lusty
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Re: It's what you might call a limited offer....

"Bingo."

Not sure what you're trying to say there. The published statistics and my experience are completely in line with one another so as far as I'm concerned that's reality. By your own admission on these forums and in your articles you deal with a fairly niche market so it's expected that your experience wouldn't line up with the global statistics.

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Lusty
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Re: It's what you might call a limited offer....

@Richard Plinston

Ah yes, the all encompassing open source defence of conspiracy theory.

@Trevor, personally I would use OSE as the definition of server these days as stated in the MS licensing docs which nicely defines running instances and would also work well with the various Nix technologies used to virtualise and otherwise split hardware.

Even ignoring the stats, my own experience of UK companies (and I've worked with a lot, right across the spectrum of size and in pretty much all verticals) shows overwhelming favour to Windows with the exception of transactional stuff at banks/retail and web farms. Unfortunately with a lot of Reg readers being developers it's easy for them to overlook the many uses for servers in business outside of web apps

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Lusty
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Re: It's what you might call a limited offer....

Perhaps your experience is different to other people. My experience shows that rather than being easier to manage, Linux and Unix simply gets ignored following install, with patches rarely being applied and very little housekeeping done unless there is a problem.

I think you're stretching the meaning of the word "most" to mean people you deal with. In the real world, Microsoft has the majority of server systems as can be clearly seen from various statistical sources. The Azure cloud is a fine example of cloud technology and will likely be the way normal companies do their IT in 5 years time, so for partners it's time to adapt or die off. Luckily my employer has chosen to adapt and our cloud services are growing rapidly, but I do feel sorry for the reseller only businesses out there who don't offer services as their slice of the pie won't be there in a few years.

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Hang on, lads. I've got a great idea, says NetApp as it teeters on the edge

Lusty
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Re: Amazon

Amazon never would use NetApp storage. Customers, on the other hand, very much like the software features of NetApp for backup and replication, as well as the ability to change disk formats from VMDK to native LUN to VHD and back to VMDK without that annoying time delay seen with other technologies (which all copy/move the data). The ability to snap mirror your local data to the cloud is a very big opportunity too, and since NetApp are one of the few who have real experience using primary storage as backup they are ideally placed to make some cash here. Although other vendors can do primary storage backup, very few of them actually have customers doing this - HP and EMC for instance prefer to sell you a replicated D2D system so you can have 4 copies of your data rather than just two the NetApp way.

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Lusty
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Amazon

Amazon already have NetApp storage attached to their cloud in the building next door and fibre connected. Anyone close to NetApp have known the software split was on the cards for quite a while, partly to fit in to Azure as well, although they are taking a maddeningly long time to finish it. With project shift I suspect it would be a very popular service too, allowing very rapid moves into the cloud.

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CERN: Build terabit networks or the Higgs gets it!

Lusty
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I suspect a transcription error

20GB/s works out at 160Gbps so not sure what they are doing between those 1000 100Gbps connections and the storage but seem to be binning a lot of data!

Sure they didn't say 20 Petabytes? My MacBook can sustain 4GB/s so 20 would be pretty easy to do with a small Violin array PCIe connected.

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EMC's DSSD rack flashers snub Fibre Channel for ... PCIe

Lusty
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Re: Linux Controllers don't add any latency?

"This is why it's such a head scratcher to me when people say its a "bad thing" to acquire"

It's not a bad thing to buy good tech - it's what happens next that counts. The reason tech acquisition is often frowned upon is because tech companies often just change the logo and call it their own rather than taking that technology and merging it into their own over time. One only has to look at the HP stoage line up to see this in action with completely different technology in every product and no attempt to cross pollinate. If the LeftHand network RAID is so great, how come 3Par hasn't added it in? If ASICs are so great, how come LeftHand still uses a Xeon? All they have done is paint the LeftHand yellow, and even then one of the fascias is upside down!

If acquisition leads to conflicting marketing material through your range then yes, it's a bad thing. Dell are surprisingly good with this, they are slowly but surely merging their various acquisitions into all of their products. Microsoft also are usually good with this sort of thing with some notable exceptions.

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Lusty
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"With an all-flash-array you can easily achieve sub-millisecond response times"

Try not to use the word "sub-millisecond" as this is still potentially orders of magnitude slower than microsecond. Sub-millisecond was brought in to marketing to combat Violin who were claiming low microsecond latencies. Sub-millisecond includes 999 microsecond latency, which is 10 times slower than 100 microsecond latency and 100 times slower than 10 microsecond latency. What many people forget while thinking these times are so low it doesn't matter, is that one clock cycle of a modern Xeon is very short indeed - 4 billionths of a second in fact. This means that is your storage could operate at 1 microsecond latency, the CPU still had to wait 4000 cycles for the information to arrive. If you look at a worst case marketing "sub millisecond" latency of 999ms then the CPU will be waiting around 4000000 cycles.

To the average Joe with an average estate and average workloads, this doesn't matter. Most of the time VMware will fill in the blank cycles with other work anyway. For those that need the performance though, this is all critical stuff even if EMC do appear to have photocopied someone else's technology with the anti-patent filter engaged.

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Lusty
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Re: On the back of an envelope

"I think you might just have invented infiniband"

Current Infiniband is slower than current PCIe so there is a difference, albeit one that most people won't care about. This type of storage is not aimed at most people though :)

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Lusty
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so

a bit like a bigger Violin array then?

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Peak thumb drive is coming in 2016

Lusty
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I'd have thought it's more likely that the mobile phone and cloud solutions have replaced thumb drives for the average user. Techies may need them for a while to install operating systems but most of the techies I know have long since stopped using them for actual data transfer unless a customer is playing the no laptop on the network game. Even then, customers without wifi are becoming increasingly rare so it's often only for files over 10MB or so where email becomes more difficult than finding the USB key at the bottom of the bag :)

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Ericsson puts 5G towel on Japanese deck-chair

Lusty
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Re: Voice

Why would voice have anything to do with it? As with 4G voice is just another type of traffic. It may have QoS applied but it's traffic nonetheless.

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The amazing .uk domain: Less .co and loads more whalesong

Lusty
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Re: Finally catching up?

"And yes, it is too bad that the .uk folks were too clever by half back then. It is also too bad that they are even less clever now."

Which "back then" are you talking about? The one where .uk domains were available, or the later one where they were not but people like police.uk still had them?

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Thanks for nothing, Apple, say forensic security chaps

Lusty
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Re: Alternate article title

I don't want my phone forensically secure, I just want it wiped when it gets lost and I want to keep my data.

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Lusty
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Re: Alternate article title

No need, the default action is to wipe the phone after 8 failed login attempts. With iCloud, your data is all backed up so this poses no problem. Once wiped the device is effectively bricked until your Apple ID is used to unlock it again (although I've not Googled for workarounds to this to be fair)

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Sony nanotechnicians invent magnetic tape that stores 148 Gb per square inch

Lusty
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@LoopyChew

None at all. Research was done ages ago and showed no data loss whatsoever in this scenario.

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94% of Brit tech bosses just can't get the staff these days, claims bank

Lusty
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Re: Can't get the staff

"That could be because they are asking for 5 years of experience in two year old tech."

If you think there is such a thing as 2 year old tech then you're clearly not experienced enough. Everything I've seen from vendors is based on older technologies, and having experience in these means that you'll make smarter decisions with the new stuff from day one. A good example is the recent addition of in memory tables to SQL server (not new at all in the database world), or the Atlantis memory product for SQL (RAM drives effectively. clever ones, granted, but RAM drives nonetheless). Inexperienced people immediately said "awesome, that'll fix my performance problems" while experienced people said "How did you solve the data consistency and security issues?". New tech, totally different reactions based on old tech experience.

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Lusty
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"Apparently one of you is wrong. But which one?"

If he'd have said System Architect or Enterprise Architect I'd have been with him, but solutions architect is just a more presalesy version of consultant. Unless your company has far too many people in the chain of delivery of course...

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Enterprise storage will die just like tape did, say chaps with graphs

Lusty
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I certainly wouldn't go with 3Par for a 250 user implementation. Something like Purestorage, Equallogic SSD or Atlantis would be more in line with that size solution, and even those are stretching it a bit.

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Lusty
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The difference is that disk doesn't need a meat bag to load and change tapes slowly over a period of months, the data on disks is all online which is where the cost savings come from. As long as power requirements don't outweigh that cost then disk is starting to be the winner until you get to the extremely large capacities of systems like the LHC.

recyclling in this instance means rewriting to the same tape every 5 years rather than replacing the tape. If the data is valuable enough to archive this is a necessary step. Disk can do this online as part of normal maintenance.

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Lusty
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Re: PCI is the new network…..

Violin do this. You may not be able to afford one but it's certainly widely available

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It's GOOD to get RAIN on your upgrade parade: Crucial M550 1TB SSD

Lusty
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Any chance of seeing tests with full size IOs? Modern Windows uses 8KB by default, and you ought to get a bit more throughput by increasing them. Given what you'd need the throughput for (video editing for instance), larger IOs make more sense anyway. I would expect this drive to be able to saturate the SATA connector.

EDIT - sorry hadn't noticed the ATTO pic. A little disappointing for flash performance to not be able to saturate a SATA link.

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Next Windows obsolescence panic is 450 days from … NOW!

Lusty
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Re: Does your software require Windows? @lusty

Sorry Roland, I didn't mean that in a bad way, just that you were saying IBM had better support while also saying you'd not used the MS equivalent. I can fully believe they have great support, but I know from experience that it's not better than MS.

My statement asking for commercially supported OSs still stands - you pointed out a currently supported OS which was not available when 2003 was released and this is equivalent to Server 2012 being supported. As you said, the workloads are supported but the old OS is not, and that is identical to the MS policy which people here are bashing despite 2003 being one of the longest supported OS versions of all time from any vendor.

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Lusty
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Re: Does your software require Windows?

"Oh, it's you. Hello shill. Kindly stop spreading incorrect information."

ANONYMOUS, please point us to your sources showing well conducted tests to back this up. I have personally run benchmarks with various hypervisors and have found that the MS one perfumes generally better due to superior driver support which allows it to get more from the hardware. Linux drivers tend to work but often lack the enhancements to really drive the hardware features.

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Feast your PUNY eyes on highest resolution phone display EVER

Lusty
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Re: Pixel wars

Siri knows your home address because it's in your address book, not because of GPS. The fact that you bought a model without GPS is hardly Apples fault, they sell a device that does what you want to achieve and you chose the other one.

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Lusty
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Re: Yup, as usual Apple were first with an earth-shattering innovation.

"Also, you realise that "clock speed, memory, megapixels and pixel density" are where "functionality and usefulness" come from, don't you? "

no they don't. Functionality and usefulness come from imagining a use-case for the device. Clock speed, memory etc. are enablers of these ideas, and occasionally more are necessary to implement the new use-case or to speed up poor user experience. If the user experience isn't currently crappy and slow then benchmark figures like these can be left alone and other areas improved with the exception of where new functionality requires a boost. Beyond retina type resolutions there is little benefit to more dots since almost nobody can see the difference. Beyond about 5MP a small camera sensor actually starts to produce worse pictures (for Physics reasons). Phone storage doesn't need to be large enough to hold every bit of data you have, as long as that data is easily accessible (cloud for instance). As long as functionality is improving then these other things are nice, but usually other areas are not improving and phone manufacturers are relying on benchmarks to sell new phones which are needlessly faster. Perhaps I'm wrong and more performance is required but I've not had a slow phone for a good 6 years.

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CEO Tim Cook sweeps Apple's inconvenient truths under a solar panel

Lusty
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Re: Replaceable battery

Transistor radios didn't need the battery to be shaped around the other components in order to make them smaller. I've had various mobile phones since the mid 90s and I've never needed to replace a battery before I replaced the phone. Usually my mobiles stay with me for 2-3 years and then a family member uses them for a year or two. I've no idea what you're doing to your phone to break the battery but in normal use you should get at least 3 years out of it if not more. You're right, it would be slightly simpler to put a flap on the back, but then the iPhone would look just as cheap and plasticky as the competition. A trip to the store to swap out the battery every 4 years or so wouldn't be the end of the world for me even if I ever do need a battery change. Of course, it might just be that Apple uses better batteries in the first place so they are less likely to need replacing, I guess that might be why our experience differs?

I'm curious though Boltar how many times have you personally replaced the battery on your phone? I rather suspect it's none but you'll probably post 5 or 6 on here to try and make your pointless point.

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Lusty
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Re: Replaceable battery

"An easily replaceable battery would be a big step forward."

It's not difficult to change the battery, you just like to think it is. There is a simple link and pricing on the Apple website which explains everything.

"And easy replacement would extend handset life."

No it wouldn't. Handset life has nothing to do with battery life. Handsets are thrown away either at the end of a contract or when they are destroyed as a general rule. I have an iPhone 4s which still lasts 2 days on a charge which was bought on launch day, and my old 3GS was still going a year ago until my little brother smashed it.

The real question being ignored by el Reg is how recyclable is a Samsung handset? We can be certain that all handsets will be discarded at some point, and Apple using highly recyclable components is to be applauded. As has been said many times on these forums, the now common industry practice of gluing together is to allow easy recycling - serviceability works against this unfortunately and ultimately is worse for the environment.

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