* Posts by Lusty

973 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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Microsoft is BEATING Amazon's cloud revenues. Er, how?

Lusty
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"I can think of lots of well known third party companies who run their operations entirely on Amazon. I can't think of any who do the same with Microsoft Azure."

Lotus F1 and the Olympics are the two that immediately come to mind from events I've been to but I'm sure there are others.

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Lusty
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Also if you compare revenue it's entirely likely that the highest priced service will win. Ultimately adoption is more important. Either way, AWS and Azure are the only horses in this particular race right now. We could use a third runner for competition but nobody else seems close and VMware seem uninterested in offering a real cloud for some reason and are concentrating on managed hosting with the word cloud in the name.

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Apple to devs: Watch out, don't make the Watch into a, well, a watch

Lusty
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Re: Zap, darling...

They probably do know better than you. It's quite likely that apps run in a much less efficient way to the watch face, and so a watch app would kill the power in a few hours because you'd always need to have an app running. The standard watch faces probably aren't normal apps and almost certainly have power saving built in.

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Lusty
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Re: Face it

Why would you want to tell everyone you had an iWatch? Surely it would be a better boast if you had an Apple Watch?

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If hypervisor is commodity, why is VMware still on top?

Lusty
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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

You have yet to learn your lessons by the look of it. That's generally the attitude of small environment admins who are king of their world, or BOFHs as we call them. Real admins do their job and keep things up to date with proper change control and testing to ensure platform stability AND SECURITY. Just because it didn't crash doesn't mean it isn't vulnerable, and there have been numerous stability and security issues with VMware 5.x, along with patches which have added functionality such as Windows 2012 support. Of course, you probably still run Windows Server 2003 so that wouldn't bother you, because that's also "stable".

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Lusty
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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

"This 10 minute example includes updating security patches via RPM."

A properly configured Hyper-v deployment patches before deploying to the hardware or virtual machine using offline servicing on the image. The administrator doesn't need to do anything, and the new deployment is immediately secure wi the latest patches. So yes, 10 minutes seems like an age when you're used to instant.

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Lusty
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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

"Having an uptime of 5 years does not mean that "security patching and maintenance" has not been done."

He was talking about VMware, so yes it does mean no patching or maintenance. It's also very hard to update your firmware without downtime on the box. The smart people design so that components can be taken offline without service downtime. This involves redundancy, clustering, load balancing etc. and is the only way to create a resilient service. Having a massive uptime on a single box is a sign of a naive administrator who will eventually come unstuck and cause massive issues for the company.

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Re: Admin tools, management tools, monitoring tools, APIs, instrumentation and documentation

AWS is a direct competitor as far as I'm concerned and the tools there make VMware look over complicated.

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Lusty
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Re: How far out can you depend on Microsoft?

"they've never done anything "Metro interface on Windows 2012 server" stupid."

Moving TO Flash when world+dog was going HTML5 for the web interface must surely count? Metro at least had good reasoning behind the decision if you care to read the dev blogs.

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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

Lol if you think Puppet comes close to Windows management functionality you know even less than I thought about securing and managing enterprise Windows environments. Server 2003 had more advanced functionality and Windows has moved ahead significantly since then.

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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

10 minutes is a long time. Policy in AD allows machines to be secure as soon as they boot after install including setting appropriate firewall rules for the intended role. Other solutions are gradually copying this kind of stuff but the MS implementation is second to none for large networks. Sadly most people assume it's insecure rather than doing the necessary research.

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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

So you don't patch your VMware boxes then? My Hyper-v implementations have all been very stable, but then I understand the difference between the hypervisor and the management partition. I also understand how to secure Windows, which these days is a hell of a lot easier than securing any other OS on the market free or otherwise.

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Rackspace in Crawley: This is a local data centre for local people

Lusty
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If only there were some way to obfuscate your data so that when your cloud provider sends it to the authorities it's unreadable...oh yes, encryption. If a UK based company holds the encryption keys on their own premises then the U.S. authorities can't force them to hand them over because the UK company isn't subject to American laws. Yes, the data will be handed over, but it won't be readable so who cares?

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Excessively fat virtual worlds – come on, it's your guilty secret

Lusty
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Re: Don't forget

A few years out of date more often than not means a 4Ghz processor core which runs threads faster than all but two of the current Xeon range (when single core running under Turbo boost). This is why many apps run slower virtualised because most apps are single thread due to poor design.

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Lusty
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Cracking article, more of this type of stuff please Reg.

When a vendor asks for 16 cores and 32GB memory, ask them to provide permon logs from another similarly sized customer install. It's not the vendors responsibility to correctly size your solution, and it's not their job to ask the right questions but they should be able to justify what they are asking for as a minimum.

Another issue not addressed in the article is that of IT staff generally not knowing enough about computers to make these decisions. The difference between free and available memory in Windows is something almost everyone seems to struggle with even though it's a very simple concept.

Many also don't know the extra memory requirements for 10GbE networking either, despite it being stated clearly in hardware vendor documentation (HP Quickspecs certainly mention this more than once).

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VMware fires Photon torpedo – a homegrown Linux for microservices

Lusty
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Look at this lovely wheel we've invented...

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Questionable ads

Lusty
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"This, I assume, is not the kind of respectable advert you want on your site?"

They can't hear you, they are too busy counting money ;)

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comments moderation or censorship?

Lusty
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I thought it was well known that El Reg delete comments they don't like. It's in the Ts and Cs after all, along with their policy of publishing literally any story if it gets delivered in a wheelbarrow full of cash. There's no standards around here, only the moneys!

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Citrix reveals direction for cloudified XenApp, XenDesktop

Lusty
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Facepalm

Excellent

Thank goodness that they haven't spent the last 20 years telling people to put the desktop (WinFrame, MetaFrame, XenApp) next to the data (i.e. in the corporate data centre) to make the network efficient..oh wait...arse. Perhaps a new name, yes a rename will sort this...

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HGST says its NVMe flash card will manage 750,000 IOPS

Lusty
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Very cool

Trouble is you'd need something that produces that much random IO either within the server or on 4 10GbE links to take advantage of this properly so it seems a bit niche. No more niche than a lot of current high end hardware mind you, servers seem to be big enough these days for most normal purposes. I guess animation and CGI maybe would use this? Very busy non distributed databases? I'd love to hear what everyone else can think of that needs 750k IOPS in a single system.

The evil that is VDI will of course use every IO it can get its grubby mitts on, but I shan't count that because those IOs should be in the ruddy end point ;)

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Fancy a wristjob from Tim Cook? TOUGH LUCK, you CAN'T HAVE ONE

Lusty
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"you'll probably have to top the thing up with charge during the day."

Curious, none of the reviews have said this. Do you have some new use-case for yours that will drain the battery faster than normal people?

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US govt bans Intel from selling chips to China's supercomputer boffins

Lusty
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Re: Since those chips are already made in China...

I was thinking that. You can only export them once they are actually in America, surely.

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Eyes on the prize: Ten 23-24-inch monitors for under £150

Lusty
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If you receive broadcasts on it, yes you do. If not then you don't need one. Simples.

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Popular crypto app uses single-byte XOR and nowt else, hacker says

Lusty
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Re: Get a grip!

"Would you feel the same way about, say , a front door lock that appears secure because it appears to require a key then you discover that using a certain sequence of knocks, you can open it?

It's the same principle, appearing to be secure."

No, it's more like a small padlock on a bedroom door, behind a very secure front door and alarm system. Nobody can get into the house without authorisation but once inside security doesn't need to be as tight because you already trust them enough to let them in. Your house guest is unlikely to sit there and break the padlock or try to pick the lock because you're there with them. When you're not home they can't get in because they don't have keys to the house.

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Lusty
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@1980s coder

"Exactly what does anyone gain using this app?"

They get exactly what it says on the tin. The app encrypts data. You claim to understand the concepts so I find it unusual that you're so confused on the matter, and I'm sorry to say coming across as a bit of an ass in this instance.

Wikipedia defines encryption as "the process of encoding messages or information in such a way that only authorized parties can read it". Now, the phone itself is protected and fully encrypted (admittedly I don't know much about Android and your fancy removable SD cards...) such that someone stealing my phone cannot access the fully encrypted drive at all. I'm confident that my data is properly encrypted from that perspective.

So, this app then has nothing to do with properly encrypting the whole file, since that's already done at another layer. It has everything to do with authorising users on your device but not to that data. For instance, letting your current squeeze look something up on Google while also having pictures of a previous squeeze present and inaccessible from the phone.

I have to say that in this instance, the methods of the app appear to be completely appropriate for the requirements. They certainly should have been upfront about their methods and let people choose between battery life and protection but good design for mobile has to be appropriate design to minimise things like power draw.

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BBC waves £230m of feepayers' dosh at tech backbone deal

Lusty
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eh?

Doesn't the supplier normally tell the customer what the price will be? Surely they are putting themselves in a poor negotiating position by stating a price up front.

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Samsung's bend blame blast: We DEMAND a Galaxy S6 Edge do-over

Lusty
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Re: "You mean the watch pocket?"

@Jedit, I doubt you'll have much luck with a condom sticking out of your jeans either. It's still a watch pocket regardless of Levis trying to market it otherwise. In the intervening years they have been perfect for Zippos too, but I wouldn't call it a lighter pocket.

If you think that a condom in on of these pockets will be fit for purpose by the end of a good night out (let alone a few good nights out which they would last for a normal human male then you must have a very large family or very swift bedding skills :)

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Lusty
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Re: Glass is not meant to be bendy

"condom pocket"

You mean the watch pocket?

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Aluminum bendy battery is boffins' answer to EXPLODING Li-ion menace

Lusty
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Re: For once the news on the battery front may actually lead to something.

"Have you SEEN the energy density of a Duracell AA?"

Funny you should say that. A couple of months ago I bought an original Gameboy and I'm still on the original set of Duracells I put in on day of delivery. I've played it a lot in the mean time and they show no signs of dying.

I remember in the 90s I'd get a few hours, hot batteries and dissapointment and ended up always tethered to the wall. This direct comparison was a great example of progress to me.

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Lusty
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Re: For once the news on the battery front may actually lead to something.

"Even if the shortfall in voltage compared with Li-ion batteries proves a tough nut to crack"

At this point it may be easier to change the requirement for higher voltage. Chip voltages have been dropping gradually, and seem only to be as high as they are for legacy reasons a lot of the time. I think it was Google who pioneered the idea of removing all but the 5v connection from power supplies which increased efficiency compared to the old multi voltage ones. I wouldn't be surprised if it's just the screen backlight that needs higher voltage these days to avoid the wires overheating with current.

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CoreOS bags $12m, touts Tectonic – a DIY Google cloud for big biz

Lusty
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Re: @1980's ... Yeah but you have to like the name...

"Tectonic ... try and copyright it. :-P"

Why would there be an issue copyrighting the word Tectonic in the specific realm of IT unless it's already taken? Or have I missed something funny?

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Lusty
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While you're right that there are fewer systems to manage and patch, you're wrong to think that normal enterprises want this. Change control means that anyone without an army of coders writing bespoke software for all the company workloads will want to patch each workload individually in a controlled manner to reduce business risk. This works for Google because they have numbers on their side, so each hardware image probably does only run one workload but maybe 50 instances of it. They would have sufficient hardware to allow failure of many hardware servers though so patching may not be an issue. They also have robust procedures for managing those changes while most enterprises do not, and backing out is often chaos.

The technology here and in virtualisation may be based on old technology but there are a significant number of new tricks which those old platforms can't do. There are also a number of things which make working with them unpleasant compared to the newer copies with updated tool sets.

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Don't be stiffed by spies, stand up to Uncle Sam with your proud d**k pics – says Snowden

Lusty
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Re: And the followup question should have been

@OzBob, the answer in your example is that the parent is the bad one who needs to be monitored. Perverts don't just randomly email pictures to random email addresses, the 13YO would have to be somewhere for this to happen, and what happens next is down to education and good parenting. I would be unconcerned at a 13YO seeing nudity of any gender since nudity is natural. I would be incredibly concerned if they continued talking to a stranger who sent them such pictures unsolicited in an unrelated forum. It is not the job of the state to protect and educate your children from things like this and it's demonstrably unfeasible for them to do so without massive privacy invasion which, to me at least, is less acceptable than preventing the crimes. Pre-crime never works.

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The coming of DAB+: Stereo eluded the radio star

Lusty
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Re: DAB...

"Extremely unlikely. Broadcast is free, data is expensive."

Broadcast is most certainly not free, it's quite expensive actually what with all those towering transmitters and massive power and distribution requirements.

Data is relatively expensive right now, but then we're only half way through the revolution right now. 12 years ago most people used modems for access, 12 years in the future I would expect gigabit links to the home, and content cached at every provider so data services will be cheaper than broadcast at that point. Besides, with ultra high def we may get to the point where there isn't sufficient bandwidth for broadcast of a useful number of channels.

Even now, though, broadcast is taking a backseat. Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, Sky, catch up TV services are rapidly becoming the primary way people watch TV content (here in the UK at least). Even my mum uses streaming services rather than broadcast. For some reason, America appears surprised by the idea of content not over cable, with Apple TV being branded a revolution so perhaps the next 12 years will see everywhere else catching up.

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Lusty
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Re: DAB...

I don't think sound quality will drive any new sales. The vast majority of radio listening is background noise. Most of those interested in quality either buy music or already have DAB. I especially liked the quote "Mediatique, who produced the figures, think that by 2027 there will be 69 million DAB sets around". The idea that radios will still be a thing in 12 years amuses me. 12 years ago we didn't even have smartphones or proper mobile Internet, both of which are now ubiquitous. In 12 years time is be surprised if broadcast isn't dying off rapidly to free up spectrum for whatever next next next gen devices we have.

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Smart meters are a ‘costly mistake’ that'll add BILLIONS to bills

Lusty
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Re: Just give us the numbers

Knowing the numbers will only tell you what everyone already knows - the benefit is not cost based. Sure, a few people will save a few quid, but most won't. The other benefits are currently not quantifiable, as the article stated, and so even with the numbers we wouldn't be able to have a sensible discussion because half the people think energy consumption would drop and the other half don't, just like in the climate debate.

Handing over the report would definitely fan the flames of people who don't think that smart meters will help reduce energy consumption and therefore carbon emissions etc. so I don't think they should hand it over. If they do, the newspapers will publish the numbers, enrage the uneducated masses and the money will definitely have been wasted. If we do nothing, then worst case is everyone gets a replacement meter which can be read remotely which would at the very least improve the archaic system we have now where once a quarter I have to let two men into my house to avoid getting estimated (read imaginary massive numbers) bills.

I'm not necessarily in favour of these meters, but the content of the article was enough to convince me that we shouldn't stop them at this point - someone clearly has an agenda in stopping them.

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Apple's 13-incher will STILL cost you a bomb: MacBook Air 2015

Lusty
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Re: It's not expensive

"Then my summer working outside in the sunshine is a reality."

+1, someone needs to make a machine which works nicely in the sunshine. Perhaps instead of a black plastic case that bakes in the sunshine, a solar panel would be a good option. I'd happily buy a second laptop purely for garden use. For work the screen doesn't even have to be fast at updating, Word docs are still Word docs with a bit of lag :)

This machine also has to be tested against beer, gin, tonic and ketchup of course :)

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One day all this could be yours: Be Facebook, without being Facebook

Lusty
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So, we're saying HP's Moonshot is a great technology while also saying that proprietary complex hardware is not good in this situation. Hardly a clear message unless I've missed something and other vendors are producing identical kit to what at first glimpse appears to be the very epitome of proprietary complexity. You can't have it both ways unless you have motherboard designers on staff, you can either have the slotty tech like blades or Moonshot, or you can have white box simplicity.

What many people miss though, is that those simple white boxes don't come with firmware and driver management so unless you also have an army of coders who can automate updates this is a step in the wrong direction too.

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Ford: Our latest car gizmo will CHOKE OFF your FUEL if you're speeding

Lusty
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Re: Is this a lost in translation

@John, I don't keep repeating it, I responded to what I thought were two different threads spouting the same crap, which you repeat here. There are LOADS of roads in built up areas which do not have street lighting at all, are you saying these are 60MPH limit simply because the local council decided not to light them? The highway code doesn't mention street lights, and I would wager that bringing up street lights in a court defence would be met with laughter from the judge. The current trend is to remove street lighting to save energy and reduce light pollution so if there were mention of lights in the speed laws it would be time to remove it.

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Lusty
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Re: Is this a lost in translation

"On single carriageway roads with streetlamps and no reminders otherwise, the limit is 30 mph."

No, single carriageway roads are 60MPH whether lit or otherwise. Built up areas are 30 whether lit or not, and whether single or multiple carriageway. Street lighting is sometimes an indicator that an area is built up, but not the best one. Pavements are better, lots of houses and schools are a dead giveaway.

https://www.gov.uk/speed-limits

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Lusty
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Re: Is this a lost in translation

"e.g. look for lamp posts, they are relevant in the UK"

No they aren't unless they have a speed sign on them. Plenty of motorways have lamp posts, as do numerous dual carriageways (which, incidentally, doesn't mean 2 lane roads is means two separate carriageways which can each be a single lane and still 70 limit) and many single carriageways, multilane and otherwise. If lamp posts are your method of determining speed limits then it must take you forever to get around :)

https://www.gov.uk/speed-limits

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Chrome trumps all comers in reported vulnerabilities

Lusty
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Chrome security

Is there anyone running Chrome who wasn't expecting at least one massive global corp to have full access to all their data? If you want security then a data mining ad company is not your best bet for software.

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Wind turbine blown away by control system vulnerability

Lusty
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Re: Sir

"The problem is that the "big ones" are not any better"

My assumption was that the big ones were installed by people who were capable of installing their own cable infrastructure. If that's not the case then web GUIs are the least of our problems!

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Lusty
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Re: Oh Good Grief

"Either don't connect it to the Internet, or do it properly."

I suspect that's exactly what the programmer was thinking - why would anyone connect these to the internet? They are small turbines to use on site rather than national infrastructure size so surely will just go on the local network behind the firewall and therefore don't need excellent security. If you're putting power cables to your garden then popping an ethernet link in as well is no bother. This announcement is probably because some "hacker" worked it out and contacted them, forcing an announcement. I would imagine whoever coded it already knew about the "exploit" and just didn't care enough (or had too few resources) to do anything about it.

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Lusty
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Re: Sir

"Are these wind-turbines considered Critical National Infrastructure?"

No, these are for people with large gardens and businesses trying to look green. They are not proper big turbines.

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Nutanix 'working on a homebrew hypervisor', sources tell El Reg

Lusty
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Re: Xen?

All of them are small and lightweight, then various layers of crap have to be added for them to work such as drivers and machine management. Lightweight is marketing directly aimed at OCD techies who like things to be optimised and small.

Xen also had the unfortunate problem of being used by Citrix which effectively killed it and caused the birth of KVM, which has the unfortunate problem of not being VMware or Hyper-V and lets face it Hyper-V only made progress because it's bundled with Windows and is cheaper than VMware to buy.

In reality, Nutanix don't need their own, they just need to package a hypervisor so that the install is slick with a single package. Xen or KVM will achieve that as long as they play nicely with the licence folks (yup, looking at you VMware...)

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Review: McAfee Endpoint Protection for SMB

Lusty
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Re: Fellow commentards - help needed pls...

Just uninstall McAfee and let the Windows one do its thing. AFAIK all modern AV uses the MS API anyway so it's really just interface and definitions you're worried about. Make sure the firewall is on and configured and you'll stop 99.99% of modern malware. Don't click on stupid emails/links/pictures and you'll stop most of the rest. For the one in a million remaining, Microsoft are quire capable by themselves because it's really a crap-shoot as to who gets a definition out first. Anyone who genuinely is first every time with a definition for new exploits I would recommend not funding simply because they probably also wrote or funded the malware!

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Woman caught on CCTV performing drunken BJ blew right to privacy

Lusty
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Re: Dazed and confused ...

Having now googled it, she really ought to pursue this case under the DPA.

Guidance is at https://ico.org.uk/media/for-organisations/documents/1542/cctv-code-of-practice.pdf and clearly suggests this is in violation of the rules.

For instance, the signage should tell the public that they are being monitored, and for what purpose. If the lift said "for the purpose of crime prevention" then selling footage to C4 is clearly not that. There are many, many other rules broken here though.

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Re: Dazed and confused ...

"unexpected outbreak of common sense in a Regulator's judgement."

How on earth is this common sense? CCTV cameras are not there for amusement, they are supposed to be there for protection. I was always under the impression that there were rules regarding what the footage could/couldn't be used for, and that the purpose was supposed to be protection.

Given this usage has now been ruled legitimate, I'm forced to conclude that I am no longer in favour of the millions of CCTV cameras "protecting" us. Regardless of what she was doing, it shouldn't have been broadcast on TV for entertainment purposes.

If she was committing a crime, then use the tape as evidence.

If she couldn't be identified, use just enough footage to ask the public to help identify her.

Given that they don't appear to be prosecuting her for urinating in the lift (the only actual crime described, assuming that's illegal) then the footage should be destroyed.

When did the rules on CCTV change?

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CIOs: What tech will be running your organisation in 2020?

Lusty
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"BES server for Blackberries"

Lol they were asking about 2020 - you won't be using Blackberries in 2020! You probably won't even remember who RIM were by 2020...

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