* Posts by Lusty

1005 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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John McAfee launches cert authority but it's got a POODLE problem

Lusty
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Childcatcher

Another venture?

We haven't even finished cleaning the McAfee virus software off all the machines on the Internet yet!

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IBM slurps database-as-a-service outfit Compose

Lusty
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Re: while THE PATRIOT remains in force

All my data are encrypted. They can have at it, it's only pr0n anyway :op

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Google gives away 100 PETABYTES of storage to irritate AWS

Lusty
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Re: It is all great, but the telco's do not play ball

Simple answer - don't connect to your cloud with the Internet. Cloud doesn't mean Internet connected, you can use MPLS to all major providers.

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Lusty
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Ultimately the offline will end up cheaper as dedupe rates begin to suffer with scale. The more data you have the more often you hit the same hash for different data and eventually will get to the point where storing as dedupe actually takes more space than storing native data (because all the pointers etc. need recording alongside the data). BD wouldn't be deduped so as long as ultimate capacity is cheaper that way then it's a winner.

Sadly, I have always seen Bluray as a dead technology thanks to the Internet so have no idea what a blank disk costs for comparison

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Lusty
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Re: Wot no Oracle?

They probably didn't mention you because no-one cares, a little like Oracle Linux. They never mention VMware in cloud conversations either. If you were a serious competitor you'd be on the list. By serious competitor I don't mean offering a service which competes, I mean offering a service which competes and has the customer base, scale, and brand recognition in the sector. Oracle are big but not recognised for their cloudy products. I hate to say it but I would count Oracle in the "me too" category alongside HP where cloud is concerned. Perhaps I'm wrong, if so I didn't mean to cause offence it's just how I see the cloud landscape right now.

FWIW how often do you see Amazon mentioned in database articles? They have some extremely capable products there...

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Lusty
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Re: need more bandwidth

Latency makes no difference to throughput if you know what you're doing, although the majority in our profession are sadly afflicted by poor throughput with latency.

The other two clouds offer 10Gb links via MPLS so although I've not looked specifically at Google I'm assuming they would too. a quick calc (365 / 2 x 24 x 60 x 60 x 1.25 /1024 /1024) suggests you could upload 18PB in 6 months with this arrangement, although it certainly would require more investment than free would suggest.

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Even Microsoft thinks Outlook is bloated and slow

Lusty
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Blimey, was I just thanked by several people on the Reg comments for a post disagreeing with someone? Surely I deserve a gold badge for this miracle! :)

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Lusty
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"For example, don't ever put a table at the top of a page. As at Office 2010, my version, you still can't then insert a line above it if you need to without a bit of trickery."

I don't seem to have an issue with this, and don't recall it being an issue. go to first cell, press home, press enter. Perhaps they did fix it after 2010 but I'm sure I've done it this way for years.

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You've tested the cloud – now get ready and take a bigger step

Lusty
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Agree with AC, many apps just can't be made highly available in the cloud which means they can never meet SLAs for being up during the working day.

Also what's all this jibber jabber about uncertain latency. If you need reliable connectivity, put the cloud on your MPLS with direct connect or express route!

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On yer bike: Hammerhead satnav for cyclists – just don't look down

Lusty
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Re: The title is no longer required.

While true, the Edge Touring for £130 has the same mapping functionality (and hardware) as the 810 and the lower down Garmin devices include turn by turn but lack the maps. Even if someone, somewhere finds this useful it will surely not succeed because everybody else will buy the vastly superior devices leaving this lot bankrupt.

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Lusty
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Re: The title is no longer required.

Can I decide that it's shit based on the fact that it appears to use the same mount as a Garmin Edge (not mentioned in the article from what I could tell) while offering considerably less functionality than said unit? The Garmin is a little more expensive, but offers cyclist friendly routing with maps and directions on the screen with better battery life than this LED thing. The Garmin also offers offline mapping stored on a huge SD card, and internal GPS which won't run your phone battery down. The garmin gives a polite beep when you need to take action and then displays a nice big arrow on the screen to show where to go.

This is a device that simply doesn't need to exist, the problem was solved many years ago with GPS bike computers.

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Lusty
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Why don't you just use a Garmin Edge on your motorbike?

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Someone at Subway is a serious security nerd

Lusty
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Re: Subway devs employ security by design

"We beg for security by design" actually most around here tend to beg for choice such as third party firmwares which this seems to not play with. Ask yourself, out of all the commentards, how many would prefer not to be able to use an app for ordering a sandwich compared to how many are happy that a sandwich app is so secure they can't use it with their modded phone?

Security is fine where appropriate, and banks should definitely do this stuff, but ordering a sandwich just doesn't justify this.

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Lusty
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Re: Subway devs employ security by design

Why Trevor, the article even says that their methods were pretty trivial to bypass? Not that I don't think they shouldn't be rewarded for being competent, our industry could certainly do with a few more competent people...

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Lusty
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"Security" is starting to do my head in. Dominos made me set a long complex password a while ago to protect my previous orders from ne'er-do-wells. I really don't mind folks hacking my pizza history, that's why my old password was "password". You're not a bank, Dominos, you're a pizza shop. I'll never let you store my credit card data even if you did offer that. Same for Subway and any other like them. Make my life easier, not more secure. Place appropriate security on your processes, and sack anyone doing security for security's sake.

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It's 2015 and VMware tools break VMs if you open two browser tabs

Lusty
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Holmes

I can't tell if you're joking or not?

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The VMware, Nutanix mud wrestle is hilarious, but which one is crying with fear on the inside?

Lusty
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Hyperconverged

The trouble is, every time I look at hyper-converged systems I come to the conclusion that there are only really a couple of use cases where it fits; VDI and simple web farm setups. For any moderately sized enterprise there are just too many edge cases to make it worthwhile. I don't disagree that for systems like VDI the benefits can be enormous where consistent scaling and performance makes this a natural fit. If you live in a world where all your servers are virtual and don't need consistent high performance then again it's great. For the rest of us though, we have things like heavy database workloads where the performance and consistency trade-offs of hyper-converged solutions are simply unacceptable. We have servers which for various reasons must be physical, and a million and one other things which mean that the hyper-converged system will need to sit next to the other standardised servers. Anyone who has run even a small enterprise data centre will tell you that standardisation, not diversification, is the way to a sane life and stabe systems. If I choose to lock myself in to HP, I know I can update all of my firmware through a single solution rather than visit each silo individually. Locking myself in to Microsoft means that all my servers are patched in the same way, and I only need to test patches once. Locking myself in to NetApp means I can easily replicate my data and backups in a single operation. Those are choices to be made individually, and I'd certainly agree the storage replication is a good area where software is a good addition and things like Veeam can mean not needing same vendor storage on every site.

The real costs, the real complexity is not in the hardware or the software, it's in the human element. Can your IT team learn and professionally operate all these different solutions to an acceptable level, or will they be masters of none? The answer to this and most other data centre questions is generally how susceptible to marketing BS you are.

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How a Cali court ruling could force a complete rethink of search results

Lusty
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@Neoc the really nice thing is it would take Amazon about 10 seconds to change the site to do so and effectively make this court case null and void. Or they could leave America, that threat always seems to change the outcome of court decisions in the completely uncorrupt USA :)

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How do we train the next generation of data centre wranglers?

Lusty
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Re: Demise and rise of the IT generalist

I agree that young people are not getting the opportunity to learn, but I'm not so convinced it's a problem. We're moving very rapidly to a SaaS model in all aspects of IT, and that SaaS will be running on PaaS or IaaS in any one of a handful of cloud providers. In the short term, folk like you and I will run things and we won't need new blood. In the longer term there will only be a need for a few good people to run the cloud environments. Thanks to scale, the pay for these people can be very high and so it will be a worthwhile thing to train up for. Most of the industry though will become either programmers where there's a low enough entry barrier that it's not a problem, and DevOps people to get the code from the developer to the cloud platform to provide SaaS. No doubt PC world will by that time have an army of very low skill PC re-imagers as I can't see that function remaining on-prem long term either.

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So much for rainbows, Zuck: Facebook staff still overwhelmingly male and white

Lusty
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Re: Shock, surprise .. NOT!

"Most women just aren't interested"

Weird then, how the number of women interested is rising as the apparent opportunities rise and as workplaces become more equalised. Perhaps what you mean is most women don't want to work in an all male environment where sexist comments are rife? Perhaps you also think blacks are also genetically not interested because they don't want to work in all white environments where racism is common? There are plenty of women, gays, blacks etc. interested, and constantly telling them that they are incapable, genetically predisposed to not want this, not physically able, or any other crap you care to come up with is likely more of a reason why there is an imbalance. Females do things in developing countries because males in developing countries force them to. Here in the rest of the world we have education to try to allow freedom for everyone. Females may be genetically programmed to be different from males, but that certainly doesn't mean we shouldn't hire them.

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Cheaper Apple iStuff? Foxconn eyes costs-busting Indian move

Lusty
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8 is a lucky number to them so that makes sense. Never occurred to me that it would be different elsewhere!

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Lusty
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Indeed, Apple seem to choose prices based on aesthetics of the number rather than any connection to the priciest cost. Even when they reduce prices they always land on X99. Cunningly in the US the price is a rounded number before tax, and in the UK it's a rounded number after tax. They aren't the only ones obviously, but this makes it clear that reduction at manufacture won't necessarily change retail. But as I said above, they do reduce prices all the time, no idea why I was downvoted, it's a fairly straightforward fact to verify. Presumably someone who thinks Apple is still overpriced, but I fail to see why I should be held responsible for that!

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Lusty
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Apple have consistently been lowering most prices for the last 10 years from what I've seen. They certainly never enter the cheap zone, but prices have definitely gone down overall.

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Nutanix did build 'Acropolis' hypervisor, wants you to bury it

Lusty
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Re: Lulz

Customer luck stories you mean. Enterprise storage is about the long term not just implementations that sound cool on paper. AC you're presumably an employee so biased but I've yet to meet anyone with experience who wasn't concerned by the trade off between latency and data consistency in this solution for any real data driven workload. Also the performance figures based on cache performance is a major concern for people doing real work too

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Lusty
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Re: Dinosaur alert!

Not dinosaurs, no. Just people with genuine enterprise experience who can see through the marketing to the problems that are ahead. There is no free lunch, and I can take you through the maths of how, when and why your solution will fail. Even the Nutanix techies will admit it performs like crap when set to certain workloads if you ask the right questions. Just a hint though, as you're obviously new, the guy who comes to you to sell a Nutanix is not a techie...they are all locked up in the call centre away from customers.

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Lusty
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Childcatcher

AAaaargggg!

I tried to read the whole article I really did but my BRAIN nearly EXPLODED with all the marketing crap spewing at me.

So they've invented a hypervisor, which is actually KVM.

The hypervisor is app centric, instead of VMs it actually houses the OS, containers, software and drivers that make up the app. Or FSCHKING VMS as we call them.

All of this, just as the rest of the industry is on the cusp of SaaS for pretty much everything, negating the need for these marketeers.

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Nutanix: We're not a storage company, but, er, watch out, NetApp

Lusty
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This marketecture is amazing!

Slightly more proprietary standard hardware, where do I sign up?

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Apple preps summer bonking bonanza for Brits

Lusty
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Problems

It'll be interesting to see if we have the same issues here as the US has had. I suspect that many of their issues were due to both chip and pin and contactless being deployed as new technologies. Since we've had both for many years we should in theory see fewer problems as it's a more tried and tested system here.

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Fanbois designing Windows 10 – where's it going to end?

Lusty
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Listening

"After the years of the Sinofsky rampage, which via Windows 8 forced drastic changes on to users, Microsoft felt it needed to be more of a listening company. "

Don't worry about research, the story is fine with make believe. Windows 7 and Windows 8 were based almost entirely on feedback from the customer experience program. The reason many geeks think MS wasn't listening is because geeks are the ones who always tick the opt out box for this. Telemetry told MS what people were clicking on and when, hence removal of a load of stuff in the start menu for Windows 7. It then told them that after clicking start, users almost never clicked on something other than the menu, hence the decision to make the menu full screen and get more results visible in searches.

MS have been listening for years, and they have publicly explained this in every release since XP.

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Secure web? That'll cost you, thanks to Mozilla's HTTPS plan

Lusty
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Thumb Up

Thank you I wasn't aware that catscan had been resurrected. I was very sad when the original site closed due to hippy nobbers saying it was cruel!

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Docker death blow to PaaS? The fat lady isn’t singing just yet folks

Lusty
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PaaS

I get the feeling you don't understand what PaaS is. Containers can be used to provide IaaS, PaaS and SaaS solutions, the difference is which components the vendor manages and which components the customer manages, and these have literally nothing to do with the virtualisation layer. O365 is SaaS because you buy a mailbox, Web Apps are PaaS because you get a web server where MS manages the IIS instance as well as the OS, VMs are usually IaaS because after initial deployment you manage everything other than the virtualisation layer. Docker, VMware, Xen are all irrelevant to this conversation and vice versa.

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Microsoft is BEATING Amazon's cloud revenues. Er, how?

Lusty
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"I can think of lots of well known third party companies who run their operations entirely on Amazon. I can't think of any who do the same with Microsoft Azure."

Lotus F1 and the Olympics are the two that immediately come to mind from events I've been to but I'm sure there are others.

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Lusty
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Also if you compare revenue it's entirely likely that the highest priced service will win. Ultimately adoption is more important. Either way, AWS and Azure are the only horses in this particular race right now. We could use a third runner for competition but nobody else seems close and VMware seem uninterested in offering a real cloud for some reason and are concentrating on managed hosting with the word cloud in the name.

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Apple to devs: Watch out, don't make the Watch into a, well, a watch

Lusty
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Re: Zap, darling...

They probably do know better than you. It's quite likely that apps run in a much less efficient way to the watch face, and so a watch app would kill the power in a few hours because you'd always need to have an app running. The standard watch faces probably aren't normal apps and almost certainly have power saving built in.

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Lusty
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Boffin

Re: Face it

Why would you want to tell everyone you had an iWatch? Surely it would be a better boast if you had an Apple Watch?

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If hypervisor is commodity, why is VMware still on top?

Lusty
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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

You have yet to learn your lessons by the look of it. That's generally the attitude of small environment admins who are king of their world, or BOFHs as we call them. Real admins do their job and keep things up to date with proper change control and testing to ensure platform stability AND SECURITY. Just because it didn't crash doesn't mean it isn't vulnerable, and there have been numerous stability and security issues with VMware 5.x, along with patches which have added functionality such as Windows 2012 support. Of course, you probably still run Windows Server 2003 so that wouldn't bother you, because that's also "stable".

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Lusty
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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

"This 10 minute example includes updating security patches via RPM."

A properly configured Hyper-v deployment patches before deploying to the hardware or virtual machine using offline servicing on the image. The administrator doesn't need to do anything, and the new deployment is immediately secure wi the latest patches. So yes, 10 minutes seems like an age when you're used to instant.

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Lusty
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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

"Having an uptime of 5 years does not mean that "security patching and maintenance" has not been done."

He was talking about VMware, so yes it does mean no patching or maintenance. It's also very hard to update your firmware without downtime on the box. The smart people design so that components can be taken offline without service downtime. This involves redundancy, clustering, load balancing etc. and is the only way to create a resilient service. Having a massive uptime on a single box is a sign of a naive administrator who will eventually come unstuck and cause massive issues for the company.

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Lusty
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Re: Admin tools, management tools, monitoring tools, APIs, instrumentation and documentation

AWS is a direct competitor as far as I'm concerned and the tools there make VMware look over complicated.

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Lusty
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Re: How far out can you depend on Microsoft?

"they've never done anything "Metro interface on Windows 2012 server" stupid."

Moving TO Flash when world+dog was going HTML5 for the web interface must surely count? Metro at least had good reasoning behind the decision if you care to read the dev blogs.

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Lusty
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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

Lol if you think Puppet comes close to Windows management functionality you know even less than I thought about securing and managing enterprise Windows environments. Server 2003 had more advanced functionality and Windows has moved ahead significantly since then.

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Lusty
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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

10 minutes is a long time. Policy in AD allows machines to be secure as soon as they boot after install including setting appropriate firewall rules for the intended role. Other solutions are gradually copying this kind of stuff but the MS implementation is second to none for large networks. Sadly most people assume it's insecure rather than doing the necessary research.

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Lusty
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Re: Why Hyper-V is a non-starter in all situations

So you don't patch your VMware boxes then? My Hyper-v implementations have all been very stable, but then I understand the difference between the hypervisor and the management partition. I also understand how to secure Windows, which these days is a hell of a lot easier than securing any other OS on the market free or otherwise.

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Rackspace in Crawley: This is a local data centre for local people

Lusty
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If only there were some way to obfuscate your data so that when your cloud provider sends it to the authorities it's unreadable...oh yes, encryption. If a UK based company holds the encryption keys on their own premises then the U.S. authorities can't force them to hand them over because the UK company isn't subject to American laws. Yes, the data will be handed over, but it won't be readable so who cares?

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Excessively fat virtual worlds – come on, it's your guilty secret

Lusty
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Re: Don't forget

A few years out of date more often than not means a 4Ghz processor core which runs threads faster than all but two of the current Xeon range (when single core running under Turbo boost). This is why many apps run slower virtualised because most apps are single thread due to poor design.

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Lusty
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Cracking article, more of this type of stuff please Reg.

When a vendor asks for 16 cores and 32GB memory, ask them to provide permon logs from another similarly sized customer install. It's not the vendors responsibility to correctly size your solution, and it's not their job to ask the right questions but they should be able to justify what they are asking for as a minimum.

Another issue not addressed in the article is that of IT staff generally not knowing enough about computers to make these decisions. The difference between free and available memory in Windows is something almost everyone seems to struggle with even though it's a very simple concept.

Many also don't know the extra memory requirements for 10GbE networking either, despite it being stated clearly in hardware vendor documentation (HP Quickspecs certainly mention this more than once).

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VMware fires Photon torpedo – a homegrown Linux for microservices

Lusty
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Look at this lovely wheel we've invented...

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Questionable ads

Lusty
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"This, I assume, is not the kind of respectable advert you want on your site?"

They can't hear you, they are too busy counting money ;)

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comments moderation or censorship?

Lusty
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I thought it was well known that El Reg delete comments they don't like. It's in the Ts and Cs after all, along with their policy of publishing literally any story if it gets delivered in a wheelbarrow full of cash. There's no standards around here, only the moneys!

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