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* Posts by Lusty

756 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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Violin: Don't weep for Tier 1 storage... it'll soon be flashtastic

Lusty
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Two PCIe cards do not count as a highly available solution. My entire point was that the performance claims by these companies are entirely at the cost of other things which anyone who actually understands storage refuses to do without. Now clearly you've spent two years boning up on marketing nonsense from these vendors, but those of us in the real storage world with real workloads such as databases can only accept low latency if it comes with security. That still means dual controllers in a proper SAN whether you like to accept it or not.

You've mentioned RDMA several times. I'm amazed you're seeing so much uptake of this outside of marketing since literally none of our thousands of clients are currently using the technology. Loads of people have been using the term since MS used it in SMB3 material, but I have yet to see a single RoCE adapter in the wild and IB is beyond the means of even quite large companies unless they have specific needs such as with Violin arrays.

It's not a willy waving contest, and I'd appreciate if you could avoid trying to make this personal - you seem to have some kind of problem with me as evidenced by your past posts. If you genuinely believe in your arguments then please just make coherent points and let them speak for you.

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Lusty
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The fact that you don't agree doesn't make what I'm saying FUD, and what I'm saying is based on considerably more than a couple of years experience.

To make storage highly available you need to either have two controllers able to see the same blocks, or you need two separate copies of the blocks, one for each HA controller. Currently it's pretty much only SAN hardware which can do the former since SCSI died off, SAS switches are beginning to become available which will eventually allow multiple hosts to see the same disks for a reasonable cost. Until these become cheaper than SAN hardware then the alternative is the two copies approach which absolutely requires a round trip over the network which raises latency. This is a physics thing. If you genuinely believe your data is in a good place with only a single controller having access to up to date info then fair enough, our opinions differ perhaps based on the types of solution we work on. Again that doesn't make what I say FUD, it just means my customers value their data and its consistency more than yours do.

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Lusty
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Trevor, the interconnect problem is certainly not the same for server SAN compared to traditional SAN (counting P4000 as server SAN in this instance). In a traditional SAN you send the data to the storage and it's confirmed as written, in the case of Violin this is done via the PCIe interconnect ideally or IB, Fibre for the less well off. With server SAN, that same write has to go out and back to the second copy server, usually via Ethernet over an Ethernet network. In almost every real world case this results in higher latency for the server SAN. Anything the server SAN guys say to the contrary is from their "testing" which ignores data consistency issues completely in favour of better stats. EMC, NetApp, HP, HDS never ignore data consistency for their tier 1 systems even in testing, hence the apparent difference to the layman.

As for using volatile memory for storage, the same is true - yes it's quicker, but only in the same way as strapping solid fuel rockets to your car. Survival rates are considerably lower in exchange for a faster ride.

In addition to the above, CPU and memory usage for modern SAN operations are huge. I don't really have that sort of spec to spare on my virtualisation platform, and if I did, it would have cost as much as a real SAN to purchase the extra hardware and more importantly software licences. For each virtualisation host with Windows and VMware you're looking at more in licence costs than hardware costs - these are usually ignored by the software SAN guys.

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Doctor Who and the Dalek: 10-year-old tests BBC programming game

Lusty
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Re: hold on...

"So what does that leave?"

Ada is what that leaves. The perfect language for either teaching or torture depending on viewpoint. Those who understand programming will get on fine and those who don't will never try coding again thanks to the torture that is the Ada compiler. Problem solved, written code quality improves, wages go up and all the pretend programmers leave the profession forever. As a result we would probably drop 80% of the project managers too since there would be so few programmers required...

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Watersports-friendly e-reader: Kobo's Aura H2O is literary when wet

Lusty
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Re: No Amazon Lock-in is possibly the best feature.

Just checked the last 6 books I bought on Google play and they were 2-3 times the price I payed on the Kindle, although as you say slightly cheaper than Waterstones. Also Amazon doesn't require me to give Google my details. Win win.

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Lusty
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Re: No Amazon Lock-in is possibly the best feature.

Yeah, every time I buy a book I think to myself "I wish I could have bought this from one of those other more expensive shops". I used to think ePub was a good idea until I realised that Amazon are consistently much cheaper for books than the competition. True, they may decide to abuse that monopoly some day but right now they are winning for a reason.

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MasterCard adds fingerprint scanner to credit cards for spending sans the PIN

Lusty
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Re: The law suits...

Why cut off a finger? The card will have the fingerprint on it anyway from when it was put in the wallet. More to the point why wouldn't you put the sensor on the pay point?

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NetWare sales revive in China thanks to that man Snowden

Lusty
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Black Helicopters

ROFL

Thank goodness Attachmate isn't a 'merkin company otherwise they'd be subject to the same laws as MS...

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Iron out the kinks and all-flash servers just might have a future

Lusty
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Diskless

It's not diskless if it's stuffed full of disks! I assume you meant "spinning disks"

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Windows 10 feedback: 'Microsoft, please do a deal with Google to use its browser'

Lusty
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WTF?

Never mind Chrome vs Firefox, didn't we JUST finish moaning at MS to get spyware OFF of default builds on OEM systems? Why would anyone now ask for spy software to be included. Chrome isn't all that much better than IE, and at least IE isn't writing down your every move...

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Re-light my diode: Trio of boffins scoop physics Nobel for BLUE LEDs

Lusty
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Re: Curious

"Did Edison just go, hmm bit of wire, bit of electric, hey presto light? No he spent a long time trying out different methods."

Maybe not, but Edison wan't a physicyst either. As someone else said, another Nobel prize would have been appropriate for the outcome, but the physics of LEDs is well known already so this wouldn't appear to be much of a breakthrough in that field.

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ARMs head Moonshot bodies: HP pops Applied Micro, TI chips into carts

Lusty
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Re: Ubuntu - Seriously?

From what I was told on a course recently, replacing the OS may not be as easy as all that as these blades are pretty bespoke to the task. The idea being that if you need one to do X then they design one around X with hardware and software. If you have a software stack they can design and test you a blade in a couple of months ready for deployment so it's quite flexible despite the inflexibility.

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Netflix bullish after six-country European INVASION

Lusty
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Re: Scifi

Time to go Netflix then :) not sure they have Universe yet but I can only assume it's in their plans

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Lusty
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Scifi

seems pretty good on Netflix now, they have all of Star Trek, Stargate SG1 and Atlantis and several others I've forgotten. I never seem to get to the end of one series before they've added something else I want to watch. I'm still getting through Mythbusters after nearly a year of watching it almost every day.

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iPhone 6: The final straw for Android makers eaten alive by the data parasite?

Lusty
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Re: lets look at this in another way..

"My Android phone can do 100% of anything useful I've ever seen anyone do with an iPhone"

Try looking on fitness/running/cycling forums, there are quite a few happy Android users shouting the exact opposite of what you said there. Compatibility is the issue, with many and various bits of third party hardware. Primarily because until a few months ago Android didn't support Bluetooth LE at all, and so fitness hardware manufacturers have been slow to port any of their apps across.

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Lusty
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Re: lets look at this in another way..

@QXL I'll be interested to hear your comments after using the software on that phone which matches the specs of your iPhone. Hardware specs are very easy to replicate and improve upon but user experience is a whole other ballgame, and the reason Nokia used to be king of phones in the feature phone times. Many of us fell for the specs of competing models and regretted that we had to spend a whole year with a POS phone that had great hardware but couldn't use it. For instance, my Samsung D900 could take 1GB SD cards, yet their software only allowed me to play a maximum 20 MP3 files in total spread over a maximum 4 playlists.

That's not the only example of my poor purchasing decisions with phones so these days I'm much more careful about jumping ship. Luckily work have given me Android and Windows phones so I haven't needed to use my money to realise what I prefer for a while.

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Lusty
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Re: Really can't get this

"costs 50 to make"

You're confusing manufacturing cost with the cost of producing a device. The R&D budget required to produce a top end phone is enormous, and those costs must be recovered alongside the component costs. For example, the iPhone has two custom designed processors and custom memory chips (to reduce size) with a unique flash and custom designed camera. The people designing these things didn't do it for fun, they did it because they get paid to, and because Apple, Samsung etc. pay for the very expensive machines they need to design, prototype and produce them. In addition to those, someone needs to design the exterior of the device, the packaging, write documentation, support end users and many other costs. Every single phone design also needs to go through costly approval processes in every region it will be sold, otherwise it wouldn't be legal to sell them.

but yeah, they only cost like 50 bucks to make so why do they cost so much...

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Stray positrons caught on ISS hint at DARK MATTER source

Lusty
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Re: Pedant alert

Cartographers say datum all the time...

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Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets

Lusty
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Re: Apple pay...

"But what Apple will do except skim the cream????"

Apple wrote the software stack, spent years researching how people want to use their phone to pay, designed the hardware and brought to market a working solution where many, many others have failed. They will also do the ongoing support of the system and possibly reduce the number of cards the credit card companies need to issue, thereby saving them some money.

The banks on the other hand simply change two lines in a database...

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Lusty
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Re: Apple NFC

" the iPhone's Bluetooth stack is so limited as to be useless"

Compared to Android which only started supporting BTLE 4 in version 4.3 this year and even then only on a limited number of handsets?

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Lusty
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Re: Apple NFC

"Useful things like tap to pair Bluetooth speakers"

No need, Bluetooth 4.1 includes tap to pair and doesn't require NFC to do so. Apple have the hardware in iPhone 4S and above to achieve this and will probably update iOS to allow it as soon as the standard is complete later in the year.

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NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine

Lusty
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Re: NoSQL I thought was Not Only SQL

"Normally, no. Hence the name...."

You mean the name which is short for "not only SQL"?

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Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT

Lusty
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Re: Few questions

Really, I didn't realise the Nexus 4 now had a separate low power processor which monitors movement even when there are no apps running. Does it have optical image stabilisation in the camera too alongside the white balance flash? And an integrated payment system which uses fingerprints to confirm identity while storing no card details in the phone and allowing configuration of new cards by simply taking a photo?

Maybe I will look at Android alternatives when my contract is up after all...

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Apple's ONE LESS THING: the iPod Classic disappears

Lusty
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Perhaps

perhaps they looked at their list of every customers iTunes library of legally purchased music and found zero people had paid for more than about 30GB of music. I'm sure by now they are able to extrapolate what a heavy user will require based on spending habits of their top customers. Given the classic doesn't really do video there can't be many who even filled one with music let alone legally.

Obviously there will be some nerd along to explain how much better lossless MP3s sound through their iPod headphones, and that they only get 37 tracks on their iPod before it's full...

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Fedora gets new partition manager

Lusty
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Derfag

My new fav word, thank you.,

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It's official: Vendors are NOT shifting that networked storage

Lusty
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Curious

Do we count NetApp being at the bottom of overall storage market share as actually a good thing given their preference for dedupe and compression?

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Square Kilometre Array reveals its 1.6TB-a-day storage and network rigs

Lusty
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Re: Not quite...

Plus with tapes you don't have 1000 electricity sucking disks spinning all year, or the intern whose job is permanently seeking out duff drives, or the engineering team trying to scale a RAID solution instead of just adding another shelf of tape to the robot library.

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Lusty
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Tape

There we go then..tape isn't dead, official. For those who really really need it...

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Zuck: Yo, Mexico! My $19bn WhatsApp could connect THREE BEEELLION people

Lusty
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Re: Stopped..

Wow you're so cool. Not only have you stopped using Facebook but you're also telling EVERYONE you don't use it. Just think how cool you'd be if you stopped using other mass communication services like phones, email and the Internet too! You could go back to writing cheques and using postal services too to make sure you're properly retro.

You'll have to trust me when I say that Facebook and Whatsapp are much better when people accept your friend requests.

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Don't bother with Apple's 9 Sept hype-day: Someone's GONE AND BLABBED IT ALL

Lusty
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No but it's the same as any other phone based HRM. If you want proper monitoring you'd need an ECG band, the BTLE versions of which work fine with the iPhone and newer Android phones. Alternatively you could use an optical sensor, but since we were discussing sensors in the phone my point stands - there is zero advantage to a dedicated sensor over the camera. I have compared to my ECG and it's just as accurate.

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Lusty
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"If they add a heartrate monitor I'll be disappointed. I can measure my pulse with a finger and a clock if I really wanted to."

You can measure your heart rate with the camera on existing iPhones too with the Withings app. No need for special hardware...

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HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers

Lusty
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Re: Phone?!

The messages don't go out of the LAN interface, they go out of the non fire walled management interface, iLO or Drac for instance.

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Loss of unencrypted back-up disk costs UK prisons ministry £180K

Lusty
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Re: Pointless fine

You can fire them if you like but they'd only get another job straight away because they'd have experience in government and there is no way to confirm they were fired these days.

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VMware's MARVIN emerges as 'EVO' for branch offices and web-scale rigs

Lusty
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"Who needs a Nimble or Lefthand or converged Nutanix when you can get something like marvin?"

Oh I don't know, perhaps the people who use more features than the ability to share disk? Perhaps those who use SAN for backup purposes too.

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Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable

Lusty
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Re: No googling?

"From what I know of MCSE (not much admittedly), it's all still a multichoice memory test "

Not so much any more, there are quite a few simulations these days which require you to navigate the interface. There are also design questions which easily catch out those who don't know their stuff. Although you'll find a lot of techies knocking the MCSE, you won't find that many of them actually hold one...

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Lusty
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Re: No googling?

Thankfully, that's why we have exams to separate the people who don't know anything but can google and try things until it works from those who actually know what they are doing. The vast majority of Linux how to's on the Internet are incorrect from a good system admin perspective. For instance almost every article about joining a Windows domain tells you to put the IP address of one or more domain controllers in the config rather than using DNS to look up the domain (and that's just the first massive mistake in these guides). Other guides I have seen have all had similar bad practice in them because at the end of the day, most people looking for the info are after a get it working guide rather than a do it properly guide. Doing it properly requires a much deeper level of understanding than Google will ever provide.

Of course, this all means that interview is the only way to see if someone knows their stuff, and exams are still irrelevant. The RHCE, like the MCSE, at least counts towards partnership requirements, and therefore is actually valuable (in money terms) to many employers...

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Apple takes blade to 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display

Lusty
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Re: I bought the last of the non retina range.

"and will have a nice fast SSD when the HDD dies."

Oh really? how will you match the PCIe bus speed with that crappy old SATA 3Gbps interface? I've tested mine at 4GB/s on the new Pro which was sustained for 5 minutes while the SATA interface isn't even capable of 400MB/s in ideal conditions. But hey, at least you can swap it out eh? Oh wait, so can I on the PCIe flash module in the Pro Retina...

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UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco

Lusty
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Re: Are there ANY success stories?

The problem is not really the government, its the requirement of the people that government is fair. The Gov has to ask for a project and three vendors have to bid, minimum. These bids are essentially random guesses since the spec is not written at that stage, yet the entire budget must be specified in detail along with hardware requirements despite knowing nothing of how the system will work. The reason they can't ask three companies to do the design is that that would allow the other two to undercut on the implementation and blame failure on the winning design. Because there is no design, the wording goes to the lawyers and everything gets very specific. Profit comes from changes to the spec, which was written before the design.

I've racked my brain and can't think of a better way which would be allowed to happen without MPs being accused of back hand deals with their IT supplier mates. We can either have open government spending on "failed projects" OR successful overpriced contracts to mates. The two are mutually exclusive because the design must be done by those who implement and the design should be done before the budget is set and hardware agreed.

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Microsoft and HTC are M8s again: New One mobe sports WinPhone

Lusty
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One Mate

Surely if HTC had any sense they'd have named the WinMo version One M8 and just called the Android one the One?

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NetApp: Revenues are down – but own brand kit wasn't to blame

Lusty
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Better?

"is not being evangelised as a radically better piece of kit, with the all-flash EF-Series products being shown in the slide above as a faster performer."

If your only concern is raw performance then you're looking at it wrong as far as FlashRay is concerned. The FlashRay is a vastly better piece of kit (or will be when the code is completed) because not only does it offer flash performance nearly as good as the EF series, it also will do everything the FAS can do - the business value and efficiency stuff for which NetApp is famous and generally trounces the competition. The EF series is quite dumb by comparison, so although it performs very well it's a bit of a one trick pony.

It's quite possible today to go out and buy a very fast SAN, but many of my customers are waiting for one which also manages the backups, DR and automation of private cloud functionality, and most importantly fits in with the company strategy which for many of my customers is currently NetApp FAS for these same reasons.

Since I don't work for NetApp the above is based purely on hearsay and speculation, but I believe it's the aim of the platform

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BAD VIBES: High-speed video camera records your voice from trash

Lusty
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"The pretty blue and green blinking lights on your routers, switches and computer monitors emitting electromagnetic frequencies tell us some interesting things too."

No need for LEDs, the monitor cable gives off sufficient EM to read the screen remotely if you're clever about it. El Reg reported this years ago.

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Lusty
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Re: Er....

The real question is, now that this is public what did the spy agencies just invent that's so much better?

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Ancient pager tech SMS: It works, it's fab, but wow, get a load of that incoming SPAM

Lusty
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Re: Hmmm

Indeed, any spam filtering would be much easier at the sending end - anyone sending a message with 10000 recipients ought to have some kind of permission to do so since it's unlikely to be an invite to the pub to some mates. Why the receiving end would need to look is beyond me - same as with the postal service, Royal mail offer filtering at a cost to individual households while also charging the person sending the bulk mail for delivering it. I for one don't want to see this same situation on mobile networks where everything is much more traceable.

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DAYS from end of life as we know it: Boffins tell of solar storm near-miss

Lusty
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Re: Just goes to show...

"No, success in death is having a large personal debt that is wiped upon you shuffling off your mortal coil."

Yup, ultimately the only way to make a profit is to die in debt, any kind of assets or savings would technically be a loss...

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US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account

Lusty
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Re: sigh

"doesn't Google Mail T&C stipulate that you shouldn't use it for business purpose?"

Not their corporate mail offering, no. It would be subject to the same court order, as would an internal Exchange system.

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Apple 5S still best-selling smartphone 8 months after launch

Lusty
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Perhaps

Maybe it's because the iPhone adverts concentrate on how the device can improve your life, while Samsung adverts concentrate on slagging off the competition. Apple show me how to use my phone to do stuff like making music, educating kids, getting fit etc. while Samsung tell me the stuff Apple devices can't do which I haven't noticed by myself while out using them for all that stuff. Yes, call me a wall hugger if you like, but I still have no idea why a Galaxy is more use than an iPhone.

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10Gbps over crumbling COPPER: Boffins cram bits down telco wire

Lusty
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Re: Wire up my home?

Surely your home already is wired up - that's the point of this.

What I want to know, is why nobody is ditching the requirement for legacy telephones to share the wires, surely that will give massive gains in bandwidth as the frequencies available increase. I don't know many people who feel a desperate need for a house phone these days but most people would love streaming 4k video!

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Conformist Google: Android devices must LOOK, WORK ALIKE

Lusty
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Re: Google, your megalomania is showing

"What Google is doing is denying any design or creative input from any source other than themselves"

What Google is actually doing is trying desperately to prevent Android being stricken down by the same crap that made those same manufacturers fail without it. Phone manufacturers and networks have a long history if ignoring user needs and randomly changing things to get some imagined competitive edge while actually making the experience worse for the end user. What Google are saying is that the platform will succeed because people are familiar, just like with Windows, and that the hardware people just need to make nice hardware which is what they are good at.

This is one of the things I quite like about Apple - they may not advance very quickly but they are oblivious to the competition and so user experience is pretty stable as a general rule. Even when they completely changed their interface recently all they did was skin it. I realise many people think the opposite, and I guess change and chaos is what Android is there for so maybe Google are wrong after all.

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Psst. We've got 400Gb/s Ethernet working - but don't tell anyone

Lusty
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Re: Reg's standard for this?

"I suspect industry may skip 400Gbps as they pretty much did 40Gbps"

I think you'll find 40Gbps is incredibly popular among those who need it. The reason you may not have seen much of it is that very few people do need it. 10GbE is sufficient for the vast majority of infrastructures with 40GbE and 100GbE only really necessary when connecting up lots of large switches, for instance in data centre use or at very large companies. It's occasionally useful on very fast flash based SAN too, although this is also pretty rare.

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Canon offers a cloud just for still photos, not anything else. Weird

Lusty
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Re: Marketing bollocks

"Yeah, quite - what's it doing new that Flickr doesn't?"

Anyone who has ever read the T's and C's on Flickr could probably answer that. All Canon need do is not require your firstborn child in exchange for picture storage and they are winning. I'm not usually the kind of person to even read conditions of use, but somehow I've decided against Flickr several times due to their legal jibber jabber.

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