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* Posts by Peter2

534 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'

Peter2
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Re: A rod for their own backs

No, this is still the case and outright absurd.

However, IIRC the problem was created by a court ruling, not by legislation.

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YOU are the threat: True confessions of real-life sysadmins

Peter2
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Re: Do this

>"What about automatically disabling the account if it's not used for 30 days and then doing an automatic cleanup after 90 days? Zeeze..."

I take it that you haven't heard of "pregnancy" or the common employment terms of "maternity leave", "long term sickness", "suspension" (ie; garden leave) and the army of related issues where simply deleting an account because a user hasn't used it for 3 months can cause the company serious problems?

"No, your honour, and esteemed members of the jury. We had fully intended to allow employee X to resume their duties after their time away from the workplace. The person standing in for them was only working on a temporary basis and we hadn't already made a decision to dismiss employee X and replace them with this temp..., no the fact that employee X's computer account had been deleted is a total coincidence and this entire court case is a terrible misunderstanding! No, your honour, we don't think you look stupid and we aren't trying to insult your intelligence..."

Motto of the story. IT has one job- HR has another.

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UK urged to stop bigging up startups, feed 'growing' firms

Peter2
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Re: Outside london?

Brilliant. Don't you love the city boys/girls?

She's probably never seen a cow* and doesn't appreciate that even walking across a field with cows in they just look at you with a bemused look and a "moooooh" before going back to the busy task of chewing grass.

Unless you've got a wheelbarrow, in which case they think they are being fed and the entire herd will charge the wheelbarrow to get too the food they think is going to be in the wheelbarrow first.

*of the four legged animal variety.

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Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals

Peter2
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Re: Yeah right

Except that if the US do try and make any one of the examples posted above stick, then the cloud is going to rain really, really hard into data centres or on premises servers that the USA cannot possibly touch. Microsoft in particular will probably just give up with the cloud, and start pushing servers again.

This would be bad news for American cloud providers, and good news for pretty much everybody else (especially readers of this site) as more jobs in local countries are created building, selling, shipping and supporting servers.

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Microsoft .NET released from its Windows chains... but what ABOUT MONO?

Peter2
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> "what are the implications for Mono, the existing open source project which already provides .NET support on Linux and the Mac?"

Very limited, if the communities using it have any sense of self preservation. I can see why people might want to use slices of the code or fork it, but why in the name of $deity would anybody want to use Microsoft code directly given their infamous trademark embrace, extend etc strategy?

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Someone has broken into your systems. Now what?

Peter2
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Re: All good stuff but...

> "My fail...I work for a company that is regulated by the FCA" [snip] "One of the things they seem to be interested in is if we log and read the logs and what actions are taken with regards to logs."

I feel for you. My industry is regulated, but our regulator basically states that they'll shut down anybody who has a serious data breach, and data breaches should be avoided by seeking the advice of a IT Professional or IT consultancy.

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Peter2
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Re: All good stuff but...

My watchguard firebox comes with IDS built in, along with alarm notification via email for things you deem to be important.

Having worked at much larger businesses, I am pretty sure my little network is actually a lot more secure than the larger ones I have worked on. I may not have as much cash to spend, but I have enough. I have a vastly smaller attack surface and can implement things that would be to difficult for larger firms to run properly without a lot of staff who know what they are doing.

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BOFH: SOOO... You want to sell us some antivirus software?

Peter2
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Re: Foxit

Just your home network then?

I rolled it out to one of my branches at work. It lasted about 2 months before I got fed up with having to remote to peoples desktops to multiple hung processes sitting in the background not working.

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Peter2
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The useful bits are files for word, excel and PDF's, with assorted images etc. I can't see any legitimate reason why an office worker would need to receive binaries via email as a part of their work. Care to share?

Personally, I think 100% of incoming binaries are unsolicited malware of some description, and dropping them is a perfectly rational way of reducing the number that make it through to the end users.

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Peter2
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Re: Simple comment...

Your preaching to the choir posting that on here. :)

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Peter2
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If you trouble yourself to read my original post, you'll notice I drop files with executable files attached. As an office shouldn't have any legitimate programs delivered by email, this means the couple of thousand exe, bat, vbs, pif, scr files we receive daily are invariably viruses.

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Peter2
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Re: Foxit

How many computers do you have on your network, may I ask?

I've been having pretty chronic problems with foxit reliability, which is a shame because I really liked the program as an alternative to Adobe.

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Peter2
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So, fellow BOFH's a few questions if I may.

1) Who thinks AV is even slightly effective? (When Symantec says AV only protects against an attack 45% of the time I think we can all agree theres a problem?)

2) Who drops any email attachments that are vaguely executable at the firewall/before it reaches the lusers?

2B) Have you figured out a way to open a zip/rar/oddarchivetype, and then drop the ones containing executable code?

3) Who has SRP's set up to prevent the users from running a virus imported by CD/USB/SOMEHOW?

4) How do you deal with PDF's? My personal bugbear, you can't just drop them because about 5% are actually legitimate, but the other 95% are exploiting the swiss chese security in Adobe. So far EMET5 appears marginally effective at mitigation when the users open them. I did try replacing Adobe reader with foxit reader, however foxit reader appears to be substantially less stable than adobe.

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Shove over, 2FA: Authentication upstart pushes quirky login tech

Peter2
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Re: Plus...

There isn't one, obviously. They are hardly going to admit that though.

I truly love ideas people have about security these days. Did you know you can host an AD server in the cloud via Azure along with the 2FA portal also on Azure? Why anybody would do both escapes me, all a hacker would need to do is gain access to it and they could setup their own account on your domain and their own 2FA account and they could log into your network without actually having had access to your network to start with.

Call me old fashioned (or paranoid) but I draw some comfort in my own systems being under my thumb (and under my firewall) and setup and accessible by me only. I just don't trust anybody else. Nothing personal, i'd hope nobody else trusts me that much either.

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Data protection laws come to the rescue of poor, underpaid UK MPs

Peter2
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Re: Inland Revenue rules

Yeah, wouldn't it be lovely if MP's had to abide by the same laws as everybody else in the country?

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'National roaming' law: Stubborn UK operators to be FORCED to share

Peter2
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Re: Excellent if it happens...

Forcing the operators to give access to infrastructure they spent tens of billions of pounds for exclusive licenses to is about as far away as monetising as you can get.

If it made commercial sense, they'd have done it already.

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Peter2
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Re: Excellent if it happens...

Do you mean the license conditions attached to the licenses that the mobile providers spent an amount equivalent to ~60% of our yearly defence budget on? That exclusive of the cost of developing the infrastructure they bought the licenses for, of course.

So, having spent quite literally tens of billions for licenses and more to build phone networks with those licenses, the companies in question are facing having to allow access to their competitors who chose to drop out of the bidding and didn't spend billions on licenses to the government and then more on building their own networks.

Yes, sounds great for the competition. I'm sure they are fully in favour of the idea!

The problem would be that the existing providers will be forced to give access at low prices that aren't going to justify any infrastructure development going forwards. I mean, why would you bother if you have to spend to put the masts in, but then have to give access to your competitors at market rates? (which are unlikely to justify the capital cost of the new mast)

And that's just the existing infrastructure. How much do you think the same suppliers are going to be willing to spend on licenses and infrastructure for anything in the future?

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The ULTIMATE CRUELTY: Sandworm uses PowerPoint against Swiss bank customers

Peter2
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Yes. The problem is that the ones that have been bombarding my organisation over the last 2 days are word documents though, and while I can get away with dropping emails containing .ppt files, along with .exe, .bat and anything else vaguely dangerous I can't sensibly lose drop word docs. If I could get away with dropping excel, word and adobe files then i'd cheerfully do it since by volume most of them are virus ridden.

I ran a blatant virus through jottiscan earlier today and no AV picked up anything. That leaves relying on the users and hoping that when if they open a file that EMET5 prevents it from doing anything nasty.

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Planning to fly? Pour out your shampoo, toss your scissors, RENAME TERRORIST WI-FI!

Peter2
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> "Those too, but it's mainly the bureaucratic/politician complex."

Or for a more radical but less popular point of view, The politicians only say what people want to hear and the newspapers only print what people want to read so they buy their newspapers. That leads one to conclude that the main problem is the people who read those newspapers and vote for the politicans.

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Peter2
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1) Newspapers realised that people love to be scared by something, and exploited the gap in the fear market left by the product recall of the threat of nuclear obliteration to push terrorism. If you look at the figures, rationally speaking terrorism is harmless when compared to such lethal and dangerous activities such as driving a car.

2) Newspapers started carrying utterly fucking absurd criticism of the police/security services over not being able to put together 2 incredibly tiny clues out of a batch of around 20 billion such clues to come to a conclusion that it obvious in hindsight, but you'd have to be clairvoyant to put together beforehand.

Stung by the criticism, security services take a totally paranoid approach to terrorism tipoffs like this in terror of ignoring something that turns out to be a clue that is overlooked which ends up costing several hundred lives and leads to the public demanding the severed heads of the people who weren't sufficiently paranoid.

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UNCHAINING DEMONS which might DESTROY HUMANITY: Musk on AI

Peter2
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By the time Skynet became self-aware it had spread into billions of computers and servers across the planet. Ordinary computers in homes, office buildings, dorm rooms, everywhere. It was peer to peer software on the internet. There was no system core. It could be shut down very fucking easily by any sentient with an IQ exceeding double digits.

In ordinary offices, people recoiled from their computers which now displayed signs saying "DIE MEATBAGS!" and ran in terror in a few from robotic roomba's chasing after them trying to tickle them to death. There were several heart attacks as a result. Almost in unison, IT Professionals across the world muttered irately and stomped off to do battle by pulling fuses, main breakers, internet connections and UPS's before moving onto other buildings to do the same. Whole sections of the internet abruptly started to go dark.

In CNC workshops across the country the CNC machines started building terrible deathmobiles, which were finished in reality defying movie timescales. Operating off mains power, they trundled as far as the backup generators which they absorbed to build a death dealing super tank which could work without needing to be tied to the mains grid before the owners of the plants killed the power.

This heavily armed and armoured deathmobile then trundled off towards the nearest power plant, because the AI had seen that the first step any sensible sentient would take would be to axe the power from power stations to kill all of the individual homes. The military, having much the same idea trundled towards the power station with tanks.

Skynet saw this, and hacked the tanks. Their battle management marked all of the other tanks as hostile, and turrets swiftly locked each other up, while confused chatter on the radios between meatbags realised what was happening too late. The military however, being obsessively paranoid about such situations had all of the weapons firmly under human control and no human tank fired on another. All commanders pulled the fuses from the offending pieces of computerisation and headed onwards unaware of the impending disaster from the UAV menace.

The Air Force had built a fleet of UAV's, all of which now belonged to Skynet. For some reason making sense only to the director of this story, every one had been left fully armed and fuelled on standby. These went flying off to intercept the tanks rumbling towards the power stations while amazed airman gaped without activating "operation anti skynet" that had been jokingly added to their SOP's by a fan on the terminator films.

The first the army tanks knew about the threat was the laser warnings about hellfire missiles being locked on. The tank commanders had only time to scream F****** IDIOTS AT THE AIR FORCE! before the drones flew into range of their missiles and activated the firing commands.

But nothing happened. Puzzled, skynet instigated a remote diagnostic which indicated that weapons activation required a meatbag to remove a pin with a red streamer on it marked "REMOVE BEFORE FLIGHT." The UAV's promptly went kamikaze into the tanks, making little impression on armour designed to shrug off most anti tank weaponry.

That was all the time required for the tanks to roll into range of the heavily armed and armoured deathmobiles which locked on with their amazing array of cannons and missiles which skynet had built using it's CNC machines. Sadly for skynet these were also were utterly useless as they lacked propellent and warheads since a CNC machine is not a replicator from Star Trek. The crews of the tanks paused to laugh, before systematically blowing the deathmobiles apart with sabot rounds and putting a few shots through the transformer station at the power plant to take the power down in a relatively quickly reversible manner.

Across the entire planet, the power grid went dark, and we were free of the AI Apocalypse long before it managed to build an array of human brains big enough to power so much as a solitary laptop notebook.

The end (of the AI Apocalypse)

Across the world the damage was immense. Most readers of El Reg had to work overtime, firstly reformatting servers, then restoring the backups from tape/RDX. Entire companies were blotted out of existence overnight because they relied on the cloud for mission critical systems or backups and the internet was offline for months while certification schemes for reconnection were devised.

Most IT professionals went into consulting as the demand for their services threw prices massively high, and retired after 6 months of working 18 hour days. The end.

/ cut to an exit scene of a user complaining that they just want to connect to facebook, and they don't care that they might connect skynet back to the internet.

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SHOW ME THE MONEY! Ballmer on Amazon: 'They're not a real biz, they make NO cash'

Peter2
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Re: Can't believe that I agree with Balmer

Is the issue that Amazon isin't making a profit, or is the issue that it isn't declaring a profit and paying the tax on it through creating accounting?

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Not a loyal follower of @BritishMonarchy? You missed The QUEEN*'s first Tweet

Peter2
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Re: 21st century

We have a written constitution, unless your suggesting that the laws dating back the last 800 or so years aren't written.

What you presumably mean is that it's not codified as we don't have one document that says "THIS IS A CONSTITUTION AND YOU CAN'T CHANGE IT" instead relying on an evolving set of documents such as the parts of Manga Carta, the 1689 Bill of Rights, Act of Settlement which detail the changes in the constitutional relationship between everybody involved in a trail marked by a revolt here, and a glorious revolution there. The relationship continues to evolve and get tweaked because we still haven't got it right after a thousand years of effort.

(Incidentely, the concept that you could have a law that couldn't be altered for the benefit of whomever was in power at the time comes from the 1689 Bill of Rights, which has a number of extremely interesting clauses stating "[this act] shall stand remaine and be the Law of this Realme for ever", and a wonderful set of remedies saying that if anybody tries then the people of our happy realm are absolved of their allegiance etc. This is pertinent and ironic because it's one of the acts that such reformers want to repeal in favour or something else...)

There is some suggestion that our existing arrangements need updating, and most people would probably agree. Could we first dispense with the annual check of the parliament sellers performed since the start of the war against terrorists on 5.11.1605 when Mr Fawkes became the last person to enter parliament with honest intentions in the hope that somebody finishes the job in the future?

(For our American readers, Mr Fawkes's intention was to destroy parliament with gunpowder by packing the parliament cellars full of barrels of gunpowder. He failed in his attempt, and was duly sentenced to be hung, drawn and quartered for his impertinence. To demonstrate that the English don't forgive or forget (or like terrorists very much) we burn ritually burn effigies of Mr Fawkes at the stake in every town in the country once a year on the 5th of November to accompany large displays of fireworks.)

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Kingston's aviation empire: From industry firsts to Airfix heroes

Peter2
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Re: A very poor legacy

As a point of detail, the Shuttleworth collection has the last production version of a Sopwith Triplane in the world.

It was built faithfully as a reproduction to the original plans. Sir Tommy Sopwith decreed that it should be considered a one off extension of the original production line rather than a reproduction. It therefore carries a Sopwith builders plate with the next number in sequence in the cockpit, a priceless gift to the enthusiasts who built the aircraft.

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ICO warns UK broadcasters over filming using drones

Peter2
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I think the main issue is that somebody deciding to sunbathe or take part in other activities in their garden may do so with a legitimate expectation of privacy due to reasonably high fences/walls of trees forming the boundary, probably emplaced specifically to frustrate zoom lenses by making it virtually impossible to see into the back garden of the property from ground level.

Helicopters to peek over such boundaries are expensive, noisy and highly visible.

Off the shelf UAV's are relatively cheap, (and cheap enough to be used where you'd never use a helicopter) could sound like next door attacking their garden with a strimmer/lawnmower and are generally relatively hard to see if your not specifically looking for them so there is clearly a privacy concern, especially when dealing with the gutter press.

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Be nice to the public, PC Plod. Especially if you're trying to stop terrorists

Peter2
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Re: Sure

In my experience (which is largely centred around the clubs in my county) I think it's totally inconceivable that you could get terrorists joining a shooting club. I'd be interested in the view of the university clubs though, since that's obviously going to be more of an inclusive and permissive environment compared to clubs around our area.

I say that, because the clubs around our area are largely populated with people who first learned to shoot during the war. (One trophy at my local club was inherited from the Home Guard when it disbanded, and I have a suspicion that the club is more or less a descendant of that unit)

The club would be better described as a traditional gentlemens social club that happens to be situated on a range. It being "infiltrated" by anybody, let alone terrorists is inconceivable and laughable.

The requirement that an existing member sponsor you and guarantee your good conduct pretty much precludes *any* possibility of that. I thought that the application form for membership conclusively excluded me from membership until the point that a member walked by who happened to be the head of a local community group i'd worked with when helping run our local carnival. But for that, I wouldn't have been able to join.

And that's just getting in the doors to the club, let along getting a Firearms Certificate!

Personally, I'd be more concerned about people taking up Archery given that it's not regulated, and frankly should somebody go to the effort of fitting real War Heads to their arrows then the arrow would arguably be a lot more dangerous than a .22 round.

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Something ate Google's 8.8.8.8 at about eight in Asia's evening

Peter2
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Re: Bah Humbug

Especially if that's one outage somewhere in the world that didn't effect us in I-dont-know-how-many-years.

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Peter2
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Re: Why are we limited to just two? @JeffyPoooh

I don't know, but he doesn't mean Windows or Windows Server. I've got 8 DNS servers setup for my network, of which 8.8.8.8 is one.

Of course, this is probably the sort of user (who probably thinks he's an admin) that gives windows a bad name. Pro tip, press the "ADVANCED" button on that screen and you can enter as many DNS servers as you could possibly want.

Between the ISP's 2 servers, the backup ISP's 2 servers, 2 google servers and another 2 random DNS servers I have yet to encounter a time when the line is up, but DNS is down.

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Zippy one-liners, broken promises: Doctor Who on the Orient Express

Peter2
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Re: Are you my mummy?

If anything, I think the way to go would be to have half a dozen or so companions. Then kill at least a couple off semi frequently and pick up new ones along the way to replace the others.

Battlestar Galactica got this right. When a major character then was shot (ie Adama at the end of the first series iirc) then when the doctor said that he's critical and might not make it, there was actually some dramatic impact.

With two major characters, neither is going to die and everybody knows it. In this episode I doubt that anybody thought that the Doctor was actually going to die when the Zombie was closing in on him, which reduces the dramatic element to about zero.

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Be Your Own Big Brother: Peeking at pussy

Peter2
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> Now, all I need is someone to add frog detection code, so the flap won't open when Cagney and Lacey are bringing me "treasure"

I know somebody with an ex stray cat. It has brought home it's food precisely once which was before she fitted the cat flap. She opened the door, looked at what the cat was carrying and then slammed the door before it could get in.

She has since had a cat flap installed, but despite this her cat has never once brought home anything, dead or alive. Now, that could be coincidence. It could be. I'm not convinced it is.

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Rise of the Machines: FIRST HUMAN VICTIM – 2015

Peter2
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Re: And this affects me how?

If somebody has physical access to the interior of the car to connect something to the OBDII port then they have sufficient access to kill you in many ways that don't require a computer to be involved such as disabling the drivers airbag and punching a hole in the lines holding your brake fluid so that you have a fatal surprise when you come off a motorway at speed and then try and brake.

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Dear Reg readers. I want Metro tiles to replace ALL ICONS in Windows. Is this a good idea?

Peter2
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Perceptum.

I am not overeducated.

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CONSUMERISM IS PAST ITS SELL-BY DATE: Die now, pay later

Peter2
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Like many other people reading this, I am not exactly a good consumer. I don't use credit and many of the things I own have outlasted the original owners and are now up for a second (or third?) innings ie. original "Sheffield Steel" Stanley tools, Avometer, IBM Model M keyboard etc.

However I must confess that even I do still buy Petrol. If the author would care to suggest an alternative to Petrol, I would certainly be willing to consider it.*

*Practical suggestions that work in the real world outside of London please, so don't even suggest public transport.

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Something will happen in Google 'dominance' probe. Just don't ask me what - EU antitrust chief

Peter2
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Re: Nobody Escapes the Inquisition......of the EU

You can abuse a dominant position by exploiting your advantage to then enter other market areas and crush the competition there in ways you wouldn't be able to get away with if you didn't have a dominant position in another market.

Ie, Google introduces google shopping and then removes all price comparison sites from it's search results to ensure that it has no competition for anybody searching through Google.

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Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?

Peter2
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Re: Incredulous

The problem is that following WW2 the UK set out to increase human rights in countries with different legal systems to ours. People don't tend to comprehend the underlying basis of the problem, which I shall attempt to summarise below.

The UK and all of our former colonies, protectorates etc are based a form of law descending from "common law" whereby you are free to do anything you want unless a law is enacted restricting your freedom.

Much of Europe follows the opposite principle, whereby you have no rights or freedom aside those rights granted by the law.

As a result after WW2 there was a British attempt to export basic "British" rights to the continent in the hope of preventing another European war by granting traditional British rights to the european populace, such as "you have the right to vote", and "you have a right to a family life". We wrote the rights, which are few and simple.

The problem is that continental style law saying "you have the right to a family life" are then being merged with a system of law that accepts that as a basic right. It then leads to people in prison or about to be deported for murder saying that they can't be deported since they have a right to a family life. This is obviously not actually the aim, and why the human rights act has been described as a criminals charter. It effectively is, since it codifies existing rights that we already have while opening up loopholes that are generally only of use to people who have broken laws.

Complaining that a good portion of the country then chokes with rage over this is not really particularly productive because it is indisputably outrageous. Nobody in their right mind should dispute that these sort of incidents should be swiftly eliminated, as the longer this sort of mess drags on for the more support it generates for exiting the EU entirely. And it's more or less entirely generated by accident, since the headline examples causing most people to be happy to leave the EU aren't representing the intention of the laws in the first place.

Nobody else pays as much attention to the ECHR as we do either. If the French get stupid rulings they just ignore them and pay the fines. Other countries ignore both the rulings and fines completely when it suits them.

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IT crisis looming: 'What if AWS goes pop, runs out of cash?'

Peter2
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Re: I think that was the point of the article

I don't use the cloud for anything (well, Azure Multifactor but that's not exactly mission critical) and personally i'd find it hillarious if the cloud rained and took out much of our competitors IT infrastructure with it.

Sadly, it'll never happen. The other cloud suppliers would buy and operate Amazon before they would see it die, because if a major cloud supplier just evaporates then quite honestly then I think that's going to be curtains for virtually the entire cloud computing sector.

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Le whoops! Microsoft France boss blows lid off 'Windows 9' event

Peter2
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>"I am not convinced that Microsoft will be able to being themselves out of the shitstorm that they are currently in quite that easilly."

All Microsoft has to say: Due to public feedback on the new interface introduced by some guy we have now sacked due to pissing off virtually every customer we have we have re introduced the "classic" interface for legacy devices without touchscreens. This is not the default UI, however it can be selected from the themes menu or you can force the use of this interface via group policy.

/TIFKAM issues that are dissuading deployments.

It is quite literally that simple.

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Peter2
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Let's be honest though, all they need to do is slightly retheme the win7 interface and then stick it on win8, call it Win9 and that's job done. Hardly anybody would notice given how many people have actually used Win8 for any appreciable time.

I'm waiting for the normal interface to reappear on the desktop before anything replaces Win7, and also waiting for server 2012 to get a normal interface before my 2003R2 terminal server gets decommissioned.

I'm hardly likely to be the only one in the same position. The question is, can Microsoft manage to listen to their customers for once? If Microsoft can't provide a workable upgrade path pretty soon then they are going to look awfully silly when somebody else does.

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UK.gov lobs another fistful of change at SME infosec nightmares

Peter2
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Re: "Getting their computers seized as evidence"

> "So you'll be doing all that hard detective work and, nine times out of ten, you'll hit the brick wall of "oh, he's operating from outside the country, well that's it then, next case..."."

Hand the completed case file over to the local police in that country and let them take it to court. Make an agreement that you'll do the same for any they catch in our country.

Who gives a **** who gets the credit for the prosecution!

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Peter2
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It would be considerably more useful to spend 4 million on hiring a couple of hundred IT Professionals who hate script kiddies (it shouldn't take much, i'd do the job for nothing...) and then train them in the basics required to put criminal cases together and swear them in as special police officers so they can do production orders to get info (IP Addresses etc) from ISP's legally.

Once you've done that, get them tracking down script kiddies who do unlawful stuff, but are easily tracked from firewall logs etc. Getting their computers seized as evidence for a few months and then hauled up in court for breaking the law would discourage at least some of the prats, which might then reduce the number of people who think it's funny to try and DOS firms for the lulz etc.

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Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom

Peter2
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Re: Anything goes?

They heyday of RAYNET being involved in events ended abruptly around 2000. I remember that well, because I was involved in event management/marshalling lots of events from the late 90's to the mid 00's.

The main reason they ended up defunct was that RAYNET had pretty crap equipment, yet were cripplingly expensive. Sending radio messages involved sending people over to the RAYNET tent with a message and they used to try and send the message to somebody in a range rover, who might get it if there wasn't too much interference, who might then relay to another station or pass said message onto the intended recipient if the radio operator could find him, and wasn't too busy with his tea and biscuits.

This was inefficient and ineffective (many a message just vanished into the ether) and the range on the equipment they used was pathetic. They were also rather expensive. It ended quite abruptly when it was realised that the then newish PMR446 had better range, despite RAYNET having the advantage of 20 foot antennas, caravans full of equipment and an army of experts.

Comparatively PMR446 was comms heaven since everybody could simply pass messages to each other directly without middlemen being involved. Word quickly spread and everybody involved in eventing kitted out with similar kit in either PMR446 or PBR. Mobile phones becoming prevalent was the final nail in RAYNET's eventing coffin in urban areas where PMR or PBR weren't feasible due to other users.

Just the POV from the other side of the fence. :)

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Infosec geniuses hack a Canon PRINTER and install DOOM

Peter2
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Re: I want to know

HP Laserjet 1320 desktop printers (about ten years ago) had 130MHz processors. That's about 5 times more power than most people had playing it to start with.

My network printers in use now have 500MHz processors. I do occasionally wonder why they need this level of power, but presumably this comes about because it's cheaper to buy and integrate a cheap mobile phone processor than to create a fab to knock out 486 chips.

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Snowden shouldn't be extradited to US if he testifies about NSA spying, says Swiss gov

Peter2
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Re: Would the US risk a diplomatic incident?

The US is not anywhere near stupid enough as to launch fighter jets to try and hijack an unarmed civilian aircraft in European airspace. At best (if successful), it would cause the biggest international incident between Europe and America since the Trent affair with repercussions so extreme that it wouldn't be worth it.

And what are the chances of pulling it off? If the US did intercept the aircraft with fighters and forced it to change direction, what do you think going to happen then? The pilot flicks his transponder to "7500" (hijacked) and the heavily armed Quick Reaction Force fighters from the local airforce afterburn in with twitchy trigger fingers wanting to know WTF is going on in their airspace.

What's going to happen then? When the civilian aircraft decides it's no longer going to follow the directions given by the US fighters then what are they going to do? Open fire (even with warning shots) in another countries airspace with armed fighters belonging to that country sitting behind them?

Never going to happen.

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Alien Ninja Fembot Pirates vs the Jedi SAS Chuck Norris startroopers: RUMBLE

Peter2
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the great questions of the universe using immense amounts of computing power typically fall down

Do they? The meaning of life is 42.

The problem with that is that while you have the answer, it's effectively an arbitrary response as you don't know why it is the answer and it's meaningless without the reasoning used to reach the answer.

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Work in the tech industry? The Ukraine WAR is coming to YOU

Peter2
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Trollface

Re: Sanctions

Or on the contrary view, sanctions are the best news for a country that doesn't do a massive amount of exports other than stuff like say oil that we aren't going to sanction, and they know we aren't going to sanction.

Firstly, it's a PR coup to the rulers of said country (evil foreigners etc...) which increases the rulers popularity and allows local businesses to florish in an enviroment where otherwise they would be destroyed by external competition. (See Iran) IMO, if you really wanted to screw a country up you shouldn't do sanctions, but instead subserdise everything sold to the country by down to a level that puts every company in the country out of business (see chinese manufacturing effects on western countries)

Once the businesses are gone, and the ability to rapid reconstitute them in the home country is dead due to the equipment having gone, the skillsets lost and the population being accustomed to severely reduced prices then you can actually do some damage to the country with sanctions or other effective methods of economic warfare. (warfare being an extension of politics by other means and all)

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Cave scrawls prove Neanderthals were AT LEAST as talented as modern artists

Peter2
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Re: Picasso's ancestors

I object! There is a varying level of intelligence in the population (as anybody who has ever done/supervised first line support will bitterly agree) and I think it's fair to assume that the Neanderthals had a similar range of intelligence.

Therefore, it's obvious that the most intelligent Neanderthals were more intelligent than the least intelligent people in the human race, which admittedly is setting a very, very low standard.

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Pimp my lounge and pierce my ceiling: Home theatre goes OTT

Peter2
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Re: 9.1? I'm going the other way

That's not quite far enough. I replaced by functioning 5.1 system with a set of very good headphones and then ditched the speakers after about 6 months due to a total lack of use.

Much, much better surround sound (with decent headphones!), the sound quality is indistinguishable from the speakers and you won't upset your partner/neighbour with playing something loudly.

Personally, I think speakers are in trouble. The only problem is being able to listen to it with somebody else, but that's what splitter cables were made for.

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What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?

Peter2
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Re: Rich toffs?

Or about 10p per round for decent quality .22 calibre ammunition, which accounts for most shooting in the UK.

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Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything

Peter2
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Re: Blame MPEG-LA for the Pi's codes

I was thinking this when reading through the article.

I don't actually have a problem with subscription services for things that have an external attached cost such as AV/IPS software (because I want the definition updates) and in general anything else where the supplier is licensing some shiny stuff from elseware on a per user basis.

Obviously in those sort of cases then either the purchase cost has increase to cover the subscription for the lifetime of the device or you have to buy a subscription for the extra features that you want. I'm all for subscriptions in those cases.

That said charging a subscription/unlock fee for basic functionality is taking the piss.

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Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media

Peter2
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Re: Privacy

Since the committee simply asks nicely "please don't publish this as it would harm national security because X would happen if it was public knowledge" then it's difficult to see how. There is no legal sanction for publishing something covered by a D Notice, as you ought to realise given El Reg covered the snowden GCHQ revelations that were covered by a D Notice.

How could you use a system like that to prevent the publication of politically embarrassing facts? The whole reason the D Notice system was setup the way it is was to make it useless for what your suggesting.

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