* Posts by captain veg

578 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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Intel has driven a dagger through Microsoft's mobile strategy

captain veg
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Re: Logic & Gui

> Outlook (for example) cannot be compiled to run on ARM...I cant remember why

Because it's a load of useless crap?

-A.

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The EU wants you to log into YouTube using your state-issued ID card

captain veg
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Re: not that I want to spoil the party, but...

Thanks for that.

In the linked document it specifically demands that "consumers should be able to choose the credentials by which they may wish to identify or authenticate themselves". [ My emphases.]

Now, I'm the most anti-ID person I know, but the headline "The EU wants you to log into YouTube using your state-issued ID card" does not seem to be supported much by the document claimed as its source.

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captain veg
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not that I want to spoil the party, but...

Where are the links to any kind of evidence supporting this story? There are none in the article itself, and I can't find anything at all putting key phrases into search engines. It's almost like Orlowski just made the whole thing up.

-A.

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Have a Cptn Cook: VXers learn 'Strayan to plunder Down Under

captain veg
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and?

Shirt-fronted?

-A.

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Windows 10 handcuffs Cortana web search to Bing and Edge browser

captain veg
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Re: I am amazed...

Who is this "everyone" of which you speak? I avoid everything Google and Microsoft to the greatest extent practicable. I doubt that I'm alone.

I do wonder, though, about those people who, given an actual URL, *still* prefer to share it with Google than put it in the address bar. What's that all about?

-A.

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Reskilling to become a devops dude could net you $105k+

captain veg
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how come?

I'm a developer and were it not for reading el Reg, I would not have even heard of DevOps. Is it a real thing?

As for salary embiggenment, that doesn't sound very likely to me. When I was looking for my first job as a programmer, several millenia ago, countless employment agencies tried to persuade me to take lowly paid operations roles as a "way in". How spending all day changing tape reels would help was never explained.

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Galileo in spaaace: France's 'equivalence principle' satellite

captain veg
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apparently

If you went to the top of the leaning tower of Pisa and dropped two spheres of different weight over the edge, you would be arrested on terrorism charges.

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Node.js releases version 6.0. Yes, yes, LTS

captain veg
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padStart

Thanks for the tip. Unlike the infamous leftPad, that one looks like it might actually work correctly for any combination of parameter values.

-A.

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Ad-blocker blocking websites face legal peril at hands of privacy bods

captain veg
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Re: Ad blocking is no win situation for everyone - both publishers and users.

> And yet, you failed to demonstrate that

I didn't fail to do anything at all. Demonstrable means "capable of being demonstrated". That I have better things to do with my life than to spell out the obvious to cretins is not a failure on my part.

> because as already explained, ad blocker don't differentiate between local and 3rd party ads

You have failed to explain any such thing. Which is understandable, since it is wholly false.

> They place their stuff in the public exactly as much as publishers do.

No they don't. There are these things called "shops" which are private property.

I have belatedly realised that Hanff is right. You are a troll. Now fornicate elsewhere and decease forthwith.

-A.

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captain veg
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Re: Ad blocking is no win situation for everyone - both publishers and users.

> ad blocker are out to block all ads, whether served locally or remotely.

With all due respect, that is unmitigated tosh. If you really believe it, then you understand neither how HTML nor ad-blockers actually work.

> even if local ads would be not blocked, they could be served less effectively, less targeted and more costly than in the current, centralized/distributed model

Well, it's an opinion. Apart from the "more costly" part, it is also demonstrably false.

The only thing going for the current model is cheap impressions. And it's killing publishers. Along the way it is also damaging the content, encouraging click-bait and poor production values, so degrading the experience for users too. The only people profitting from this are the likes of Google.

If any industry required a bit of "disintermediation", it's this one.

> they are no better and not much different than ordinary shoplifters and thieves

Really, this is desparate stuff. Shop owners do not place their wares in a public space and invite the public to take as much as they like on condition that they send off a self-addressed envelope to some third party who will use it to return junk mail to them. It's a business model that is deeply broken, and that's not our fault.

-A.

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captain veg
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Re: Ad blocking is no win situation for everyone - both publishers and users.

It most certainly is not.

The problem is the current ad-serving model. A page directly contains content, which I want to see, and some links to external embeds, which I might or might not be interested in. Those links are invitations to my browser to fetch additional content and inject it into the page. My browser is entirely free to ignore those invitations. It offers me an option, for example, to not download images, which is useful when bandwidth is tight. But when it comes to ad-serving, the invitation is to hop off to some third party server and get some random (so far as I am concerned) and totally unprovenanced content from there. It could be anything. It could be malicious. It is quite likely to be annoying, or be otherwise detrimental to my experience of the page. Is it any wonder that more and more people are saying no thanks?

If enough of us do, the model dies. This does not mean the death of online advertising, just of third-party ad-serving. Publishers are free to do as traditional media have always done: review the ads, judge their suitability and compatibility with the primary content, and embed them DIRECTLY in it.

Advertisers will have to try harder with production values. Publishers will regain control of their ratecards. Users will not be exposed to potentially dangerous crap.

Everyone wins.

-A.

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The web is DOOM'd: Average page now as big as id's DOS classic

captain veg
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Re: Same thing happens with scripts

I recently completed a standalone HTML 5 app for in-house use, and was a bit horrified to note that it came in at over 3000 lines of Javascript code (with no libraries). Then I noticed that a colleague had included, in a related project, a single third party library comprising more than 17,000 lines, not including myriad other libraries that it depends on. So far as I can tell it doesn't seem to work any better than my effort.

-A.

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captain veg
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Re: from three 'double u's to one single 'm'

In Spanish, doble v is pronounced like v. In English, double u is more like "ooh" -- compare French OUI and English WE.

-A.

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Bypass the Windows AppLocker bouncer with a tweet-size command

captain veg
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Re: thanks to the fact...

Not really. The kicker here is that it executes code in the fetched file. Javascript code, so it ought to be sandboxed, at least, but no. This is Microsoft's take on Javascript, and it is allowed to execute random ActiveX objects. Which are native code. Boom.

-A.

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Is Microsoft's Office dev platform ready to go mainstream?

captain veg
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Re: coming soon?

Already here, according to the web page that the article links to.

"To make your Add-in available to users, you can publish it on the Office Store"

-A.

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Woz says wearables – even Apple Watch – aren't 'compelling'

captain veg
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Yes. The get-in-it-and-drive-it bit is what makes private cars different from public transport. And don't bleat about going where you want when you want, I'm including taxis in my definition.

Honestly, why would anyone pay serious money for a vehicle over which they had no control? It would make much more sense to get on a big scheduled one or hail a small on-demand one.

-A.

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Ofcom wants you to thank it for resurrecting the spectre of BT's 1980s monopoly

captain veg
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Re: Mild understatement

To be honest, I had issues with the very idea of having to pay them anything at all -- let alone most of a month's disposable income at the time -- for the privilege of becoming a paying customer. Especially with that monthly standing charge malarkey.

-A.

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captain veg
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Re: Mild understatement

I continued to have little affection for them into the 1990s. In 1992 I bought a newly built flat in Sarf Lumdum. The builders had already wired it for telephones, so all BT had to do was make a connection in the cabinet next to the street entrance. For which they wanted 150 quid! No negotiation, no reasoning, no choice. Or no telephone.

When the guy turned up to do the necessary, I timed him. Less than 15 minutes from arrival to departure. Surprised me that he contrived to take so long.

-A.

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Cash, fear and uncertainty: The Holy Trinity of Bitcoin and blockchain

captain veg
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Re: neologism

Apart from extreme ugliness, I object to the lack of any substantive core to disintermediation. It's all affixes. Reminds me of when I had to explain to a colleague that disenable is not a word. How about demiddleman? Unmiddlification? Or if cod-Latin pretention is important, just exmediation.

Keep quiet about utilise. Before you know it the buggers will be going on about utilisation cases. or worse, utilization cases.

-A.

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captain veg
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neologism

So, the author apologises for the word "disintermediation" but then sprinkles it copiously across the article. What's wrong with "cutting out the middleman"? OK, its more words, but fewer syllables.

And what does "use case" add to "use" alone other than a word?

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Websites take control of USB devices: Googlers propose WebUSB API

captain veg
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Andreessen was wrong

Now you don't even need Windows to act as a poorly-debugged device driver layer.

-A.

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Windows 10 with Ubuntu now in public preview

captain veg
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almost worth it

At last, a sensible ssh client on Windows.

But Windows 10? No thanks.

-A.

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Feature-rich Vivaldi rolls out, offering power users a choice

captain veg
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Re: Been using for a bit

The email client in propert Opera was deployed as a DLL, so entirely optional rather than bloat. It was also rather good. I always found it entirely natural to have my email available to me inside the web browser, and that was before webmail became a commonplace. There was an RSS feed, torrent client and newsgroup reader too. And it was still smaller than the competition.

-A.

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Mobe and Wi-Fi firms flog your location data to commercial firms, claim reports

captain veg
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Re: Space travel is the solution

But then you'd end up being wiped out by a virulent disease contracted from a dirty telephone.

-A.

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Brits rattle tin for 'revolutionary' hydrogen-powered car

captain veg
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Re: 8.5kW and 0-60 in 10 seconds?

I was thinking along the same lines, but the qoted power output is for the fuel cell alone. Presumable the acceleration figures factor in the super capacitors too.

-A.

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UK Home Office seeks secret settlements over unlawful DNA retention

captain veg
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Re: Home Office or MPS

> May et al. talk about the importance of the rule or law and then ignore court rulings

I see where you are confused. She doesn't mean "the law" in an abstract sense. She means it as in "the long arm of The Law", also known informally as "The Bill" and sometimes "The Fuzz", amongst other, less complimentary epithets.

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UK.gov watchdog growls at firms that pass off advertorials as real opinions

captain veg
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Re: Note to Journo's

Note to Journo's what? Photocopier?

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Which keys should I press to enable the CockUp feature?

captain veg
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Re: Rotated screens and "pranks"

Back in the Windows 3.1 days I pranked a colleague by swapping the function of the left and right mouse buttons and setting the vertical sensitiivity to max and horizontal to min, so it looked like you could only move the cursor up and down.

Arrived next day at the office to find the BOFH running malware scans on it. Ho ho ho.

Not long after, the same machine, along with most of the others in the office, had its memory nicked by "RAM Raiders" (for a time, the value density of DRAM was greater than gold). The thieves had, very courteously boxed the PCs back up again after removing the DIMMs so the reason why none of them would boot up wasn't immediately obvious. Guess where the finger of blame was pointed?

-A.

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Call the Cable Guy: Wireless just won't cut it

captain veg
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the answer

"Wireless networking is a shared-media network. So if you connect more and more machines, it's going to run appallingly – just like Ethernet used to."

So we need wireless token ring?

-A.

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Google tried to be funny, cocked it up, everyone thought it was a bug

captain veg
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Re: MIssing the Point?

Whoooshhhh!

-A.

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captain veg
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Re: MIssing the Point?

Sorry to be a pedant, but "criteria" is plural. You meant "criterium".

-A.

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'No regrets' says chap who felled JavaScript's Jenga tower – as devs ask: Have we forgotten how to code?

captain veg
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Re: Writing your own is NUTS

Writing your own is certainly not nuts if the examples in this and related articles are representative of typical library code. Unless by "nuts" you mean "a huge improvement".

-A.

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Ad giant Google thinks its cloud biz could be bigger than its adverts

captain veg
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ulterior motive

There's always one -- and it is always the same one -- where Google is concerned. When they're hosting everyone's content in their own data centres, discovery and indexing becomes trivially easy.

I used to wonder what they got out of providing high quality DNS resolvers for free, until it dawned on me that it crowdsources the discovery of new domains.

-A.

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Let’s re-invent small phones! Small screens! And rubber buttons!

captain veg
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Re: Best smartphone/keyboard design

The keyboards on my old Treo and Centro handsets were the best my short fat fingers have used, and they (the keyboards) were tiny. Yet perfectly formed, so easy to distinguish individual keys by touch and you were never in any doubt that you'd actually pressed one. On-screen is a disaster. Can't actually see the key I'm aiming at, due to fat finger getting in the way. Better on a large tablet, but the enormo-virtual-keyboard obscures whatever it is that I'm trying to type in to.

Can we please go back to physical? Slide-out would be nice.

-A.

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How one developer just broke Node, Babel and thousands of projects in 11 lines of JavaScript

captain veg
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turning into a coding competition?

function leftpad(str, len, ch)

{

var i = len - (str + "").length;

var pad = (i > 0) ? Array(i + 1).join((ch || ch === 0) ? ch : " ") : "";

return pad + str;

}

No charge.

-A.

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FreeBSD crushes system-crashing bug

captain veg
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I might as well be first

Having not been to the pub, allow me to be first to point out that *BSD is not "Unix-like".

-A.

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Web ads are reading my keystrokes and I can’t even spel propperlie

captain veg
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keep that to yourself, Dabbsy

"I don’t mind at all being sold to, and often I am very appreciative, if the ads are relevant"

I think you are in a very small minority there, and I'd thank you to keep quiet about it. They keep rolling that one out as an excuse for harvesting personal data.

-A.

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Swede builds steam-powered Raspberry Pi. Nowhere to plug in micro-USB, then?

captain veg
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Re: Loop much?

> Unless there's a PDP-11 or the like in the setup

Could use an x64 server, and power the steam boiler from the waste heat.

-A.

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How to make the trains run on time? Satellites. That's how

captain veg
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in-depth analysis

"[India's] roads are often deeply average"

So, how deep is the average road?

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Irish shun beer, whiskey in favour of … wine

captain veg
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MDMA

"neck whiskey (with an e)"

Are you suggesting that readers enjoy their whiskey with a little something extra?

-A.

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Subjects! Speek your branes to Parliament on the Snoopers' Charter

captain veg
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Re: I want a None of the Above option at the next election

The much maligned Lib Dems opposed this, even to the extent of thwarting their senior partners in coalition. Seems strange the way that they were rewarded at the ballot box.

-A.

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Get lost, Windows 10 and Phone fans: No maps HERE on Microsoft's OS

captain veg
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Re: better job than Outlook

A monkey with a typewriter and a carrier pigeon could do a better job of email than Outlook.

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How a Brexit could stop UK biz and Europe swapping personal data

captain veg
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Tempted

On Europe I make Ken Clarke look like a rabid Kipper. And yet, given the chance to really spoil Theresa May's day, well, you'd have to consider voting Brexit, wouldn't you?

-A.

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captain veg
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Re: @codejunky

> I can only assume the company you work for didnt exist before the EU

Because voting to leave would magically transport Britain back to 1972, obviously. Get out your tie-dies everyone.

-A.

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You say I mustn’t write down my password? Let me make a note of that

captain veg
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Uncrackable

I remember as a student reading an article about password security that recommended, in addition to the usual mix of case, digits and symbols, the inclusion of control characters on systems that allowed that. "Wonder if ours does..." Turns out it did, for setting the password, but not when actually logging on. So my account was completely inaccessible.

-A.

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Home Office is cruising for a lawsuit over police use of face recog tech

captain veg
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re: "Government disobeys its own laws, and doesn't care."

In this case it's the Police acting unlawfully*. Send in the cops!

-A.

*Which is not necessarily the same as disobeying the "government's laws" (which are sometimes themselves found to be unlawful).

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Data protection: Don't be an emotional knee jerk. When it comes to the law, RTFM

captain veg
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Re: I'll tell you what's worse...

I had that at Debenhams (IIRC) trying to return a shirt that was a different size to that advertised on the packaging. This was back in the 1980s, before "data protection" was a thing. Only the excuse changes.

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Google-backed British startup ‘stole our code’, says US marketing firm

captain veg
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Re: Perhaps ...

Nah, no reference to jQuery.

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captain veg
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> How did Bounce steal the Yieldify code anyway?

I think the allegation is the other way around, but I would guess the answer is right-click and select the View Source command. It looks a lot like client-side Javascript and thus entirely open-source.

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New Firefox, Chrome SRI script whip to foil man-in-the-middle diddle

captain veg
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Re: jQuery

Upvoted.

There was a time when jQuery was useful for papering over the cracks of incomplete and/or non-conforming ECMAScript implementations. That time has passed. Voluntary use of jQuery in new code is, at best, laziness.

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