* Posts by FIA

164 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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British bloke bailed after 'hacker plunders Pippa Middleton's iCloud'

FIA

Re: Free publicity

Skinny non-entity who was once 'famous by association' gets free publicity, has she got a book coming out ?

Really? That's what you took from the story? For me it was 'Person made famous by dint of being related to someone has deeply personal information stolen by scumbag who then attempted to profit'.

Hey ho.

There are many people whose fame seems curious and unfathomable to me. Siblings of the future Queen hardly fall into the celeb big brother bracket though do they?

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Matt LeBlanc handed £1.5m to front next two series of Top Gear

FIA

Personally I think Evans deserves some credit, as he probably saved TG.

Given the nature of the previous presenting team you could never really follow that with any great success, however the collective ire at Evans did provide a distracting focus from the loss of Clarkson and Co., which allowed Reid, Harris and LeBlanc the space to grow into their rolls without too much scrutiny.

Then, rather than being dismissive of the new 'unknowns' the consensus seemed to be that 'these other guys are pretty good; if only they'd drop Evans'.

I'm sure it wasn't what he intended, but ironically, I think he did the job he was hired to do.

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If we can't fix this printer tonight, the bank's core app will stop working

FIA

What a stupid system design.

In what way? Do you have a full list of requirements? Do you know what they were trying to acheve?

These were financial transactions on an old system, maybe there was a requirement to have a hard copy of the transaction within a fixed timeframe? So stopping the transactions from proceeding if this can't happen seems very sensible?

Not heard of speccing out storage to cover such eventualities? Only an hour or two of grace, or even a day or two? That's just ridiculous.

You do know how expensive storage is?? Even in the years long after systems like this became outdated storage was still very very expensive.

Someone should be fired - the guy who designed it, the guy who managed it, or the guy tasked with renewing it that failed to put that in.

Yes. You're right, you've got a half remembered story about a system you know sweet f/a about, but you're right... someone should be fired.

Keeping the damn printer is even more ridiculous, in this day and age.

Some day you may be the person in charge of making the decision to replace a system like this; You may then realise it's not quite as simple as you think.

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Oracle's new cloud rated 'minimum viable product' ... for now

FIA

...I could dance with the devil in the pale moonlight

The longer I spend in IT, the less purchasing decisions seem to be made on the actual technical merit of a solution.

For example I'd not use Google as they seem to drop products at will, which doesn't inspire long term confidence. However I do like AWS partially because of the excellent documentation they provide.

Basically, the way you behave and your past actions are actually as important as your product.

I suspect I'll never be using Oracle cloud. :)

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Naked, drunken Swede assaults chicken shed after 60th birthday

FIA

and carted him to the nearest thing they had to a drunk tank in village of just 50 souls.

Souls? Has the village since sunk??

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FBI overpaid $999,900 to crack San Bernardino iPhone 5c password

FIA

Re: @Voland ...You are missing the point

Dude seriously, dangerous to desolder chip, WTF?, oh my God, we can not make any electronics the danger of soldering chips. No current, no change in chip, don't even need to desolder it, just cut the tracks on the board on the chip connections and hook in, in place, oh gees, if you are a really worry wart, practice on a couple of phones first.

Most surface mount components aren't designed to be removed once installed, and can quite easily be damaged by too much heat. Whilst it's well within the skills of any decent electronics engineer it's not something that an unskilled person should be attempting.

It's not really a case of being a 'worry wart', this is a piece of evidence in an ongoing investigation; presumably of high enough focus that this level of effort is warranted, you really don't want to screw it up.

Also, given that this was a 'suspects' phone what's the procedure assuming they're found innocent? "...oh... yeah... we destroyed your phone with all your personal info and photo's on... erm... sorry about that...."?

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iPhone 7's Qualcomm, Intel soap opera dumps a carrier lock-out on us

FIA

Re: i5 and ARM are similar in performance?

Really?

If so, I'm impressed with ARM! [...]

It's possibly not as impressive as you think, remember when they debuted ARMs were much faster than the Intel chips of the time, it's 30 years of focus on performance vs. 30 years of focus on low power that's caused them to diverge.

Apple has long been rumoured to be looking to switch to ARM across the board, which does make sense given their penchant for vertical integration and their long term involvement with ARM, so it's not too surprising that 'desktop performance' is a long term design goal of their in house chip team.

The A series of CPUs have for a while been class leaders in single threaded ARM performance; I suspect this is no coincidence. ;)

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SETI Institute damps down 'wow!' signal report from Russia

FIA

Re: Paging Mr. Niven...

Would that be Phew ?

That would be 'Admiral Few!' to you. Puny Human!

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Apple is making life terrible in its factories – labor rights warriors

FIA

Re: If you own an Apple product, then you are the problem.

"The OP is absolutely spot on, it's not Apple, it's their customers"

Oh, don't be daft, it's not Apple customers, it's all of us, or at least anyone capable of reading this comment. Companies like Pegatron are huge, they don't just abuse labour to make Apple kit, and they're not they only company doing it.

From the article: "Specifically, the group reports that Pegatron has been passing on financial pressures from Apple by committing multiple violations of Chinese labor laws on fair pay and workplace safety."

That's the issue. While companies are allowed to flout local labour laws this will continue to happen, and there's not that much we can do about it. Sure we could all stop buying products made in the far east, which would probably cause the western economies to collapse, along with the far easter economies too. This would just make the situation worse, not better.

Over time the rights of workers across the globe will slowly equalise, and at that point it won't be cheaper to manufacture goods and ship them half way across the world, but until that day comes there's unfortunatly very little that can be done other than continuing to highlight the issue.

But don't pretend that we're not all guilty of perpetuating it.

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You shrunk the database into a .gz and the app won't work? Sigh

FIA

Gary mis-heard the address and instead went to the bank's branch in the town of Otley, about 15 kilometres away and a half-hour's drive when the traffic is kind.

I'm from around here and I can promise you no-one travels anywhere using one of those fancy modern fangled kilometre things. (Especially now we've left Europe), infact I'm not even sure most folk know what one is.

We travel to our underground places of gainful excavation in Gods own miles.

And nowt else.

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Google's brand new OS could replace Android

FIA

Re: QNX?

QNX didn't die. It's on ice and I'd bet that it's for sale if Google is buying.

I thought QNX was doing quite well, with the rise of IoT and flashy in car stuff? They seem to be hiring...

https://bb.wd3.myworkdayjobs.com/QNX

Even thought BB10 died I still think QNX could be quite a smart little buy for BB. It's a well regarded, small, battle tested RTOS that does seem to 'just work'

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FIA

Re: Open Sourced or Binary Blob?

Should be enough to feed video streams. Use composite video grids as well, rendering part of the screen rather than the whole thing per device.

The problem is telling it what to render. if you have a device 5m away you have a minimum 30 milisecond latency just for the round trip. That's before you've done anything.

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Tech support scammers mess with hacker's mother, so he retaliated with ransomware

FIA

hmm... the wife once 'bought' a hair straightener from a dodgy Chinese site, I noticed what she was doing just as she clicked the pay button,

When you say 'dodgy', do you mean 'actively serving malware or obviously scamming' or 'badly put together with poor engrish'?

made her cancel her cards

Wise precaution if you're unsure.

and then looked into the site and noticed it was VERY vulnerable to SQL injection, dropped the customers and products tables from it... Hair straighteners never turned up...

Erm... wow.... I really hope the answer to the first question was 'very very very dodgy' otherwise criminal damage and potentially destroying someone's lively hood seems a little extreme to not get some badly made hair straighteners. Especially if their only crime was bad web site design and poor ability in a second language.

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More gums than Jaws: Greenland super-sharks live past 400 years old

FIA

Re: Typical specimen is older than America

That said, on this side of the pond the same happened, the f*ckwit in question a certain Tony Blair. Also twice.

Nope. That would be 3 times. (To be fair, sometimes traumatic events do get repressed).

Or more pedanctically, Zero times, as we elect MPs (and by extension parties) not prime ministers. ;)

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IPv6 now faster than IPv4 when visiting 20% of top websites – and just as fast for the rest

FIA

Re: Time to learn

"Just make sure that you configure your IPv6 firewall correctly (on each device) as there is no need for NAT now. The good tutorials cover this off."

I thought one of the advantages of IPv6 was that it made NAT actually useful? I.e. you have your internal network on a private /64 subnet then NAT bidirectionally to your external /64 subnet. This means changing IP is easy but you can still get the advantages of uniquely addressable machines.

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BlackBerry's licensing strategy looks smart – and a lot like Nokia's

FIA

"When they bought out a small company to get an OS (forgot its name) which they spent 2+ years into making it a Tablet ONLY OS, then another 2 before making for their own phones."

That would be QNX, a nice little real time OS.

I'll be interested to see what becomes of this, as I understand it it's pretty much the go to OS for in car stuff these days. Might be a good little investment long term.

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Tight-wad Apple repair techs swapped our damaged iGear with used kit – lawsuit

FIA

Re: They've been doing this for years

You're right, they really should have the decency to let you defraud them with expedience.

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Alleged skipper of pirate site KickAss Torrents keel-hauled in Poland

FIA

Re: Big content: 3

correct me if im wrong , and i may well be , but isnt KODI just a flashy front end for pirated content?

Kodi is a very capable open source HTPC media player with a fairly good 'ten foot' interface, originally designed as a media player for the original XBox it's since been ported to most major platforms. It's actively developed and has a rich and vibrant community; if you want a general purpose media player that isn't Plex it's a good piece of software. (I use it on my Mac as it's a much better front end to mythTV than the OSX builds of the myth front end).

Kodi also supports plugins, for example for iPlayer, making it even more useful.

Unfortunately this means there's a plethora of plugins that act as aggregators for dodgy web based streaming sites, also there's a lot of unscrupulous people selling Kodi preloaded with a good selection of such plugins, often illegally trading on the Kodi name to do so.

It does sound like it's a problem that will be sorted out in the medium term though as piracy and it's associations are slowly killing the project.

It's a shame, as it's a quality piece of open source software that a lot of people have worked very hard on.

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Microsoft releases cross-platform .NET Core 1.0 at Linux event

FIA

Re: Dear software developers...

Cheers for the heads up. It's a good job we're still in the planning stage.

Mind you the project as a whole has currently been put on hold whilst we all scrabble around trying to fix this Y2K issue. (I'm not convinced it'll come to anything but the 'higher ups' are quite worried about it).

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Holy Crap! Bloke finishes hand-built CPU project!

FIA

Re: Bah...

Vista? VISTA? Mr La-de-da with your fancy memory protection. YOU were lucky. WE used to dream of Vista; whilst hand whittling our 2 bit CPUs using nothing more than hope and the dog eared edge of a wordstar function key strip; and one of the bits was permanently zero due to Father selling it and replacing it with an 'oola 'oop in the hope we wouldn't notice. Upgrade (paid for, mind!) was Microsoft Plus! for Windows 95, with the pinball game removed and the theme permanently set to that horrid brown one.

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Linux on PS3 white flag

FIA

Just a pity it's only for our friends over the pond.

In the UK you've already got recourse against the retailer. Goods have to be fit for purpose and as advertised. If you bought a PS3 to run linux when this was removed you had a pretty good argument for compensation under existing statutory rights. (IANAL, E&OE, Your home may be at risk if you do not keep up repayments, etc etc).

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Pressure mounts against Rule 41 – the FBI's power to hack Tor, VPN users on sight

FIA

@Six Re: Definitely different!

Thank you! That was very informative; it now doesn't seem quite so ludicrous.(Just deeply worrying).

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FIA

"would allow a US magistrate judge to grant law enforcement access to any stored data on a computer, phone, or any storage device around the world that was suspected of being "related" to a crime."

Are magistrates in the US the same as the UK??

I remember a few years ago chatting to my mum, and she was considering applying to be a magistrate. Now; whilst I love my mum very much and would trust her judgement when it comes to issues like Mrs Johnsons massive bush obscuring the light to her neighbours back porch I'm not sure she should be ruling on matters of international security.

I assume a magistrate in the US Is a little different??

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Apple pollutes data about you to protect your privacy. But it might not be enough

FIA

What do you mean if it so desires?

I mean that in reality it's more likely machine read by algorithms to best target advertising, rather than a human sitting there reading everything I write.

of course it reads your email which also gives it information about the people sending you email - so much for their right to privacy.

I'm not sure I understand what point you're making here? What right to privacy?

1. Email isn't end to end encrypted; sending an email and not assuming someone somewhere along the delivery chain isn't reading it is naieve. It's a postcard not a sealed letter.

2. If someone is contacting me then either they know me, and if they desire to communicate privately they'll use one of the other communcation channels available, or they don't know me in which case the mail is unsolicited and I'd question as to why they were sending something with an expectation of privacy using a system where there is none.

Frankly I equate @gmail.com with asshole.

I'd think you'd have a point if it was something like google analytics, however when we're discussing an unencrypted protocol which comes with no expectation of privacy I think you're perhaps being a little too harsh.

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FIA

To privacy advocates who continue to use Google Services, or carry a generic uncloaked Android: should we do as you say, or do as you do?

Surely it depends if you do so knowingly?

I support the right to privacy, and also have a gmail account. But I use that knowing Google can read all my email if it so desires; but as that's an informed choice I don't see the problem. (I see it as the price for the convenience of Gmail).

The issue for me is when people don't realise or understand the implications of their actions.

Oh, +1 for Owncloud too, never liked the idea of Dropbox but the convenince of contact/calender/file sync whilst still having full control over your data is marvellous.

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World goes SIM-free, leaving Sony and HTC trailing behind

FIA

“Apple is facing iPhone fatigue and pressure is mounting for Apple to innovate a new wow design beyond its standard rectangular form factor,”

This made me laugh a lot; bring on the hyperbolic paraboloid iPhone 7 I say. (It's taken at least 2 accidental launches across the room to get my iPhone 6 into anything aproaching this shape, and frankly that's far too much work).

said Strategy Analytics’ Neil Mawston, executive director at the analyst firm.

This bit however made me jealous. I wish I could get exec director sallery for not saying much. (especially as I'd probably just wing it and make up some nonsense about maturing markets and saturation rather than rabid obsessive ranting to 'MAKE ME SOMETHING NEW!!')

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Chaps make working 6502 CPU by hand. Because why not?

FIA

TUBE

Next step... a Tube interface?

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It's all very well hacking ISIS, Barry, but what about your ISA?

FIA

Re: Help a foriegn-raised youngster out

Can anyone tell me who is featured in the headline picture and what movie/tv series they are from? I feel like it is a pop culture reference I should know.

The lady at the back is Laura Croft. The film is hackers. Personally not my favourite, but probably one you should know. :)

It's no Office Space though.

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PHP pioneer and Zend co-founder enlists for AWS big-data mission

FIA

Re: Yeah

The only thing wrong is a programmer choosing to write

print TRUE ? "A" : FALSE ? "B" : "C";

Yeah, you're right, noone ever needs a nice convenient if,then,else-if construct. My bad.

Its not PHPs fault that someone does not understand the order of evaluation, and chooses to write a completely irrelevant and nonsensical bit of code.

It's not PHPs fault, but it is a little odd that a language that on one hand seems to want to implement every form of every function under the sun (to ostentiably make it easier to learn/use for people with experience in other languages) then has an operator with precedence opposite to virtually every other language. I mean as a programmer I really hate consistency.

If you want it to work the other way round just add brackets

print TRUE ? "A" : (FALSE ? "B" : "C");

But the real answer is to just write

print 'A';

There, coding problem solved.

....and point missed. ;)

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FIA

Re: Yeah

Its a mad language...but it is very easy to pick up and extremely flexible. I use it for all sorts...web stuff to admin scripts.

Oh, don't get me wrong, just because it's a truely awful language (the way print TRUE?"A":FALSE?"B":"C"; prints B being a particular favourite of mine), that appears to be really badly written doesn't mean it's not useful, or that you can't write good code using it. (just that you possibly shouldn't ;) ). I've written a fair bit of PHP in my time, and may yet do again.

Its just easy to hack together a working script with it.

This does seem to be the best use for it really, quick and dirty scripts, rather than anything large.

Arguably the quirkiness is what makes it easier to learn...ironically. Especially given the very usable error output.

If you think PHP is easy to learn, you should take a look at some of ther other modern scripting languages. (I'm currently learning to really love Groovy for example) A lot of them as as easy to use as PHP (if not a bit easier), and a consistant API is a wonderful thing.

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FIA

Ahh, PHP, got to love any language where 'a < b', 'b < c' and 'c < a' can all be true. (Without changing the values for a, b and c).

I don't know why you'd use anything else.

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First successful Hyperloop test module hits 100mph in four seconds

FIA

Re: So many luddites...

Good thing we don't have the same person trying to change too many forms of transport. I mean a consistent approach can't possibly work on a third transport mode can it?

To quote this piece....

"The test of Hyperloop One's propulsion system is just one step of many on the path to achieve a dream put forth by Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, who first drew up a plan to transport people at 760mph in low-pressure tubes in 2013. Musk decided not to pursue this business venture, which he called Hyperloop, but his whitepaper spawned two rival Hyperloop companies and an international student engineer competition."

Emphasis mine.

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PLA sys admin gets six months house arrest for yanking US Army docs

FIA

Re: Six months only? House arrest, no jail?

I'm genuinely surprised. It must have been very unimportant classified material.

Really? It was classified documents he was copying, not media files.

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Database man flown to Hong Kong to install forgotten patch spends week in pub

FIA

Re: Not quite these distances, but still a PITA

Fine, I drove home."

Right away? From a brewery?

He had to be quick or they'd notice the car bottoming out and an odd metalic clanking from the boot.

2
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UK govt admits it pulled 10-year file-sharing jail sentence out of its arse

FIA

Re: So is anyone going to be held to account?

Blatantly lying to the public, falsifying research, general incompetence. Sounds like there should be some peoplepolishing up their resume

Good point, next step is Middle East peace envoy, right?

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Ubuntu 16.04 LTS arrives today complete with forbidden ZFS

FIA

Re: Thought Experiment

If I were to write an app and licence it under the Apache licence, Google could take it, add a small proprietary extension of their own that made it incompatible with mine, and release it binary-only, refusing any request for Source Code. They would still be complying with the letter of the licence, even if not the spirit.

Why would they not be complying with the spirit? Surely the reasons for using things like BSD or Apache licences is because the requirement to open source derivitives isn't a factor? If the continued open sourcing of derivitives is important then use the GPL; otherwise use one of the others.

I will accept though there have been some projects over the years that have missed this distinction; Intending to licence their project in a way that future contributions should always be fed back but picking a licence that actually allows this not to happen. WINE would be the obvious example.

But then I never quite understand why people will spend a large amount of time writing software, but seeminly little time considering how they licence it and the future implications of this decision.

There's a definate difference between open source and Open Source. One's where you get the words that make your software, the other's a movement. (Three part harmony entirely optional).

0
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US congresscritter's iPhone hacked (with, er, the cell networks' help)

FIA

Re: -1 for the disparaging comment...

Was going to upvote, then read the last paragraph

Genuine question, what did you find disparaging?

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Linux-fight! Dev's plan to bundle kernel patches sparks debate

FIA

Re: Good on him

WRT the fuss on the Linux mailing list, it is bizarre why anyone would even dream of slagging the effort. All he's doing is exercising the rights granted by the GPL in a way that some (or indeed, quite a lot) people will find useful.

You've got to be very careful when messing around with religion, even branches of the same religions can often not see eye to eye. ;)

1
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Bash on Windows. Repeat, Microsoft demos Bash on Windows

FIA

Re: This isn't Nan friendly

If you want to be really old school: FORMAT c: /autotest

(add a /s if you're feeling nice. ;) )

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Apple's fruitless rootless security broken by code that fits in a tweet

FIA

Re: Question

Thank you both. :) That's much clearer now.

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FIA

Re: No magic bullet

I dunno, I think that root is enough, ...

It depends on the use case though. There are situations where the fairly course grained unix permission system just isn't suitable. For example, you may have a system where root needs to administer the actual computer, but you wouldn't want the root user to have full control over the system; for example you may have sensative information on there, which the systems administrator may not be authorised to read. In these situations you do need a permission system that can allow full control of the computer but not unrestricted access to everything.

The other problem arises that the other major OS that provides a decent hierachical fine grained permission system is NT, which unfortunatly got Windows grafted onto it (and all the historical baggage that came with it), and whilst, in theory, it has a much better more fine grained system for permissions, in reality it's complex and troublesom and very very easy to misconfigure; so many people simply don't bother. (Plus I suspect it's slightly broken as I've more than once had the 'effective permissions' dialog show me I should be able to access a file....)

The question "Why did Apple feel that root, administrator of the system, needed to be locked out"? Has not been answered.

Apple don't make 'computers' in the traditional IT sense, they make computers for consumers; and sometimes, in Apple's opinion (and I must confess having done many years of 'IT support' for friends it's an opinion I can sympathise with*), sometimes consumers need protecting from themselfs; whilst still being able to install software that requires system wide accesss.

If the person responsible for the system borks their computer or company server then that is something that they must deal with.

If the person responsible is a trained IT professional then absolutly, yes. But just as we let non trained mechanics drive cars, sometimes non IT professionals need or want to use computers. Apple is trying to minimise the amount of time these people spend calling Applecare, or negative fallout from the 'I didn't click on ANYTHING, it just BROKE' crowd. Had OSX been designed from the ground up it probably wouldn't have the concept of 'root' in the traditional sense, but it's an evolution of a 26 year old OS. (with it's roots much further back than that).

*Seriously; once had a friend who on finding an issue just started randomly deleting files in C:\WINDOWS that they 'didn't like the sound of'. It didn't fix the issue. :(

5
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FIA

Question

What does the &- do with the redirect?

...which creates a symbolic link to AppleKextExcludeList.kext's Info.plist from /dev/diskX, and then gets fsck_cs to work on /dev/diskX and pipe stdout to that linked Info.plist file, thus trashing it with garbage

I'm not sure this is correct, surely the ln symlinks the /dev/diskXX file to the file to destroy, which fsck then treats as a block device and writes to, trashing the file. But I don't understand the redirect, and my google fu has let me down. :(

0
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Remix OS: China's take on an Android operating system – but for PCs

FIA

Re: @tony72 - Finally!

Small correction here: The Year of Linux Kernel on the Desktop. The rest is OK.

<pedant>

Erm, that /is/ Linux. The rest of the stuff is GNU, but everyone forgets that most of the time.

</pedant>

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I beg you, please don't back up that secret directory full of photos!

FIA

Re: Yeah been there.

We could never look them in the eye again so I learnt my lesson to never go looking.

Which one?

<Gets coat>

6
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Stop whining, America: Your LTE makes Europe look slow

FIA

Might be worth asking for a replacement SIM, I had similar problems; a new sim fixed it.

1
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Apple's Watch charging pad proves Cupertino still screwing buyers

FIA

Re: This kind of crap is why I won't buy Apple products....

I can accept that perhaps the Lightning charger does a better job than a mini-USB charger.

It doesn't. It's just a regular USB charger, albeit better built than some of the really cheap stuff. It's the cable that's proprietry (and more expensive).

However, I feel like a chump that is being taken for granted when I shell out extra $$ for something that just seems more intentionally designed to drain my wallet rather than charge my phone.

Meh, I wouldn't worry about it too much. 'Apple stuff is more expensive' is just one of the decisions you've got to factor in when buying stuff. Some people are fine with it, some aren't. Horses for courses really.

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Dad who shot 'snooping vid drone' out of the sky is cleared of charges

FIA

how did the drone's owner justify having it hover over someone's property?

He claims it never flew below 200ft.

5
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Google's YouTube Red deal: Sign, or we'll make you disappear

FIA

Re: Subs service...for YouTube?

Though I read in TechCrunch that Disney has refused the new terms, so there's that. Disney might still leave their videos on YouTube without monetizing them (no ads shown), otherwise they will disappear.

As I understand it if you don't accept the new terms then your videos are automatically set to private. However Disney are probably big enough to object and not be ignored.

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Microsoft promises Clang for Windows in November Visual C++ update

FIA

Re: Standards? From Micros~1?!?

By the way despite the waffly language of the article, Apple didn't create Clang/LLVM any more than they created Webkit. In both cases (and many others) they started using an already existing open source project.

LLVM was an existing open source project but I believe Apple did create clang.

Is it just me that finds this new Microsoft a bit scary and disturbing?? I'm not quite sure what they're gonna do next. It feels a bit like being given a cake by a serial killer.

7
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World finally ready for USB-bootable OS/2

FIA

I don't think it's a problem any more, newer ones are built on NT technology.

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