* Posts by Paul 87

103 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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18 million iPHONE USERS HAVE NEVER BONKED to ApplePay

Paul 87

I don't understand thw rush to put this technology in a phone. Do people really want to hold their £100+ device, and risk it being knocked or snatched from their hand as they do so, or dropped and being damaged.

At least with a card it's not the end of the world if it gets stolen, a phone represents infinitely more hassle to replace.

That said, don't trust NFC personally, the lack of contact means you cannot control which card is used and the range can easily be boosted to a couple of metres or more.

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Plusnet customers SWAMPED by spam but BT-owned ISP dismisses data breach claims

Paul 87

Doesn't have to be a hack per-se (as in data stolen), could be that their billing server's email routing software was tricked into sending the spam.

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2

Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’

Paul 87

So, £4m, to service 10,000 over 5 years.

That's on average 7.9 people per working day, at a cost of £3200 ish a day, or £400 per person served.

Seems a load of bollocks really.

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Tim Cook in Applerexia fears: New MacBook THINNER THAN EVER

Paul 87
Joke

Macbook Air: So thin you can use it as a razor!

Coming soon, Macbook Air Duo for twice the closeness

4
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IT blokes: would you say that LEWD comment to a man? Then don't say it to a woman

Paul 87

Don't know what's worse, that you had to put up with people acting like jerks, or that none of their colleagues slapped them down for acting that way. There's a world of difference between crude jokes and innuendo to shoving a picture of your anatomy in someone's face.

Working in a gender balanced IT team, sure, we all have a laugh and at times, there's sexual humour, but on the rare occasions where someone makes another person feel uncomfortable, the rest of the team makes sure that it's put a stop to.

To me, that's where you draw the line, if you make someone else feel uncomfortable, upset or hurt their feelings, then it's stopped being a joke.

Shame more people don't know that really...

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VC who wants to split California REVEALED as Silk Road Bitcoin slurper

Paul 87

Still amazes me that US citizens accept a law in place which allows the seizure and sale of goods based on someone accused of commiting a crime, before that person is even convicted.

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Remaining Snowden docs will be released to avert 'unspecified US war' – ‪Cryptome‬

Paul 87

Do we need to know every little thing that the "government" choses to do in our name? I don't think that's the case, there are things which happen which quite frankly, I don't want to know the details about because I don't want to worry about the things which are stopped from happening.

Do I think that we also need more transparency on the subject, yes, but also bearing in mind that only a fool believes that the Internet, a tool designed to share, gather and collate information is private. If I want to keep something a secret, I don't publish it online, and heck, if I can avoid it, I don't put it on a computer at all, because that's just basic uncommon sense.

In fact, I'd go as far to say as that we have more to fear from what is undertaken by private companies than government agencies, precisely because they do have a greater level of oversight and morals which are stronger than "Well can we get sued for this and if we do get sued, do we make more money than we're likely to lose"

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D-Wave disputes benchmark study showing sluggish quantum computer

Paul 87

So basically, bad code causes slowdowns?

Who'd have thought it!

2
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The cute things they say

Paul 87

Qualifying this as an IT story because it took place on a software package (hey, it's a less tenuous link than some of the articles on here!)

Client: Ok, so we've invoiced the same shipment three times and given them to the customer

Support: Since you've given them to the customer, they're a legal document, you'll need to issue a credit note for two of the invoices

Client: I can't do that, only one's been paid, I can't issue a credit note if the invoices are unpaid

Support: No, you'll be issuing the credit note's to pay off the two invoices

Client: No, I'm telling you, I can't issue a credit note if the invoice isn't paid.

Support: Why not?

Client: Well every time I issue a credit note, it asks if I want to generate a refund, I can't refund him if he hasn't paid.

Support: Sir, why don't you click no when asked if you want to refund him?

Client: I can do that?

Support: Yes, why do you think it asks Yes or No

Client: oh... bye!

2
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Android is a BURNING 'hellstew' of malware, cackles Apple's Cook

Paul 87

Wonder what the percentage of malware on a per capita basis is instead, rather than a nebulous "99% of malware in the mobile sector is for Android"

However one telling statistic there is the number of users which get an upgraded OS, Android manufacturers are lagging behind on getting updates deployed, a fact I'm sure not assisted by the sheer number of different devices on the market.

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TrueCrypt considered HARMFUL – downloads, website meddled to warn: 'It's not secure'

Paul 87

Or, ya know, it's just a publicity stunt for when they "regain control" of the webpage and announce a new, even more secure version for a price.

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7

Job for IT generalist ...

Paul 87

Definitely sounds like a strong candidate for project management or a buisness analyst. Being able to take your general knowledge and understanding helps ensure that your specialists will be working on the right goals. To strengthen your CV you need supervisory and managerial experience, alongside project planning and implimentation skills.

There's also opportunities out there to move towards the Cxx level instead, particularly in smaller companies which can't afford hordes of specialists, but can invest in an individual who can handle or oversee most of the IT needs for the company. Consider looking at a software development company, they often have diverse roles, particularly those engaged in B2B software sales.

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A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally

Paul 87

Given the preference for the use of a mobile phone or similar as a cheap remote detonation device, this thing will only guarentee to get your baggage seached at every single search

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Google's Nest halts sales of its fire alarm – because waving your hand switches it off

Paul 87

What I'd like manufacturers to understand is that we don't want all these devices to have automatic updates, what we want is form them to have been programmed correctly in the first place!

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Comprehensive security in the home

Paul 87

Maybe it's worth considering a combination solution? For Windows PC's, Microsoft Security Essentials plus regular scans from Malwarebytes will usually put paid to the most common threats, and for the phones there are several options available.

In combination with this, a secure router (e.g. http://www.zonealarm.com/security/en-us/zonealarm-secure-wireless-router.htm) offers additional protection for the devices at home.

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Two million TERRIBLE PASSWORDS stolen by malware attackers

Paul 87

All I can say is this...

http://xkcd.com/936/

Randomness != secure

Length and non-biometric information is far more secure in the long run, and easier to remember

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Twitter fires up stronger, anti-snooping encryption for its millions of twits

Paul 87
Joke

Additional security on a service designed to publically broadcast information, that's paid for by said company reading the information sent to it and selling "appropriate" advertising alongside it.

You might as well send everything in plaintext!

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Oh please, PLEASE bring back Xbox One's hated DRM - say Xbox loyalists

Paul 87

I agree with part of the petition's sentiment, allow console owners the same market that Steam provides, with both the direct delivery and deep discounts that digital distribution allow, at the expense of not having a physical disc to trade or sell on.

The major flaw was that this was seen as mutually exclusive, so they could only support one or the other and not both. I suspect that many publishers would be happy to keep the funds flowing long after it becomes viable to produce more discs, and if you set it up so that the physical disc represented "first dibs", you can keep the bricks and mortar retails somewhere content to allow speedy gamers the ability to trade in when needed.

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Reports: New Xbox could DOOM second-hand games market

Paul 87

The biggest flaw I can see with the scheme from Microsoft's perspective, is with games tied so closely to accounts, and with a product aimed at security unaware teenagers and young adults, there's going to be a vast rise in account "theft" between mates. Without some form of lending library mechanism built in, this will end up costing Microsoft a lot more in man-hours dealing with the complaints, or if they don't, from lost sales from bad press

Not to mention the jailbreakers are going to have a field day getting around the DRM restrictions and selling on their hacks.

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Who's a Siri boy, then? Apple hoards your voices for TWO years

Paul 87

A far more realistic answer is that they're admiting to retaining a tape archive of the data. Data older than 6 months is moved off the main storage array, and onto a pile of tapes, which after 2 years, are re-used.

When any organisation offers a "delete" function, they'll never consider going through archives and disaster recovery media to also remove the data, it just removes it from the "live" system.

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Veiny green 'scum' meteorite may be first visitor from Mercury

Paul 87

The deeply cynical part of me is going "hang on, they want funding for their Mercury mission and NOW suddenly discover a rock that must, almost totally definitely certainly come from there, but without this mission we'll never know"

Yeah.... not at all suspicious

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I am NOT a PC repair man. I will NOT get your iPad working

Paul 87

Then again, the number of people in this world who still don't understand modern technology is a fail on the part of the designers. Very very few IT literate people are capable of writing software that can be understood by someone without any relevant IT experience.

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Movie, TV ads annoying? You ain't seen nothin' yet

Paul 87

I'm frustrated and annoyed that advertisers are all focusing on "targeted" adverts, because they all rely on Orwellian levels of surveillance to be able to gather the information needed to target them in the first place. It's downright creepy and instrusive that not only am I expected to give a damn about whatever piece of consumerist crap that is being thrust upon me, they expect to know every single detail about my preferences, all harvested from spying on me.

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Review: HTC One

Paul 87

Sadly, you lost me at the point where it said "Blink Feed can be moved, but it can't be removed"

I'm already frustrated with the latest HTC updates for my One X, preventing me from blocking HTC Sense for Facebook, to have yet more privacy invading "smart" technology on my phone, is just frustrating.

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Six things a text editor must do - or it's a one-way trip to the trash

Paul 87

Personally, I favoured Textpad as it was the only application I could find which would happily cope with opening and editing multi-GB SQL backups. Yes, it'd be nice if our development team hadn't needed me to do this in the first place but hey, that's IT for ya.

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Help-desk hell

Paul 87
Facepalm

Oooeerrr Missus!

It's 17.25, we're about to make our way home, and the phone goes, it's one of our smaller customers and they're concerned that someone has hacked into their systems as the mouse is moving on it's own.

Hoping for a quick resolution, one of the younger girls on staff logs in and makes a note of the remote access user, so they can phone them up and ask if they're genuinely using the system. Whilst she's doing this, she's told that suddenly a gay porn website has opened up and is playing videos.

Anyway, between her and myself we trace back the user ID, it's the MD of our client, so we quickly phone his mobile, and hear a brief couple of seconds of audio from the same website. We innocently ask him if he's working from home tonight, and he replies yes.

Trying desperately not to laugh, my colleague says to him that he should be careful as we've had his office on the line saying someone's accessed the internet on the server and it's visible on the monitor. The MD apparently swears, and hangs up on her, leaving us in fits of laughter.

We phone back to the office and say that the situation is resolved, and we'd speak to the MD in the morning for them to give a full report.

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Software sucks these days - and just maybe it's all YOUR fault

Paul 87
Alert

I'd offer an explanation that it's the exponential growth of computing power that has made developers sloppier in their approaches. Whereas once upon a time, they had to watch every resource used closely, and not following best practice led to programs that failed to run entirely, now we're in a situation where "good enough" code runs and error handling routines pick up the slack.

Additionally, the comercial drive where companies have realised they can make money if they constantly sell to new customers, and care little about retaining or placating the old ones, then there's less financial pressure on the developers to fix anything other than the most critical of bugs, and instead they become focused on developing new features for the software instead that look good in a sales demo

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Draft UK libel law forces websites to axe mudslinging comments

Paul 87

Don't see what the fuss is, this seems like a sensible step to take to tidy up the already existing laws on libel and defamation of character. Admitedly, like many of the laws, it only benefits those who are rich enough to afford the time in court, but being able to force site holders to take down entries after they've been ruled to be illegal hardly seems like an erosion of free speech.

Incidentally, the UK *doesn't* and never has had the right to free speech, that's strictly part of the American (and possibly French) constitutions. We haven't needed an implicit right, because our legal system is based on the principle that everything is legal, providing it isn't illegal, whereas many other countries work on the presumption that everything is illegal unless there's a law or constitutional right allowing you to do it. Hence why you get a tonne of laws saying "You can't do/say this"

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Samsung Galaxy Tab 'a harmful drug', says Apple in ban bid fail

Paul 87
FAIL

I don't care which company is suing the other, the fault lies with neither company, but with the US legal system that makes this such a valid business tactic that companies are forced down this route to ensure that they remain competative.

Let's not forget that corporations are obliged, by law, to maximise the return of investment for their stock holders. They have no legal responsibility to be "nice" about it, and in fact, if it were found that those running the company deliberately avoided an oppertunity to make money, then they could face civil and criminal prosecution.

So stop bitching about who'se suing who, and start bitching to the US politicians who'se laws are responsible for the situation instead!

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Google warns against ISPs hard on web filth

Paul 87

I actually agree with the idea of an ISP based filtering service, providing that it's opt-in for customers (heck, why aren't the ISP's offering this as a chargeable add-on I'll never know). Not everyone in the world is technically literate, and anything that makes it easier for parents to make valid choices for their children is a good thing.

Unfortunately, this moderate middle ground is getting swamped by the "Censorship is evil" vs "Porn is evil" battle, and both sides are ignoring their chance to compromise.

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Congress warned that military systems may already be pwned

Paul 87

The policy is much more sound than trying to make things "more secure", for example watching your system more closely so you know what's supposed to go where in terms of traffic, and paying attention to file access times and patterns would be far more effective in terms of damage limitation than trying to keep "something" out.

It also conicendentally means paying a lot more people to sit there and just learn the system's behaviour on a normal day.

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Facebook denies poaching your text messages on Android

Paul 87

One of the reasons I haven't updated my Android app in *ages*, I don't want the new features, I just want to read my FB wall and post comments.

I wish it were profitable for developers to make these kind of applications far more modular in nature, letting us pick and chose the functionality we want, instead of having their latest idea shoved down our throats

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Whitehall hopes to shave 'conservative' £100m off PC bill

Paul 87

So, we can save £100M huh.... but only if you pay me £110M for my consultancy services :P

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Firm pitches tech trio powered by portable processor

Paul 87

Looks like a promising idea, being able to use the same core for both a smartphone, tablet and a TV trims down the expense, though I'd imagine not by a lot given that screens comprise approximately 50% of the cost of a device, and you still need to include some basic processing power to recieve and authenticate the connection.

What I would be interested to find out is the effect on battery life; particularly as each component presumably carries their own power supply.

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2012: The year when smartphones become smart?

Paul 87

I don't want "smart", I want reliable, non-instrusive and controllable technology. Why on earth would I want some developer sitting in an office on the other side of the Atlantic deciding what I really want to be doing now is waking up, because I woke up at this time three days running.

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Official: The smartphones that suck much more than others

Paul 87

There's an alternative conclusion to draw, that people who are drawn to most heavily using the Internet prefer iPhones or HTC phones, and also prefer the newer technology. Much more likely than the phones themselves being responsible for the increase in the use of data.

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Fuel taxes don't hurt the world's poor - they don't have cars

Paul 87

This guy is an idiot, petrol taxes in the developed world hit the poor far harder than the rich. The rich can afford to purchase the latest, fuel efficient vehicles, keep them maintained better and also pay far less % on traveling costs.

In fact, you could go so far as to argue that petrol taxes are one of the factors that reduce social mobility, if you can't afford to travel in a cost effective manner, you can't seek out new employment opportunities outside your local geographical area. Even if you get a job interview thanks to the Internet, it often proves impractical to get there, or to relocate if you can't afford to drive.

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Punters hate copyright, says Steelie Neelie

Paul 87

The "freetard" idea has been around since the internet was young, a great example of this is shareware. You got the software, complete with DRM, but a lot of the time people went out of their way to bypass it.

Take Winzip/Winrar as an example, both pieces of software are widely used, both commercially and privately, but only a fraction of those users have paid for the software, why? Because they didn't have to.

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Hackers can spring Death Row crims from cells

Paul 87

Of course, all it takes is a couple of key controlled, mechanical switches in place and you can cut these vulnerabilities right down.

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Insulin pump hack delivers fatal dosage over the air

Paul 87

@cornz1

This is so right! There was never a need to include this kind of connectivity but lazyness won out. First came remote monitoring, so medical professionals didn't have to go near the patient to read the device, then came small changes to allow limited control and now we're here.

If people had accepted that sometimes, you have to get off your arse, this wouldn't be possible

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Massive study concludes: 'Global warming is real'

Paul 87

Ok, so another study shows that there's been a gradual change in average temperate over a period of time, but have reached no firm conclusions as to the cause of the problem.

My pet theory has always be simple thermodynamics, more people, all burning off more energy to run all the myriad of gadgets, machines etc that form part of modern life, means a higher average temperate.

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Worm spreads via RDP

Paul 87

hmmm

You know, this sounds like a BOFH tool for catching out the idiots who bypass the password policies

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DIY aerial drone monitors Wi-Fi, GSM networks

Paul 87

Sounds like...

... someone's punting a proof of concept device to sell to the CIA, assuming they haven't already got drones that do this :)

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Are you slaving away on the wrong projects?

Paul 87

IT Directors

Well, it's one thing to say "this is the director's job", it's another to communicate the information effectively. I'd argue that this is the main strength of using a software based solution, the ability to get the information out the heads of one or two people, and make it available to the customer facing roles.

Working on a support desk for an in-development piece of software, I'm often faced with issues where it needs a fix from the developers, but have absolutely no way to estimate their workloads without bothering them and taking them away from their current work.

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AT&T: 'Eat too much data and we'll strangle you'

Paul 87

So they'll always throttle the top 5%

Ok, so what happens in a situation where everyone is abiding by a sensible amount of data usage? The way the article is written implies that they'll still throttle the top 5%, even if they reduce their data usage....

In effect, if you're in this demographic, you might as well keep sucking down as much as you can because unless you stop using the service entirely, you're gonna keep getting capped.

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UK data watchdog 'looking into' Google+ mission creep

Paul 87

I predict that...

An incredibly large number of John Smith's will invade Google+ over time. Try catching *that* in an auto-filter without getting too many false positives

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ITV eyes micropayments for Corrie specials

Paul 87

Micropayments

It doesn't necessarily mean processing the credit card payment each time you want to watch something. Chances are, it'll be an account balance you top up (minimum £5 - £10) that you eat up on the various services.

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Toyota tech to steer cars round jaywalkers

Paul 87

It can't be a good idea

Any system that over-rides a driver's ability to crash their car willingly will only end up causing an accident eventually.

A car should always be in the driver's full control and these systems are far too excessive! Warnings, yes, automatically taking control of the vehicle no!

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Rescue privacy before it vanishes forever

Paul 87

Unfortunately...

.. there's money to be made in selling our details to advertisers. As long as advertisers are willing to pay per impression, instead of per actual click, then these businesses will continue profiting from making us take part.

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Marketer taps browser flaw to see if you're pregnant

Paul 87

Ok, so if it grabs your browsing history...

... deleting your history, cookies and all other files reguarly works too right?

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