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* Posts by James Hughes 1

1880 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

Red-faced LOHAN team 'fesses up in blown SPEARS fuse fiasco

James Hughes 1
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Re: blade fuse

Surely a blade fuse holder would be bigger and heavier than an inline fuse holder? (Or can you get inline blade fuse holders)

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James Hughes 1
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Blimey

Make a major mistake with a fuse ruining a hugely important test flight, and have to stand in the corner wearing a hat; make one minor programming error in OpenSSL and get vilified.

What is the world coming to?

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Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS

James Hughes 1
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Re: I bit the bullet yesterday

I do wonder whether all these Unity haters have ever actually used it for more than 5 minutes.

I get on quite well with it.

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Elon Musk's LEAKY THRUSTER gas stalls Space Station supply run

James Hughes 1
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Re: Say what?

Good luck indeed! Go SpaceX! I've read somewhere that because Musk seem to be very good and choosing where to spend his money to make lots more money, he is expected to be the richest person on the planet in a few years time. Don't have link I'm afraid.

(OK, I admit it, I'm a bit of a fan of SpaceX and Musk...and Tesla.)

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James Hughes 1
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Re: Helium is *very* hard to seal systems against

I think it's a pressurisation gas because it doesn't react with the O2. O2 stays quite cool all by itself I would think!

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James Hughes 1
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Re: Helium is *very* hard to seal systems against

For me, that is the reason why hydrogen powered cars are perhaps a bit of a dead end. But maybe the problem can be solved somehow - we will see.

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James Hughes 1
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Re: Say what?

Indeed..in what way.

Seems to have been going pretty well so far. But then, there are some serious Anti-Musk people out there, presumably working for the usual suspects.

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Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years

James Hughes 1
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So, on the horizon

Transparent Aluminium?

(Can't believe no-one has already mentioned it)

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SpaceX Falcon tests HOVERCRAFT tech – despite ISS outage

James Hughes 1
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Re: ohoh

That was certainly the case with the Space shuttle. Cost a bloody fortune to get it ready for the next flight.

Estimated cost of the F9 reusable 9 engined first stage is $30M or I believe. Don't have to reuse it many times to get your money's worth (and you can afford to replace an engine or two). And it only carries about $150K worth of fuel....

Expected turnaround is a LOT faster than something like the shuttle.

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James Hughes 1
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Re: Soft landing on the ocean

Then you have to add the cost of getting the rocket back to the launch pad....might as well take the hit up front and fly back.

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James Hughes 1
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Re: Soft landing on the ocean

They have already done many hover tests with Grasshopper - what they really need is a test with all systems in place. There are plenty of aerodynamic issues that are affected by the legs, so yes, it needs them on there to be a representative test.

As for landing in a desert - possible, but much much safer to test at sea. To get to a desert, you probably have to overfly something that you probably don't want to land on by accident. And the sea is much bigger so harder to miss.

With rockets, its always best to err on the safe side.

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GoPro's new lens: Like a GOOGLE STREETMAPS car... for your life

James Hughes 1
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Re: Took a couple of laps

For the overtaking Giggles?

(Or perhaps engine problems in quali, or took it easy getting used to the track? Paddock Hill bend certainly takes some getting used to if you've not raced their before)

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James Hughes 1
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Took a couple of laps

But Brands Hatch short circuit in a Formula V? Not sure of the car, might be FFord of some description.

Looks very odd in 360degs.

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Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS

James Hughes 1
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Re: Twitter = marketing and PR

Good - at least you have experience of it before commenting which means your comment is entirely valid.

80%? Seems about right to me. But the other 20% is still pretty useful. Careful pruning of followed accounts should keep you in that 20% and still have more stuff to read than hours in the day.

As for my tweets - generally to announce changes to software I work on for Raspi cameras. Not self promotion, but certainly promotion of a sort. It's a good mechanism to announce changes.

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James Hughes 1
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Re: Twitter = marketing and PR

"Never been on Twitter, never signed up, possibly never will.", "As far as I can tell..."

So....how can you tell ANYTHING at all, or feel informed enough to comment, given you first statement?

Back to article. A more interesting figure would be how many people receive Tweets. I know that I receive a hell of a lot more than I send, as I use it mainly to keep abreast of things I am interested in. It's not just celebs and companies...

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Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders

James Hughes 1
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Re: In the words of mandy Rice-Davies

Same applies to Apple witnesses of course....

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Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray

James Hughes 1
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Re: Not interested..

Ditto. But the best bonus from the new BluRay player is that the upscaler is much much better than the previous DVD player, so the picture quality from the existing DVD's is brilliant in comparison to before.

And no, I haven't bought a BuRay yet. I did borrow one, looked OK, but only a small improvement over the upscaled DVD's

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James Hughes 1
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Re: Not forgetting, of course

I certainly haven't forgotten to add those monster cables to the shopping list.

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OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts

James Hughes 1
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Code Reviews

Having been using a code review scheme for the last year, it has caught many many issues (not just bugs, but commenting mistakes, inefficient code etc).

It does depend on how good the reviewer is. I'm particularly crap at it, but others can find real niggly issues that didn't show up in testing.

Also, static analysis like Coverity, or even running in valgrind for some dynamic stuff digs up hundreds of issues, even on code that has been around for ages. Both well worth doing. I think Coverity may well have found heartbleed for example.

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Gimme a high S5: Samsung Galaxy S5 puts substance over style

James Hughes 1
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Re: J.A.P

Bordering on a pointless post. It's quite clear that phones have reached a technological peak with the feature set available - no-one has come up with a new and globally useful feature to put on phones for a number of years (not since GPS and/or cameras). All we get are better versions, with a few sometimes useful bells on. They are certainly still smart, but they are all pretty much the same.

As for 'inventing' a longer battery life, well, since a lot of very clever people have been trying to develop (not invent) longer life battery tech for some years,I wouldn't hold your breath. As for better reception - that's not the phones problem, but the telco's, and as for unbreakable glass fronts, well glass has been around for a number of years now, and it's still not that robust. Note how all the things you ask for are actually unrelated to the product being a 'phone'. That implies phones are at the aforementioned peak.

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Anatomy of OpenSSL's Heartbleed: Just four bytes trigger horror bug

James Hughes 1
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Quite.

This being a userspace application, the problem is not kernel or OS related.

Is that what you meant?

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Running OpenSSL? Patch now to fix CRITICAL bug

James Hughes 1
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Re: Reg doesn't seem to get the implications of this bug.

"dumped the servers memory"

Only if the server memory is 64K.

Whilst this is a hole, it's not, as I understand it, a huge one. Yes, keys can be compromised, but only if they are in that 64k at the time of the attack. That's quite unlikely, although not impossible, so perhaps not a world ending issue, but still an important one.

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Mad Raspberry Pi boffins ripped out its BRAINS and SHRANK them for your pleasure

James Hughes 1
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Re: Thinking in the future...

The base is not intended to be a big seller - it's a development platform that people can use to develop their own PCB's. And it won't be particularly cheap, because it's low volume, and not optimised for cost. I'm expecting going on $100. (but I don't know)

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James Hughes 1
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Re: An old dog @pete

The huge majority of embedded applications don't need a huge amount of horsepower. But they might want something like a decent display/video for the UI. This is the target for the CM, as the 2835 does have very good graphics and video capabilities, with a slightly weaker ARM (although you can do a hell of a lot in 700Mhz)

Now, you cannot buy the 2835 in the sort of quantities that most embedded devices are needed in (production runs 10-50k or so), so this module is a quick and easy purchase for that sort of market. It also takes a lot of HW design work away, and also software work as it already run Linux. And of course, you can prototype on the Raspi itself.

I think it will sell quite well, there's certainly a big market for something like this, that Pete obviously hasn't knowledge of.

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James Hughes 1
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Re: This raises a potentially interesting possibility

They're a bastard to unsolder as well.

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Torvalds rails at Linux developer: 'I'm f*cking tired of your code'

James Hughes 1
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Re: Hee Hee....

I think you'll find that its not just the Linux world where lack of social skills are prevalent.

Try the 'rest of the world' as well.

And this is nothing to do with social skills, but with stopping a rogue developer being a twat despite repeated requests.

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James Hughes 1
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Woeful

That 95% of the commentors on this thread have read ONLY the Reg Article. C'mon people. This is the Reg. It's renowned for it attention grabbing headlines. Do you really believe its exactly as they say?

Having actually read up on this, it's clear LinusT is pretty much in the right here. Kay has a reputation for producing buggy code then telling everyone else it's their code that is buggy. That is an untenable situation when it comes to the kernel. In this case, Kay used a kernel specific command line option, 'debug' and hijacked it for systemd. So if you turn on kernel debugging, it also turned on systemd debugging, flooding the *kernel* logging, and stopping booting in some circumstances. This debug option has been in the kernel for years. He is the first person to break it through clear misuse.

He also immediately claimed it wasn't his problem. Clearly, he didn't use the systemd namespace (i.e. systemd.debug) that is ALREADY used elsewhere for other command line parameters. So, yes, it IS his problem.

That said, the kernel devs are now looking in to some sort of rate limiting for kernel messages to protect against this sort of moronic behaviour.

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Nominet bins Optical Express' appeal against 'It ruined my life' website

James Hughes 1
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And yet if you type in "Optical Express Problems", this is the first site that comes up in Google.

So, if you were wondering whether optical express were any good (perhaps because you want corrective eye surgery and were comparing products), you would immediately be put off. No Streisand effect needed.

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Tesla in 'Ethernet port carries data' SCANDAL

James Hughes 1
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Re: Thank god I have an old car

Actually, the Tesla S has very few buttons to play with. It's all done on the central screen. So in a way, it's a lot less complicated than the majority of cars on the market. It also means adding new 'features' is just a software upgrade....and weighs nothing....so no extra weight involved at all. There's a real advantage to etherneting everything. Wiring looms are quite heavy, heavier than an ethernet cable.

So for the OP, just ignore the central console if you don't want the features.

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Facebook swallows Oculus VR goggle-geeks. Did that really happen?

James Hughes 1
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Confused

Almost all the comment above are how Facebook has ruined Occulus, and put the VR industry back.

Where is the evidence? Do you all have crystal balls? NONE of the commentators have ANY IDEA what Facebook with do with Occulus. So how anyone can says it's ruined is beyond me.

For all you people know, they could leave the company running as is, pump more money to accelerate development, use the device on Facebook but also let it be sold as a general purpose headset. The effect may be you get your super cool VR headset earlier than previously expected. You may never need a Facebook account to use it, the money may mean even better tech.

You JUST DONT KNOW.

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Bletchley boffins go to battle again: You said WHAT about Colossus?

James Hughes 1
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Re: So why not

I was fortunate to have an Xmas dinner in the big hall at Duxford a couple of years ago. It was FULL of British planes. I mean, absolutely chocker. Was very pleasant to be able to wander around them all whilst sipping wine, and eat next to the Shackleton.

Not quite sure which Duxford you went to.

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How to Poo on a Date wins odd book title of the year

James Hughes 1
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Re: Thank God, that...

WTF right back at you.

Now everyone, back to work, right now, on fixing world hunger. All of you. Yes, including you in the hospital at the back there.

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Middle England's allotments become metric battlefield

James Hughes 1
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Or perhaps, being a product of an education system that has been using metric for many years, and never having heard of 'poles' (me neither, and yet I do know my imperial measures, being old enough to have used them in anger), they just thought it was an obvious and sensible thing* to do? And wasn't expecting a bunch of luddites to get all airy fairy about it?

* It clearly is the obvious and sensible thing to do.

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Proof Apple is GOING BACKWARDS: It's trying to patent a Newton-ish touchscreen stylus

James Hughes 1
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I was using pressure sensitive stylii in the late 80's. TDS tablets IIRC. Quantel used them on the Paintbox, Spaceward on the Mattisse.

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Bono bests Bezos in Fortune's 'World's 50 Greatest Leaders' list

James Hughes 1
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Elon Musk would be my vote

Top electric cars, solar power and reusable rockets.

What's not to like.

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Google wearables: A solution looking for a rich nerd

James Hughes 1
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Once again

It never ceases to amaze me how many luddites post here. I was under the impression this was a tech site. So many people say this or that will never catch on, or the (almost always bleeding edge) tech is crap and so on, just barging in with comments like "I don't like it so it won't catch on" without really thinking about the possibilities.

And yet here we are, even Windows Phone is getting bigger market share.

So it appears luddites don't have crystal balls. Or imagination.

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Star Wars movie to start shooting in UK this summer

James Hughes 1
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Perhaps, just maybe...

It might be quite a good film? Loads of people commenting on how bad it going to be, and they haven't even started filming, and no plot has been released! Can I borrow your crystal balls (skulls?) c'cos I need to win the Euromillions.

As for what the plot could be? Well, how about, with a whole fecking universe to play with, anything they like?

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This record-smashing robot solves a Rubik's Cube in 3.253 seconds

James Hughes 1
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Re: "machines make our efforts in this field look puny"

No, what is amazing is the guy who can look at 20 rubiks cubes, put on a blindfold, then do them all.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eE3rxyC_FhI, 8 minutes in.

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Dying for an Ubuntu Linux phone? Here's how much it'll cost you

James Hughes 1
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Re: Smartphones

There are still many phones out there that are 'feature' rather than Smartphones which makes calls, text and have long battery life. Since they do exactly what you required, I'd get one of those.

There, I've sorted your life out for you. It was quite easy, I just suggested you buy what you need, not something you don't need. I use this in my own life, I tend to buy stuff that does what I want, as opposed to buying stuff that is unsuited to my requirements. It's a great technique, I suggest you try it.

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The browser's resized future in a fragmented www world

James Hughes 1
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Er what?

Browsers are dead - it's all native apps?

Bollocks.

I hardly ever use native apps, because, lets be honest, the hugely massively vast majority of websites out there need a browser to view them. It would be insane to expect every website to have their own native app.

Or have I completely got the wrong end of the stick?

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PM Cameron leaps aboard Internet of Thingies

James Hughes 1
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Re: Write once, copy many

Not quite quite which part of the IT industry the two previous posters inhabit, but it's not mine - here I sit in a building with hundreds of software engineers, in a company with thousands.

It's not all small app teams or IT departments. You need a lot of engineers to produce a lot of software. And software in continually getting more complex, as requirements become more complex.

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20 Freescale staff on vanished Malaysia Airlines flight MH370

James Hughes 1
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Re: Very sad indeed...

It's a bit off topic, so please excuse given the subject matter, but relevant..

"The odds of dying per mile are

by car, 1 in 100,000

by plane,1.6 in 100,000,000,000

That is, the odds of dying in a car crash per mile driven are over 625,000 times higher than dying in an airplane crash per mile flown.

The odds of dying per trip are

by car, 1 in 10,000,000

by plane, 1 in 720,000,000

In other words, the odds of dying in a car crash per trip are only 72 times higher than in airplanes. "

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James Hughes 1
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Re: Very sad indeed...

Odd that you don't fly due to terrible but fortunately very rare circumstances such as this, when driving a car has a much higher chance of injury or death.

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So long, Samsung! TSMC is fabbing Apple's A8 chip, insiders claim

James Hughes 1
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TSMC have more than one plant....

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James Hughes 1
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Re: Why quad core?

Why quad core? Marketing, pure and simple. 4 is bigger than 2, and that's all the customer sees.

As for dedicating more die space to GPU - probably better to make the cache bigger. Most current or slightly next gen GPU's do all anyone needs anyway, making cache bigger increase the speed of the existing ARM *and* GPU silicon.

What's interesting is that GPU silicon takes up a lot more space than ARM cores...

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Winklevoss twins say their Bitcoins will take them to SPAAAAACE

James Hughes 1
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Re: Interesting...

Intrigued - in what way is VG a 'fake' space company?

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GNU security library GnuTLS fails on cert checks: Patch now

James Hughes 1
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Re: Open source vs closed source

A nine year old bug, that has been in open code for nine years, and has taken nine years for someone to spot even though the code has been available for nine years.

Pretty much exactly the same as would happen with closed source code. Although one wonders if the exploit was only found because the code was open, and wouldn't have been found (by hackers) if it had been closed. Interesting question - do hackers find more exploits from browsing open code than they find in closed code by reverse engineering/trial and error?

Aside from the kernel which has many eyes on it, so is a special case, I do wonder how many bugs are found in OSS code because it's open and people can view it vs bugs found by usage. The huge majority of issues are reported during usage to the developers (even on OSS code) rather than fixed by the finder who in general hasn't the vaguest idea how the code works.

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Reg reader rattles tin for GoPro camera 'Stubilizer'

James Hughes 1
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Re: In software instead?

It does indeed need a lot of cropping. And a lot of post processing.

Given that all this 'can be done in post' one wonders why there are so many Steadicam devices/operators out there.

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Bill Gates is BACK... as CHIEF RICH human of PLANET EARTH

James Hughes 1
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As of Jan 2013 (1 year ago) Gates had given $28B to charity.

I think that is a worthy sum and he is to be congratulated for it.

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Get Quake III running on Raspberry Pi using Broadcom's open-source GPU drivers, earn $10K

James Hughes 1
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Re: WOW!

I wonder if that 1990 system could render in 1080p20 as per the requirements...?

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