* Posts by handle

691 posts • joined 11 Jun 2009

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Mom and daughter SUE Comcast for 'smuggling' public Wi-Fi hotspot into their home

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Re: Doesn't BT already do this in the UK?

@AC Yes but I believe the Superhub actually provides the subscriber's identity and bandwidth throttling so can't possibly be replaced by a generic device. They're not just being bloody minded - in fact they're being rather helpful by allowing you to switch off all non-essential functions and use your own router/firewall/access point - "modem mode".

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@cowherder

But then you no longer get the benefit of any other hotspot!

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Re: Doesn't BT already do this in the UK?

Instead of trying to impress us with your paranoia about security (would Virgin really snoop on data flowing around your LAN?), why didn't you just say what we all know - the Virgin Superhub is a crap wifi router and replacing that functionality with a third party device makes the whole experience far better?

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Re: What if someone uses it to download copyrighted movies or child porn?

Churches are where all the mobile phone masts are hidden instead, conveniently providing those facilities...

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Affect on network bandwidth

Ol' Grumpy: "In BT's case, they also claim they put a Quality of Service policy on the router so the home network always takes priority over the public one and therefore your service shouldn't be impacted."

"shouldn't" is I guess the operative word. Only if transactions were instant would this be the case. Due to the latency of the link, once a data stream has been established, packets can continue to appear from the remote end for a relatively long time even if the local end tries to put a stop to them, potentially saturating the download path and so interfering with downloads the high priority user wishes to make.

Of course, how much effect this has in practice is open to debate.

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Yotaphone 2: The two-faced pocket-stroker with '100 hours' batt life

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Re: designed by ex-nokia guys

Sorry, I'm no fan of American imperialism but I was unaware the US had annexed parts of Chile.

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Meet Jack and Jill: Google’s new Android compilers

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Re: Not not mention...

"Jill forgot to take the pill and now they've got a daughter"

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Ten Linux freeware apps to feed your penguin

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Gimp

The single window mode makes it a lot more manageable.

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Re: Linux?

.deb != Ubuntu

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Simplez: OLD SCHOOL TECH can SAVE the MEERKAT

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But

...you could at least correct your naive description of "white space". It isn't simply the frequencies vacated by analogue TV, which would be nothing special. As Mage says, it is the parts of the spectrum in a given area which are apparenty not in use for TV broadcasts, requiring a device to be location-aware in order to know what frequencies and transmission powers to use. Unfortunately Mage then rather clouds the issue by going off on one about how free this spectrum actually is.

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A DRONE OF THEIR OWN: GoPro tabbed for cameracopter launch

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Wobblevision

Let's hope they dispense with the rolling shutter in the process.

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Re: GoPro need to do more with their software

Those sound as much like hardware as firmware problems.

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Rosetta science team thinks Philae might come to life in the spring

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Hard surface

They would have catered for the situation of the surface being hard, with, for instance, the thruster.

...except that that didn't work either!

Evil-looking things those harpoons.

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PHONDLESLAB-ULOUS: Motorola Moto X Android phablet

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Re: Mmmmm, shiny, want one!

You haven't heard the impressive spacial effect created by a bit of signal processing on a dual-speaker handheld device then? No it's not proper stereo, but then neither is what you'd get from "two loudspeakers on opposite sides of the room."

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ATTACK OF THE DRONES: ‘Nefarious’ private use rising, says top Blighty copper

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Re: Blocker

You'd have to block GPS as well, as decent ones fly back to launch point on signal loss.

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Eye laser surgery campaigner burned by Facebook takedown

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Even worse

"If the reporting party withdraws their complaint or you obtain a determination of your legal rights, we would be happy to follow up about possibly restoring the removed material." (My emphasis.)

Why on earth would they not restore the material if the original complaint went away or was proved to be groundless?

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Sporty in all but name: Peugeot 308 e-THP 110

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4 + 3 =

Your average race vehicle has 7 cylnders then?

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CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz

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I hoped that, being in Australia, they would be powered from 100% renewable energy sources. I'm guessing that, because they're stuck in cities, they aren't.

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Son of Hudl: Tesco flogs new Atom-powered 8.3-inch Android tablet

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Re: @I ain't Spartacus "The microSD slot at the bottom is open to the elements."

On your Vanmoof Electrified Bike, dear AC, dear AC

On your Vanmoof Electrified Bike, having charged it from the AC

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"The microSD slot at the bottom is open to the elements."

Then put a micro SD card in.

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Vanmoof Electrified Bike: Crouching cyclist, hidden power

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Re: heart rate?

Your simplistic theory doesn't take into account the fact that we live in a welfare state. Smash yourself up through not wearing a seatbelt and it costs the rest of us to put you back together again.

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Re: I'm a veteran of leccy bikes

Plenty of logic to the 250W rule: if you want more, get a motorbike and a driving licence, number plate, helmet, insurance, MOT etc and keep out of most bus lanes, etc. The more powerful these things are, the more dangerous they are for you and others (not to mention the lower the benefits in terms of keeping you fit and healthy and reducing energy use) and at some point this has to be regulated. Yes, of course the cutoff is is a bit arbitrary but can you suggest a better way of dealing with such situations?

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Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro Ultrabook flexes new 'Watchband' BENDO hinges

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Re: I wonder why the change of hinge...

Marketing.

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Re: Power and video signals

You forgot at least two coaxial wifi (etc) aerial cables which, like the rest, simply pass through the centre of the hollow pivot points. This design has more pivot points between base and screen so I assume that the cables pass through each one, following the straight line drawn between them (almost parallel to the back of the unit), and therefore not needing to change direction significantly. There is more than twice the amount of twisting (360 degrees) but it can be spread over a significant distance. There are also more sets of hinges, so the cables can be distributed better. I'm not sure why you have concerns about dirt and grease - they are insulated cables which will stand up to this.

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BEND IT like YOGA: Newest Lenovo gadgets have built in PROJECTORS

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Subwoofer?

Ha ha ha ha ha! Maybe I'll stop laughing when I hear this miracle of nano-technology, but I doubt it.

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Windows Tax obfuscated again

"the Android version gets half the storage [of the Windows version]" so you can't compare prices.

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Re-light my diode: Trio of boffins scoop physics Nobel for BLUE LEDs

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Re: Can we end the obsession with blue yet?

I agree, but I think some of it is the horrendous overbrightness of a lot of blue LEDs. In the old days, LEDs were very inefficient and so much more muted. High-efficiency/brightness ones cost more; it seems nowadays they don't so they put them everywhere.

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Re: Beware of seemingly low-cost gifts

All LED bulb assemblies, whether mains or 12V, contain a bridge rectifier and a switch-mode power supply (LED driver). So the difference isn't as stark as you might expect, but I agree that it seems it should be easier to make a cheap reliable 12V AC LED driver than a mains one. I have eight 3W MR16 LED fittings (12V) in my hall/stairs which, despite being imported from a Chinese tat bazaar, are still working apparently perfectly after several years.

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Re: Reducing Electricity Consumption???

@AndyS - Marcus Aurelius does have a point. You only have to look at what happened when mains reflector halogen lamps (GU10) came along. They started a whole fashion in excessive lighting. With bulbs and fittings being cheap as chips, you'd get one 100W pendant lamp being replaced with a dozen 50W halogens. LEDs will also be sold for fashion rather than practicality, their size and low heat output allowing a whole new generation of lighting which will be exploited because it looks different, not necessarily because it can be made to consume less power for a given light output.

I agree that the step change in efficiency between halogen and LED is a lot greater than between conventional incandescent and halogen, though.

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Re: Reducing Electricity Consumption???

All other technologies used for street lights either cannot be switched on instantaneously and/or their life is reduced by every switching cycle. So as well as being more efficient in the first place, LED street lights can be on motion sensors, allowing them to remain off most of the night without a safety implication.

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Re: Reducing Electricity Consumption???

True, it's hard for an LED to survive in an oven, but most of the time an incandescent will be as "efficient" as any LED as the heat it generates is offsetting use of the elements!

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Fiat 500S: So pleasingly sporty we didn't want to give it back

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Re: ...one doubt is about stop and start

Typical Luddite comments with a hint of "nanny state". (How DARE you take any control away from ME! It's my party and I can pollute if I want to!)

You could get auto stop start on VW Polos (and probably other things) in the early 1980s, before fuel injection and engine management systems, which at the very minimum increase idle speed if they sense the battery is low. Even then they had thought about engine temperature and so were disabled by a thermostat if the engine was cold. No doubt they checked battery voltage too (dead simple), but the Haynes manual is long gone. If they were reliable enough to be incorportated into a retail product in those days, just think how reliable they will be now.

I am fortunate enough not to have to drive very often, but on a car hired recently (an up-to-date VW Polo coincidentally) found the need to turn the key back to off after a stall and to press the clutch before starting (a hire car thing?) far more disconcerting than the already whisper-quiet engine stopping at the lights and starting again so smoothly and rapidly that there was never a worry that it wouldn't be there. Super in traffic jams - hopefully the vehicle in front would be similarly equipped so as not to be pumping fumes at me in the same way that I wasn't pumping fumes at the vehicle behind.

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POISON PI sniffs WiFi from your mail room, goes on rampage

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"being improve continually upgraded"

Sounds like you should apply that to your sub-editing...

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Supercomputer water-cooling comes to solar power

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Re: Hang on a minuite !!!!

You're still missing the point though - concentrating the sun's power on one point to get high temperature heat is not the clever bit. They have indeed been doing this for ages, but they have not been doing it with a photovoltaic panel in the way, because traditional methods of cooling would fry the panel. You are asking your 10 year old the wrong question. Please ask how you get water at 90 degrees while keeping the panel below 100 degrees.

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Re: Budget version already available.

Useless version already available, more like. If that generated usable amounts of heat it would tell you the water inlet/outlet temperatures and flow rate in the specs, but these are glaringly absent.

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Re: Hang on a minuite !!!!

No, AC, no-one is telling you that some of the best scientists in the world have just figured out some basic physics. What a silly statement.

The breakthrough is in applying it. This project looks like several techniques have been brought together to make a practical solution. As far as heat production is concerned, the clever bit is being able to get electricity and useful heat (i.e. at a reasonable temperature) at the same time. Without the specialised cooling there would be a large temperature difference between the cells and the cooling water, so you either end up with fried cells or tepid (useless) water.

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One million people have bonked on London public transport

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Re: Obvious reason is obvious

Yes, but they're the same as Oyster ones, and because cash fares are so outrageously expensive, very few people don't have Oyster cards any more.

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What the 4K: High-def DisplayPort vid meets reversible USB Type C

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Re: sigh

@Steven Jones: you're missing the point - what is done currently is irrelevant - we are developing higher frame rates (as well as other improvements) to go with higher resolutions for the future. You might as well have been arguing in the 1950s that there was no point in developing colour TV because no commercial or broadcast systems captured in colour.

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Re: Nirvana

@leon clarke: a 3.5mm jack plug shorts out every time it is inserted.

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Re: sigh

@Steven Jones: you're concentrating on large-area flicker whilst completely ignoring motion portrayal. The eye will track moving objects, so if you don't wish an object to go blurred as soon as it (or the camera, eg when panning) starts to move, you need a high enough refresh rate. The higher the resolution of the static image, the more noticeable will be the effect so as resolution increases, frame rate needs to increase to maintain image quality. There is evidence that several hundred frames per second can be needed for ultra-high resolution ("4K"). For further explanation, see, for instance, here.

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Pop open this iPhone 6 and see where the magic oozes from ... oh hello again, Qualcomm

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My laptop's display is glued together

...and at a year old, the "glue" (some variation on double-sided tape by the looks of it) started to come unstuck at the point of maximum stress - the hinge. Before display, backlight, touch screen or aerials failed, I applied epoxy resin adhesive, clamped it shut to set and so far it's holding, fingers crossed.

The laptop is made by S*msung.

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Speaking in Tech: 'I'm an Apple guy and I COULD CARE LESS about the iWatch'

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Musunderestimation

It is impossible to underestimate just how upset some of us get about these things.

Oh hang on...

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Re: How much do you care?

If it's just a quote, it needs a subtitle.

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Italy's High Court orders HP to refund punter for putting Windows on PC

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Re: Marketplace

How do you know how much an OEM pays MS per machine it ships? It's a closely-guarded secret, which is why when MS panicked and started foisting Windows XP on netbooks to nip the consumer Linux PC in the bud, you could never get the same spec machine with Linux as with Windows, so it was impossible to work out how much the Windows licence actually cost - positive, zero or negative!

Why is it such a secret? Could it be that if indeed it does turn out to cost the hardware manufacturer peanuts compared with a standalone copy, the OEM bundling would be viewed as an anti-competitive subsidy to hinder the adoption of alternative operating systems and applications which run on them (or MS's applications which don't - for no technical reason)? Perish the thought!

Because it is a secret, the court can only award the known price of the software, which is that of a stand-alone licence. I think we agree that this is likely to be far higher than the price paid by the OEM, so that secrecy backfires in a particularly satisfying manner! If this becomes a trend, MS will soon change the way it does things.

Microsoft was the company that institutionalised this anti-competitive behaviour - nay stranglehold - and has benefited from it since the 1980s, so the fact that you think it's "unfair" to penalise the company for it strikes me as quite bizarre.

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Re: What are Apple buyers going to do.

@Mad Chaz: yes, but that's not the point: you can install any OS on a PC too. But in both cases, non-free (as in beer) software has been bundled with the hardware, for which you can get no refund. I have explained the difference between the two situations above.

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Re: What are Apple buyers going to do.

@Curly4: hasn't it dawned on you that the case of Apple is one company's non-free software being bundled with the same company's hardware, whereas in the case of Microsoft it is one company's non-free software being bundled with a myriad of other companies' hardware?

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Apple's Watch is basically electric perfume

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I think your iWatch is running slow...

"...or become a Linux geek - in much the same way that many car drivers have no desire to learn how to be a mechanic."

I think it's running slow by about a decade.

"I read very few of 'em, these days."

But you read this one...

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New USB spec offers two-way power flows AND double-sided plug

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Trollface

Re: History

"The Amstrad had the power supply in the monitor."

Shh - don't tell anyone! Apple invented that concept with the iMac!

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@ AC opening poster: research > rant

"They change connectors way too often; you had the whole mini and micro and all they did was reduce one dimension. Why they even had the other is beyond me; they weren't that far apart."

If you do a little reading up you will find that micro USB connectors are actually a lot more durable than mini USB.

"USB was an idea copied off of others and they continue to copy, but not very well either."

Like what? FireWire? How much do you think a FireWire mouse would cost?

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Re: "Your mobe could charge your laptop"

"(I complain because something happened to USB cables about a year after I bought my last mobe. They don't work with it. That was just 2 1/2 years ago.)"

The price of copper went up.

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