* Posts by Mark 65

2148 posts • joined 11 Jun 2009

Fedora 21: Linux fans will LOVE it - after the install woes

Mark 65
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Re: play the ball not the player?

Well that's preposterous. Don't like systemd? Find a dist which doesn't use it. Or do you sort-of-like systemd but not all of it or the personalities? Fork it.

#WorstStrawmanEver. Virtually any viably usable non-niche well supported distro has gone down the systemd rabbit-hole, how do you propose people find another?

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Mark 65
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Re: systemd vs Play Services (was: play the ball not the player?)

RH hired him based on his Avahi/PulseAudio work

Plenty of due diligence performed there then. I believe PulseAudio is often muttered in the same sentence as the phrase "heap of shit".

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Mark 65
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Re: No to gnome, no to systemd

Having binary rather than text format logs and only being able to pass-through filtered (WTF?) information doesn't strike me as being desirable in any way shape or form and I could only surmise that it exists due to the will of a fucking idiot.

But the great thing about Linux is you can choose not to use a dist if you don't like it because there are bound to be others that do things the way you want.

When all major distros have gone down this route best of luck with your replacement options.

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Gigabit-over-TV-cable spec DOCSIS 3.1 passes interop test

Mark 65
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Anecdotally I can tell you my cable connection used to dick about when Foxtel and Cable broadband were in operation. Since we got rid of Foxtel it's solid as a rock.

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Cloud Printing from a Chromebook: We try it out on 8 inkjet all-in-ones

Mark 65
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Re: Wi-fi and printers....

My inkjet has WiFi, however I connect it via ethernet. Why? I do it because it sits right next to the router, ethernet is far more stable and it means there's one less source of interference in the house with practically everything wanting to use the 2.4GHz band.

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'Shadow IT' gradually sapping power and budget from CIOs

Mark 65
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Re: Obstacle or Enabler?

Too often central IT says no or is glacial in the pace of their progress (and eye-wateringly expensive in their chargeback) with far too many self-enforced boxes to tick to be of any use. That and purchasing overpriced and unsuitable items due to the shinyness of the sales pitch inevitably leads to business units hiring their own contractors to perform tasks. At the end of the day money needs to be made and IT is there to enable that (and prevent loss where appropriate). Often they lose sight of this and I have worked at many a firm where it seems that the tail is wagging the dog. At every one of them it ended badly. I have worked at two companies where the upper levels of IT were removed in their entirety due to poor delivery/results and one where 50% was removed in one day in the name of cuts to be replaced by more capable individuals bit by bit. Central IT is the master of its own destiny but in most cases it seems to want to steer a rudderless and unresponsive ship.

Nowadays the first thing I do when joining a company is seek out the doers and the go to infrastructure people - the ones you always need and every firm has them - in order that when something needs doing it gets done rather than sitting in the abyss that is the Helpdesk system.

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Deprivation Britain: 1930s all over again? Codswallop!

Mark 65
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Re: Slight edit error

Although I have to ask, how reliable is the inflation series? Is it one of those typical Government constructions where it's actually total bollocks and doesn't reflect changes in costs whatsoever but suits them nicely for their index linked stuff?

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NBN Co, Turnbull, issue contradictory broadband speed promises

Mark 65
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Coalition's broadband motto

Yesterday's Network Tomorrow.

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US Navy's LASER CANNON WARSHIP: USS Ponce sent to Gulf

Mark 65
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Re: USS Ponce

Surely the sister ship of the Ponce would be the Ho?

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El Reg Redesign - leave your comment here.

Mark 65
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Re: El Reg Redesign - leave your comment here.

I still see we have no full time SSL option so the login form is delivered up by http and is susceptible to on-the-fly shenanigans as detailed in one of the many articles on web security trumpeted at El Reg. Practising that which is preached would be a healthy start before dicking around with look and feel.

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UK slaps 25 per cent 'Google Tax' on tech multinationals

Mark 65
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Re: @Ledswinger

We can safely assume that if a business such as Google has developed accounting practices to avoid paying tax, this assists in reducing the price of the product/service to the end-user.

Wrong. It reduces the cost of production and thereby maximises the profit. No savings get passed on in the modern World, margins just fatten.

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Microsoft forks .NET and WHOMP! Here comes .NET Core app dev stack

Mark 65
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Re: 'The .NET Framework and C# language were a hit with developers'

I haven't voted either way but, to be honest, I'd much rather be developing in .Net than Java.

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Mark 65
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Re: Er? Excuse me....

Agreed. This seems like MS has taken something that broadly works and have then just utterly fucked it up in order to get some all encompassing development World. Have a look at Java and the aforementioned ancient JRE versions that some apps require. Like a software developer is going to give much of a shit about a security hole in the version of the .Net libraries they shipped? Well, it might well prompt a next version of .Net is only available on the latest codebase, send your upgrade fees here.

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SUPER-SUEBALL heading IBM's way in Australia

Mark 65
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Re: 27 million to 1 billion!!!

My prediction: IBM Australia, facing such huge penalties, will threat to close out its Australian arm and the state will settle again.

That's not really a threat though. Most would be glad to say "hand over the money and don't let the door hit you on the arse on the way out". Fact is Government departments, inept as they are, always have plenty of willing suitors. The "we'll take our ball with us" threat of megacorps holds little weight these days when most import low wage developing world labour and then take the piss with their taxes anyhow. Fuck'em.

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Mark 65
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Re: Are you listening UK Gov?

Whilst you might claim the project management was crap I believe it was revealed that one of the chief people involved was a contractor who was, ta-dah, an ex-IBM man who was deemed to have done his utmost to push it in their direction. He was also found to be f'cking useless.

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How to get ahead in IT: Swap the geek speak for the spreadsheet

Mark 65
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Re: Its odd

That's the problem though, companies are reaping that which they have sewn. Cuts to training budgets and an us/them attitude propagated by both sides has helped create the situation. Still, keeps me in contracts.

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Turnbull should spare us all airline-magazine-grade cloud hype

Mark 65
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Re: Why not "the" cloud?

What Turnbull(shit) is missing here is that what is really needed is a Government operated cloud (or datacentre in old World terms) whereby any department can spin up required capacity. An AWS for tax-burdens as it were. The thought of using private sector cloud for Government work leads me to think:

1. Privacy out the window

2. Zero control over what is really going on

3. Taxpayer robbed blind.

What Governments like Australia need is a centralised IT resource that they all chip in for (and can therefore afford to hire people that know what they're doing), that is completely under their control, and that can provide the basic operation of the elastic compute capacity. Provide infrastructure services, backups etc, sort out proper data segregation, correct public facing server settings etc and in a scalable way. But no, most Governments and their departments reinvent the wheel very badly then shout cloud from the rooftops.

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Hacker dodges FOUR HUNDRED YEARS in cooler for SCANNING sites

Mark 65
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I was under the impression that it's of interest as a reference point for plea bargaining.

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Re: I'd like to know

My first thought at hearing he could launch 14,000 guesses and the admins were locked out is "you're doing it wrong". It certainly seems like the settings could do with tweaking but I'm guessing the admins weren't really admins but maybe Adobe Dreamweaver operators asked to set up a website.

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Euro Parliament VOTES to BREAK UP GOOGLE. Er, OK then

Mark 65
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Re: (un)fair advantage

@eulampios: When you are 90+% of the search market choice becomes irrelevant. With great power comes great responsibility.

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Bank of England: What's all this then, CHAPS? Review to get a grip on IT cockup

Mark 65
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Re: Deloitte?

and then perhaps giving him the contract to guard the rest of the flock?

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Mark 65
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Re: "lessons learned from the incident"

The lessons learned will be that some highly paid consultants need to come in to complete an incredibly expensive project of work that will achieve little other than fill their pockets.

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And the award for the world's most tech-savvy country goes to …

Mark 65
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Re: Teaching using IT

But that doesn't fit with the program does it? Governments want teachers to use computers to teach in ever increasing amounts because they think people will believe it results in better outcomes. Perhaps some that aren't too smart or computer literate think it will make their child the next Bill Gates. Whatever. When I was told how much teaching was done by computer at my child's school my retort was along the lines of "I'd much rather you concentrated on teaching the basics more comprehensively and perhaps a bit more of critical thinking". However my junior schooler does knock up a good powerpoint presentation so I guess there's a middle management career in the offing somewhere.

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Mark 65
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Re: Nice bit of spin

Agreed. An imbecile connected to the internet tweeting nonsense or updating their status is still, nevertheless, an imbecile.

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Ex-EU digi supremo Steelie Neelie's net neutrality bid in tatters?

Mark 65
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Re: Bait and Switch

@Flatpackhamster: Ha ha ha, that's really funny. Meet the new Government, same as the old Government. Pretty much every Western Government and opposition in existence is beholden to corporate interests.

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Too 4K-ing expensive? Five full HD laptops for work and play

Mark 65
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Call me lazy

But could you not have a small conclusion section? Table of machine, RAM, CPU, Resolution etc and maybe a relative score?

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Everything your users ever need to know about BYOD

Mark 65
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Re: Really?

I'd argue that if you're considering VDI as in the article then BYOD is utterly pointless. The expense you've just gone to with server hardware means that the screen and WYSE unit you could have on the desktop is an insignificant cost compared to the hassle of someone connecting their porn filled malware riddled laptop to your network. Obviously an exaggeration but why would you ever want to deal with this eventuality, it makes no sense? Please don't try and offload your hardware costs onto me.

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Blackpool hotel 'fines' couple £100 for crap TripAdvisor review

Mark 65
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Re: Legal?

That's really why you need a one-time number linked to your credit card. It stops secondary charges being placed after the fact like this and it also prevents arsehole insurance companies from placing recurring annual charges on your card when you only signed up for one year's insurance and wasn't forewarned of their shady practises apart from in the finest print of the 30+ page disclosure statement sent after the first deduction was made.

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'Pirate block' proposal back on Oz agenda

Mark 65
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Re: First we hobble the NBN

First we hobble the NBN...then we fire up the VPN.

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UK PM Cameron says Internet must not 'be an ungoverned space'

Mark 65
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Re: Cameron talking crap again

Extremist will merely be that with which they do not agree. Watch this space.

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ISPs are stripping encryption from netizens' email – EFF

Mark 65
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Re: S/MIME or PGP

I think this only serves to highlight the point though - it simply isn't at the straightforward, easy to use, and reliable level that you'd want it to be. Hence all our emails are no longer ours.

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FLASH better than DISK for archiving, say academics. Are they stark, raving mad?

Mark 65
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Re: Endurance?

Surely if it is archive you want a sort of drive where the data is just burned in and read only preferably with no, or minimal, moving parts?

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Hacker Hammond's laptop protected by pet password

Mark 65
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Re: Good Grief

Given the lack of SSL you don't think that El Reg is run by a TLA do you? Gathering up all these anarchic rants and snippets of dissent? Oh the irony if it were.

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MoD releases code to GitHub: Our Ideaworks... sort of

Mark 65
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Re: What's your problem? Fecking GPL

That's exactly how it should be don't you think? A Government department paid for by the taxpayer releases software under the GPL. Free for all to use under the condition that improvements are contributed back. I see no problem as the taxpayer then benefits from this and society benefits should the code be any use. It also allows the potential for small outfits to familiarise themselves with MoD software, improve it, and potentially tout for a support contract. The alternative is they give it away under a permissive license that some company benefits from, produces a product that is highly profitable and the taxpayer gets fuck all in return.

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'Tech giants who encrypt comms are unwittingly aiding terrorists', claims ex-Home Sec Blunkett

Mark 65
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Unfortunately a lot of the findings rely on access to source or access to black box. The issue these days likely comes from the rise of cloud nonsense whereby you do not have access to both the encrypted and unencrypted blocks or necessarily the code that produced it in which case you cannot run the numbers. Cloud is therefore something I would avoid at all costs - you need to encrypt your data at source using something you control. The convenience of cloud at first seems like you do not need to run your own data centre but the real convenience is all that juicy data in one spot.

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Mark 65
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Re: Now there's a first...

I'd only agree with his guide dog if he decided to take Dave on a trip across a motorway like Frogger.

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Mark 65
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Re: Use a VPN? Use SSL/TLS? Well, you are a terrorist

He fathered a child with someone else's partner - presumably carelessness.

On whose part? He's hardly catch of the fucking day is he? I think if your partner gets pregnant by Blunkett it's high time they were an ex.

Could he not have set up a trust fund - and watched the child's progress from a distance?

He's far too short-sighted for that. Ba-dum. I'll get me coat.

Can anyone remember why one of Blunkett's other sons apparently changed his surname while his father was in office?

Errrm, his dad is a totalitarian c*nt and he wants nothing to do with him?

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Mark 65
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Re: Fuck terrorism

The number of deaths and injuries is irrelevant. The measures are in place to control you and I, not the terrorists. The sure sign of corrupt Governments is when they bring in ever more unjustifiable laws in the name of preventing XYZ which, as a useful sideline, also help to diminish open protest and dissent, prevent adequate oversight or supervision of the state apparatus, and keep the subjects controlled thereby securing their ruling class status. Ability to protest outside of Parliament in Westminster? Total inability to ever report on a security service operation in Australia even if a tragedy resulted and dozens of innocents were killed? Military equipment and snipers used for crowd control in US? There are some fine examples out there.

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EFF: VPNs will crumble Verizon's creepy supercookie stalkers

Mark 65
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Re: might it be easy

Maybe more HTTPS could be the way. I'm assuming you cannot modify that header without MITM the interaction between user and website and thus that would form an interception of communication etc even though, arguably so does the current wrongdoings.

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Bloke, 26, accused of running drug souk Silk Road 2.0 cuffed by Feds

Mark 65
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Re: Whoops !

Though it's quite possible that incompetence played a part, I don't exclude parallel construction.

I do. Complex highly technical highly secret work breaking a system built for anonymity vs complacency and stupidity. I pick basic human failings every time.

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Mark 65
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Re: Mmm...

"Over a billion pounds a year to combat the damage done by a completely legal substance that is ubiquitously available here in the UK. How can you reconcile that with the view that controlled substances are controlled because of the damage (both individually and to society) that they cause?"

But what revenue is obtained from alcohol in the UK? Around £9bn in 2010. Much harder to OD on too. Got to allow the proles something in their lives.

How much of that cost is down to fights that occur? I bet they make it onto the statistics despite the fact that typically such arseholes would want a fight with someone irrespective of alcohol. Booze just makes you a more obvious prick than what you already were.

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If you're suing the UK govt, Brit spies will snoop on your briefs

Mark 65
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The current system is much like trying to retrofit security to an OS rather than designing it in from the start. We all know how that ends.

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Brit cops nab six in Silk Road 2.0 drugs sting

Mark 65
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Re: TOR is compromised

@Version 1.0: I do not agree that TOR is clearly broken and have not seen any evidence of that. They had someone on the inside working for the main man (be careful who you hire) and apparently he used his normal email account for certain things. Complacent or ignorant I know not which, but certainly not careful. No breach of TOR was necessary. As for other sites it is likely, as others have posted, that there may be commonalities such as staff or hosting.

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UK superfast broadband? Not in my backyard – MP

Mark 65
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Re: He cited a computer programmer who had reported that it took three days to download a program

The problem is that at those kinds of speeds it's already a serious threat to their leased line business and that puts them in an awkward position.

Always be prepared to cannibalise your own business because if you don't then someone else will. At least you get the money if you do it.

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Apple OSX Yosemite infested by nasty 'Rootpipe' vuln

Mark 65
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Re: Ubuntu etc too?

Seems like there were 6 but one lost interest.

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Hans Neij of Pirate Bay arrested in Thailand

Mark 65
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Re: It's all good

I'd argue that if you're on the run with an international arrest warrant issued for you then, if you've been hiding successfully for 2 years, crossing international borders is probably not a wise move.

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The late 2014 Apple Mac Mini: The best (and worst) of both worlds

Mark 65
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I've long been of the opinion that the only way forward is Hackintosh. The attractiveness of the Mini is destroyed by soldered on RAM and no upgrade path. It is unfortunate it is hard to replicate. The Mac Mini + display always seemed a better option than the iMac unless you needed the GPU (which unfortunately I did). The Mac Pro is therefore the only true desktop remaining but the cost is eye-watering and potentially only justified by design houses. The old tower design is certainly easy to replace with something in a much smaller Lian Li or Fractal Design casing. It is definitely what will replace my iMac - the premium is now just insulting.

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Mark 65
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Re: Upgradability

My guess is that they envision that any such upgrades would occur via Thunderbolt and would be contained in an external unit of great beauty. The processor can be upgraded though and it can have 2 graphics cards internally.

I think that they figure that most units will be used as is and that anything else is likely to be an external component addressed by the 6 Thunderbolt ports etc.

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Mark 65
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Re: To think Apple once marketed the Mini as a server machine (do they still do that)?

My wife bought a car with no place for, and with no, spare wheel.

When I questioned the wisdom of this, she pointed out that if she had a flat she had no intention of replacing the wheel herself, and hasn't had a flat in the last 150,000 miles of motoring. Things change.

Sorry, but that logic is just retarded. It equally means that nobody can help you out either. You are waiting for a tow-truck or repairman regardless and may be doing so for a rather long time. Depending on your model of vehicle it may contain an odd-ball tyre size that isn't as widely stocked as you think. If towed it may be to a repair shop rather than your home or destination. If you get a flat on a public holiday or late night/early morning you are equally screwed.

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Mark 65
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Re: Just what were you running exactly???

My iMac seems to have slowed down considerably since I upgraded the OS.

Don't upgrade (I'm making the bold assumption that your use of upgrade implies exactly that rather than fresh install) but clone the disk (if not using time machine), format, install, and migrate data etc back where possible. I've always found that in-place upgrades are a touch lack-lustre no matter whether it is Linux, OS X or Windows and generally result in the OS running slower.

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